Gilbert Edition - September 2020

GILBERT EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 1  SEPT. 23OCT. 20, 2020

ONLINE AT

VOTER GUIDE 2020

GILBERT FIREPLACES AND BBQS

THE NOOK A DAYTIME EATERY

SAMPLE BALLOT

IMPACTS

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Gilbert commits to expansion of ambulance service through town

Here is the town’s nancial projections for paying for ambulance service from 2021-28, the expected lifecycle of ambulances. PAY I NG FOR SERVICE

Startup $2.49M $1.65M for six ambulances, gurneys $833,000 for equipment and supplies $7,000 for training

BY TOM BLODGETT

to initiate the expansion by approv- ing purchases of six ambulances and six ambulance stretchers. Town o- cials said the costs are among the nearly $2.5 million in initial startup costs from the town’s general fund for the expanded service, but they project the service change to result in nearly $2.8 million in net revenue over the rst eight years. Ocials from AMR, the town’s pri- vate provider since 2015, told council they felt blindsided by the action and CONTINUED ON 12

In the coming months, Gilbert will expand its ambulance service from a small line of service out of one station to one that covers the entire town. Town ocials contend the change in 2021 from American Medical Response to a service run through the Gilbert Fire and Rescue Department will result in better, more consistent service throughout town at a lower cost to users without burdening taxpayers. Gilbert Town Council voted Aug. 25

Net revenue $2.76M

SOURCE: TOWN OF GILBERT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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Prominent retail developments progress despite pandemic

E. BASELINE RD.

Development is ongoing across Gilbert. Here are six projects going up in town and what they contain. • 770 multifamily housing units • 636,338 square feet of commercial development • 99.17 total acres GOING VERTICAL

City Gate

BY TOM BLODGETT

said construction has not fallen o signicantly in town. Development services revenue—or revenue generated from business licenses, fees and per- mits related to construction and development— have been increasing since April. While they are still down from the same months last year, total revenue at $6.94 million exceeded the budget projection of $6.6 million for scal year 2019-20, according to town documents. Gilbert has 678,878 square feet of oce space,

Gilbert ocials anticipate the town reaching build-out in about 2030, and the coronavirus pan- demic is not slowing that timetable. Multiple developments, involving hundreds of thousands of square feet of retail and restaurants, are going vertical or nearing completion through- out town, including Epicenter, Gilbert Warner, City Gate and two Cooley Station developments. Developers said they have faced some chal- lenges this spring and summer, but town ocials

Gilbert Warner

Epicenter Air Guitar

E. RAY RD.

The Post at Cooley Station

Verde at Cooley Station

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SOURCES: JOHNSTON & CO., AGRE, BARCLAY GROUP, REMINGTON NEVADA, SB2VB, EVERGREEN DEVCOCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS IMPACTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

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Now open, Coming soon &more TRANSPORTATION Local road projects TOWN& EDUCATION Gilbert and local school district news

MARKET TEAM EDITOR Tom Blodgett GRAPHIC DESIGNER Isabella Short ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Michelle Gavagan

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FROMAMY: New retail centers are on the verge of opening throughout the town of Gilbert. It’s hard to travel a great distance within the town without driving by a signicant project that will soon bring new retail options to residents. In our front-page story, readers will receive the latest updates on the various projects that are nearing completion. Amy Ellsworth, PUBLISHER

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METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Amy Ellsworth,

2020VOTERGUIDE

aellsworth@communityimpact.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

SAMPLE BALLOT November general election BUSINESS FEATURE Gilbert Fireplaces & BBQs

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FROMTOM: Town ocials were excited to inaugurate ambulance service from one re station last November. But a proposal in the spring to expand service throughout town drew some surprise and sharp criticism and then became a political hot potato during election season. Now, a decision has been made to do it. Our front-page story on ambulance service looks at what that means going forward. Tom Blodgett, EDITOR

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THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

New businesses 6

Local sources 17

Town unemployment 8.2%

Eggs benedict plates at The Nook 5

DINING FEATURE

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The Nook—A Daytime Eatery REAL ESTATE UPDATES August residential market data IMPACT DEALS

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GILBERT EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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N. SAN BENITO DR.

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GILBERT

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Life Storage

Barking Dogs

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E. WARNER RD.

PHOTOS BY TOM BLODGETT/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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4 Hypnosight opened in July for hypnotherapy consultations in the Art of Healing Wellness Center at 1757 E. Base- line Road, Bldg. 10, Ste. 140, Gilbert. Dr. Ralph Potter provides confidential ses- sions for smoking cessation, ideal body weight, dynamic personality and more. 480-712-1400. www.hypnosight.org 5 Life Storage opened a new location June 11 at 1485 N. San Benito Drive, Gil- bert. The facility has all climate-controlled units with 24/7 surveillance and extended access hours from 5 a.m.-10 p.m. 480-681-7959. www.lifestorage.com/ storage-units/arizona/phoenix /85234/975-in-gilbert COMING SOON 6 Angel Touch Nails , a nail care ser- vices salon catering to those interested in top-line services in a spa-like facility, will open in Verde at Cooley Station, at Wil- liams Field and Recker roads, in fall 2021. Angel Touch Nails plans to offer services while following health and safety guide- lines in a spa atmosphere. Safety features such as physical distancing markers and sanitizers along with staff masks and gloves will be implemented for the health and safety of nail spa guests. 7 Barking Dogs boutique pet store anticipates opening a location Nov. 1 at 3244 E. Guadalupe Road, Ste. 106, Gil- bert. The store’s services include a self- dog wash, professional grooming and on-site bakery. The store carries premium pet food brands, all-natural treats and supplements. https://barking-dogs.com 8 Culver’s is opening its first Gilbert location at 3610 S. Val Vista Drive, Gil-

bert. Franchise owner Brian Farrel said he anticipates it will open in early December if it stays on schedule with construction. The restaurant chain is known for its fro- zen custard, butter burgers and cheese curds. www.culvers.com 9 El Taco Santo will open a location in the Gilbert Warner development at Gilbert and Warner roads in 2021. It will serve Sonoran-style Mexican food. It started as a food truck based out of Gilbert, then added a brick-and-mortar 10 The Learning Experience will open a Morrison Ranch location of its early childhood education centers at 727 N. Higley Road, Gilbert, in October. The center offers child care for children ages 6 weeks-6 years. 480-687-4518. https://thelearningexperience.com/ center/gilbert-morrison-ranch 11 The Los Primeros group will open a Mexican restaurant, name still to be de- termined, in the Verde at Cooley Station development when it opens in fall 2021. It will be a full-service restaurant serving authentic Mexican food and will have an outside garden dining patio and a tequila bar. location in Ahwatukee. www.eltacosanto.com 12 Matty G’s Steakburgers & Spirits , a neighborhood grill adorned with sports memorabilia, will open this fall at 3373 E. Queen Creek Road, though no date has been finalized. It specializes in burgers and hot dogs. This will be the fourth Valley location of the restaurant. https://matty-gs.com 13 The QuikTrip Corp. purchased 2.78 acres of land at 2366 S. Higley Road,

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MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

HUNT HWY.

E. HUNT HWY.

NOWOPEN 1 The Bod Squad opened its health and beauty salon Sept. 6 at 732 E. Warner Road, Ste. 24, Gilbert. It offers non-inva- sive body contouring through ultrasonic cavitation liposuction or radio frequency skin tightening. The procedures can be used to treat the face or body. It antici- pates adding IV vitamin therapy soon. 602-730-5952. https://bodsquadaz.com 2 Dulce Vida Coffe e opened a location Aug. 16 inside Tribe: House of Salons at

1981 E. Pecos Road, Ste. 105, Gilbert. Pre- viously, it ran out of a trailer, which it still uses. It is a vegan coffee shop. 480-382- 4125. https://dulcevidacoffee.com 3 Eatalio Pasta & Wine , an Italian fast-casual restaurant, anticipates open- ing Sept. 23 at 6348 S. Higley Road, Ste. 106, Gilbert. Its specialty is a sub-pasta, which features garlic toasted bread with any pasta the customer chooses. It also does pasta and pizza catering. 909-244- 6042. www.facebook.com/eatalioaz

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY TOM BLODGETT

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Culver’s

The Learning Experience

at the northwest corner of Higley and Williams Field roads on Sept. 3 with plans to build a QuikTrip store. QuikTrips are a combination convenience store and gas station. The sale was for more than $3.19 million, according to commercial real estate data website www.vizzda.com. 800-848-1966. www.quiktrip.com 14 State 48 Tap House will open at Christmastime in SanTan Village at 2218 E. Williams Field Road, Ste. 101, Gilbert. The locally owned and operated brewery has scratch kitchens at its locations, of which Gilbert will be the sixth in the Valley. www.state48brewery.com 15 Vitality Bowls Superfood Café , a fast-casual health food restaurant, will open in Verde at Cooley Station in fall 2021. This will be the first unit in the Phoenix area for Vitality Bowls, which looks to bring health and wellness through fresh, high-quality superfoods.

Menu items include açaí bowls and other antioxidant-rich menu items including smoothies, fresh juices, soups, salads and paninis. https://vitalitybowls.com RENOVATIONS 16 HD South reopened Sept. 1 at 10 S. Gilbert Road, Gilbert, after a two-month closure to do maintenance work on the 107-year-old building, which was the original Gilbert Elementary School. The work was to shore up and reframe the stairs to the basement. The historical museum and cultural arts space is open 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday. It will continue to have the same health and safety guidelines in place, such as physical distancing, hand sanitizing and thorough disinfecting. Facial coverings are required at all times. 480-926-1577. https://hdsouth.org

Black Rock Coffee Bar’s first Gilbert location is near Queen Creek Road on Val Vista Drive.

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Black Rock Coee Bar opened its rst Gilbert location Sept. 11 at 4925 S. Val Vista Drive, Gilbert. It serves espresso, crafted coee and other drinks, including teas, hot chocolate, chilled drinks and its own brand of an energy drink called Fuel. It has a drive-thru window and oers subscriptions for delivery of coee beans to customers’ homes. The company started out of Beaverton, Oregon, in 2008 and has 71 locations in the West, including 14 in Arizona. A second Gilbert location

E. QUEEN CREEK RD.

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is anticipated to open in the Gilbert Warner development later this year. Each location’s team is expected to engage with the community. 480-462-7637. https://br.coee

480-581-8298

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GILBERT EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 60

COMPILED BY TOM BLODGETT

E. BASELINE RD.

ONGOING PROJECTS 1 Recker Road improvements

Funding sources: town of Gilbert bonds and funds, regional funds, developer contributions 3 Val Vista Drive widening The town is widening Val Vista Drive from Appleby Road—about where Val Vista narrows to one lane in each direction—to Riggs Road. Status: The closure of Val Vista between Appleby and Chandler Heights roads was lifted Sept. 11, which has restored access through the Val Vista and Ocotillo Road intersection. Timeline: March 2020-July 2021 Cost: $25.96 million Funding sources: bonds, town funds and regional funds 4 Val Vista Drive reconstruction The town is reconstructing deteriorated asphalt pave- ment on Val Vista Drive from Baseline Road to the Gua- dalupe Road intersection, adding bike lanes, updating landscaping in medians and replacing three signals to bring them to current standards. Status: Work is shifting from the curb lanes to the median lanes. Left turns will be restricted for at least six weeks while median curbs are constructed. Traffic will remain on the asphalt base course until the top is paved. Timeline: March-November Cost: $6.32 million Funding sources: town of Gilbert bonds and funds

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E. GUADALUPE RD.

The town will complete Recker Road improvements to minor arterial road standards, including four lanes and a raised median, from Ray Road to Loop 202. Status: Construction is approximately 45% complete but has been delayed four to six weeks while awaiting the relocation of Salt River Project power poles, which is expected to happen in early October. Base pavement has been put down in southbound lanes. Final pavement will not be placed until after the power poles are relocated. Traffic is shifted to one lane in each direction on the east side of the street. Timeline: January 2020-March 2021 Cost: $3.03 million Funding sources: town of Gilbert bonds, funds; develop- er contributions 2 Lindsay Road/Loop 202 interchange construction An interchange at Lindsay Road and Loop 202 will be built to provide access to State Route 202 and a frontage road system on the north side of SR 202 between Lindsay and Gilbert Road. Status: Construction of a single box culvert for a Roosevelt Water Conservation District canal near the interchange is nearly complete but is affecting traffic at the site on Lindsay. Salt River Project pole relocation is anticipated to start in October. Construction for the interchange is anticipated to start in January. Timeline: October 2020-November 2021 Cost: $18.15 million

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF SEPT. 10. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT GILNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TOWN&EDUCATION

COMPILED BY TOM BLODGETT

News from Gilbert, Gilbert Public Schools, Higley USD & Chandler USD

GILBERTPUBLIC SCHOOLS The district will seek a $30 million federal enrollment stabilization grant to recover some of its funding losses in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, Business Services Assistant Superintendent Bonnie Betz said Sept. 2. The district has lost about 900 students in enrollment, more than double the 400 it projected during the budget process. Average daily membership, a weighted enrollment gure, is a key component of the state’s funding formula. HIGLEYUSD The governing board approved a change to the district’s calendar Sept. 9, moving some early release dates for parent teacher conferences for elementary and middle school students from September to October. CHANDLERUSD The scal year 2020-21 capital plan was submitted to the Arizona School Facilities Board on Sept. 9. The plan outlines what the district will fund in construction and renovations. SCHOOL HIGHLIGHTS Gilbert Town Council Oct. 13, 6:30 p.m. 50 E. Civic Center Drive, Gilbert 480-503-6871 • www.gilbertaz.gov Gilbert Public Schools Board Oct. 13, 6 p.m. 140 S. Gilbert Road, Gilbert 480-497-3300 www.gilbertschools.net Higley USD Board Sept. 23, 5 p.m. Oct. 17, 8 a.m. (retreat) Oct. 21, 5 p.m. 2935 S. Recker Road, Gilbert 480-279-7000 • www.husd.org Chandler USD Board Sept. 23, 7 p.m. Oct. 14, 7 p.m. 1525 W. Frye Road, Chandler 480-812-7000 • www.cusd80.com Follow us on Twitter: @impactnews_gil MEETINGSWE COVER

Judge’s ruling to seat LaurinHendrix on Town Council onNov. 3, upholds votes

Students head back to district campuses GILBERT SCHOOL DISTRICTS School boards from Gilbert’s three public school districts cleared the way in August for students to begin returning to campuses once health benchmarks set by the state and Maricopa County had been met. The benchmarks from the state departments of health services and education were guidelines districts could use to decide when to return for a hybrid model of learning that mixed in-person and remote learning or when schools could open up to full-time in-person instruction. The benchmarks measured case counts per 100,000 popu- lation, percent of positivity in testing and hospitalization rates for COVID-19-like illnesses. Higley USD was rst to open to full in-person learning Sept. 8. Gilbert Public Schools also returned Sept. 8 in a hybrid model with only half the students on campus at a time. It anticipated reopening in full Sept. 21 if the district continued to meet the health benchmarks. Chandler USD elementary students began returning to campuses in a staggered approach Sept. 14. High school students are expected to return in October.

GILBERT Town Council Member- elect Laurin Hendrix may be seated to council Nov. 3, the date of the general election—not the immediate seating he sought in a lawsuit, but earlier than the town set as his start date. Daniel Kiley, Maricopa County Superior Court judge, also ruled Sept. 11 that appointed Town Council Member Bill Spence is not an “usurper” of Hendrix’s position and that the votes that have taken place since Hendrix defeated Spence in the August election will not be voided. Hendrix, through his attorney Tim- othy LaSota, argued that state law prefers elected to appointed ocials and that Hendrix was thus entitled to

the seat held by Spence once the Aug. 4 election results became ocial. The town’s position was that when its code and other

Laurin Hendrix

state election laws were considered, the town could seat Hendrix with other election winners on the second Tuesday in January. Kiley, in setting the Nov. 3 date, noted that state law referenced the general election and further wrote in his decision that the town’s code could not supersede state law on the matter.

Scott Anderson appointedGilbertmayor

council accepted the resignation of Jenn Daniels. The council then voted Council Member-elect Kathy Tilque into the seat left vacant by Anderson. That vote also was unanimous. Anderson won re-election and Tilque election to four-year council seats in the Aug. 4 election. Tilque retired June 30 as longtime president and CEO of the Gilbert Chamber of Commerce. Yung Koprowski, who was appointed to council April 21, was the unanimous choice for vice mayor at council’s Sept. 1 meeting. Koprowski replaces Anderson in the role.

Scott Anderson takes the oath of oce. SCREENSHOT COURTESY TOWN OF GILBERT

GILBERT Scott Anderson, who has served Gilbert as an employee, council member and vice mayor, was sworn in Aug. 18 as the town’s mayor. Anderson was appointed unani- mously by Gilbert Town Council at a special session, just moments after

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GILBERT EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

GUIDE

Candidates and information for November elections

COMPILED BY TOM BLODGETT

VOTER GUIDE 2020

DATES TOKNOW

OCT. 5 Last day to register to vote in the 2020 general election OCT. 7 Early voting for general election begins OCT. 23 Last day to request that an early ballot be mailed for the general election OCT. 30 Last day to vote early in person NOV. 3 General election day

SAMPLE BALLOT

*Incumbent

D Democrat

G Green

L Libertarian

R Republican

Corporation Commission (vote for 3) R Lea Marquez Peterson* D Bill Mundell R James “Jim” O’Connor R Eric Sloan D Shea Staneld D Anna Tovar MARICOPA COUNTY Maricopa County Board of Supervisors District 1

County sheri D Paul Penzone* R Jerry Sheridan County treasurer R John Allen D Daniel L. Toporek East Valley Institute of Technology Governing Board District 6 David Lane* District 8 Frank Lamar Watkins* Maricopa County Community College District At large Shelli Richardson Boggs Linda M. Thor* District 1 Laurin Hendrix* Jacqueline V. Smith District 2 Susan Bitter Smith Maricopa County Special Health Care District District 1 John B. Farnsworth Mary A. Harden* District 2 Mark G. Dewane*

er and property owner rights; bans smoking in public places; imposes a 16% excise tax on marijuana to fund public safety, community colleges, infrastructure, and public health and community programs; authorizes state and local regulations for the safe sale and production of marijua- na by a limited number of licensees; requires impairment to the slightest degree for marijuana DUIs; transfers monies from the Medical Marijuana Fund; permits expungement of some marijuana violations; and prescribes penalties for violations. provides additional funding for public education by establishing a 3.5% surcharge on taxable income above $250,000 annually for single persons or married persons ling separately, and on taxable income above $500,000 annually for married persons ling jointly or head of household lers; dedicates additional revenue to (a) hire and increase salaries for teachers, classroom support personnel and student support services personnel, (b) mentoring and retention pro- grams for new classroom teachers, (c) career training and post-sec- ondary preparation programs, (d) Arizona Teachers Academy; amends the Arizona Teachers Academy statute; requires annual accounting of additional revenue. Proposition 208 Invest in Ed Act The Invest in Education Act

NATIONAL

LOCAL Mayor of Gilbert Matt Nielsen Brigette Peterson Chandler USD Governing Board (vote for 3) Barb Mozdzen* Jason Olive Joel Wirth Gilbert Public Schools (vote for 3) Reed Carr* Sheila Rogers Uggetti* Lori C. Woods* Higley USD (vote for 3) Michelle Anderson Michelle M. Bugg Kristina Reese* Tiany Shultz Greg Wojtovich* Gilbert County Island Fire District (vote for 2) Cindy Biggs* Carlos M. Mejia* BALLOT MEASURES Proposition 207 Smart and Safe Arizona Act This Act permits limited possession, transfer, cultivation, and use of mar- ijuana (as dened) by individuals 21 years old or older; protects employ-

President D Joe Biden G Howie Hawkins L Jo Jorgensen R Donald Trump*

U.S. senator D Mark Kelly R Martha McSally* STATE U.S. representative, District 5

R Jack W. Sellers* D Jevin D. Hodge District 2 D Deedra Abboud R Steve Chucri* County assessor D Aaron Connor R Eddie Cook* County attorney R Allister Adel* D Julie Gunnigle

R Andy Biggs* D Joan Greene State senator, District 12

R Warren Petersen D Lynsey Robinson State senator, District 17 D Ajlan “A.J.” Kurdoglu R J.D. Mesnard* State representative, District 12 (vote for 2 ) R Travis Grantham* R Jake Homan State representative, District 17 (vote for 2) R Liz Harris

County recorder R Stephen I. Richer D Adrian Fontes* County school superintendent D Jeanne M. Casteen R Steve Watson*

D Jennifer Pawlik* R Je Weninger*

VOTER TURNOUT Arizona Turnout

Maricopa County 2012 presidential election

Registered voters

Turnout

Registered voters

2012 presidential election

1.39M

2.32M

3.12M

1.81M

2014 gubernatorial election

2014 gubernatorial election

1.54M

877K

3.24M

1.93M

2016 presidential election

2016 presidential election

2.66M

1.61M

3.59M

2.16M

2018 gubernatorial election

2018 gubernatorial election

2.41M

1.45M

3.71M

2.25M

2020 primary election

2020 primary election

1.45M

860K

3.99M

2.43M

SOURCES: ARIZONA SECRETARY OF STATE, MARICOPA COUNTY ELECTIONS DEPARTMENTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

For more election information, visit communityimpact.com/vote .

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BUSINESS FEATURE

Wood chips can bring dierent avors and qualities to the smokes.

A patio o the shopmakes for a good display place and is home to Ryan Barnhart’s popular demonstration videos.

Gilbert Fireplaces & BBQs is a real family operation with (from left) Mike Craig, Hannah Daigger, Ryan Barnhart, Kayla Barnhart, Therese Barnhart and Mike Barnhart.

Gilbert Fireplaces &BBQs 1150 S. Gilbert Road, Ste. 101, Gilbert 480-635-1227 https://gilbertreplacesbbqs.com that serves as a crowded showroom carries medium to high-end stock and accessories. Here are some of the store’s top sellers. • Yoder Smoker • Dimplex Ignite XL electric replace • Hestan 42-inch gas grill HEATING UP SALES The pandemic recession has treated Gilbert Fireplaces & BBQs better than the Great Recession, with contractors and customers looking to upgrade yards keeping the business busy. The store

Gilbert Fireplaces &BBQs Store evolves into place of business for entire Barnhart family M ike Barnhart did not have plans for his business, Gilbert Fireplaces & BBQs, to become a family business. It just evolved into one. “The business has got to be able and communications, including social media. The closest they go to out of family is their warehouse manager, Mike Craig, a family friend who went to school with Kayla. BY TOM BLODGETT

helped him with the lease as he got on his feet. Gilbert Fireplaces & BBQs still carries their products today. Getting that help was essential as the country entered the Great Recession. Barnhart was work- ing seven days a week without vacations to keep it going. Ryan was working part-time in college. Eventually Therese left her job at a church to help lighten the load. The store had out-of-family employees, some of whom Ryan Barnhart said were very good. But as it grew, family kept joining to the benet of the business. “For us to all be family, I think we all have such a strong, vested interest in [the business] that I think it allows us to help the public better,” Ryan said.

The business did not start out like that. Barnhart worked 25 years in restaurants and then started selling appliances at a couple dierent places. Eventually a vendor poached him to run Arizona Fireplaces & BBQs’ east store in Gilbert in 2006. But two years later, it decided to close the store. Barnhart had a dierent idea. “I said, ‘Whoa, whoa, whoa, I’ll buy it from you. You’re just going to have to carry me on inventory,’” he said. As a vendor for products, the company not only did that but

to support everyone, too,” Barnhart said as he recounts how nice it is to run a true family business. The whole family is involved, too. His wife, Therese, does the books and runs the oce. His son, Ryan, directs operations. Oldest daugh- ter Hannah Daigger left a dental assistant’s job a year ago to do sales while her husband, Drew Daigger—a guy who can gure out how to x anything, according to his father-in- law—is the service technician. Even youngest daughter Kayla has joined recently to do marketing

Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-3 p.m., closed Sun.

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ARIZONA

9

GILBERT EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE The Nook—A Daytime Eatery Owners set out on their own after leaving franchise chain S ean and Annette Anderson were nicely ensconced in their jobs, Sean as a nurse and Annette in sales, until the day a 650-pound patient fell on Sean and ended his nursing career. That sent him o to look for something new. “He looked at me, and he says, ‘What do you want to be when you grow up?’” Annette recalled. “And I said, ‘Well, I don’t know.’ And he said, ‘What do you think about opening a restaurant?’ And I kind of looked at him like he had lost his mind.” But eight years later, that is exactly what they are doing at The Nook—A Daytime Eatery. The restaurant was a franchise of The Egg & I, which the Andersons said provided great support with a family feel. But the owners sold to a com- pany with a more corporate culture. The Andersons asked to be freed from the franchise agreement. “We took the training wheels o, and you get that excited feeling when all of a sudden you’re out on your own,” Sean said. The Andersons said they rebranded last fall by going back to the beginning in menu and restaurant feel. The menus have “Meals & Memories are made here” printed at the top. When the Andersons shut down March 18 because of the coronavirus pandemic, they gave away food to their employees and the remainder to the community with the help of reghters. “I looked at Sean and said that we are responsible for 22 families,” Annette said of the employees. “That is our responsibility.” The Andersons said the regulars have showered them and sta with support during the shutdown and since reopening May 11. “It’s enough to keep the doors open,” Sean said. “You feel loyalty toward your people. They make us what we are.”

BY TOM BLODGETT

While the Andersons have returned their menu oerings to what was originally oered at The Egg & I, they said the kitchen sta has license to try their own spin on dishes and see how their customers react to them. THEIROWN SPIN

Annette and Sean Anderson took a leap of faith in changing from a franchise-backed restaurant to their own place, The Nook—A Daytime Eatery. (Photos by Tom Blodgett/Community Impact Newspaper)

The Vive la France French Toast ($10.49) has two pieces of brioche bread dipped in batter and griddled golden brown, topped with butter and powdered sugar.

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TheNook—ADaytime Eatery 3321 E. Queen Creek Road, Ste. 101, Gilbert 480-988-2100 https://thenookaz.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 6 a.m.-2 p.m., Sat.-Sun. 7 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

E. QUEEN CREEK RD.

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11

GILBERT EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

TRACK I NG RESPONSE Although American Medical Response’s contract to provide ambulance service for Gilbert only requires the company to meet its metrics on a townwide basis, Gilbert has pushed for more consistent emergency response throughout town. The town broke down the times AMR missed the required response time of at least 8 minutes, 59 seconds by percentage of calls in 11 zones throughout town, each with its own re station. The map shows those percentages in each zone and the location of each re station.

8%

8%

CONTINUED FROM 1

W. BASELINE RD.

22%

said they felt improvements could have been made. Ultimately, though, the council approved the provider change 5-2. “It has been a long journey with a lot of work and research that [have] gone into this that has led us to this point today,” Town Manager Patrick Banger said, “where we believe it’s in the best interest of this community to expand our ambulance service so that we can provide the fastest possible response times with the best trained and qualied sta to handle the needs when people make the most important phone call of their lives.” The change was not without oppo- sition. The two dissenting votes were from Jared Taylor and Aimee Yentes, who questioned the costs of provid- ing ambulance services. Yentes said she would have liked to have allowed all service providers, including Gilbert Fire and Rescue, to bid for service. “I would be happy to instruct our legislative team to advocate for more competition in this regulatory environ- ment,” she said. “This isn’t about AMR. This is about making sure we make the right decision.” Theneed for change In presentations made since sta rst proposed expanding the town’s ambulance service last spring, ocials have cited an evolution from not want- ing to get into the ambulance business to taking over service. That evolution is rooted in the 2013 bankruptcy of Rural/Metro Corp., a dis- ruption in the ambulance market that left Gilbert feeling vulnerable to losing service. Rural/Metro serviced Gilbert until 2014. In 2015, Gilbert reached an agree- ment with AMR. In fact, AMR and town

10

E. GUADALUPE RD.

2

3

3%

9%

W. WARNER RD.

3%

7

202

8%

6

4

1

Percentage of calls exceeding contracted response times

E. WILLIAMS FIELD RD.

E. PECOS RD.

ocials note that Gilbert helped AMR get its certicate of necessity, or CON, from the Arizona Department of Health Services to operate ambulance service in Maricopa County. The town also sought its own CON to protect itself from ever losing service. But DHS expects ambulance CON holders to use the certicate to imple- ment service, leading the town to run a pilot program and open service last November from Fire Station No. 3 on Guadalupe Road east of Lindsay Road. Meanwhile, Gilbert began to be unhappy with some of AMR’s service, ocials said. “It’s not just about the CON,” Fire Chief Jim Jobusch said. “It’s not just about AMR. It’s about a list of things, several dierent things that we need to stabilize for our citizens. And we can do that by providing the service ourselves.” At the top of that list is response times. AMR’s CON for the county requires it to have a response time on 911 calls of 10 minutes at least 80% of the time. Gilbert’s contract with AMR requires it to respond within 8 minutes, 59 sec- onds at least 90% of the time.

10%

5

E. GERMANN RD.

4%

8

Station No. 1 Station No. 2 Station No. 3 Station No. 4 Station No. 5 Station No. 6 Station No. 7 Station No. 8 Station No. 9 Station No. 10 Station No. 11

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

E. QUEEN CREEK RD.

8%

E. OCOTILLO RD.

9

E. CHANDLER HEIGHTS BLVD.

13%

8 9 10 11

11

E. RIGGS RD.

N

HUNT HWY.

SOURCE: TOWN OF GILBERTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

However, Gilbert found in its data that in the northeast corner and south- ernmost portion of town, AMR falls far short of those standards, Jobusch said. The town’s data shows AMR not meet- ing the town’s standard 22%of the time in the northeast and 13% of the time in the south. Overall, the town reported 333 times that AMR did not reach the standard between May 1, 2019, and April 30, 2020, with 24% of those coming on

life-threatening calls. AMR combines all response times across the town to meet the requirements of its CON and its Gilbert contract. For its part, AMR ocials says they have enjoyed a good relationship with the town and have been open to changes. “We’re always open to looking at how their system can be designed to better service the community,” said Glenn Kaspryzk, chief operating ocer

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12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

for AMR in Arizona. However, Gilbert ocials also said they found it increasingly dicult to negotiate with AMR, the area’s largest ambulance service provider. Addition- ally, DHS can reject contracts, which it did last February on a negotiated extension between Gilbert and AMR because it considered the terms too burdensome for AMR to bear within its regulated fee structure. “We’ve been told, ‘Just negotiate more; negotiate better.’ But DHS is not going to allow us to put provisions in that potentially raise the rates in the area,” Jobusch said. The council approved an extension with AMR on Aug. 25 to provide service to the town until its ambulances are running. Qualitycontrol Gilbert ocials said they will achieve better response by expanding the service over what is now oered through AMR. The town will own eight ambulances and have six in service at any given time. If one is out for mainte- nance, there is backup to maintain the level of service. AMR had four ambulances in ser- vice, adding one or two more during peak service times, with Gilbert pro- viding one more. The service will be staed by trained PAY I NG THE BILL Gilbert ocials claim providing services through the Gilbert Fire and Rescue Department will be less expensive to patients than what is provided by AMR. Here is a comparison of their rates. The billing rates are the maximum allowed and are subject to lower reimbursement due to Medicare, Medicaid and private insurance allowances. The remaining balance is billed to the patient if the plan allows it.

projections now that they have data to back it up. Gilbert will have to pay startup costs up front, which were built into the scal year 2020-21 budget approved June 16. The six ambulance purchases approved Aug. 25 will cost nearly $1.4 million, while the stretchers and cots will cost about $253,000. Overall the town projects startup costs at $2.49 million and operational expenses at $30.05 million over eight years with revenue at $35.3 million during that time frame. After recover- ing startup costs, the town calculates net revenue at $2.76 million. That rev- enue then can be used to replace aging ambulances and equipment, ocials said. At the Aug. 25 council meeting, Tay- lor questioned whether the relatively small set of data from one ambulance could scale to a service line for the entire town. But Jobusch said he was condent the town has what it needs to make accurate projections. Spence said an independent DHS review of Gilbert’s nancial model, done in conjunction with its CON approval, conrmed the town’s nancial model was solid. The town also said it anticipates oering the service at a lower price to patients than what AMR charges. Costs are projected to be atminimum$47 less than what AMR charges, plus mileage costs. In town projections of some sce- narios, Gilbert Fire Department users would save $100 or more compared to AMR users. “I’ve seen the evolution of the ser- vices in town, and we’ve reached a point where this is the right decision to make for our citizens,” Jobusch said.

Basic Life Support

Advanced Life Support

Mileage

Supplies

$813.65

$913.01

$0

$11.18

Gilbert

$25 $100+ $25 $100+

$860.19

$965.67

$20.02

AMR

$46.52

$52.66

$8.84

Dierence

A user of the Gilbert Fire and Rescue Department’s ambulance service would save at minimum $46.52 over a user of AMR’s service, plus an additional $8.84 per mile on the transport from the scene to facility, according to the town. $

SOURCE: TOWN OF GILBERTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

civilian personnel. The town will decide where to place ambulances by looking at data on service calls closer to when service starts, which is expected to happen in mid-2021. "IT’S NOT JUST ABOUT THE CERTIFICATE OF NECESSITY. IT’S NOT JUST ABOUT AMR. IT’S ABOUT A LIST OF THINGS, SEVERAL DIFFERENT THINGS THATWE NEED TO STABILIZE FOROUR CITIZENS. ANDWE CANDO THAT BY PROVIDING THE SERVICE OURSELVES. " JIM JOBUSCH, GILBERT FIRE CHIEF Yentes has asked for a citizens' review commission to make certain the town was maintaining the level of service it outlined to residents. Council Member Bill Spence, a pro- ponent of the servicewho said he spent

many hours talking to stakeholders and other municipalities oering the service, liked Yentes’ idea. “I’m absolutely a fan of an appropri- ate snapshot that tells us, ‘Do we need to dig deeper? Are there problems, or are we seeing what we expect to get for the money we’re paying?’” Spence said. “I think that’s good.” Spence said he believes the data sup- ports expansion. “It’s a solid plan,” he said. “People that don’t see it in spite of the data are just committed to assigning an ambu- lance service as an expansion of gov- ernment. That’s an ideology that is valid, but lives are at stake. I think the decision that we made will save lives at Town ocials maintain the service is revenue-neutral, requiring no tax increase, because the service’s costs are borne by end users in billing. That was the town’s position before it launched its rst ambulance last fall, but ocials said they are more condent in their the end of the day.” Paying for service

For more information, visit communityimpact.com.

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GILBERT EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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