Southwest Austin | Dripping Springs - June 2022

SOUTHWEST AUSTIN DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION 2022

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HEALTH CARE EDITION

VOLUME 15, ISSUE 3  JUNE 23 JULY 20, 2022

Area hospital systems invest billions in expansions to keep pace with Central Texas population boom

In the coming years, hospital systems and health care providers in Central Texas will invest almost $2.5 billion to grow their physical footprint by building new facilities or expanding existing ones. Creating capacity

BY CLAIRE SHOOP

in the nation. Andy Davis, the CEO for Ascension Texas, a major health care system that includes Ascension Seton and Dell Children’s, said based on pro- jections, within 10 years the metro area will have a 1,200-bed deˆcit. “The great thing about Central Texas is the community is growing in every direction, and so it presents a unique opportunity for us to make sure that we’re doing all we can to be present in a way that keeps families close to home and together,” Davis said. Bringing care to the community One hospital system making a major investment in physical infrastructure is

Central Texas is on pace to gain more than 600 hospital beds in the next three years, including two new hospitals in growing suburban areas, two new chil- dren’s hospitals in Northwest Austin, a new behavioral health hospital and expansions at seven existing facilities. Combined, three major health care systems are investing almost $2.5 billion in physical infrastructure to increase access to services and meet the needs of the growing region. Hospital o cials said the additional space is necessary to care for the pop- ulation of a rapidly expanding region, with Williamson and Hays counties ranking as some of the fastest growing

637 NEW HOSPITAL BEDS have been announced or are under construction at 12 hospitals across three health care systems.

Ascension Texas

St. David’s HealthCare

Texas Children’s Hospital 52 BEDS AT

160 BEDS AT

425 BEDS AT

By 2032, Central Texas is projected to need an additional 1,200 HOSPITAL BEDS. 3 FACILITIES 8 FACILITIES 1 FACILITY

SOURCES: ASCENSION TEXAS, ST. DAVID’S HEALTHCARE, TEXAS CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL‰ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

CONTINUED ON 44

DRUG DEATHS

Overdose deaths reach ‘crisis’ level in Travis County

Top 4 causes of accidental deaths Drug toxicity

Drug toxicity was the leading cause of accidental death in Travis County in 2021. SOURCE: TRAVIS COUNTY MEDICAL EXAMINER'S OFFICE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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BY DARCY SPRAGUE

that her organization is using to prevent overdose deaths. The purpose of the town hall was to urge local leaders to dedicate more resources toward combating drug overdoses, which the Travis County medi- cal examiner would state in late

May was the leading cause of accidental death in 2021 for the county. “My question to policymakers is when is enough, enough?” said Nova Skye, outreach coordinator for the THRA, a nonproˆt that CONTINUED ON 46

In early May, Cate Graziani, president of the Texas Harm Reduction Alliance, stood on a stage in front of a veritable who’s who of local government o - cials holding a bag of supplies, some illegal under Texas law,

Falling down

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Motor vehicle fatality

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HEALTH CARE EDITION 2022 SPONSORED BY

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Curious what is selling in your neighborhood? Scan me *All prices shown are list price

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

realtyaustin.com/p/4798289

realtyaustin.com/p/2230032

realtyaustin.com/p/3019006

realtyaustin.com/p/3087103

$595,000

$999,000

$1,300,000

$1,350,000

4 bds

3 ba

2,240 sq ft

3 bds

2 ba

1,780 sq ft

5 bds

4.5 ba 4,197 sq ft

4 bds

3 ba

2,998 sq ft

189 Limestone Trl, Austin, TX 78737 Sari Pearce | 512-516-1972

5404 Emerald Forest Dr, Austin, TX 78745 Kim Fodor | 512-809-3844

194 Margaret Cir, Austin, TX 78737 Betsy Smith | 512-348-5888

11300 Pompey Ct, Austin, TX 78739 Nicole Sislen | 512-632-7875

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

PENDING

PENDING

realtyaustin.com/p/6149925

realtyaustin.com/p/1619949

realtyaustin.com/p/7554240

realtyaustin.com/p/4350435

$1,799,999

$1,800,000

$949,000

$980,000

4 bds

4 ba

3,992 sq ft

4 bds

3 ba

3,125 sq ft

4 bds

2.5 ba 2,910 sq ft

5 bds

4 ba

3,221 sq ft

301 Plum Creek Ln, Dripping Springs, TX 78620 Burt Dement | 512-689-7352

561 Hazy Hills Loop, Dripping Springs, TX 78620 Sasha Vasquez | 512-417-4436

174 Lloyd Ln, Dripping Springs, TX 78620 Colt Clements | 512-808-6438

10411 Dedham Ct, Austin, TX 78739 Heather Greenberg | 512-695-6002

PENDING

PENDING

SOLD OVER ASKING

SOLD

realtyaustin.com/p/6857849

realtyaustin.com/p/2880728

realtyaustin.com/p/3472067

realtyaustin.com/p/7500367

$1,075,000

$1,550,000

$1,100,000

$2,399,000

3 bds

2 ba

2,257 sq ft

4 bds

4 ba

4,295 sq ft

4 bds

3.5 ba 2,855 sq ft

5 bds

5.5 ba 4,479 sq ft

5642 Oak Blvd, Austin, TX 78735 Liz Warren | 303-910-7220

12224 Pratolina Dr, Austin, TX 78739 Sarabeth and Jordan Team | 512-468-5520

11212 Bastogne Loop, Austin, TX 78739 Michelle and Michael Kopp Team | 512-657-3305

6300 Bernia Dr, Austin, TX 78739 Michael Del Castillo | 512-944-5999

As interest rates, inflation, and home prices continue to rise, you might be unsure if now is the right time to buy or sell a home. As the #1 independent brokerage in Central Texas, we are constantly studying how the market is trending to help you make the right decision. Scan the QR code to learn what the cost of waiting could mean for you. Cost of Waiting to Buy or Sell a Home? Cs of i ng

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SOUTHWEST AUSTIN  DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION • JUNE 2022

More Rebates, More Savings » Find instant savings on energy efficient products at local stores » Enjoy rebates averaging $1,800 or low interest financing on home energy upgrades » Get up to $115 in smart thermostat rebates and incentives » Enjoy an $800 rebate on eligible heat pump water heaters » See if you qualify for free home energy improvements » Monitor your energy usage and get savings tips at coautilities.com Learn more ways to save at austinenergy.com/go/summer

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the „rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and P‘ugerville, Texas. Now in 2022, CI is still locally owned. We have expanded to include hundreds of employees, our own software platform and printing facility, and over 40 hyperlocal editions across three states with circulation to more than 2.8 million residential mailboxes.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS MONTH

FROM DEEDA: As our population grows, so does our need for health care. In this month’s front-page story, we take a closer look at the hospital construction and expansion projects across the Austin metro area that are rising up to meet the demand. The story written by Editor Claire Shoop is part of our annual Health Care Edition, a special section within this monthly publication. Inside (see Pages 20-47), you’ll „nd hospital listings, a Senior Living Guide and medical updates on local and nationwide issues including the baby formula shortage, call for blood donors and push for more mental health services. At Community Impact Newspaper , we know health and wellness are a priority for our readers, so we welcome any feedback you may have that we can apply to next year’s coverage. Thank you for reading! Deeda Lovett, GENERAL MANAGER dlovett@communityimpact.com

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

WHAT WE COVER

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MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Deeda Lovett EDITOR Darcy Sprague REPORTERS Glorie Martinez, Ben Thompson GRAPHIC DESIGNER Don Grabowski ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Weston Warner METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Travis Baker MANAGING EDITOR Amy Denney COPY EDITOR Andy Comer SENIOR ART PRODUCTION MANAGER Haley Grace CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PRESIDENT & GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES & MARKETING Tess Coverman CONTACT US 16225 Impact Way, Ste. 1, P‡ugerville, TX 78660 • 512Ž989Ž6808 PRESS RELEASES swanews@communityimpact.com ADVERTISING swaads@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions

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TAKE YOUR LEGS OUT OF HIDING 512-614-1025

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SOUTHWEST AUSTIN Ž DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION • JUNE 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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The Copper Closet

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COURTESY THE COPPER CLOSET¦ BARTON CREEK SQUARE

event will be held in the summer. www.starbasebrewery.com 5 Food truck Cali Tacos Please opened in March 2022. The menu features authentic, California-style street tacos. Specialties include chicken and beef tacos made with grilled whole cut meat chopped into taco meat. Hours are Wednesday-Saturday, 3:30- 9:30 p.m. 5312 Menchaca Rd., Austin. www.instagram.com/cali_tacosplease COMING SOON 6 AGE of Central Texas , a nonprot organization that supports older adults and their caregivers, broke ground on a new facility in South Austin on June 7. The location will provide programming and support, including a nonresidential day health center for older adults living with memory loss or dementia. It will house all six of AGE’s programs, serving up to 75 people daily. The facility is expected to be complete by summer 2023 at 9400 Alice Mae Lane, Austin. www.ageofcentraltx.org 7 Pilates studio Club Pilates will open a new location at 4220 W. William Cannon Drive, Unit 110, Austin. The tness center will feature 12 Pilates reformers, spring- boards, ballet bars, TRX straps, a retail space and a private training area. A soft opening is planned for the last weekend in June. The William Cannon studio will be the chain’s ninth Austin-area location. www.clubpilates.com 8 Aordable cosmetics and jewelry shop Miss A will open inside Barton Creek Square in August. The retailer is known for its selection of makeup products $1 and under. All products are cruelty-free

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SOUTH AUSTIN NOW OPEN 1 The rst H-E-B Wellness Primary Care Clinic in Austin opened at the grocery chain’s South Congress and Slaughter store May 12. The clinic oers full-service primary care for ages 12 and up as well as physical therapy, nutrition coaching, clini- cal pharmacists and more. Cash, credit and exible spending accounts are accepted. Insurance is not required. It is located at 8601 S. Congress Ave., Ste. 110, Austin. 855-803-9355. www.hebprimarycare.com

2 Vi Collina Apartments , a 170-unit multifamily aordable housing complex, opened in Southeast Austin on May 12. The complex oers 1- to 3- bedrooms. All units are aordable to households earning between 30% and 80% of the median family income for the Austin area. It is located at 2401 E. Oltorf St., Austin. 512-448-8835. www.vicollina.com 3 Aordable women’s clothing bou- tique The Copper Closet opened a new location at Barton Creek Square on May 7. All items in the store are $45 or less. The store is located in the mall’s upper level

Dillard’s wing, next to Buckle, at 2901 S. Capital of Texas Hwy., Austin. 737-295- 1638. www.thecoppercloset.com 4 New space travel-themed brewery Starbase Brewing at 4700 Burleson Road, Ste. F, Austin held a soft open- ing Memorial Day weekend. The craft microbrewery produces a range of beer styles, from IPAs to lagers. The company is helmed by engineers, and all its beers are inspired by recent advancements in rocketry. One percent of all of Starbase Brewing’s prots are donated to fund sci- ence education in Texas. A grand opening

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY GLORIE MARTINEZ

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Cali Tacos Please

Studio Barre

COURTESY CALI TACOS PLEASE

COURTESY STUDIO BARRE

and made with Food and Drug Adminis- tration-approved ingredients. Miss A will be located on the mall’s upper level near Lovisa and Auntie Anne’s Pretzels at 2901 S. Capital of Texas Hwy., Austin. www.shopmissa.com 9 Applied behavior analysis (ABA) clinic Action Behavior Centers will open a new location by July 2022. The clinic will pro- vide individualized treatment programs and lessons to children with autism ages 18 months through 14 years old. Most insurance types are accepted. 5700 S Mo- pac Expy. SB Bldg. D, Unit 400, Austin. www.actionbehavior.com RELOCATIONS 10 International fusion food truck Smokin Bahn Mi moved from its former location on Burnet Road to Meanwhile Brewing in South Austin on March 21. The veteran-owned trailer oers a variety of avor and protein combinations for its Vietnamese sandwiches, including smoked brisket bahn mi, Peruvian chicken bahn mi and vegetarian bahn mi. 3901 Promontory Point Dr., Austin. www.smokinbanhmi.com EXPANSIONS 11 INIC Preschool will expand at its William Cannon location by taking over and renovating a former neighboring laundry business. The space will include four new classrooms. INIC is a Span- ish-immersion preschool that serves children from 3 months to 5 years old. The school is enrolling for all age groups at 2100 W. William Cannon Drive, Austin. 512-435-7868. www.inic-edu.com

The South Austin Church started in Army barracks before moving to its current location.

COURTESY SOUTH AUSTIN CHURCH

FEATURED IMPACT ANNIVERSARIES South Austin Church will celebrate its 75- year anniversary in July. The church was originally located in a barracks building near Becker Elementary School in Central Austin before relocating to its current home on Menchaca Road. An anniversary celebration featuring food and games will be held July 23 followed by a special church service July 24 at 6711 Menchaca Road, Austin. 512-442-8476. pet supply store oers natural food and supplies for dogs, cats and other animals. Free delivery is available in the Austin area from 4301 W. William Cannon Drive, Austin. 512-892-8848. www.healthypetaustin.com IN THE NEWS Argo AI , an autonomous vehicle technol- ogy company, launched driverless vehicle testing in Austin on May 17. The company’s driverless vehicles will operate on public roads during daytime hours amid heavy tra¬c. No human safety drivers will accom- pany the vehicles. Driverless service is not yet available to customers, but Argo AI employees can hail rides via a company test app. The company is running rideshare— with safety drivers still present—and gro- cery delivery pilot programs with Lyft and Walmart in the Austin area. www.argo.ai

https://southaustinchurch.churchcenter. com/home

Argo AI

COURTESY ARGO AI

W. WILLIAM CANNON DR.

ANNIVERSARIES 12 Jump Gymnastics marked 15 years in the Austin area June 15. Jump oers gymnastics classes for children ages 1-10. Since its inception in 2007, the company’s curriculum has expanded to include summer camps, parent’s nights out and a full-time preschool. Jump serves about 750 students per month at its two Austin locations, including Jump South Austin at 6800 West Gate Blvd., Ste. 111, Austin. 512-593-6226. www.jumpgymnastics.com 13 Studio Barre will celebrate ve years in Austin on July 1. The boutique tness studio oers specialized classes focused on building core strength, improving posture and developing lean muscles. It is located at 4970 W. Hwy. 290, Ste. 410, Austin. 512-709-8839. https://austin.studiobarre.com 14 Healthy Pet marked 10 years at its Arbor Trails location June 11. The

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NEW OWNERSHIP 15 Investment company TruAmerica MultiFamily acquired Cannon Oaks, a 230-unit apartment complex in South Austin. Cannon Oaks apartments at 2302 E. William Cannon Drive, Austin feature between two to four bedrooms and average 1,000 square feet. TruA- merica plans to renovate Cannon Oaks’ interior units. www.truamerica.com CLOSINGS 16 The owners of pizza trailer Dough Boys at 3901 Promontory Point Drive, Austin, announced the restaurant’s last day of operation was May 29. Dough Boys specialized in wood-red Neapolitan piz- zas and was located at Meanwhile Brew- ing Co. in South Austin since July 2021. www.instagram.com/doughboysatx

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SOUTHWEST AUSTIN  DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION • JUNE 2022

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

We have a new test where we are comparing the performance of these two technologies side by side.” -EH Does HESOLAR install batteries? “Yes, HESOLAR is a certi–ed installer of the Tesla Powerwall. With the Tesla Powerwall, a solar pv system can continue to operate in the event of a power outage. e Powerwalls can be added now or retro–tted to a system in the future without replacing existing equipment. is year we added Tesla Powerwalls to the test array and will continue to make suggestions based on our –ndings.” -DH What makes HESOLAR di erent from their competitors? “We have many answers to that question. e most common feedback we get is that our customers value working directly with Derrick and I from start to –nish. Customers also have our direct contact a˜er installation. On the sales side, we don’t knock on doors and we don’t push the sell, we just educate. Behind the scenes is where we really di‚erentiate ourselves. Derrick and I have been Master Electricians for over 10 years, and we’re NABCEP Certi- –ed Solar Installation Professionals. We lead our team through the design, installation, and warranty of your system. We don’t subcontract our labor and we use the highest quality materials available. Below is a table we use to display the di‚erences between HESOLAR and our competitors.” -EH

Every design. Every installation. By The Ho man Brothers.

Q & A with the Homan Brothers

What exactly does HESOLAR Do? “e service we provide is a specialized form of electrical contracting. Derrick and I are second generation Master Electricians that grew up in the electrical industry. We’ve spent the last 10 years building on our skill-sets as Master Electricians specializing in solar power, energy storage, and electric vehicle charging. ” -Eric Homan Why are customers adding solar? “Saving money, back-up power capabilities, lowering their carbon footprint, energy independence... Ultimately, solar power allows customers to invest in their own energy needs. e cost of solar installation will be o‚set by savings gained on their electric bills. Additionally, the current Federal Tax Credit of 26% has motivated a lot of our customers to act now before the credit goes away.” - Derrick Homan How does the Tax Credit work? “e credit is factored on the entire system cost. It is currently at 26% and will ramp down to 22% next year. Homeowners should consult with a Tax Professional regarding applicability.” -DH Are all solar panels the same? “Not at all. Solar panels come in di‚erent colors, sizes, and quality. at’s why we created the HESOLAR Test Array. We are actively monitoring the top solar panels in the solar industry and specify our material based on the results. We are also testing leading inverter technologies.” -DH

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Any advice for homeowners ready to go solar? “Be careful with sales companies knocking on doors and advertising bogus claims on social media like Facebook. eir goal is to get in your house and convince you to make a rush decision. Our advice is to politely close the door. Don’t rush this purchase, take your time and do your research. Cra˜smen don’t –nd you, you –nd us.” -EH

The HESOLAR Test Array video is available at hesolarllc.com

What are inverters? “e inverter converts the solar panel’s DC voltage to an AC voltage. Solar consumers will have a choice between Microinverters and DC-Optimized String Inverters. Microinverters convert the DC to AC under the solar panel. A DC-Optimized string inverter manipulates the DC voltage under the solar panel and then sends it to an inverter near the electrical service.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon

COMPILED BY GLORIE MARTINEZ

3 Sport Clips opened in Belterra Vil- lage shopping center June 7. The salon specializes in haircuts for men and boys, and it o‘ers trims, cuts and styling at 12680 Hwy. 290, Austin. 512-337-8974. www.haircutmenaustinbelterratx.com 4 Summer Revival Wine Co. opened May 27. The winery and tasting room o‘ers minimal intervention wines. Menu options include tasting •ights and wine by the glass, along with cheeses, pas- tries and shareable bites at 665 W. Hwy. 290, Dripping Springs. 512-829-5060. www.summerrevivalwineco.com 5 Nonpro t organization Foster Village celebrated the opening of its new Support HUB—Heal, Unite & Belong—building May 27. The space will connect children and families with free ongoing support services and enrichment opportunities. Trau- ma-informed parent coaching and family visitations will also be held inside at 15400 Fitzhugh Road, Dripping Springs. 512-599- 4144. www.fostervillageaustin.org ANNIVERSARIES 6 First Baptist Church of Dripping Springs celebrated its 150th anniversary on June 5. The church was built in 1872. It was destroyed by arson in 2007 and was reopened in 2010. The anniversary was marked with an open house, worship service and barbecue lunch at 203 W. Hwy. 290, Dripping Springs. The church

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COURTESY SUMMER REVIVAL WINE CO.

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DRIPPING SPRINGS NOW OPEN 1 Behavioral health clinic Training Wheels ABA opened in April. The busi- ness said it is the rst Applied Behav- ioral Analysis clinic in Dripping Springs. Training Wheels provides one-on-one therapy to children with autism between the ages of 18 months and 10 years old at 151 E. Mercer St., Ste. A, Dripping Springs. 512-820-3825. www.training- wheelsaba.com 150

2 Patriots’ Hall of Dripping Springs , a 10-acre retreat and resource center for veterans, marked the opening of its rst building with a ribbon-cutting ceremony May 21. The new building is the Meeting House for local chapters of Veterans of Foreign Wars and The American Legion. The nal vision for the PHDS retreat center includes a Wellness Center to assist veterans with Veterans Association claims, an obstacle course, a shing pond and a healing garden. Completion is ex- pected in 2023 at 231 Patriots’ Hall Blvd., Dripping Springs. www.patriotshall.org 162 1826

Foster Village

COURTESY FOSTER VILLAGE

o‘ers bible study for children and adults at 9:30 a.m. on Sundays and a worship service at 11 a.m. 512-858-4270. www.žcds.com

3D MAMMOGRAPHY IN 30 MINUTES At ARA, we believe that taking care of your health should be convenient, quick, and absolutely accurate. That’s why we offer 3D mammography in 13 of our locations. We’ll get you in and out in a flash. Then, one of our more than 115 expert radiologists will evaluate the images and issue a detailed report so you can get a clear picture of your health. What are you waiting for?

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SOUTHWEST AUSTIN  DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION • JUNE 2022

The City of Austin is in STAGE 1 Drought Response Water Restrictions

The combined storage level of water in Lakes Travis and Buchanan has dropped below 1.4 million acre-feet. Austin residents can protect the lakes, the environment, and our future water supply by following Stage 1 Watering Schedule Restrictions . For more information, visit austinwater.org .

austinwater.org

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TODO LIST

June & July events

COMPILED BY GLORIE MARTINEZ

JUNE 26

SEE A CONCERT IN NATURE JESTER KING BREWERY

JULY 01

UNWIND WITH MOTORCYCLES INDIAN MOTORCYCLE

JULY 03

HELP BUNNIES IN NEED THE AUSTIN WINERY

Strings in the Woods combines nature and music for a concert series that turns green spaces into live music venues. The event will begin with a guided nature walk accompanied by solo violin, followed by an hourlong sunset concert a featuring singer- songwriter duo Sasha K.A and Everett Wren. The June 26 event will be held at Jester King Brewery and will run from 7:30-9:30 p.m. $30-$40 per ticket. 13127 Fitzhugh Road, Austin. www.stringsinthewoods.com/ events (Courtesy Strings In The Woods)

Indian Motorcycle will host a free, all levels Wild and Free yoga ”ow led by Collette Ouseley-Moynan to begin the 4th of July weekend. The class will be accompanied by a live set from DJ Cassandra. Refreshments from local sponsors will be available. The event will run from 6-7:30 p.m. Admission is free. Space is limited. Reservations can be made online. 2401 S. I-35, Austin. www.linktr.ee/ colletteouseleymoynan (Courtesy Collette Ouseley-Moynan)

The Austin Winery will partner with The House Rabbit Network to host an event bene ting house rabbits across Central Texas. The Reds, Whites, and Bunnies event will o„er custom wine glasses, wine, light food and beverages, with a portion of the proceeds going to the House Rabbit Resource Network. 6-8 p.m. Attendance is free, and a $20 online donation guarantees a custom wine glass. 440 E. St. Elmo Road, Austin. www.hrrn.ticketbud.com/reds-whites- and-bunnies (Courtesy Kyle Golden)

JUNE 26 TAKE IN A CAR SHOW Cars and Coee Austin, one of the country’s biggest car meetups, is returning June 26 to the Circuit of The Americas. The family-friendly event will feature a range of automobiles. The meetup will be held on the last Sunday of June, July and August from 8 a.m.-noon. Free. Displaying a car in the show costs $10. 9201 Circuit of The Americas Blvd., Austin. 512-301-6600. www.circuitoftheamericas.com/events 30 SEE A CABARET SHOW The longest continuously running burlesque show in Texas will celebrate its 16th anniversary with a show at The Ballroom at Spiderhouse. The Jigglewatts Burlesque Revue features live music, comedy, drag acts and burlesque performances in a cabaret setting. 7 p.m. (doors), 8 p.m. (show). $20-$140. 2906 Fruth St., Austin. www.thejigglewattsburlesque.com

JULY 01 READ, EXPLORE AND CREATE Austin Public Library will hold its summer reading challenge, “Completely Booked,” through Aug. 15. Readers of all ages are invited to keep track of their summer reading via the Beanstack app. After completing the challenges and activities, readers can claim a prize. Free. www.library.austintexas.gov/summer 01 ENJOY A COMEDY PARTY Independence Brewing Co. will kick o July 4th weekend with a party and comedy showcase featuring all local performers. Comedian Casey Rocket will headline the event. 6 p.m. (doors), 7-10 p.m. (show). $10. 3913 Todd Lane, Ste. 607, Austin. www.independencebrewing.com 04 CELEBRATE INDEPENDENCE DAY Join sponsor H-E-B and the Austin Symphony Orchestra for the largest Independence Day celebration in Texas. The family-friendly event will be held at Vic Mathias Shores and feature a

Admission is free. RSVPs can be made online. 3901 Promontory Point Drive, Austin. 512-308-3659. www.meanwhilebeer.com 23 HONOR A TEXAS ICON Lady Bird Johnson Wild¨ower Center will celebrate its namesake July 23 with free all-day admission. Guests are welcomed to explore the center’s exhibits and commemorate Johnson’s environmental legacy. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. 4801 La Crosse Ave., Austin. 512-232- 0100. www.wild¨ower.org 23 THROUGH 31 SEE BANKSY'S ART Banksyland, an international touring exhibition featuring 80 pieces and installations from artist Banksy, is coming to Austin. The collection will feature studio works, street artworks and immersive installations. The exhibit is organized by One Thousand Ways, an international arts company specializing in experimental art immersive events. Times vary. $29. The location will be revealed to ticket holders. www.banksyland.com

Ÿreworks display and live music. 8:30-10 p.m. Free. 900 W. Riverside Drive, Austin. www.austinsymphony.org 04 PARTY WITH WILLIE NELSON Willie Nelson & Family will headline a concert at Q2 stadium during the annual 4th of July picnic and Ÿreworks show. Food and drinks will be available. 11 a.m. (doors). $55 and up. 10414 McKalla Place, Austin. www.q2stadium.com 08 THROUGH AUG. 13 SEE A SUMMER MUSICAL Zilker Hillside Theatre’s summer musical “Newsies” will run from July 8 through Aug. 13. The show is based on the real newsboy strike of 1899. 8:15 p.m. (Thu.- Sat.). Free. 2206 William Barton Drive, Austin. www.zilker.org 10 GET YOUR SWEAT ON Meanwhile Brewing is partnering with Lumos Fitness to oer a donation- based outdoor exercise class suitable for all ages and abilities. HIIT in the Park combines strength training, bodyweight movements and endurance skills.

Find more or submit Southwest Austin and Dripping Springs events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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SOUTHWEST AUSTIN DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION • JUNE 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION UPDATES

New interim transportation director named

71

BY KAITLYN WILKES

On June 5, Public Works Department Director Richard Mendoza took over as the interim Austin Transportation Department Director. Former director Rob Spillar is moving to the private sector. Mendoza has 27 years of experi- ence in public service in Austin and other large metropolitan areas. “I’ve had the pleasure of working closely with former director Spillar since my arrival

Richard Mendoza (left) took over as interim director of the Austin Transportation Department.

35

COURTESY AUSTIN TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT

in Austin in January 2017 as the public works director,” Mendoza said. “Many of the activities of both departments, we share the same space within the public right of way.” Deputy Director of Public Works James Snow will act as Public Works director.

Crews are nishing work on the Circle Dr. and Southview Rd. intersection.

45

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DEEDA LOVETTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

South I35 project funding approved

ONGOING PROJECTS

BY GLORE MARTINEZ

The Texas Transportation Commission approved a nearly $548 million contract to build the I-35 Capital Express South project, according to a May 31 news release. Two high-occupancy vehicle lanes will be constructed in each direction along I-35 from Hwy. 71/Ben White Boulevard to SH 45 SE. The project will also add intersection bypass lanes and improve pedestrian and bicycle paths. Fluor Corp. was awarded the contract. The commission also approved a sep- arate $3.5 million contract to extend the pedestrian barrier along the lanes to deter pedestrians from crossing the interstate in areas without crosswalks. The completed barrier will run 25 miles along I-35 from SH 45 SE to Greenlawn Boulevard in Round Rock. The I-35 Capital Express Central project is in the technical studies phase. Construction on the I-35 Capital Express North project is expected to begin later in 2022.

290

Capital Metro to use American Rescue Plan Act funds for stang shortages

N

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JUNE 14. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SWANEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. in July. The current intersection of Circle/South View with Hwy. 290 will be closed and relocated to allow work to begin on the bridge over 290 at that location. Timeline: fall 2021-26 Cost: $7.1 billion Funding source: TxDOT Oak Hill Parkway Texas Department of Transportation crews are wrapping up work on the frontage roads of Hwy. 290 between Thunderbird Road and Southview Road/Circle Drive ahead of a tempo- rary intersection that will be installed

BY CHLOE YOUNG

its grant to hire and retain more sta™ with career development services and training. Frontline workers such as operators, supervisors, mechanics and dispatchers, will undergo a training program with the goal of providing employees better support and furthering long- term employment. The grant comes through the FTA’s Route Planning Restoration Program, which allocates $25 million in ARPA dollars to help transit agencies recover from the coronavirus pandemic.

Capital Metro was awarded $780,100 in American Rescue Plan Act funds, the U.S. Depart- ment of Transportation and Federal Transit Administration announced June 3. “This is great news for the hardworking frontline sta™ at Cap[ital] Metro, and it will truly make a di™erence,” interim Capital Metro CEO Dottie Watkins said in a press release. As Capital Metro has strug- gled with stažng shortages amidst the pandemic, the Austin transit agency will use

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Dripping Springs & Austin ISDs

COMPILED BY GLORIE MARTINEZ

QUOTE OF NOTE

Austin ISD names interim superintendent AUSTIN ISD The district named Anthony Mays, AISD chief o cer of schools, as the interim superinten- dent June 14. “I got to Austin with very little college knowledge, and now I sit before you as the Mays said at the June 14 meeting. The decision followed a public comment period and a closed session discussion from the board that started June 13. Stephanie Elizalde resigned from the position in May. The search for a full-time replacement is expected to last until summer 2023. Anthony Mays interim super- intendent—the rst Black male in Austin ISD—and I’m thankful,”

Austin rep. announces $5.5 million for school COVID19 safety measures

“SCHOOL DISTRICTS ALONE CAN’T CURE THE GUN VIOLENCE

PROBLEM, AND IT’S AN UNFAIR EXPECTATION.”

Dripping Springs ISD increases pay DRIPPING SPRINGS ISD General pay increases are 7% for teaching sta› and auxiliary hourly sta›, and 4% for administrative and professional sta›. Full and part-time Dripping Springs ISD employees who return for the 2022-23 school year will also receive a $1,000 retention incentive payment in September. The board also approved raising the district’s minimum wage from $12 to $15 per hour. AUSTIN ISD The district will receive $5.5 million in federal funding to reimburse its spending on COVID-19 safety measures, according to a June 7 news release from U.S. Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D—Austin. AISD spent millions over the past two years to keep its commu- nity safe by purchasing personal protective equipment, sanitation supplies, social distancing The changes were made in response to increased cost of living in Dripping Springs and a desire to ensure employees can continue to live and work in the district, according to a DSISD news release. The 7% raise and retention bonus will amount to nearly

measures, and screening and testing sites for students and sta›, according to the release. “We are thankful to Congress- man Doggett for advocating for this federal reimbursement,” AISD board of trustees President Geron- imo Rodriguez said in a district media advisory. “These resources have been essential to keeping our students and community safe during the pandemic.”

HIGHLIGHTS AUSTIN ISD A group of 31 students from Akins and Travis early college high schools graduated from Austin ISD with the district’s Dual Language Seal of Biliteracy on June 1. The students are the rst cohort to complete 12 years of AISD’s dual-language program, beginning in kindergarten and continuing throughout elementary, middle and high school. AUSTIN ISD Former Austin ISD Police Chief Ashley Gonzalez departed the district after four years of service May 24. Gonzalez will go on to lead a police agency in Massachusetts. GERONIMO RODRIGUEZ, AUSTIN ISD BOARD PRESIDENT, SAID AT A JUNE 8 TOWN HALL ON GUN VIOLENCE FOLLOWING THE UVALDE SHOOTING. GERONIMO PROMISED AISD WOULD CONTINUE TO IMPROVE SAFETY ON CAMPUSES AND ADDRESS UNDERLYING ISSUES, BUT HE URGED LEADERS TO ACT ON THE ISSUE. Austin ISD Will not meet in July due to summer break 4000 S. I-35, Austin www.austinisd.org Dripping Springs ISD Will not meet in July due to summer break 510 W. Mercer St., Dripping Springs www.dsisdtx.us MEETINGS WE COVER

PRIORITIZING PAY

Dripping Springs ISD will increase pay and provide one- time incentives for employees. 7% pay increase for teaching sta 4% pay increase for administrative and professional sta $15 minimum wage for district employees, up from $12 $1,000 retention bonus for returning employees

SEARCH PROCESS Austin ISD's superintendent search is expected to take a year.

Summer 2023 June 30, 2022 May 27, 2022 Feb. 19, 2020 Aug. 11, 2020

Superintendent Paul Cruz resigns Elizalde named new superintendent

SOURCE: DRIPPING SPRINGS ISD‘COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER $5,000 for teachers. Raises for non-teaching sta› will depend on pay grade midpoints. Employee pay raises will be re¡ected on the rst paycheck of the 2022-23 school year.

Elizalde resigns

Elizalde’s last day Goal start time for new superintendent

SOURCE: AUSTIN ISD‘COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

15

SOUTHWEST AUSTIN DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION • JUNE 2022

News from the Austin metro NEWS BRIEFS Area nonprot to add eight aordable housing complexes

AFFORDABLE HOUSING Nonprot Foundation Communities will build new housing in Austin.

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LAKELINE MALL DR.

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BY KAITLYN WILKES

N. CAPITAL OF TEXAS HWY.

aordable communities, we received 10 times more applications than the number of units, and our waiting lists are longer than ever,” Foundation Communities Executive Director Walter Moreau said in a press release. He added the foundation was anxious to build up its capacity to help more individuals. Foundation Communities has 23 complexes housing over 7,000 people. The new complexes will provide 1,000 new homes for over 2,000 families and single adults. The new communities will oer on-site case management, healthcare and other services.

45 TOLL

Balcones Terrace Apartments Burleson Village Apartments Juniper Creek Apartments The Loretta Norman Crossing

Local nonprot Foundation Communities is asking for the public’s help to raise $30 million to fund its latest eort to build eight aordable housing communities over the next three years for low-income Austinites. On May 25 the organization said it has received about 90% of the total $272 million needed for the new communities. Funding comes from the city, the county, local foundations, and private and corporate partners, making this initiative one of the largest aordable housing expansions in Austin’s history. “When we opened our last two

1

183

2

MOPAC

SAMUEL HUSTON AVE.

3

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360

TANNEHILL LN.

4

7

5

5

PARKER LN.

Apartments Parker lane Apartments Zilker Studios

6

6

E. OLTORF ST.

2

7

BURLESON RD.

SOURCE: FOUNDATION COMMUNITIESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

N

Hays County selects rm to head the new public defender’s oce

Workforce Solutions pushes hiring local

applicants to receive job training. Mayor Steve Adler said Austin residents who receive the training will likely increase their yearly income by $30,000. SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION Austin and Travis County are funding 1,000 scholarships for workforce training as part of Workforce Solutions’ Hire Local plan. Individuals who are: • unemployed • work part-time • classi ed as low-income or have a high school diploma. • live in Austin-Travis County and authorized to work in the U.S. can apply at www.wfscapitalarea.com.

BY DARCY SPRAGUE

BY ZARA FLORES

them in the criminal legal system. The push to create a public defender’s oŽce happened amid court backlogs and jail overcrowding that are costing the county thousands of dollars per day. County Judge Ruben Bec- erra noted he does not think the public defender’s oŽce will solve all of the county’s problems, but the burden is on the commissioners to do everything they can to address the issues as best as possible.

Nine months after the the Hays County Commissioners Court voted to allocate $5 million of American Rescue Plan Act funds to establish a public defender’s oŽce, the court selected Neighborhood Defender Service Inc. as the rm to create the oŽce May 24. NDS has teams in New York, Michigan and Texas composed of investigators, paralegals, pro bono attorneys and more who work to address underlying issues with clients that landed

Workforce Solutions Capital Area announced a plan to bring higher-paying jobs to Austin residents while helping local companies close the “skills gap,” or the need for more highly qualied employees, in the area on May 31. The Hire Local Plan will encourage Aus- tin-area employers to ll their employ- ment pool from residents with the help of WFS, which will provide training and certication programs to local workers through support from Travis County and the city of Austin. Austin and Travis County are funding 1,000 scholarships for qualied local

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Gov. Abbott calls special legislative committees regarding school safety

ERCOT SUMMER GRID FORECASTS, 2017 22

The Electric Reliability Council of Texas releases seasonal forecasts for the state’s power grid. Figures shown cover projections only and do not re‹ect actual seasonal use, which varies and has not exceeded projections in past summer.

Generation capacity forecast

Peak demand forecast

90,000 MW 80,000 MW 70,000 MW 60,000 MW // 50,000 MW 0 MW

BY HANNAH NORTON

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott on June 1 called for a review of safety measures in Texas public schools in order to maximize the safety of students in the wake of the May 24 shooting in Uvalde, but the Texas State Teachers Associa- tion wants to see more action and legislation. “We don’t need more committees on school safety,” TSTA President Ovidia Molina said in a news release. Molina said that school safety was studied after shoot- ings in Santa Fe in 2018 and El Paso in 2019. But “schools obviously aren’t safe from mass shooters,” she said. The TSTA wants lawmakers to enact laws that “keep guns out of the hands of people who shouldn’t have them,” the release said. Abbott sent a letter June 1 to Kathy Martinez-Prather, director of the Texas School Safety Center, asking that she ensure school districts meet over the summer to discuss safety measures and train sta. School districts are required by Texas law to create school safety and security committees, according to the letter. The letter states the committees are required to meet three times per year, typically with one meeting in the summer. Before the beginning of the 2022-23 school year, the governor’s oŽce requires that all public school districts meet and address safety needs; train sta and substitute teachers on safety procedures; schedule schoolwide safety drills; and assess all building access procedures, such as single access points and locked classroom doors. All districts are required to complete these safety tasks by Sept. 1 and report their ndings by Sept. 9. The organization will then provide the governor and the Texas Legislature with a statewide safety report by Oct. 1. Abbott said in the letter that he will work with the TxSSC, the Texas Education Agency and the Legislature to “hold accountable any districts that do not meet these requirements.” Austin and Travis County leaders have called on Abbott to convene a special legislative session on gun violence.

ERCOT’s previous all-time summer demand record was set in August 2019, when Texas needed 74,820 MW of power across the grid. That record was broken June 16 with a demand of 75,124 MW.

Summer

SOURCE: ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL OF TEXAS—COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Regulators condent in power grid for summer

BY BEN THOMPSON

summer heat. The report states peak demand this summer could reach 77,317 megawatts—more than 3% above the previous record set in 2019. To meet that demand, the grid oper- ator said as much as 91,392 MW of resource capacity will be available across power sup- pliers, including natural gas, coal, solar, wind and nuclear facilities. According to ERCOT oŽcials, 1 MW of electricity can power 200 homes on a hot day. The Texas grid’s widespread, costly and deadly failure during Winter Storm Uri last year put the isolated system under intense scrutiny and spurred the passage of several pieces of state legislation aimed at over- hauling the network. That broad process is still underway and, so far, is proving to be successful, according to Lake.

Regulators said May 17 the Texas electric grid is reliable and ready to support the growing state through what could be one of its hottest summers on record. The update from the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, the state grid manager, and the Public Utility Commission of Texas, its regulator, followed a statewide request to conserve power May 13 after several genera- tion facilities went o¡ine from ERCOT. PUC Chair Peter Lake said the warning represented ERCOT being “proactive,” rather than letting residents know too late that power issues could be at play. ERCOT’s seasonal summer projections for power demand and capacity throughout Texas forecast electricity usage and supply could both reach record heights in the

17

SOUTHWEST AUSTIN  DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION • JUNE 2022

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