Plano North - January 2021

2021 PLANONORTH EDITION

ONLII NE AT

A N N U A L C O M M U N I T Y G U I D E

VOLUME 7, ISSUE 4  JAN. 21FEB. 16, 2021

ANNUAL COMMUNITY GUIDE 2021

NEWS STORY TO WATCH IN 2021 Eatery owners adjust

COMMUNITY INFO

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BY LIESBETH POWERS

Maple Bacon chef and owner Debra Delaurier said keeping her west Plano restaurant open these days requires printing single-usemenus, buying extra disinfectants and supplying employees with gloves, which have tripled in cost. She also spent $8,000 on partitions for the restaurant’s dining booths. Since opening in December 2019, Maple Bacon saw an estimated loss of $100,000 in its rst year of business, Delaurier said. According to the Texas Restaurant Association, the industry has been “decimated by the COVID-19 pan- demic,” withmore than 10,000 closures statewide as of December. Restaurants that survived the crisis have made many adjustments along the way. Some have been temporary, while other changes have been made for the long haul. And while the future of the industry remains uncertain, restaurant own- ers have said they hope dispersal of vaccines will help alleviate capacity restrictions and restore condence in diners who have for months opted to stay home. “We pray for those vaccinations,” Delaurier said. “That’s the only thing CONTINUED ON 18

DINING LISTINGS SHOPPING LISTINGS

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TRANSPORTATION

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EDUCATION

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Server Kristen Pierce takes food orders from diners Ken and Mary Jo Johnston in the early afternoon at Maple Bacon. (Liesbeth Powers/Community Impact Newspaper) FILLING VACANCIES New certicates of occupancy for restaurants rose steadily in Plano between 2017 and 2019 before dropping slightly in 2020.

DEVELOPMENT

BUSINESS FEATURE

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Certicates of occupancy

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2017 2018 2019 2020

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87

DINING FEATURE

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SOURCE: CITY OF PLANOCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more

FROMLEANNE: Our Annual Community Guide brings you stories of positive growth and plans for the future. We chose to not look back—too much, anyway—but we do want to celebrate those businesses that opened in 2020 with our Dining and Shopping Listings (see Page 8). We’ve included updates on upcoming local elections, development projects, school and city news and more. We’re thankful to our business partners for their sponsorship of this hyperlocal content. Enjoy, and welcome to 2021! Leanne Libby, GENERALMANAGER

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Leanne Libby,

ANNUAL COMMUNITY GUIDE

llibby@communityimpact.com EDITOR Olivia Lueckemeyer SENIOR REPORTER William C. Wadsack REPORTER Liesbeth Powers GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chase Autin ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Rebecca Anderson, Stephanie Burnett MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across ve metropolitan areas providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

COMMUNITY INFORMATION

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Getting to know Plano DINING LISTINGS SHOPPING LISTINGS

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FROMOLIVIA: In this issue, we highlight the top stories we think will shape 2021, including what is to come on several major redevelopment projects (see Page 16) and planning for a municipal bond that could exceed $400 million (see Page 17). Our front cover story takes a look at how the pandemic has changed Plano’s restaurant industry, both temporarily and in the long term. Olivia Lueckemeyer, EDITOR

TRANSPORTATION Stories to follow in 2021

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THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Local sources 20

New businesses 11

Transportation projects 8

Redevelopments of former malls 2

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BUSINESS FEATURE Closet Revival DINING FEATURE Bella Italia Ristorante REAL ESTATE Residential market data IMPACT DEALS

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stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON CONTACT US 7460 Warren Parkway, Ste. 160, Frisco, TX 75034 • 2146189001 PRESS RELEASES plnnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2021 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

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PLANO NORTH EDITION • JANUARY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

Dash. 214-383-9299. www.facebook. com/sams-liquor-warehouse 7 A new Smoothie King location opened Dec. 17 along the edge of Plano at 3220 E. Hebron Parkway, Ste. 106, Plano, across from Preston- wood Baptist Church. The smoothie franchise offers lifestyle-focused, nutrient-based smoothies and has 70 smoothie options on the menu, accord- ing to a company release. Smoothie ingredients include mangoes, blueber- ries, kale and spinach. 469-892-5980. https://locations.smoothieking.com 8 Top Fitness Store opened its first Pla- no location Dec. 13 at 2101 Preston Road, Plano. The sporting goods store sells exercise equipment for at-home fitness, including treadmills, elliptical machines, lateral trainers, rowing machines and other accessories, from various brands, such as Precor, Octane Fitness and Stages Cycling. Top Fitness has stores across the U.S. and entered the Dallas-Fort Worth market with its Southlake store. 469-969-0204. www.topfitness.com COMING SOON 9 Aspen Dental is scheduled to open Jan. 28 at 901 W. 15th St., Plano. The business offers a variety of dental ser- vices, including routine care, checkups, periodontal disease treatment, tooth extraction, fillings, root canals and dental crowns. It also offers cosmetic dentistry services and dentures. 800-277-3633. www.aspendental.com 10 Raising Cane’s is set to open another Plano location in April at 6060 Coit Road, Plano. The Louisiana-based eatery is known for its chicken ten- ders, crinkle-cut fries, coleslaw, Tex- as toast and signature Cane’s sauce. www.raisingcanes.com 11 Summit Climbing, Yoga and Fitness is expected to open a full-service Dunn Bros coffee shop and restaurant serving breakfast, lunch, dinner, beer and wine Feb. 15 at 501 Talbert Drive, Plano. In addition, the space includes a climbing training center and an outdoor boul- dering area. Summit owns and operates a gym across the street that offers bouldering, belay climbing and yoga to members and day-pass visitors. Summit

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E. HEBRON PKWY.

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SOUTH PLANO

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W. PARK BLVD.

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W. PLANO PKWY.

15TH ST.

14TH ST.

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KRONA DR.

TALBERT DR.

E. PLANO PKWY.

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NOWOPEN 1 151 Coffee reopened its Plano loca- tion Jan. 7 at 1151 Preston Road, Plano, per the shop’s social media. The coffee shop closed last year for a remodel of the building, including renovations to its indoor seating space. The location, which originally opened in January 2020, pre- viously only offered drive-thru service. 151 Coffee provides a number of classic options, such as lattes and cappuccinos, as well as hot and iced beverages, such as the Vanilla Bean and the Irish Sin. Other options include hot chocolate, tea, energy drinks and Italian sodas. 682-325-2124. www.151coffee.com 2 Air Pros USA opened a Plano office in mid-August at 624 Krona Drive, Ste. 120, Plano. Founded in Florida in 2017, Air Pros USA provides air conditioning

and heating services, such as installa- tion, repair, duct cleaning and preventive maintenance. The Plano office is the company’s second Texas location after it acquired Blue Star Heating and Air in Fort Worth in November 2019. 469-200-2724. www.airprosusa.com 3 Burnt BBQ & Tacos opened Jan. 12 at 2929 Custer Road, Ste. 302-D, Plano. The restaurant serves barbecue dishes such as coffee grind smoked brisket and roasted garlic pulled pork, as well as tacos, family meal kits and sides. 469-786-0078. www.burntbbqandtacos.com 4 A new location of Marco’s Pizza in Plano opened Dec. 22. The pizza store, located at 3916 McDermott Road, Ste. 100, Plano, is the newest of the restau- rant’s three locations in the city. Marco’s is open for in-person orders as well as for pickup and delivery. Menu items include

classic and specialty pizzas as well as sal- ads and sub sandwiches. 469-825-4800. www.marcos.com 5 Plano Athletic Club opened to the public Jan. 16 at 4600 W. Park Blvd., Plano. The newly renovated, membership-based health club features state-of-the art athletic equipment, a physical therapy zone, a 3D body scanner, a recovery zone and more. Plano Athletic Club also offers fitness training and classes, such as yoga, spin and Zumba, among others. 469-895-4258. http://planoathleticclub.com 6 Sam’s Liquor Warehouse opened Nov. 4 in northeast Plano at 10545 Custer Road, Ste. 102, Plano. The store sells a variety of spirits, wine and beer, including Grey Goose, Crown Royal and Jack Dan- iels. Delivery from Sam’s Warehouse is available via Uber Eats, Drizzly and Door

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The Haggard family has owned farmland in Plano for generations. (Community Impact Newspaper sta)

FEATURED IMPACT IN THE NEWS Roughly 18 acres of Haggard family land along Windhaven Parkway and Spring Creek Parkway in Plano has been sold and will become the site of a senior living community. Forefront Living, a faith-based, not- for-prot organization that oers senior living and specialized hospice in the Dallas area, reached a sale agreement with the family, according to a Jan. 5 news release. Proposed plans for the property, named The Outlook at Windhaven , include roughly 150 independent- living apartment units and 30 cottage homes with dining, wellness and activity spaces. An additional 56 assisted-living and memory care support suites are also currently planned, according to the release. The land already has the appropriate zoning in place for this type of construction, according to the release. Additionally, the creation of boundaries for the 18.3-acre plat was approved by the Plano Planning and Zoning Commission on Jan. 4. Construction on the property is aims to grow the climbing community by making the sport accessible to all ages, races, genders and ability levels, per a re- lease. It has seven locations across North Texas and Oklahoma. 972-599-0865.

expected to begin in late 2022, the release said. The land had been owned by the Haggard family for more than 150 years. The sale was made in conjunction with Greystone, an Irving- based senior living consulting rm. Greystone had sought to purchase the land for years, said Stuart Jackson, the company’s senior vice president of client services. “The family themselves are developers and since Greystone has extensive experience with these types of projects, we were able to create alignment with Forefront Living’s vision for this outstanding community asset,” he said in the statement.

W. Parker Rd.

SAUSAGE - SMOKING WOODS 1301W. PARKER RD., SUITE #100, PLANO, TX | 972-633-5593

WINDHAVEN PKWY.

WILLOW BEND DR.

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large enough for 60 people, a kids studio with space for 12, and a splatter painting area large enough for 12 occupants. Also, at the mall, there is more foot traffic than at Pipe and Palette’s previous downtown location, Parker said. Pipe and Palette is located on the first floor of the mall next to Mexican Bar Grill and Knife Restaurant. The store and studio sells local art- work, art kits and supplies and offers art classes, among other events and items. 214-501-2314. www.pipeandpalette.com

www.summitgyms.com RELOCATIONS

12 The move to The Shops at Willow Bend has opened Pipe & Palette up for more creating space, according to owner June Parker. At the new location, 6121 W. Park Blvd., Ste. C118, Plano, Pipe & Pal- ette has a bigger storefront, a party room

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PLANO NORTH EDITION • JANUARY 2021

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

PLANO

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4 Preston Road intersection project Work is ongoing on a project to expand the bridge where Preston Road meets President George Bush Turnpike. Crews are making progress on widening the bridge on the west side of the turnpike as well as on the railroad bridge just to the north of the intersection. Timeline: March 2020-May 2021 Cost: $4.6 million Funding source: Texas Department of Transportation 5 Park Boulevard intersection improvements A project to improve five intersections along Park Boulevard began in early October. Affected intersections on Park include those with Coit Road, Custer Road, Alma Road, K Avenue and Jupiter Road. The projects will enhance roadway capacity and realign intersections to improve safety. Crews will focus on two intersections at a time and are currently working at A Coit and B Jupiter. Timeline: October 2020-October 2021 Cost: $4.2 million Funding sources: Collin County, North Central Texas Council of Governments and city of Plano 6 Parker Road improvements In December, crews began work on the intersections of Parker Road with A Coit and B Alma roads to enhance roadway capacity, improve signals and realign intersections to heighten safety. Work started at Alma to avoid conflict with the ongoing intersection projects along Park Boulevard. Timeline: December 2020-May 2021 Cost: $2.1 million Funding sources: Collin County, NCTCOG and city of Plano

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

ONGOING PROJECTS 1 Coit Road project

Crews are making repairs to pavement and sidewalks on two stretches of Coit Road. One portion of the project is ex- pected to be active between Spring Creek Parkway and Hedgcoxe Road. One lane will remain closed at all times, with an additional lane closed from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Timeline: January 2020-June 2021 Cost: $3.5 million Funding source: city of Plano 2 Plano Parkway project Work continues on a long-term road repair project extending from Preston Road to the Dallas North Tollway. Crews are focusing on the portion of Plano Parkway between Mira Vista Boulevard to the Dallas North Tollway. One lane will be closed at all times, with an addition- al lane closed on weekdays and some Saturdays. Timeline: June 2020-June 2021 Cost: $3.5 million Funding source: city of Plano 3 Jupiter Road project An extensive project to repair pavement and sidewalk on Jupiter Road began in early January. The project, which will eventually stretch from 14th Street to the northern city limits, will affect north- bound and southbound lanes between Parker Road and Los Rios Boulevard. One lane will remain closed at all times, with an additional lane closed from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Timeline: January 2020-March 2021 Cost: $500,000 Funding source: city of Plano

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF DEC. 18. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT PLNNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY SNAPSHOT

Data and analysis on local communities

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

As the city of Plano’s population grows, its residents are also earning more money and becoming more educated, according to census data. Plano’s populace is diverse, with high levels of minority residents, including those who are Black, Asian, Hispanic or Latino. More than half of Plano’s residents are between ages 20-59; however, the city’s youth population is also on the rise, with a quarter of Plano residents under age 19. The data below goes into depth on how Plano residents stack up in income, age, education and more against Collin County and Denton County residents. GETTING TOKNOWPLANO

*HISPANIC AND LATINO RESIDENTS ARE INCLUDED WITHIN THESE CATEGORIES. THE U.S. CENSUS BUREAU CONSIDERS HISPANIC AND LATINO TO BE ETHNICITIES, NOT RACES. ** CENSUS DATA MAY NOT ADD UP TO 100% DUE TO ROUNDING

SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY 2019 FIVEYEAR ESTIMATES COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

LIESBETH POWERSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Denton County

Collin County

Plano

POPULATION CHANGE

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME $82,944 $95,602 2014 2019

AGE ANALYSIS

5.86% 16.37% 17.67% Five-year change

0-19

20-39 40-59 60-79 80+

2.6%

25.0%

26.9%

29.5%

16.3%

$84,233 $96,913 $74,662 $86,913

2014 2019 2014 2019

2.1%

28.8%

26.3%

29.5%

13.6%

12.7% 1.9%

27.8%

29.2%

28.5%

EDUCATION LEVEL High school diploma or higher achieved 93.6%

LARGEST EMPLOYMENT SECTORS* 1 Management occupations 2 Sales 1 Management occupations 2 Sales 1 Management occupations 2 Sales

LOCAL DEMOGRAPHICS*

15% 52.4% 8.5% 0.3% 21.1% 0.1% 0.3% 2.4%

15.3% 57% 9.6% 0.3% 15.1% 0.1% 0.3% 2.4%

19.3% 59.3% 9.6% 0.4% 8.7%

Hispanic or Latino

White

93.8%

92.5%

Black or African American

American Indian or Alaska native

and related occupations 3 Computer and mathematical occupations

and related occupations 3 Oce and administrative support

and related occupations 3 Oce and administrative support

Asian

Native Hawaiian or other Pacic Islander Some other race Two or more races

Bachelor’s degree or higher achieved

0.1% 0.1% 2.6%

57.2%

52.3%

45.1%

*EMPLOYMENT FOR AGE 16 AND OLDER

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PLANO NORTH EDITION • JANUARY 2021

DINING

Restaurants that opened in 2020

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LIESBETH POWERSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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HAGGARD ST.

Pita Town

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COURTESY PITA TOWN

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W. PLANO PKWY.

15TH ST.

A true Scratch Kitchen focused on the absolute highest quality proteins available from 100% Certified Akaushi Beef to sustainable fish such as Faroe Island Salmon. Situated in-between Plano and Frisco with a state of the art HEATED PATIOON A LAKEFRONT . Charcuterie Board or other appetizer valued up to $15.00, with purchase of 2 entrees. Expires 2/28/2021 11 Jollibee 1016 Preston Road 469-333-2520 | www.jollibeeusa.com $ 12 Mifen Prince 2001 Coit Road, Ste. 165 469-367-4478 https://mifenprince-plano.square.site/ $$ 13 Sankalp: The Taste of India 3680 Hwy. 121, Ste. 300 214-407-7149 www.sankalpusa.com $ 14 Uncle Zhou 8200 Preston Road, Ste. 110 469-929-6622 www.unclezhou.com $$ BAKERIESDESSERTS 15 Handel’s Ice Cream 4200 Legacy Drive | 972-208-4051 www.handelsicecream.com $

14TH ST.

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$ Up to $9.99

$$ $10-$19.99

$$$ $20 or more

B Breakfast/brunch

H Happy hour

K Kids menu

Average entrees:

E. PLANO PKWY.

4 Corky’s Gaming Bistro 1900 N. Central Expressway 817-532-5000 www.corkysgamingbistro.com $ H 5 Hot Chicks 1885 Dallas Parkway, Ste. 300 214-758-0310 www.hotchickschicken.com $$ 6 Scrambler Cafe 7000 Independence Parkway, Ste. 104B 469-298-0313 www.scramblercafetx.com $ B K ASIAN 7 Chef Chin’s Hibachi Ramen 7800 Windrose Ave. 972-846-4255

www.hibachiramen.com $$ 8 Flamin Pan Korean BBQ Grill 2129 W. Parker Road, Ste. 306 469-661-9025 www.aminpan.com $ 9 Ari Korean BBQ 120 Legacy Drive 972-517-9393 www.aribbq.com $$ 10 Dosanko Ramen 100 Legacy Drive, Ste. 110 972-517-9144 www.facebook.com/ Dosankotexas-106419021247961 $$ $$$

AMERICAN 1 Bar-Ranch Steak Company 1016 E. 15th St. 972-424-2887 www.facebook.com/barsteakco $$$ 2 Bavette Grill 8100 Dallas Parkway, Ste. 115 469-287-2043 www.bavettegrill.com $$ B COMPILED BY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER STAFF

3 Brisket Love BBQ 7800 Windrose Ave. 469-592-8842 www.brisket-love.com $

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5880 State Highway 121, Plano, Texas | (214) 220-2165 | forkandfire.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

MEXICANTEXMEX 26 Chilangos Tacos 7800 Windrose Ave. | 972-846-4255 www.chilangostacos.com $ 27 Cruzitos Cocina Mexicana 2300 14th St., Ste. 135 | 469-562-4071 https://cruzitoscocinamexicana.com $$ B H K 28 Velvet Taco 5013 W. Park Blvd. 469-825-0099 www.velvettaco.com $ B OTHER 29 2Taste BBQ & Kebab 3201 Alma Drive 469-367-4754 www.facebook.com/2TasteBK $ B 30 Jai Meals 6121 W. Park Blvd. 972-905-4595 www.jaimeals.com $$ 31 Peri Peri Original 6205 Coit Road, Ste. 352 972-212-4403 www.periperioriginal.com $$ K

32 Vitality Bowls 2100 N. Dallas Parkway, Ste. 132 469-969-0088 www.vitalitybowls.com $$ PIZZA 33 Cheesy Sensation 2120 Hedgcoxe Road 972-517-8111 www.cheesysensation.com $$ 34 Delucca Gaucho Pizza & Wine 8240 Preston Road, Ste. 100 469-888-4747 www.delucca.com $$$ 35 Marco’s Pizza 3916 McDermott Rd Ste. 100 469-825-4800 www.marcos.com $$ 36 ZaLat Pizza 3909 W. Parker Road, Ste. 102 469-821-0420 www.zalatpizza.com $$

20 HTeaO 4609 W. Park Blvd. 469-331-0355 www.hteao.com $ H 21 Kokee Tea 6121 W. Park Blvd. | 469-494-9907 www.kokeetea.com $ 22 Mac’s Boba Cafe 8420 Preston Road, Ste. 177 469-294-0333 www.facebook.com/macsbobacafe $ 23 Urban Nutrition Lounge 1145 14th St., Ste. 2117 www.facebook.com/urbannutritionlounge/ $ ITALIAN 24 Little Rome 2707 W. 15th St., Ste. B 972-449-7071 www.thelittlerome.com $$ MEDITERRANEAN 25 Pita Town 700 W. Spring Creek Parkway, Ste. 106 469-367-0820 https://pitatown.net $

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Delucca Gaucho Pizza &Wine

COURTESY DELUCCA GAUCHO PIZZA & WINE

16 Mallow Box 7800 Windrose Ave. | 972-846-4255 www.mallowbox.com $ 17 OMGelato 3829 W. Spring Creek Parkway, Ste. 103 469-395-0903 | www.omgelato.net $ 18 Rum Cakes Factory 6101 Windhaven Parkway, Ste. 140 972-330-9932 www.rumcakesfactory.com $$$

COFFEETEA 19 Bean Life Coee 624 Haggard St., Ste. 708 469-298-2486 www.beanlifecoee.com $$

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Plano, TX 75093 (972) 930-4010

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PLANO NORTH EDITION • JANUARY 2021

SHOPPING

Retailers that opened in 2020

COMPILED BY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER STAFF

FOOD&BEVERAGE 14 Green Vine Market 1804 K. Ave. 972-942-0808 www.greenvinemarket.com 15 Park Wine & Spirits 4101 E. Park Blvd., Ste. 160 214-440-2626 www.facebook.com/parkwinespirits 16 Sam’s Liquor Warehouse 10545 Custer Road, Ste. 102 214-383-9299 www.facebook.com/sams-liquor- warehouse HEALTHBEAUTY 17 BAM Beauty Bar 7400 Windrose Ave., Ste. B116 214-501-5674 www.bambeautybar.com 18 Glowing Custom Airbrush Tanning 8308 Preston Road, Unit 200, Ste. 258 817-271-6954 www.glowingairbrush.com 19 NeoWell 8200 Preston Road, Ste. 100 972-746-8887 www.neowell.com 20 Pigtails and Crewcuts 4801 W. Park Blvd., Ste. 417 469-947-6415 www.pigtailsandcrewcuts.com/plano 21 Rapattoni’s Barbershop 1020 E. 15th St. 214-501-2080 www.rapattonisbarbershop.com 22 Top Fitness 2101 Preston Road 469-969-0204 www.toptness.com HOBBIESGAMESGIFTS 23 Five Below 1701 Preston Road, Ste. C1 972-597-9939 www.vebelow.com 24 Giant Party Sports 6101 K Ave., Ste. 110 469-863-7030 www.giantpartysports.com

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CARSMOTORCYCLES 1 Hance’s Uptown Collision Center 1201 E. Plano Parkway, Ste. A 214-225-5790 www.hanceauto.com 2 Midas 620 W. Parker Road | 469-331-0709 www.midas.com 3 Texas Collision Centers 2501 N. Central Expressway 469-214-9161 www.texascollisioncenters.com CBD 4 CBD American Shaman Legacy 3020 Legacy Drive, Ste. 290 469-786-0135 www.cbdamericanshaman.com

5 CBD Kratom 1861 N. Central Expressway, Ste. 200 214-501-2346 www.cbdkratomshops.com/dallas 6 Hemp & More 6921 Independence Parkway, Ste. 100 469-969-0389 www.facebook.com/hempnmoreco CLOTHINGACCESSORIES 7 Fleet Feet 2100 Preston Road, Ste. 604 469-833-3338 www.eetfeet.com

9 J’Dashae 700 W. Spring Creek Parkway, Ste. 210 972-212-4076 www.jdashaecos.com 10 Pehnava Boutique 812 W. Spring Creek Parkway, Ste. 212 214-971-5771 www.facebook.com/pehnava-boutique- plano 11 Plaza Thrift Store 3115 W. Parker Road | 972-964-0001 www.plazathrift.com 12 Protocol 6405 W. Parker Road, Ste. 320 972-403-8855 www.protocolplano.com 13 Tecovas 7601 Windrose Ave., Ste. F110 972-665-7271 www.tecovas.com

8 Gentlemen’s Suit Outlet 2963 W. 15th St., Ste. 2985 214-945-8644 www.gentlemenssuitoutlet.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION

Updates on key transportation stories

2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

STORIES TO FOLLOW IN 2021

Silver Line construction ramps up with completion slated for 2023

BY LIESBETH POWERS

to connect seven cities, including Plano, and four counties in the North Dallas area. The entire Silver Line is expected to be fully operational in 2023. The $1.266 billion rail line will include 10 new rail stations, includ- ing one in Plano, and an update to the 12th Street station. The Shiloh Road Station is projected to service 690 daily riders in 2040, with a 58-minute estimated travel time to the DFWAirport Ter- minal B station, according to DART. The 12th Street Station will likely serve fewer people, with 340 projected daily riders in 2040, but will have additional pedestrian connections, such as the Cotton Belt Trail, which is being built along the Silver Line path, and the Plano Transit Veloweb.

Rail deliveries continue to be made in Plano as construction begins on Dallas Area Rapid Transit’s Silver Line. The most recent delivery, near existing tracks east of Shiloh Road, included up to 16,000 feet of rail, according to a Dec. 18 press release. DART broke ground on the future Knoll Trail station in Dallas on Dec. 16, and expects to start construction on several other portions of the line this winter. Construction is expected to reach Plano by June. “The next fewmonths will see a lot more construction for this project,” Carlos Huerta, DART repre- sentative for community aairs, said last fall. The 26-mile project is meant

Rail deliveries continue to be made in Plano and surrounding cities as construction begins on the Silver Line project. (Courtesy Dallas Area Rapid Transit)

SILVER LINE

PARKER ROAD

NORTH CARROLLTONFRANKFORD

PLANO

CARROLLTON

GRAPEVINE

12TH STREET DOWNTOWN PLANO

SHILOH ROAD

TRINITY MILLS

KNOLL TRAIL

DFW AIRPORT NORTH

DOWNTOWN CARROLLTON

CITYLINE BUSH

UT DALLAS

ADDISON

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RICHARDSON

FARMERS BRANCH

FARMERS BRANCH

GALATYN PARK

IRVING

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SOURCE: DALLAS AREA RAPID TRANSITCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Board, committee consider supermajority vote for DART redesign

NEXT STEPS

Several discussions will take place before implementation of the redesign can occur. • Late January 2021: Redesign draft presented to the board before being shared with public • Summer 2021: Final approval by the board • January 2022: Expected implementation of the redesign

BY LIESBETH POWERS

balanced, some representatives shared. This vote requirement will be decided after the draft is revealed in late January. In November, both the DART Committee-of-the-Whole and the board approved the use of a hybrid concept, which balances the need to maintain high-ridership routes with providing adequate coverage. Sta was directed to focus the design on 70%-75%

ridership and 25%-30% coverage. These ranges allow for built-in exibility as the network design is developed and shared the network design with aected parties, sta said in a presentation. Plano’s coverage areas are not likely to be aected by adjustments within these new ranges, sta said last fall.

Dallas Area Rapid Transit board and committee members discussed raising the threshold for howmany votes they would need to approve the upcoming major bus network redesign, known as DARTzoom, as members prepare for a rst look at the drafted plan. Requiring a two-thirds vote this sum- mer might make a nal decision more

SOURCE: DARTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION

Plano ISD news to follow

2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

OTHER STORIES TO FOLLOW IN 2021

TOP EDUCATION STORIES OF 2021

Long-awaited ne arts center set to open inMarch

STAAR TESTING EXPECTED TO CONTINUE The Texas Education Agency said in December that public school students will take the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness during the 2020-21 school year, though the results will not be used for accountability purposes. TEA further announced Dec. 10 that it will not issue A-F accountability ratings for school districts amid ongoing disruptions due to the coronavirus pandemic. Gov. Greg Abbott previously waived the STAAR requirement for the 2019-20 school year because of the pandemic. HYBRID LEARNING MODEL TO CONTINUE Use of the hybrid model for PISD students in high school and senior high school will continue in the spring semester, with on-campus instruction two days a week and remote learning the remaining three days. However, students who are struggling academically or who have poor attendance may be required to engage in face-to-face learning four days a week in the new semester. PISD teachers also plan to increase interaction with and support for students during times previously set aside for students to do assignments on their own, according to the district. DISTRICT EYEING SCHOOL FINANCE REFORM IN LEGISLATURE As part of its priorities for Texas’ 87th legislative session, PISD is supporting policy to preserve public education funding while seeking cost-saving opportunities that would have no negative impact on students’ learning, according to the district. The board’s priorities state that it would like the Legislature to modify funding formulas to be based on enrollment rather than on average daily attendance. The PISD board has stated that this change would allow for greater exibility when it comes to the calculation of instructional minutes. NEWS OF NOTE The Plano ISD Board of Trustees approved the district’s 2021-22 school year calendar during its meeting on Dec. 8. The new calendar will include 84 instructional days during the rst semester and 91 during the second. School starts Aug. 11, 2021, and wraps up on Friday, May 27, 2022.

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

W. PARK BLVD.

Plano ISD’s new Robinson Fine Arts Center is sched- uled to open to students in March 2021. More than 80% of PISD middle and high school students participate in arts programs and the new center is designed to support each facet of those programs. The main theater will have 1,500 seats and a balcony level, while the building will also house an art gallery, a rehearsal space and a studio theater. “In Plano ISD, we know that the arts enhance all aspects of a child’s education,” PISD Superintendent Sara Bonser said in June. “We remain committed to providing top notch programs in ne arts to all of our students, supported by the best teachers and directors in the state and in the nation.” PISD elementary school students receive weekly instruction in music and visual art, while middle school students can choose electives such as band, orchestra, choir, theater, art and more. In high school, students may choose from 84 dierent courses in art, dance, music, speech and theater to meet the required ne arts gradua- tion credit. The ne arts center is expected to host more than 100 performance dates each year, including UIL music and theater competitions, music concerts, senior high musicals and more, according to a district presentation. The 82,200-square-foot building along Alma Drive was approved as part of PISD’s $481 million bond referendum in 2016. It was originally expected to be built by late 2019, but factors such as permits and weather pushed the start

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The Robinson Fine Arts Center will host student performances and programming. (Liesbeth Powers/Community Impact Newspaper)

of construction to April 2019, PISD Chief Financial Ocer Randy McDowell said. During its June meeting, the PISD board of trustees approved the naming of the new facility in honor of Robbie and Lynore Robinson. “The Robinsons have been a major force in support of the arts in the Plano community, and a venue such as this one has been a dream they shared with the district,” Plano ISD Fine Arts Director Kathy Kuddes said in a statement. “It is tting that this building, dedicated to all of the arts disciplines, will carry their name.”

Plano to vote on 4 trustee seats

TERMS EXPIRING The seats of four current board members will be up for election May 1.

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

each elected to their third term on the board in 2017. Powell was elected to her rst term in the same election. Chambers was appointed to Place 6 in January 2018 and was elected to fulll the remainder of the unexpired term in May 2019. The candidate ling period for the May 1 election began Jan. 13. Applications will be accepted until Feb. 12. Board members in PISD serve four-year overlapping terms and are not subject to term limits. While candidates run for specic seats, each trustee represents the entire school district, and candidates are elected by all district voters. Early voting for the May 1 election is scheduled to take place April 19-April 27.

Registered voters across Plano ISD will have the chance in May to decide who should ll four of the seven seats on the district’s board of trustees for the next four years. Places 1, 2, 3 and 6 will appear on a May 1 ballot. Board President Tammy Rich- ards represents Place 1, and Angela Powell is the Place 2 board mem- ber. Nancy Humphrey represents Place 3, and Board Vice President Jeri Chambers holds Place 6. Humphrey and Chambers each led Jan. 13 to seek another term in those seats. Powell conrmed to Community Impact Newspaper she plans to run for re-election, while Richards said she had not yet made a decision. Richards and Humphrey were

Tammy Richards

Angela Powell

Nancy Humphrey

Jeri Chambers

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PLANO NORTH EDITION • JANUARY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PLANO NORTH EDITION • JANUARY 2021

DEVELOPMENT

The biggest developments to watch in Plano

TOP DEVELOPMENT STORY OF 2021

Redevelopment projects alongUS 75 tomakemajor headway in 2021

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

the same scope and scale as the Collin Creek development, I’m hopeful that they can serve as bookends of our [US] 75 corridor.” The former Collin Creek Mall property will be transformed into a $1 billion mixed-use destination with up to 3,100 new residential units and a series of new oce, restaurant and hotel buildings. Braster said those projects, as well as the Heritage Creekside develop- ment and Texas InTown Homes’ plans for First Baptist Church’s historic downtown property on East 15th Street, are exciting for the city because Plano needs “more housing.” InTown Homes plans to re-purpose the church site to have 50 for-sale urban townhouses and 270 apart- ments with live-work units as well

Ocials say they are optimistic about what redevelopment projects at the former sites of Collin Creek Mall and the Plano Market Square Mall mean for the city’s future. “You’re seeing a real revitalization of the [US 75] corridor, and that’s really exciting,” Director of Special Projects Peter Braster said. The planned redevelopment of the Plano Market Square Mall will include about 325 new apartments and town homes as well as up to 16,500 square feet of restaurant and retail space. Council Member Shelby Williams said Dec. 14 that the property is “desper- ately” in need of revitalization. “[The developers] proposed something that is moderately dense,” he said. “And while it’s nowhere near

Plano Market Square Mall has been largely unoccupied for years. In 2021, redevelopment of the site will commence. (Community Impact Sta)

as oce, retail and restaurant space. However, Braster noted, work cannot begin until First Baptist relocates to its new home o the George Bush Turnpike later this year. Work on the $900 million Heritage Creekside development, located northwest of where Alma Road meets President George Bush Turnpike, is continuing, Braster said. The 156-acre,

mixed-use development is slated to include nearly 900 new housing units as well as restaurants, retail stores and an oce tower district. “A lot of our stu is just sort of on hold [because of COVID-19],” he said. “Things like the malls [are] a little dierent because they’re mostly empty anyway. Now is the time to do rehab or redevelop.”

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY&COUNTY

News from the city of Plano

2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

OTHER STORIES TO FOLLOW IN 2021

TOP CITY & COUNTY STORIES OF 2021

City Council to consider 2021 bond propositions

FIVE SEATS ON PLANO CITY COUNCIL UP FOR ELECTION INMAY The ling period for those interested in running for a seat on Plano City Council opened Jan. 13. The council’s Places 2, 4, 6—the mayoral seat—and 8 are scheduled to be on the ballot in May. Place 7 will also be placed on May 1 the ballot as a special election, according to City Secretary Lisa Henderson. This comes after City Council member Lily Bao announced her intention to run for mayor at a Jan. 11 council meeting. John Muns, chairman of the Plano Planning & Zoning Commission, led to run for mayor Jan. 15. Currently, Place 6 is held by Mayor Harry LaRosiliere, and Place 4 is held by Mayor Pro Tem Kayci Prince. Deputy Mayor Pro Tem Anthony Ricciardelli represents Place 2, and Council Member Rick Smith represents Place 8. LaRosiliere was elected to his second and nal mayoral term in 2017. Prince, Ricciardelli and Smith were each elected to their rst council terms in 2017. No other ocial candidate lings have been posted by the city of Plano as of Jan. 15. The ling period will end Feb. 12, and open for the Place 7 special election Feb. 9.

A LOOKAT THE POSSIBILITIES Sta has pitched four bond options, three of which would prompt a tax bill increase for the average homeowner in scal year 2024-25.

Annual tax increase based on average home value** $100.55

Proposed FY 2024-25 tax rate*

Bond option

BY LIESBETH POWERS

Current Project List = $403.9M Alternate Scenario No. 1 = $375M Alternate Scenario No. 2 = $350M Alternate Scenario No. 3 = $136M

City Council is expected to vote Jan. 25 on projects and propositions for a potential May bond election. Over the past two months, council has heard project proposals and recommendations from city boards, commissions and sta. Updated preliminary recommendations were presented to council Jan. 11. A proposed $403.9 million package includes roughly $237 million in street projects, $124 million in parks and recreation improvements, $28 million in public safety facility improvements, $6 million in service center improvements, $6 million in municipal facilities improvements, and $2.6 million in library facilities improvements. This proposal is $5.4 million less than an option presented Oct. 26. The high price of the bond is mainly due to Plano’s aging infrastructure, city sta shared last year while preparing the bond. Also at the Jan. 25 meeting, council members will indicate what order selected propositions will be listed on the ballot for voters as well as whether they will be

$0.4798 $0.4756 $0.4727 $0.4482

$87.01 $77.93 $0

SOURCE: CITY OF PLANOCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER grouped in any specic way. *PER $100 OF ASSESSED PROPERTY VALUE **CURRENT AVERAGE PLANO HOME VALUE IS $376,396, AS OF JAN. 11

In addition to the complete list of projects, city sta also prepared alternate referendums valued at $136 million, $350 million and $375 million. The only package that would have no impact on the tax rate in FY 2024-25 is the $136 million option, according to city sta. If the bond election were called by council, early voting would run from April 19-27, and election day would be May 1.

Reviewof Plano’s comprehensive plan continues in 2021

The 16 Plano residents reviewing the city’s comprehensive devel- opment plan began their work in January 2020, with an expected year’s work ahead of them and $900,000 budgeted for the committee’s work and related consulting fees. The ndings and recommendations of this group will guide the city in creating a new comprehensive plan. The city is currently following development guidelines that were put in place in 1986, following the repeal of the Plano Tomorrow plan

last summer. Three areas of the plan still need committee and zoning body revisions and approval: the redevelopment of neighborhood centers, plan map amendments, and redevelopment and growth management. Additionally, the future land-use map and density guidance map are still up for committee discussion. Committee Chair Doug Shockey said he expects to have a better idea on whether an April deadline will be feasible in mid-February.

PLACE 3

PLACE 2

PLACE 4

PLACE 1

BY LIESBETH POWERS

The Comprehensive Plan Review Committee will continue discussions through April of this year, at which point initial funding for the commit- tee will run out, according to city sta and Plano City Council members.

Candidates running for Places 1-4 must reside in the district they are running in, though all eight Plano City Council members are elected at-large.

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