Cy-Fair Edition - July 2020

CYFAIR EDITION

REAL ESTATE

VOLUME XX, ISSUE XX  XXXXXXXXXX, 2020

ONLINE AT

2020EDITION

VOLUME 11, ISSUE 11  JULY 21AUG. 17, 2020

Experts: Cy-Fair real estate market rebounds after spring coronavirus slump

Local Realtors hopeful for summer

BY DANICA LLOYD

Real estate experts reported a dip in the Cy-Fair market following an exten- sive economic shutdown brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic as buyers and sellers alike retreated. But nearly at year-over-year home sales in June reect local real estate agents’ claim that business began to pick up when restrictions were lifted in May. They said they are hope- ful increased activity will continue through the summer. Debbie Marshall, manager and bro- ker with Ross & Marshall Realty, said prior to the pandemic, she and her teamprojected an increase in sales and home prices in 2020. But once county and state ocials issued stay-at-home orders in late March, activity in the local market came to a halt, she said. “We really had no idea what to expect from this,” Marshall said. “In March, things came to a standstill a

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Any amount matters. Together, we can continue to ensure our citizens stay informed and keep our local businesses thriving. Become a #CommunityPatron

YEAROVERYEAR CHANGES FROM 2019 TO 2020:

SOURCE: DEBBIE MARSHALL OF ROSS & MARSHALL REALTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER reported a slowdown in activity starting in late March, but sales activity by June nearly caught up to that of the previous year. Auctuating market Local Realtors

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON

AVG. DAYS ON MARKET

TOTAL HOMES SOLD +14.9%

-35.5%

March

April

-12.3%

+16.3%

-31.2%

May

+125%

-0.5%

June

+23.3%

CONTINUED ON 28

DANICA LLOYDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

IMPACTS

08

SPONSOREDBY • Caldwell Communities 2020 EDI T ION REAL ESTATE

‘Severeanduncontrolled’: COVID19resurges inHarrisCounty

ALL EYES ON THE ICUS

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

After several months of progressively slowing the spread of COVID-19 in the Greater Houston area, ocials warn case counts and hospitalizations are on the rise again and could lead to disaster if left unchecked. Throughout late June and early July, the record for COVID-19 hospitaliza- tions was repeatedly shattered as more patients were checking in than check- ing out day after day. Since Memorial Day weekend, the number of COVID- 19 patients in Harris County hospitals grew from 509 to 2,696—more than ve times the amount—as of July 13. The surge in hospitalizations and CONTINUED ON 36

A surge in new COVID-19 cases in Harris County has come with an uptick in the number of patients being hospitalized.

SOURCE: SOUTHEAST TEXAS REGIONAL ADVISORY COUNCIL COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

MARKET SNAPSHOT

ICU surge* 1,948 Operational ICU beds 1,622

18

2,000

1,500

1,572

Total ICU patients Beds used by suspected and conrmed COVID-19 patients

1,000

500

752

0

BUSINESS FEATURE

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*DENOTES ADDITIONAL ICU CAPACITY BEYOND STANDARD OPERATING NUMBERS THAT CAN BE USED IN TIMES OF HEIGHTENED DEMAND

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CY-FAIR EDITION • JULY 2020

CHOOSE AWARD-WINNING EDUCATORS . One of Cypress-Fairbanks ISD’s greatest distinctions is the commitment of our educators to prepare students to be 21st century global leaders. Our teachers include the Texas Teachers of Tomorrow 2020 Teacher of the Year, a recipient of the Outstanding Teaching of the Humanities Award and a recipient of the Edith Fox King Award for Scholastic Journalism . Considering the award-winning excellence of all our teachers, that adds up to about 7,600 inspiring reasons for students and parents to choose CFISD.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

It takes all 16,705 of us to be ranked one of the nation’s best. We’re not just the largest children’s hospital in America. For 12 straight years, we’ve also been recognized as one of the best by U.S. News & World Report. This year, we’re ranked # 4 overall and in the top five in seven specialties—including # 1 in pediatric cardiology and heart surgery. It takes great technology, facilities and expertise to be recognized year after year, but the most important thing it takes is great people. People who care deeply about caring for children. And we’re honored that so many people like that choose to work here.

Learn more at TexasChildrens.org/best

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CY-FAIR EDITION • JULY 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS IMPACTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

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FROMKIM: In this special Real Estate Edition, we take an in- depth look at how COVID-19 has aected Cy-Fair’s real estate market. Since we have all been spending more time at home these last few months, you can also nd a guide to help you with home projects and tips to help you get ready for hurricane season (see Page 27). While we can’t control everything, taking life one day at a time and being grateful for the little things can give us a sense of peace. Kim Giannetti, GENERALMANAGER

Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 11 Updates on Cy-Fair road projects

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Kim Giannetti, kgiannetti@communityimpact.com EDITOR Danica Lloyd CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Shawn Arrajj GRAPHIC DESIGNER Stephanie Torres ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Karen Nickerson METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Tessa Hoee CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across six metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON

Real EstateEdition

MARKET AT A GLANCE Annual Cy-Fair market data GOVERNMENT protect renters from evictions INSIDE INFORMATION Understanding renancing GUIDE Home improvement ideas BUSINESS FEATURE Mr. Pixel’s Classic Arcade

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21 Harris County, Houston ocials look to

FROMDANICA: Predicting what the future will hold seems to become less feasible with each passing day. From local schools and hospitals to real estate agents and business owners, the Cy-Fair community is coming together to prepare for what could be next in the midst of uncertainty brought on by the coronavirus. In this edition, you can catch up on the latest news and look forward to what might lie ahead. Danica Lloyd, EDITOR

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27

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THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Local sources 48

New businesses 12

Arcade 1

Home improvement projects 4

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HISTORY

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CYFAIR EDITION • JULY 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

G R A N T

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9

SCHIEL RD.

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U E T

VINTAGE PARK BLVD.

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6

249

Roy’s Breakfast & Lunch

COURTESY ROY’S BREAKFAST & LUNCH

HOUSE & HAHL RD.

Henry Torres opened a storefront for the business June 2 at 7630 Fry Road, Ste. 800, Cypress, across from Cypress Springs High School. The family-owned and -operated business offers grooming by appointment with various services, including a bath, a cut according to the customer’s specifications, face and ear cleaning, anal gland expression and nail trimming. Specialty treatments, such as de-skunking, teeth brushing, and flea and tick treatments are also available. 346-218-1505. www.dapperdogspremiergrooming.com 6 Ivy Point Cypress , a new resort-style apartment community targeting individ- uals age 55 and older, began moving in residents July 1 at 14928 Mueschke Road, Cypress. The development features 136 units, including three different one-bed- room floor plans and two different two-bedroom floor plans. Prices range from $1,325 to $2,025 per month. Ame- nities at the community include a fitness center, a swimming pool, a greenhouse, a billiards room and community room with a community kitchen where events can be hosted. 281-720-7182. www.ivypointcypress.com 7 Officials with Solis Mammogra- phy announced the opening of a new screening center June 29 at 9818 Fry Road, Cypress. The office is staffed by radiologists who specialize in breast screening. Services include 3D mammo- grams with SmartCurve technology and bone densitometry. Since mammograms are performed as an outpatient service, they do not fall under a recent executive order issued at the state level for Harris County halting elective medical services. 832-334-0202. www.solismammo.com

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99 TOLL

N. BRIDGELAND LAKE PKWY.

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TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 A new food truck called Poppa’s PoBoys launched in Cypress on May 30, serving up Louisiana-style po’boy sand- wiches, burgers, wraps, seafood baskets, fries and boudin balls. The business is stationed at 16823 Mueschke Road, Cypress, and operates on the weekends. 832-998-6657 2 Roy’s Breakfast and Lunch opened May 14 at 20220 FM 529, Ste. 170, Hous- ton. The eatery serves breakfast for lunch and is open for dine in, to go and delivery through Uber Eats from 7 a.m.-3 p.m. Menu items are made fresh, including

hash browns and breakfast ham, which is baked in-house and sliced to order. Officials with the independently owned restaurant said they hope to open new locations in the future. 832-683-4894. www.facebook.com/roysbreakfast 3 Lan Hai Asian Restaurant opened in mid-June at 17575 Hwy. 249, Houston. Formerly the location of Texas Buffet & Barbecue, the new business offers Chinese fare such as Szechuan chicken, salt toasted tofu and walnut shrimp. Sig- nature dishes include the sizzling steak, beef short ribs and roasted duck served with white or fried rice. 832-604-8088. www.lanhaiasianrestaurant.com

4 Cypress residents Leanna and David Barton opened Play Street Museum on June 22 at 25712 Hwy. 290, Ste. E, Cypress. The small-format children’s museum is designed to encourage young children’s imagination and creativity. The farm-themed children’s venue features interactive educational exhibits and offers private parties. Health and safety precautions are in place, and reservations are available with limited occupancy due to the coronavirus pandemic. 281-717-2239. www.playstreetmuseum.com 5 After operating mobile dog grooming truck Dapper Dogs Premier Grooming Salon in the Cypress area since 2015,

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ & DANICA LLOYD

available for anxious patients or for those with special needs. Servetnik said she and her partner met during residency training after each immigrated to the United States as children. 832-305-6507. www.cavitypatrolpediatricdentistry.com Local mom Aaren Halencak launched Yard Love Cypress on June 1, offering custom yard greetings for residents of ZIP codes 77429 and 77377. The yard signs help families celebrate special occasions, such as birthdays and graduations, she said. An $85 fee includes 24-hour sign rental, delivery and setup. 830-491-0911. www.yardlovegreetings.com/locations/ cypress-tx COMING SOON 12 Gourmet hot dog restaurant Dog Haus Biergarten is expected to open this summer in a 3,264-square-foot location in the Copperfield area at 8422 Hwy. 6 N., Houston. The California-based eatery will be run by franchisee Jason Rappa- port, who plans to open 30 additional locations throughout Houston and San Antonio in five years. The restaurant spe- cializes in craft hot dogs and offers burg- ers, sausages, a fried chicken sandwich and shakes. The new space will feature a dog-friendly patio and a full bar that will serve 24 beers on tap as well as signature craft cocktails. www.doghaus.com ANNIVERSARIES 13 Marvino’s Italian Kitchen celebrated its fifth anniversary in June with a special three-course menu at 24002 Hwy. 290, Cypress. Officials said $5 of each meal or- dered from the anniversary menu would be donated to local nonprofit Cy-Hope. Marvino’s is open for dine in, pickup and delivery services as of press time. 832-220-7200. www.facebook.com/marvinoitalian 14 Foxfire Candle Works celebrated one year of business at 126 Vintage Park Blvd., Ste. C, Houston, on June 20. Customers of the candle boutique and fragrance bar can create their own 100% soy wax candles with customized scents. 832-458-5392. www.foxfirecandleworks.com

Yard Love Cypress

COURTESY YARD LOVE CYPRESS

8 Imagine Early Education & Childcare opened June 22 at 24130 Hwy. 290, Cypress. The center offers programming for social and academic development in children ages 6 weeks to 12 years. Extracurricular activities include foreign language, dramatic play, art, physical fitness, gardening, culinary, music and science. The facility formerly housed Children’s Learning Adventure, a compa- ny that filed for bankruptcy earlier this year. www.imaginechild.com 9 Rise Gym held its soft opening June 5 at 11703 Spring Cypress Road, Tomball. Rise Gym allows patrons to use gym equipment and also has personal trainers available. Various physical educa- tional courses will also be offered to the public, trainers and physical trainers. 281-702-4262. www.risegymtx.com 10 Zeneakia Ilo opened House of Zen Med Spa June 17 at 25282 Hwy. 290, Ste. 160, Cypress. The facility offers high- end treatment facials, Botox, Juvederm, waxing and an oxygen bar. Zeneakia co- owns the business with her husband, Dr. Sheriff Ilo, a physician who will provide the medical treatments that are offered. The business is open Tuesdays through Saturdays, and customers can book ap- pointments online. 832-653-3266. www.houseofzenmedspa.com 11 Drs. Chun Yin Wong and Dzhuliya Servetnik opened Cavity Patrol Pediatric Dentistry on July 20 at 7914 Fry Road, Ste. 280, Cypress. Specializing in treat- ment for children, the office will serve pa- tients under age 18 with exams, cleaning, X-rays, fillings, sealants, crowns, nerve treatment, space maintainers, and simple and surgical extractions. Oral conscious sedation and nitrous oxide treatments are

Langham Creek Family YMCA completed several renovations as of July 2.

COURTESY LANGHAM CREEK FAMILY YMCA

FEATURED IMPACT RENOVATION Officials with the Langham Creek Family YMCA in Cypress announced the completion of roughly $1 million in renovations July 2, including renovations of the indoor gym, outdoor pavilion and child watch area at 16725 Longenbaugh Drive, Houston. The renovations also include a redesigned entrance and lobby, a new pickleball complex with six courts and a new personal training room that officials said will serve as a testing ground to develop high-intensity training opportunities, according to a July 2 press release. “For nearly two decades the Langham Creek Family YMCA has been a staple in one of Houston’s fastest growing communities,” said Stephen Ives, the president and CEO of the YMCA of Greater Houston. “As home to the Miracle League baseball field and other adaptive sports leagues, we’re elated to provide new resources, activities and opportunities for the community to continue to connect.” Renovations to the indoor and outdoor fitness areas were made with social distancing in mind, according to the release. Technology updates—including new large-screen TVs—were put in place to provide on-demand access to virtual

classes. The site’s outdoor pavilion was converted into an open-air studio for group exercise classes, featuring 8,000 square feet of covered turf space outfitted with fitness equipment. The pickleball complex was reinvented from a former skate park on-site, according to the release. Meanwhile, the child watch area was redesigned to feature spaces for different age groups. Older children have access to sound and video studios where they can engage in mixing and other forms of production. A former office on-site has also been transformed into a “Makerspace,” where children ages 7-12 can participate in staff-supervised activities that involve designing and inventing. 281-859-6143. www.ymcahouston.org/ locations/langham-creek-family-ymca

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CY-FAIR EDITION • JULY 2020

SEEING A PRIMARY CARE DOCTOR Is Still Important

For everything from annual checkups to managing chronic conditions, taking care of your health should always be a priority. Houston Methodist primary care doctors are still available to provide personalized care for you and your family — safely. We offer a variety of convenient ways to get care from us, from same-day sick visits to extended hours at select locations. And, you can be confident that we are taking every necessary precaution to keep you safe during your visit, including:

Screening all patients

Ensuring social distancing in waiting rooms

Wearing masks while providing care

Offering video visits with your doctor

Enhanced cleaning of equipment and surfaces

Adding evening and Saturday hours to space out appointments

houstonmethodist.org/pcg Call or text: 713.394.6724

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Beamconstruction continues at Hwy. 6 andHwy. 290

COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

ONGOING PROJECTS

WESTLOCK DR.

GREGSON RD.

249

Texas Department of Transporta- tion work is ongoing on a four-lane yover bridge connecting Hwy. 6 and FM 1960 over Hwy. 290. Construction continued in June on steel beams that will support the bridge between North Eldridge Parkway and Hwy. 290 following the construction of columns and drill shafts along the path of the bridge. TxDOT ocials previously said the coronavirus pandemic is not expected to cause construction delays. As of early July, construction on the project was still slated to wrap up by the end of 2020, with most major lane closures ending Nov. 30. Work on a Hwy. 290 main lane widening project was in its nal stages, as of July, on the few remain- ing Cy-Fair area projects. The work, which began in 2012, is part of a project that involved widening Hwy. 290 between Loop 610 and the Waller considering the use of federal stimu- lus money to help fund a high-speed rail project connecting Houston and Dallas, according to an April 8 letter from Texas Central Chair Drayton McLane to Texas Sen. Robert Nichols, RJacksonville. In the letter, McLane said the project has “hit a snag with all the diculties” of the coronavirus, adding that “between the Japanese government funding and the monies

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North Eldridge Parkway widening Harris County Precinct 4 anticipates sending a project out for construction bids in the fourth quarter of 2020 to widen North Eldridge Parkway to four concrete lanes between Spring Cypress and Westlock roads. Trac signals would also be added at West- lock Drive and Gregson Road. Timeline: TBD Cost: TBD Funding source: Harris County Pre- cinct 4

The bridge connects Hwy. 6 and FM 1960. (Shawn Arrajj/Community Impact Newspaper)

we hope to receive from President [Donald] Trump’s infrastructure stimulus through the Department of Transportation, along with private equity, ... the project still has a great opportunity, is viable and can be construction ready this year.” As of July, ocials with Texas Cen- tral said the company has not applied for any federal stimulus funding or any funding from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act. Ocials did not respond to County line. In early July, striping was placed along main lanes between Telge Road and Mueschke Road in Cy-Fair. Final signage was also placed between North Eldridge Parkway and Mueschke Road. As of mid-July, workers were replacing concrete along the west- bound frontage road between Skinner and Cypress Rosehill roads.

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HUFFMEISTER RD.

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JULY 2. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT CYFNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. including twin bridges over Little Cypress Creek. As of press time, a construction bid of $8.8 million was to be awarded to awarded to Angel Brothers Enterprises on July 14. Timeline: July 14-TBD Cost: $8.8M Funding sources: Harris County pre- cincts 3 and 4 Louetta Road extension and bridge Harris County Precinct 4 is looking to connect Louetta Road from Telge Road to Stablewood Farms Drive as a four-lane concrete pavement section,

Texas Central weighing use of federal stimulus Ocials with Texas Central are

request for comment as to how much federal money they could seek or when they could make a decision to apply. In the letter, McLane also sug- gested the project could end up costing $30 billion, a higher estimate than was initially expected. As of July 13, the Texas Central website lists the project’s total investment cost at $20 billion, with civil works estimated at $14 billion. Texas Cen- tral estimates the project will have a direct, cumulative economic impact of $36 billion over the next 25 years.

11

CYFAIR EDITION • JULY 2020

PUBLIC SAFETY

County revisits use-of-force policies, launches criminal justice studies

Harris County has taken a number of actions as a part of a larger effort to analyze racial bias and monitor the use of force in the criminal justice system.

*AS OF PRESS TIME JULY 14

ACCOUNTABILITY Study feasibility of creating Civilian Oversight Board with subpoena power and authority to investigate and discipline law enforcement officers Agency: Justice Administration Department Timeline: update July 14* followed by public hearing

USE OF FORCE

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

where instances of police use of force would be compiled, along with video footage and details of those involved. Although past incidents of police brutality have gotten the public’s attention, Howard Henderson, the founding director of the Center for Justice Research at Texas Southern University, said he saw something different about the reactions to recent incidents, including Floyd. “I think you now have more of the important pieces focused on one issue, and the issue is that we have to stop unnecessary police excessive and deadly use of force,” he said. “Policymakers are now able to recognize that there is community sentiment behind passing such policies.” Constables on board By unanimous vote, the court also directed the Harris County Justice Administration Department to work with law enforcement agencies—the sheriff’s department, each consta- ble’s office, the county and district attorneys and the fire marshal—to come up with a uniform policy for how law enforcement uses force. Pre- cinct 2 Commissioner Adrian Garcia said he would like to see techniques such as chokeholds and hog tying prohibited. Harris County’s eight constables met June 10 to begin the process of developing a countywide policy. Precinct 4 Constable Mark Herman— whose office covers parts of Cy-Fair— said once they are able to develop and agree upon one use-of-force policy, it will be shared with Gonzalez as well as District Attorney Kim Ogg and the Harris County Fire Marshal’s Office for each entity to evaluate and combine increased training is on the horizon. “George Floyd basically opened our eyes that we need to continue [use-of- force and de-escalation trainings] and do themmore [frequently] because we don’t want what happened to Mr. Floyd ever happening down here,” Herman said. Since 2016, officers in precincts 4 and 5 were involved in eight shootings into one countywide policy. In addition, constables said

In reaction to the death of George Floyd—a Houston native who died while in police custody in Minneapo- lis—the Harris County Commissioners Court approved a broad range of studies into the county’s criminal justice system June 9. However, the question still remains of where funding could come from to implement future changes. The studies cover topics ranging from racial disparities in the criminal justice system and the criminaliza- tion of poverty to whether to create a civilian oversight board to investigate allegations of abuse of force by local police. A request from Precinct 1 Commis- sioner Rodney Ellis to look at how alternative programs could be used to reduce criminal justice interventions for issues related to poverty, mental health and substance abuse is likely to involve future spending. Ellis said he wanted to “put a marker” of $25 mil- lion on the effort to show people the county was willing to commit to real changes instead of only resolutions. “I’m trying to show a serious commitment to it,” Ellis said at the June 9 virtual meeting. “If we don’t come up with programs that make good sense, I’ll be against [them], but I want to put a marker down.” Preliminary findings frommost studies were slated to come back by July 14, after press time. Those findings will also be presented at a series of public hearings. Harris County Sheriff Ed Gonzalez said law enforcement may not need to be on the front lines of mental health, addiction and poverty to the degree they currently are. However, he argued defunding police forces should not be the go-to solution to funding new programs. “At the end of the day, there’s still violent crime out there. Somebody out there still has to protect the community. We need to be able to solve crimes. We need to make sure that we’re paying our deputies good money,” Gonzalez said. As studies are underway, Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo also proposed the creation of a public site

Work with county law enforcement agencies to develop standardized use-of- force policy Agencies: Harris County Sheriff’s Office, constables, Harris County District Attorney, Harris County Fire Marshal Timeline: ongoing Publish monthly use-of-force reports from county law enforcement agencies Agencies: sheriff’s office, constables Timeline: ongoing

RESPONSE

Study feasibility of creating county agency to administer public health programs to end cycles of violence Agencies: JAD, Harris County Public Health Timeline: update July 14* followed by public hearing Study alternatives to criminal justice interventions for incidents related to poverty, homelessness, public and mental health, substance use, and violence prevention Agencies: JAD, Criminal Justice Coordinating Council Timeline: update July 14* with recommended next steps and funding estimate Study feasibility of creating a new county agency to respond to 911 calls for mental health and substance abuse Agency: JAD Timeline: update July 14* followed by public hearing

DISPARITIES

Study use of fines in criminal justice, cash bail in pretrial detention and disproportionate impact on low-income individuals and racial/ethnic minorities Agency: JAD Timeline: report due Aug. 11 followed by public hearing Study feasibility of compiling biannual reports on racial disparities in criminal justice system and recommend reforms Agency: Justice Administration Department Timeline: update July 14* on possible barriers, report due Aug. 11

SINCE 2016

6

4

53

73

officer-involved shootings have been recorded in Harris County Precinct 4.

have been recorded in Harris County Precinct 5.

have been recorded by the Harris County Sheriff’s Office across the county.

officer-involved shootings in Harris County, about 20%, involved injuries to officers.

SOURCES: HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS DISTRICT ATTORNEY’S OFFICE/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

and four shootings, respectively, according to the Texas district attor- ney’s office. Two of those incidents took place in the Cy-Fair area. The documented incidents only include those where officers fire guns. How- ever, officers in five of those incidents were injured themselves. Over that same time, officers with the Harris County Sheriff’s Office were involved in 53 shootings across the county, including four in 2020. As protesters continue to call for criminal justice reform, Herman said

he hopes the public has not lost faith in their officers. “Over the last couple of weeks, I have seen law enforcement demon- ized,” Herman said in a June 10 phone interview. “Law enforcement, as a whole, is a lot of good people with good hearts, and they do the right things every day. But letting a couple of people in law enforcement up in Minneapolis paint a picture of all law enforcement that way is not right.” Hannah Zedaker contributed to this report.

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COUNTY

$65million programcould ‘functionally end chronic homelessness’ in county

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

an immediate effect on homeless counts but could create a future crisis if the county does not prepare. Mike Nichols, the president and CEO of the Coalition for the Home- less, said rehousing efforts carried out by the coalition have about a 90% success rate, meaning people stayed out of hospitals and the crim- inal justice system and eventually moved toward independence. When the program is up and running, he said any homeless person who presents themselves will be able to be housed within 30 days. “When we use this money and have this plan developed, we will functionally end chronic homeless- ness,” Nichols said. the homeless A $65 million effort to rehouse 5,000 homeless people in the Greater Houston area includes several programs. Helping “Bridge” to permanent supportive housing : will house 1,000 people, primarily unsheltered or in encampments, while they await PSH Rapid rehousing : will provide rental assistance for 1,700 newly homeless people who do not require intensive case management

Harris County is teaming up with the city of Houston and a group of local nonprofits on a mission to end chronic homelessness in the county over the next two years. Harris County commissioners agreed June 30 to commit $18 million to a new program that will rapidly increase access to housing for up to 5,000 homeless individu- als. One day later, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner announced the city will commit another $40 million. The effort will be carried out as part of the larger The Way Home initiative, a group of more than 100 partners formed in 2011 with the goal of ending homelessness in the cities of Houston and Pasadena as well as in Harris, Fort Bend and Montgomery counties. Precinct 2 Commissioner Adrian Garcia, who first proposed a task force in 2019, said the funding com- mitment marks a historic moment. “This is the first time Harris County has contributed significantly to this issue,” Garcia said June 30. “The whole strategy across this particular initiative is specifically in the area of rapid rehousing. This will have, we believe, the most signifi- cant impact on the encampments that we see throughout the county.” The initiative is broken up to help people at various stages of homelessness, including 1,700 newly homeless people, 1,000 people awaiting supportive housing and 1,000 people who need help with rent to avoid losing housing. Other funding will be used to expand outreach, provide enhanced mental health services and provide additional support for COVID-19 emergency shelters. On top of the $58 million, another $6.5 million will come from private donors. City and county funding will be reimbursed by federal dollars through the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act. The city and county will work with the Coalition for the Homeless. The urgency of addressing homelessness has been exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic, which officials said has not had

PSH homeless prevention : will provide ongoing rental assistance and wraparound services to 200 at-risk people Additional funds will be used to: • expand outreach to unsheltered homeless people • provide enhanced mental health services to at-risk people who were recently rehoused • provide additional support for COVID-19 emergency shelters Shelter diversion : will provide three months’ rent to prevent roughly 1,000 people from entering the homeless system

SOURCES: COALITION FOR THE HOMELESS, HARRIS COUNTY/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

13

CY-FAIR EDITION • JULY 2020

VOTE Primary runoffs end, setting stage for November general elections

Runoff returns Candidates who were victorious in July 14 primary runoff elections will move on to general elections in November. All results are unofficial until canvassed. Democrat Republican Winner

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

Moore—who served as chief of staff to former Houston Mayor Bill White—said his priorities include taking a more proactive approach to flood prevention, including increas- ing funding for the Harris County Flood Control District. He will face Republican candidate Tom Ramsey in the November general election. Mike Siegel won the Democratic runoff election for the District 10 U.S. representative seat, according to unofficial results from the Texas Secretary of State. Siegel received 54.2% of the vote, or 26,291 votes, defeating Pritesh Gandhi. He will face Republican incumbent Rep. Michael McCaul in the November election. U.S. District 10 spans portions of nine counties, including Harris County. Unofficial results also showed Joe Danna winning the Republican primary for Harris County sheriff

A handful of primary runoff elections in Harris County took place July 14, including several races for positions that cover the Cy-Fair area. In primary elections, Democratic and Republican candidates compete within their own parties to see which candidate will run in the November general election. Michael Moore defeated Diana Martinez Alexander in the Democrat runoff of Harris County Precinct 3 commissioner. Moore finished with 57% of the votes, or 19,873 votes, according to unofficial results from the Harris County Clerk’s Office. “A huge thank you to all who worked so hard to bring this cam- paign so far,” Moore said in a July 14 statement posted to Twitter. “I want to acknowledge Diane Martinez Alex- ander as a dedicated public servant and a tough opponent.”

HARRIS COUNTY PRECINCT 3 COMMISSIONER

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE, DISTRICT 10

Diana Martinez Alexander 43%

Michael Moore 57%

Pritesh Gandhi 45.8%

Mike Siegel 54.2%

Moore will face Tom Ramsey, who won the Republican primary.

Siegel will face Michael McCaul, who was unopposed in March.

SOURCE: HARRIS COUNTY CLERK’S OFFICE/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

HARRIS COUNTY SHERIFF

with 32,558 votes, or 51.5% of the total votes, compared to 30,708 votes for opponent Paul Day. The winner will face Democratic incumbent Ed Gonzalez in November. All results are unofficial until canvassed. Vanessa Holt and Anna Lotz contributed to this report.

Joe Danna 51.5%

Paul Day 48.5%

Danna will face Ed Gonzalez, who won the Democratic primary.

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14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Cy-Fair ISD

All CFISD students to have devices

BY DANICA LLOYD

have that virtual option ... available to parents and students that choose to go that direction.” CFISD administrators have devel- oped the CFISD Learning Together Everywhere 1:1 program, designed to provide equitable technology access to all pre-K through 12th grade students. Ocials said parents will receive a survey in late July asking whether they plan to enroll their children in face-to-face classes or have their chil- dren learn remotely. They will have until Aug. 10 to make a nal decision before school starts Aug. 24. Chief Academic Ocer Linda Macias said devices will be distrib- uted based on availability and need as they will not all arrive to the district by the time school starts. However, once all devices are in, even students who are taking in-per- son classes will have a device they

CYFAIR ISD In a special meeting July 7, Cy-Fair ISD trustees unani- mously approved a plan to purchase enough Chromebook devices for all students in the district as well as 4G LTE broadband wireless hot spots for students without internet access at home. The district plans to spend up to $44 million, most of which will come from bond funds. Superintendent Mark Henry said district ocials continue to prepare for both in-person and virtual instruction options in the 2020-21 school year. “When you’re going through an unprecedented time, you do unprecedented things,” Henry said during the meeting. “We are going to have the two options available once school rolls around—for in-person as dictated by the state at this time, but also we want to make sure that we

Cy-Fair ISD is planning to purchase 75,000 Chromebooks over the course of the fall semester, providing technology devices for all students. (Courtesy Cy-Fair ISD)

can bring back and forth with them from school to their homes. This will enable all students to attend school virtually from home in case they need to quarantine or if campuses are forced to close due to COVID-19, Macias said. “When we start school on Aug. 24 ... and if in a month, the state decides

that we need to shut school down, our students will not miss a beat,” Macias said. CFISD currently has about 40,000 Chromebooks and is looking to purchase another 75,000 devices, said Karen Fuller, CFISD’s director of infrastructure, communications and networks.

Cy-Fair ISDapproves extended school days

Cy-Fair ISDapproves billion-dollar budget, teacher raises for scal year 202021

BY DANICA LLOYD

202021 CALENDAR

CYFAIR ISD Board members unanimously approved modi- cations June 16 to the 2020-21 instructional calendar that will add 10-15 minutes of instructional time each day. All other previously scheduled professional develop- ment and school breaks will remain as approved in January. This additional time amounts to eight full school days over the course of the year. District ocials said should CFISD be forced to close for an extended period of time, the rst eight days would not have to be made up, but the month of June is designated as makeup time if needed. “We opted to keep our calendar the same, and yes, we did add some time to the school day to build us up a little cushion of eight days in case we have to let school out,” Superintendent Mark Henry said at the June 16 meeting. Ten instructional minutes will be added to the high school schedule and 15 minutes will be added to the elementary and middle school schedules, so instructional days at all levels will last 450 minutes.

BY DANICA LLOYD

CYFAIR ISD Board members approved a $1.04 billion budget for scal year 2020-21 June 16, which includes a $39.8 million shortfall to provide district employees with raises in the coming year. “We’ve actually adopted several decit budgets, but we’ve been very fortunate, and we have not realized any of those decits to this point,” Chief Financial Ocer Karen Smith said at the June 11 board work session. “We fully believe that we will be adding a little bit to fund balance this year for 2019-20.” An anticipated student enrollment growth rate of about 0.5%, the opening of Rowe Middle School and eects of the COVID-19 pandemic all played a role in the budgeting pro- cess, Smith said. Expenses amount to about $8,783 per student with projected enrollment of 118,498. Job security for CFISD employees is a top priority despite budget challenges, Superintendent Mark Henry said, and layos are not being discussed at this time. Full-time teachers, counselors,

librarians and nurses in 2020-21 can expect to see the one-time $1,000 payment from 2019-20 rolled into their salaries in addition to a 1% increase, while hourly employees and administrators will see last year’s $500 payment rolled into their salaries in addition to a 1% increase, Smith said. This is expected to cost the district $20.4 million. Additionally, the starting teacher salary will be $56,000 in 2020-21.

The instructional calendar as approved Jan. 16 is as follows:

Aug. 10-14, 17-21: professional development days Aug. 24: rst day of school for students Sept. 7: student/sta holiday (Labor Day) Nov. 2-3: professional days Nov. 23-27: student/sta holiday (Thanksgiving break) Dec. 21-25, 28-Jan. 1: student/ sta holiday (winter break) Jan. 4: professional day Jan. 18: student/sta holiday (Martin Luther King Jr. Day) Feb. 15: professional day/ inclement weather day March 15-19: student/sta holiday (spring break) April 2: student/sta holiday (Good Friday) May 27: last day of school for students May 28: professional day/ inclement weather day

FUNDING SOURCES Property tax revenue makes up the largest share of expected revenue.

Federal: $21.2M State: $436.38M Local: $543.31M

Total: $1B

SOURCE: CYFAIR ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: CYFAIR ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

15

CYFAIR EDITION • JULY 2020

“Cancer, you’re nomatch for our expertise”

16

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Harris County and the city of Jersey Village

Jersey Village City Council will meet at 7 p.m. on Aug. 17. 713-466-2100 www.jerseyvillage.info Harris County Commissioners Court will meet at 10 a.m. on July 28. 713-698-1102 www.harriscountytx.gov MEETINGSWE COVER Livestreams can be accessed via websites. QUOTEOFNOTE “PREVENTION IS OUR ONLY TOOL BECAUSE WE HAVE NO SILVER BULLET. WE HAVE NO MAGICWAND THAT CAN FIGHT THIS VIRUS.” UMAIR SHAH, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF HARRIS COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH

Sales taxcollectionsupover previous year for Cy-Fair entities inJuly

REBOUNDING REVENUE After seeing year-over-year drops in sales tax revenue from April, several Cy- Fair taxing entities saw rebounds in May.

2019

2020

JERSEY VILLAGE

$595K

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

$582K

$588K

comptroller’s office. The city brought in $595,000 in sales tax revenue this May compared to $472,000 last year. Meanwhile, Harris County Emer- gency Services District No. 9 saw roughly the same amount of revenue in both years. The data comes one month after Jersey Village saw April collections down 21.9% year over year, and ESD No. 9 saw revenue drop 8.4%.

JERSEY VILLAGE A once uncer- tain outlook for several Cy-Fair-area taxing entities is starting to improve after sales tax distributions in July— for taxes collected in May—came in higher than the previous year. Revenue for the city of Jersey Village was up 26% between May 2019 and May 2020, according to data released July 8 from the Texas

$522K

$472K

$459K

March

April

May

HARRIS COUNTY ESD NO. 9

$3.4M

$3.1M

$3.2M

$3.2M

$2.9M

March

April

May

SOURCE: TEXAS COMPTROLLER’S OFFICE/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Harris County announces $30million small-business assistance program

JerseyVillage ordinance allows golf carts on public streetswithin city limits

BY DANICA LLOYD

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

business owners stay afloat as Harris County continues to fight the COVID- 19 crisis.” The program launched July 13 and will remain open until July 22. It was designed for businesses with 30 or fewer employees, officials said. Earlier in March, the county provided $10 million under a separate small-business relief program to about 400 small businesses. The SBRF is part of an effort to assist a broader range of businesses strug- gling from the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to the release. “The effects of COVID-19 on our friends and neighbors throughout Harris County are immense and widespread—on our health, our families, our medical community and our economy,” Harris County Precinct 4 Commissioner Jack Cagle said in a statement.

Mayor Andrew Mitcham, who wrote the ordinance, said he believes golf carts will provide residents with another means of travel that may be more convenient. “Jersey Village, in my opinion, has a great layout for golf cart usage,” Mitcham said at the June 15 meeting. “There are some distances that are very difficult in the heat of summer to take a bike ride to or walk. For a person with physical handicap, golf carts can be very convenient ... to go to the park, golf course or swimming pool without being impacted.” The city’s ordinance does not allow golf carts on sidewalks or trails, requires anyone operating a golf cart to have a driver’s license or permit, and does not allow golf carts to exceed 25 miles per hour. Golf carts are prohibited on Jones Road, West Road and North Eldridge Parkway.

HARRIS COUNTY Harris County Commissioners Court on June 30 unanimously approved the Small Business Recovery Fund program—a $30 million grant program desig- nated for struggling small busi- nesses that have not yet obtained financial assistance from other COVID-19 relief programs, according to a press release. Through the program, eligible businesses may receive a grant of up to $25,000 to cover payroll costs, rent and accounts payable, among other operating expenses. “The impact of this crisis on small businesses has been dev- astating. We can’t afford to lose a source of jobs, innovation and the enterprising spirit our region is known for,” Hidalgo said in a statement. “These grants will help

JERSEY VILLAGE At a June 15 virtual meeting, the Jersey Village City Council unanimously voted to adopt an ordinance allowing the use of golf carts on public roads. The ordinance took effect immediately. The ordinance is modeled using language from House Bill 1548, which was passed into state law by the Texas Legislature in 2019 and allows cities to regulate golf cart usage within their limits. Residents could already drive golf carts for certain reasons under that law, including for trips within 2 miles to and from the Jersey Meadow Golf Course. The new city ordinance expands where golf carts can be driven to all public roads within the city for which the speed limit is 35 miles per hour or lower, according to the ordinance.

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CY-FAIR EDITION • JULY 2020

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