Bay Area Edition | September 2020

BAY AREA EDITION 2020 PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION ONLINE AT

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 2  SEPT. 25OCT. 22, 2020

New!

VOTER GUIDE 2020

EDUCATION E D I T I O N 2020 PUBLIC SPONSOREDBY • University of Houston Clear Lake

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DISTRICT DATA

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IMPACTS

SAMPLE BALLOT

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Meeting newneeds Clear Creek ISD adjusts to challenges for low-income, special education students amid COVID19 pandemic

third grader misunderstood classwork directions; although Brain was able to reach the teacher by email and quickly resolve the issue, her daughter was exhausted by then. “It’s too long of a day for kids to have that much screen time,” said Brain, who is also home-schooling another autistic child. “I don’t know what [to]

BY COLLEEN FERGUSON

Within the rst weeks of the 2020-21 school year in Clear Creek ISD, Marta Brain noticed her daughter’s morale sinking. Her daughter has high-function- ing autism, so she sometimes takes longer to process information even if she understands it well, Brain said. One day, during virtual learning, the

Whitcomb Elementary School teacher Jessica Anderson is one of many across Clear Creek ISD whose job duties and student interactions have changed due to COVID19.

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COURTESY CLEAR CREEK ISD

The Paycheck Protection Program gave businesses loans to combat the economic downturn caused by COVID-19. It saved 20,105 jobs in Clear Lake and League City. JOBSAVING 10,000 MEASURE

Federal loans helpBayArea businesses during pandemic

she said of her students. “It was just really hard to see them lose that.” The pandemic nancially hurt the dance theater along with millions of other businesses across the nation. One signicant relief during the economic turmoil was the Small Business Administration’s Pay- check Protection Program. Under the program, busi- nesses received forgivable or low-interest loans used primarily to keep workers employed. In late April, Reason began worrying about paying salaries for herself and the small sta. She applied for the PPP andwas approved for a $10,689 forgivable loan, which covered salaries for eight weeks, Reason said. CONTINUED ON 24

BY JAKE MAGEE

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Bay Area Houston Ballet and Theatre, a nonprot in Dickinson, was wrapping up its 44th season when COVID-19 reached Texas in early March. The pandemic forced the theater to end the season early, said Jill Rea- son, Bay Area Houston Ballet & Theatre’s executive director. “To lose their last performance was devastating,”

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BAY AREA EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 9 CITY& SCHOOLS 11 League City & Clear Creek ISD news

FROMPAPAR: Are you confused by the new face in your favorite community newspaper? Rest assured, I am not new to Community Impact Newspaper nor the Bay Area. I have been the general manager of the Pearland- Friendswood edition for over four years and now have the privilege of managing the Bay Area paper as well. Our dynamic new structure allows for a more streamlined process to get you the news that matters. The last few months have been challenging on most of us as we adjust to work, school and life during COVID-19. We understand the toll this takes, and we are committed to doing our part by continuing to provide our readers with fact-based, relevant information that helps you make the best decisions. I look forward to getting to know this community better and hope to hear from our readers on what you want to read about. Papar Faircloth, GENERALMANAGER

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Papar Faircloth, pfaircloth@communityimpact.com EDITOR Jake Magee REPORTER Colleen Ferguson GRAPHIC DESIGNER Justin Howell ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Lara Estephan METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kristina Shackelford MANAGING EDITOR Marie Leonard ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Tessa Hoelfe CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

VOTERGUIDE

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PUBLIC EDUCATION

DISTRICT DATA

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CAMPUS DEEP DIVE

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Local sources 34

New businesses 3

Pages of education content 6

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BAY AREA EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

IMPACTS

COMPILED BY COLLEEN FERGUSON & JAKE MAGEE

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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ARMAND BAYOU NATURE CENTER

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HUMBLE DR.

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FEATURED IMPACT IN THE NEWS Macy’s at the Baybrook Mall, 200 Baybrook Mall Drive, Friendswood, in late July partnered with the nonprofit Assistance League of the Bay Area to distribute more than 600 articles of clothing worth over $15,000 to the community. The donation includes prom dresses and children’s formal wear. The donation will support Operation Cinderella, which provides economically disadvantaged students with clothes for prom. Residents who want to donate formal wear can drop off dresses, jewelry, shoes, purses and more at 100 E. NASA Parkway, Ste. 80, Webster. Macy’s: 281-226-5300. www.macys.com/macysgives ALBA: 281-554-2594. www.assistanceleague.org/bay-area

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BAYBROOK MALL DR.

NOWOPEN 1 Northern Tool + Equipment opened its first League City location on Sept. 3. The 22,040-square-foot store at 200 S. Gulf Freeway, League City, is the company’s 30th in Texas and the eighth in the Greater Houston area. The business provides brand-name tools and equip- ment, a repair department, and cleaning and disinfecting equipment in response to COVID-19. In August, Northern Tool + Equipment donated cleaning and disin- fecting equipment to the Pasadena Fire Department. 346-358-4214. www.northerntool.com 2 GTX Plumbing and Drain in August opened a location at 6731 River Ridge Lane, Dickinson. The business, which is family owned and operated, serves residents from Galveston up to South Houston. GTX offers free consultations through calls, emails and texts. 832-340-4504. www.gtxplumbing.com Houston Swim Club began teaching les- sons at two new Bay Area location at 3A 2805 Dickinson Ave., League City, and 3B 1800 W. NASA Blvd., Webster, on June 1 and Sept. 1, respectively. The learn-to-swim program offers lessons to infants and children age 4 months and up, from basic lifesaving swim skills to training for intermediate and competitive swimmers. Lessons are taught year-round in indoor, heated pools with ultraviolet sanitation systems, and the club has incorporated new COVID-19 protocols such as reduced building capacity, temperature checks, mandatory masks, facility cleaning and social distancing

both in pools and in common areas. The business provides instruction from five other Houston-area locations, including

as well as specialty programming such as Champagne Cinema and interactive movie parties. www.drafthouse.com/houston 6 The Burger Joint plans to open at 1350 W. Bay Area Blvd., Webster, in front of the Baybrook Mall. The restaurant plans to open in early 2021, making it the business’s third Houston location and the first outside the Inner Loop. In addition to burgers, The Burger Joint serves sand- wiches, hot dogs and shakes. 281-974-2889. www.burgerjointhtx.com ANNIVERSARIES Founded in 1950, the San Antonio-based fast-food chain Whataburger , which has locations across the Bay Area, celebrated 70 years of business Aug. 8. Found- er Harmon Dobson opened the first Whataburger location in Corpus Christi in 1950, and the restaurant chain has since grown to more than 830 locations in 10 states. In the last year, Whataburg- er launched a new, modern restaurant design and began offering curbside and delivery services for the first time amid the coronavirus pandemic, according to the release. Whataburger offers made- to-order burgers, sandwiches, sides and breakfast items. www.whataburger.com NAME CHANGES 7 The Bay Area Museum in Clear Lake Park at 5001 NASA Parkway, Seabrook, has changed its name as of late June to the Kaila Sullivan Chapel . Sullivan was a Nassau Bay police sergeant killed in the line of duty Dec. 10. The chapel is a wed-

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in Pearland. 346-358-7946. www.houstonswimclub.com REOPENINGS

ding venue and hosts historic exhibits. 281-326-6539. www.facebook.com/clearlakepark CLOSINGS 8 Gulf Greyhound Park , 1000 FM 2004, La Marque, closed June 30 after nearly three decades in business. The owners said a decline in live racing and wagering led to the closing. Animal Well- ness Action representatives said they and Grey2K USA Worldwide are trying to ban greyhound racing in the United States, having successfully phased out the activ- ity in Florida, Arkansas and Alabama since 2018. 409-986-9500. 9 Stein Mart announced Aug. 12 it had voluntarily filed for bankruptcy as it does not have “sufficient liquidity” to continue operations. A press release from the com- pany said it expects to close “a significant portion, if not all” of its stores, including at 19801 Gulf Freeway, Webster, and has launched a store liquidation and closing process. Stein Mart sells apparel, home decor and more. 281-554-2611. www.steinmart.com

4 AMC Theatres on Aug. 20 began a phased reopening of 630 locations, including the location at 11801 S. Sam Houston Parkway, Houston. More than 400 locations will reopen by the end of September. Ticket prices on reopening day were 15 cents, commemorating the first AMC screen that debuted in 1920 in Kansas City, Missouri, and charged 15 cents per ticket. The AMC Safe and Clean program will have safety features that include mandatory mask-wearing for employees and customers, enhanced cleaning protocols, upgraded air filtering and reduced theater capacity, according to the company website. AMC Theaters temporarily closed all locations March 17 due to the coronavirus pandemic. 281-464-8801. www.amctheatres.com COMING SOON 5 Alamo Drafthouse is expected to open a League City location in the Victory Lakes Town Center, on the northeast corner of I-45 and FM 646, in late 2020, according to a media release. The theater will feature 10 screens, including a 60- foot “Big Show” large screen, and offer in-seat food and beverage service. The League City location will offer fami- ly-friendly experiences, including themed parties and an Alamo Kids Camp series,

THIS INFORMATION IS ACCURATE AS OF SEPT. 21. FOLLOW COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM FOR THE LATEST BUSINESS AND RESTAURANT NEWS UPDATES.

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BAY AREA EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, a great time to take care of your breast health by scheduling your annual mammogram. With radiologists specializing in breast imaging, the most advanced technology and a focus on personalized care and communication, UTMB Health is a nationally accredited center for breast health care and offers comprehensive breast health services.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Business group calls for public-privatemobility partnerships

COMPILED BY JAKE MAGEE

The Hwy. 288 toll lane project is an example of using public-private partnerships to address mobility issues, Keep Texas Moving ocials said.

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ With the state of Texas facing a projected budget shortfall of $4.58 billion—which comes with the threat of declining mobility funds as key tax revenue sources are weakened—a new group has emerged, calling for more public-private partnerships to keep crucial mobility projects from being curtailed. The group, Keep Texas Moving, was announced at a July 20 virtual press conference by the Texas Association of Business, an Austin-based advo- cacy group that pushes for pro-busi- ness policies. With congestion levels worsening and a mobility crisis looming, TAB Vice President Aaron Cox said private partnerships could help advance projects such as optional toll lanes, which he said could be built faster and at no cost to taxpayers. “We would love to build free roads, but the reality is our tax revenues are just not keeping pace with the need and the growth we are experiencing, especially now that COVID-19 and lower energy prices are really ham- mering the state and our transporta- tion funding sources,” Cox said in a July 20 virtual press conference. The Texas Department of Transpor- tation has engaged in similar projects in the past, Cox said—including on a project to expand Hwy. 288 in Houston—but the department’s authority to enter into public-private partnership projects expired in 2017. However, individual projects can still be approved by the Legislature. Texas voters approved a pair of statewide propositions—Proposition 1 in 2014 and Proposition 7 in 2015—that

diverted portions of oil and gas severance taxes, general sales taxes and motor vehicle sales taxes to the State Highway Fund, which is used in part to fund one-third of TxDOT’s annual budget. Fundingprojects Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar told state ocials July 20 to expect a historic drop in state revenue by the end of scal year 2020-21, with motor vehicle sales tax revenue and sever- ance tax revenue among the hardest hit. The highway fund is projected to get about $1.1 billion in transfers this scal year based on collections from

the previous scal year, Hegar said. However, next year’s transfer—which will be based on collections from this year—is projected to fall to $620 million, he said. Cox said funding was insucient to address gridlock on Texas roads even before the oil price woes. “The need for improving and expanding Texas roadways is outstrip- ping available funding,” he said. “That was true before Texas was hit by the double-barrel assault of COVID-19 and the worldwide fall in energy prices.” Keep Texas Moving is not advo- cating for any specic projects to be prioritized, a decision Cox said would

be up to TxDOT and local metropol- itan planning organizations, such as the Houston-Galveston Area Council. He said a good starting place could be looking at the annual Most Congested Roadways report released by the Texas A&M Transportation Institute. With overall state revenue on the decline, Cox said more private funding for road projects would also allow the state to preserve its tax dollars for other needs.

ONGOING PROJECT

UPCOMING PROJECT

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North Landing Boulevard extension After the widening of I-45 through League City ends in the next couple years, the city will begin concentrating on extending Landing Boulevard to the north to give motorists more north- south connections. About 1.7 miles of a four-lane, urban-divid- ed boulevard will be constructed to connect Landing Boulevard to the I-45 frontage road. Two bridges are included in this project, including one which will go over Clear Creek. League City voters approved the project as part of a $72 million bond proposition in May 2019. The project is under design. Timeline: construction starts 2022 at the earliest Cost: $49.5 million Funding sources: federal government ($31.3 million), city of League City ($18.2 million)

Red Blu Road widening About 1.5 miles of Red Blu Road between Hwy. 146 and Kirby Boulevard will be widened from three lanes to ve. The existing road will be converted to one-way westbound trac, and two new one-way eastbound lanes will be constructed. A new bridge over Taylor Lake will also be built south of the existing one to allow for more trac to create an alternative evacuation route during emergencies. The project began at the end of last year, and COVID-19 has not aected its time- line, ocials said. Timeline: December 2019-June 2021 Construction Cost: $15.6 million Funding sources : $12.1 million (Texas Department of Transportation), $3.5 million (Harris County)

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF AUG. 24. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT BAYNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY&SCHOOLS

News from League City & Clear Creek ISD

League City City Council approves budget, lowers property tax rate

CCISD superintendent to leadAustin-based education coalition

$145.48 million despite the city’s growing population, Council Member Hank Dugie said. “So our per-capita expenses have gone down,” he said. Additionally, the budget shows the city has allocated money toward what residents have expressed they want: public safety and infrastructure. The budget includes hiring new project managers, for instance, Dugie said. BUDGET BREAKDOWN The fiscal year 2020-21 budget has a lower operating budget than FY 2019-20.

BY JAKE MAGEE

BY COLLEEN FERGUSON

employee staffing and benefits. In all, 51 full-time positions were added to the budget for FY 2020-21. The total general operating fund is $370.5 million. The district has two pandemic response budgets: the 2019-20 closure budget of $800,000 and the 2020-21 reopening budget estimated at $10.9 million. The district expects to generate $9.2 million in revenue during the 2020-21 school year to offset the budget increase. The district is receiving consid- erably less federal revenue than it did during the previous fiscal year: CCISD received nearly $9.8 million “It’s come down considerably,” he said. “That’s good for the taxpayers.” Despite the tax rate falling, it is legally a tax rate increase because the city expects to bring in more property tax revenue in FY 2020-21 compared to FY 2019-20 due to growth resulting in new taxable properties in the city, Budget and Project Management Director Angie Steelman said. “It is simply bringing in more reve- nue, thus we have to call it a property rate increase,” Council Member Nick Long said. “Only governments could come up with that.” The FY 2020-21 budget totals $241.15 million, including $145.14 million for operating expenses and $96.01 million in capital expenses. The operating budget is lower than the FY 2019-20 operating budget of

LEAGUE CITY After months of meetings, workshops and discussion, the League City City Council on Sept. 8 unanimously approved the second and final reading of the city’s fiscal year 2020-21 budget and property tax rate. The tax rate will be $0.515 per $100 valuation, meaning the owner of a $100,000 home will pay $515 in property taxes to the city in FY 2020- 21, which begins Oct. 1. The rate is over $0.03 lower than the existing property tax rate of $0.548587. Council members called the ever-decreasing tax rate good news for residents. Mayor Pat Hallisey said the tax rate in the early 1990s was $0.79 per $100 valuation.

League City City Council meets at 6 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month. Watch at www.facebook.com/ leaguecitytexas. Clear Creek ISD board of trustees meets at 6 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month. Watch at www.facebook.com/ clearcreekisd. MEETINGSWE COVER additional learnings and experience from our work at Clear Creek as we navigate the challenges posed by COVID-19 on our schools, our stu- dents, our faculty and our facilities,” Smith said in the release. CLEAR CREEK Starting Jan. 1, retiring Clear Creek ISD Superin- tendent Greg Smith will serve as the executive director of the Fast Growth School Coalition, a state- wide organization representing Texas’ fastest-growing districts, according to a media release. The FGSC educates and advo- cates for investment in the state’s fastest-growing school districts to deliver high-quality education for students, per the release. Of all new students enrolled in Texas public schools each year, the vast majority are concentrated in roughly 75 of the state’s more than 1,200 public school districts, per the release. CCISD falls in this fast-growth category. “It will be a privilege to ... bring

Total budget: $241.15 million

Operating budget: $145.14

million Capital budget: $96.01 million

SOURCE: CITY OF LEAGUE CITY/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Clear Creek ISD board approves 2020-21 budget

in federal funds during FY 2018-19 but will receive $6.75 million during FY 2019-20 and $6.96 million during FY 2020-21. No tax rate was approved Aug. 24, but it will come before the board for approval in September. The proposed tax rate will decrease by $0.0441, from $1.31 per $100 valuation to $1.2659. NUMBER TOKNOW is CCISD’s total general operating budget for FY 2020-21. $370.5million

BY COLLEEN FERGUSON

CLEAR CREEK ISD The Clear Creek ISD board of trustees on Aug. 24 approved the district’s fiscal year 2020-21 budget, which is projected to be $9.2 million higher than the budget in FY 2019-20. More than 60% of the approved increase will be invested in direct classroom instruction, and nearly 90% of the total budget is for

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BAY AREA EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GUIDE

Candidates and information for November elections

COMPILED BY JAKE MAGEE

DATES TOKNOW

WHERE TOVOTE Residents of Harris and Galveston counties can vote at any voting location in their respective counties, regardless of precinct.

VOTER GUIDE 2020

OCT. 5 Last day to register to vote OCT. 13 First day of early voting OCT. 23 Last day to apply for ballot by mail* OCT. 30 Last day of early voting NOV. 3 Election Day *DATE RECEIVED, NOT POSTMARKED

SAMPLE BALLOT

*Incumbent

D Democrat

G Green

I Independent

L Libertarian

R Republican

Supreme Court, Place 8 R Brett Busby* D Gisela D. Triana L Tom Oxford Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 3 R Bert Richardson* D Elizabeth Davis Frizell Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 4 R Kevin Patrick Yeary* D Tina Clinton Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 9 R David Newell* D Brandon Birmingham LOCAL U.S. House District 14

State Senate District 11 R Larry Taylor* D Susan Criss L Jared Wissel State House District 24 R Greg Bonnen* D Brian J. Rogers L Dick Illyes State House District 129 R Dennis Paul* D Kayla Alix State Board of Education District 8 R Audrey Young L Audra Rose Berry HARRIS COUNTY Sheri R Joe Danna D Ed Gonzalez* County attorney R John Nation D Christian Dashaun Menefee District attorney R Mary Human D Kim Ogg* Tax assessor-collector R Chris Daniel D Ann Harris Bennett L Billy Pierce

Daniel Otto Elliott Rittershaus William Alex Scanlon Steve Wirtes NASSAU BAY Mayor Jonathan Amdur Ashley Graves Bob Warters

NATIONAL

GALVESTON COUNTY Sheri R Henry A. Trochesset* D Mark Salinas CLEAR CREEK ISD Board of trustees, District 2 Michelle M. Davis Will Stromeyer Win Weber* Board of trustees, District 3 Jason Clark Arturo Sanchez* LEAGUE CITY City Council Position 4 John P. Bowen Rachel McAdam Ange Mertens Shawn Byars City Council Position 5 Wes Chorn Justin A. Hicks Fred Rogers CLEAR LAKE SHORES City Council Randy Chronister Rick Fisher

President R Donald J. Trump* D Joseph R. Biden L Jo Jorgensen G Howie Hawkins STATEWIDE U.S. Senate R John Cornyn* D Mary “MJ” Hegar L Kerry Douglas McKennon G David B. Collins Texas Railroad Commission R James “Jim” Wright D Chrysta Castañeda L Matt Sterett G Katija “Kat” Gruene Supreme Court, chief justice R Nathan Hecht* D Amy Clark Meachum L Mark Ash Supreme Court, Place 6 R Jane Bland* D Kathy Cheng Supreme Court, Place 7 R Je Boyd* D Staci Williams L William Bryan Strange III

VOTER TURNOUT Texas Turnout Registered voters 2012 presidential election 13.65M 7.99M 2014 gubernatorial election 14.03M 4.73M 2016 presidential election 15.1M 8.97M 2018 gubernatorial election 15.79M 8.37M 2020 primary election 16.21M 4.11M SOURCE: TEXAS SECRETARY OF STATE’S OFFICECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

R Randy Weber* D Adrienne Bell U.S. House District 22 R Troy Nehls D Sri Preston Kulkarni L Joseph LeBlanc, Jr. U.S. House District 36

R Brian Babin* D Rashad Lewis L Chad Abbey G Hal J. Ridley, Jr.

For more election information, visit communityimpact.com/vote .

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BAY AREA EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

CANDIDATE Q&A

Get to know the League City City Council candidates

COMPILED BY JAKE MAGEE

League City City Council, Position 4

Occupation: retired network engineer Relevant experience: engineer consultant for governments and education systems 281-236-2587 www.jblc2020.com JOHN P. BOWEN

Occupation: engineer Relevant experience: project engineering, project management and campaign consulting 832-425-8362 www.shawnbyars.com SHAWN BYARS

Occupation: principal Relevant experience: public leadership for 12 years and HOA board of directors member 979-777-6980 www.rachel4lc.com RACHEL MCADAM

Occupation: flight attendant, journalist Relevant experience: League City Parks ANGE MERTENS

Board member 832-623-4536 www.facebook.com/voteforange

What can League City do to help local businesses affected by COVID-19?

League City efforts to support local business must provide a clear and unified message by gathering all best practice directives from health officials. By doing this it gives all business a fair and even playing field to work from. It is not any government’s position to pick and choose winners.

The Emergency Turnaround Task Force, in conjunction with the League City Chamber of Commerce, has helped local businesses by centralizing information and access to resources. Local leaders and business owners are working together during these trying times, and the city is using its influence in the community to make that happen.

As councilwoman, I will advocate to set up citywide competitions encouraging residents to eat and shop local. This will advertise local businesses and keep revenue in League City. We can also be a hub of information to our business community by creating a central, online source of resources and information.

With a population near 110,000we could do a lot to help keep our businesses alive by not going outside of our city to eat, shop or use services. If League City is your “home,” then during this tough time shop at “home,” eat at “home” and think local. I would also like to have a job fair to help those who have lost their jobs or businesses due to COVID-19.

What do you bring to the table that your opponents do not?

No. 1 is time. Being retired, I can commit the time to be involved beyond the bi-weekly meetings. No. 2 is a proven passion to serve my community as evidenced in my years of attending meetings, workshops and more. No. 3 is my experience in identifying problems and working to deliver the best solution.

I understand the challenges associated with large projects. I would bring a positive, well-reasoned and thoughtful decision-making process to City Council. For new issues, I would bring innovative ideas and practical, cost-effective solutions, just like I have done over my career.

I recognize the value of being a good steward of taxpayers’ money. As a school principal, I know how to do more with less and will approach the League City budget the same. As a public servant, I make unbiased decisions based on the information presented, which allows me to do what is best for all stakeholders.

I have been involved in hundreds of city activities and civic, community and charity events throughout my 19 years in League City. I am a candidate that is a voice for the people. I have a talent for calmly being able to listen to both sides, investigate and come to the best conclusion. We do not need to have a council that fights again!

League City City Council, Position 5

What can League City do to help local businesses affected by COVID-19?

What do you bring to the table that your opponents do not?

JUSTIN A. HICKS

Business owners affected by the shutdowns know better than the council or mayor. [We should] 100% open businesses as long as there is a mask [requirement]; that includes bars, restaurants, salons, gyms, et cetera. Stop calling any [business] non-essential. We need to preserve what we have before frivolously spending $1 million on kayak launches, for example.

I am unique from my opponents in that I work exclusively with large projects and budgets in the private sector. I’m responsible for meeting deadlines, staying under budget and reporting to stakeholders. None of the other candidates are beholden to stakeholders, which is exactly like being responsible to taxpayers! I am endorsed by no public official, am beholden to no special interest and owe no favors.

Occupation: program and project manager Relevant experience: twelve years in maritime, oil and gas as an engineer, project manager and instructor, and 13 years in the United States Air Force 425-877-4025

WES CHORN

Support local businesses and community. COVID-19 has slowed traffic in many restaurants and stores. We all need to shop and eat local at local establishments as much as possible and generously tip when we are able.

I have been self employed and run my own businesses for most of my life. This requires planning, budgeting and daily management—all qualities I have that are useful for being on League City City Council.

Occupation: owner of Senior Benefit Advisors and Chorn Equities Relevant experience: business owner with experience balancing budgets 832-428-0543

FRED ROGERS

It’s vital city government partner with our local chamber of commerce to educate and assist our business owners on the numerous COVID-19 financial relief programs that are available through our federal and state-run agencies. In addition, city government should use the various media platforms to encourage our 110,000-plus citizens to shop locally.

Leadership; experience; formal education; strategic thinking; conflict resolver; broader perspective; unbiased; synergy builder; and, more importantly, the time to weigh the facts, examine the data and have those important discussions with our city’s leadership team on the issues that affect the lives, property and wellbeing of the citizens of League City.

Occupation: Realtor, retired from U.S. Navy Relevant experience: chief recruiter for nation’s largest Navy recruiting areas 409 543-0633 www.fredrogersforcitycouncil.com

Answers have been edited for length. Read full Q&A’s at communityimpact.com/vote .

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CANDIDATE Q&A

2020 Voter Guide

Get to know the Clear Creek ISD board candidates

COMPILED BY COLLEEN FERGUSON

CLEAR CREEK ISDBOARDOF TRUSTEES, DISTRICT 2

Occupation: attorney Relevant experience: service on the CCISD board of trustees, including experience on various committees www.facebook.com/winwebertrustee WIN WEBER

MICHELLE DAVIS

Occupation: claims examiner Relevant experience: HOA president, admissions committee member for the Foundation of International Space Education 281-660-3024 WILLIAM STROMEYER

Occupation: retired, worked in mortgage banking

Relevant experience: former textbook clerk at Clear Creek High School and Clear Brook High School www.michelledavis4ccisd.com

What is one of the biggest challenges CCISD students are facing in the classroom today, and how would you address it as a board member?

Each student has individual needs which must be met for successful learning. This challenge is more visible in the face of COVID-19, news of violence and hurricane threats. The district strategic plan adopted by the board lets me focus on individual needs in all district planning, resource allocation and decision making.

One of the biggest challenges our students face today is the different levels of instruction. ...I am thankful to see a lot more career and technology courses being offered at CCISD. Equally as important for advanced or gifted students is the ability to accelerate their learning through dual credit, AP classes or even the early college high school.

Working and schooling from home is a challenge many students and parents will face. Even with parents at home, if they are working it makes it very difficult to assist as needed with the education aspect. I understand the purpose of synchronous learning, but it adds a strain to families that are trying to balance both parts of life.

What can the board do to ensure CCISD students and families from all socioeconomic and racial backgrounds have equitable access to resources?

Public school is the place for all students to meet and grow together. CCISD believes that “there is a collective moral imperative to invest in each person’s capacity for growth and excellence” and “inclusivity creates unity.” The district strategic plan helps to ensure each student achieves high learning levels.

Davis: The candidate did not respond to this question.

Budgeting to provide resources is the best approach the board can make. Many families do not have access to personal devices or even internet service, and it is helpful what has been provided so far. The free internet at the schools does help but still does not solve issues for kids who can’t easily get there.

CLEAR CREEK ISDBOARDOF TRUSTEES, DISTRICT 3

What is one of the biggest challenges CCISD students are facing in the classroom today?

What can be done so students from all racial and socioeconomic backgrounds have access to resources?

Occupation: director of external relations at Johnson Space Center Relevant experience: trustee since May 2017 ARTURO SANCHEZ

COVID-19 has challenged our thinking and delivery of instruction while pushing us to be flexible and responsive to students’ varied needs. Whether students chose in-school or online instruction, we must provide a learning environment that supports social and emotional development. Helping students acquire and apply the attitudes and skills necessary to explore, understand and manage their emotions is vital to their lifelong success. The biggest challenge CCISD students will face when returning to the classroom is adjusting to new procedures and guidelines that focus on safety. School will look and operate differently for our students than what they are accustomed to. It is imperative CCISD schools maintain high expectations each day for implementing the COVID-19 ... guidelines. As a board member, I would work with other members to evaluate guidelines and make adjustments as needed.

As a board member, I actively help shape the district’s policies and plans to ensure students and families from all racial and socioeconomic backgrounds have equitable access to the resources needed to succeed. I support efforts to expand professional learning on diversity and cultural understanding across the district and will continue to support critical partnerships with community-based organizations who help meet the different needs of students across CCISD. Board members need to operate with the mindset of ensuring success for all students academically and socially. This includes ...[listening] intently to the points of view expressed from students, parents and staff to make decisions that are inclusive of everyone. It is important for CCISD to adopt and maintain a culture of excellence that focuses on families of all racial and socioeconomic backgrounds.

with experience on board committees www.electarturosanchez.com Occupation: assistant principal in Pasadena ISD Relevant experience: seventeen years in public schools www.facebook.com/ jasonclarkforccisdschoolboard JASON CLARK

Answers have been edited for length. Read full Q&A’s at communityimpact.com/vote .

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BAY AREA EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER IS PROUD TO SAY THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSOR

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2020 PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION

C L E A R C R E E K I S D S N A P S H O T DISTRICT DATA

COMPILED BY COLLEEN FERGUSON Clear Creek ISD, the 28th largest district in Texas, is situated in both Harris and Galveston counties. In recent years, the district has maintained a sta of about 5,000 total employees, according to CCISD’s 2018-19 accountability report. SOURCES: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY, CLEAR CREEK ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER STUDENT ENROLLMENT

201920 TEACHER STATS

201920SUPERINTENDENT ANNUAL SALARY

CLEAR CREEK ISD

$325,678

FULLTIME TEACHERS 2,517

AVERAGE SALARY: $62,129

DISTRICT COMPARISON

FORT BEND ISD

DISTRICT COMPARISON

$363,911

201819 CCISD RETENTION RATE 87.4%

FORT BEND ISD RETENTION RATE 82.1%

2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20

PEARLAND ISD

INCREASE FROM 201516: +3.23%

$294,902

DISTRICT STATS FOUNDED IN 1948

201920 ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS 28% 60.24% STATE AVERAGE CLEAR CREEK ISD

202021 BUDGET BREAKDOWN

EMPLOYEES IN 201920 5,200

PROJECTED BUDGET INCREASE FROM 201920 +$9.2M

CAMPUSES 45

HARRIS COUNTY 25

GALVESTON COUNTY 20

FULLTIME POSITIONS ADDED TO THE 202021 BUDGET 51 Nearly 90% of the total budget is for employee stang and benets. More than 60% of the increase will be invested in direct classroom instruction.

201920 ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS 13% CLEAR CREEK ISD

SPENT PER STUDENT IN 201819 $8,243

20.26%

STATE AVERAGE

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BAY AREA EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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