Lake Highlands - Lakewood | June 2022

LAKE HIGHLANDS LAKEWOOD EDITION 2022 VOLUME XX, ISSUE XX  XXXXXXXXXX, 2022

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HEALTH CARE EDITION

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 3  JUNE 10JULY 7, 2022

Correlating conditions Parkland Memorial Hospital sta said there is evidence of higher risk of suicide in patients with other conditions. A twofold increase in risk exists in patients with: a traumatic brain injury sleep disorders HIV/AIDS SOURCE: PARKLAND MEMORIAL HOSPITAL COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Screening for suicide risk Dallas hospitals, organizations work to implement mental health tools

IMPACTS

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Hospitals, organizations and school districts near the Lake Highlands and Lakewood areas of Dallas are working to reduce deaths by suicide through wide-reaching screening tools. BY MATT PAYNE

Other conditions associated with increased risk include: head, neck or lung cancer stroke migraine epilepsy NOTE: THESE CONDITIONS WERE DETERMINED BY SCIENTISTS ACCOUNTING FOR PSYCHIATRIC ILLNESSES, SUCH AS DEPRESSION. THE INFLUENCE OF PSYCHIATRIC ILLNESSES WAS REMOVED IN THIS CALCULATION.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

CITY ORDINANCE

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Parkland Memorial Hospital completes a range of suicide risk screenings per month. Primary care settings 26,000-28,000 | estimated positive rate of 2%-3%

Emergency department and inpatient units 15,000-17,000 | estimated positive rate of 7%

BUSINESS FEATURE

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HEALTH CARE EDITION 2022 SPONSORED BY • Baylor University Medical Center SNAPSHOT 11

MATT PAYNECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Local school districts set to hire new superintendents

DISTRICTS CHANGING LEADERSHIP Despite dierences in size and enrollment, Dallas and Richardson ISDs are in the same process of looking for a superintendent for next year.

5 YEARS average length of superintendent service 4 full-time superintendents since 2000 6.3 YEARS average length of superintendent service 5 full-time superintendents since 2000

37,638 students 55 campuses 153,861 students 230 campuses

BY JACKSON KING

Dallas and Richardson ISDs each expect to have a new, full-time superintendent in place for the beginning of the 2022-23 school year. DISD’s new leader is slated to be Austin ISD Superinten- dent Stephanie Elizalde, while RISD is accepting applica- tions through June 28, district ocials said. RISD has been in need of a permanent superintendent since December, when its board of trustees accepted the CONTINUED ON 18

DINING FEATURE

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SOURCES: DALLAS ISD, RICHARDSON ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. Now in 2022, CI is still locally owned. We have expanded to include hundreds of employees, our own software platform and printing facility, and over 40 hyperlocal editions across three states with circulation of more than 2.8 million residential of mailboxes.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS MONTH

FROM BARB: This month’s edition highlights trends in the local health care market as well as what Dallas hospitals are doing to identify and treat the risk of suicide in the community. You will also nd a list of local hospitals, urgent care locations and emergency facilities (see Page 12). We hope this annual guide is useful for your family. Barb Delk, GENERAL MANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

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LAKE HIGHLANDS  LAKEWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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SusieCakes

Club Pilates

COURTESY SUSIECAKES

COURTESY QUARRY MARKETINGCLUB PILATES

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NOW OPEN 1 Parlor’s Handcrafted Ice Creams opened April 30 at 6465 E. Mockingbird Lane, Ste. 465, Dallas. The ice cream shop oers a number of avors, includ- ing seasonal and limited-time varieties. Options include milk and cookies, French vanilla bean, mint chip and double choco- late chunk. Ingredients are sourced from area farms and businesses, according to Parlor’s website. 214-281-5057. www.parlorsicecreams.com 2 Wae House opened May 23 at 9777 Greenville Ave., Dallas. The restaurant is open 24 hour a day, serving breakfast dishes including steaks, hash browns, omelets and more alongside waes. A variety of lunch and dinner plates is also available. Wae House also has a loca- tion in the Lakewood area. 214-971-8771. www.waehouse.com 3 Boardroom Salon for Men opened May 23 in Dallas at the Lakewood Hillside Village. The barber salon is located at 6441 E. Mockingbird Lane, Ste. 100. The business oers haircuts for men and boys, shaves, hand and foot grooming, massag- es and coloring services. Customers can purchase various tiers of memberships online and schedule appointments. 469- 606-1211. www.boardroomsalon.com/ locations/lakewood 4 Paradigm Gym opened for its mem- bers May 16 at its new location in the Lakewood area of Dallas. The 24-hour tness center at 5815 Live Oak St. opened its doors to the public on June 1. Para- digm oers a variety of workout classes and one-on-one training programs to provide a quality workout experience. www.paradigmgyms.com

5 Total Care Primary Care opened May 11 at 10675 E. Northwest Hwy., Ste. 1615, Dallas. The clinic oers walk-ins and the ability to schedule same-day appoint- ments, according to the Total Care Primary Care website. Physical exams, u shots and COVID-19 tests are available. Patients also have the option to schedule a virtual visit. 214-609-1720. www.total.healthcare COMING SOON 6 SusieCakes is aiming to open in June at 6441 E. Mockingbird Lane, Ste. 150, Dallas. The bakery, which has locations in Texas and California, sells a variety of goods, such as cakes, cupcakes, cook- ies, pies and puddings. 800-730-2253. www.susiecakes.com 7 Club Pilates plans to open by early August at 6402 Gaston Ave., Ste. 6402A, Dallas. The workout studio oers a range of classes, including introductory, car- dio-based and muscle-building sessions, according to the Club Pilates website. 945-800-1115. www.clubpilates.com/ location/lakewood 8 Townhome development Lakeside at White Rock is slated to be complete by 2024 at 7207 Gaston Ave., Dallas. It will feature 106 units, which will be available in phases. The rst phase is set to be delivered in the rst quarter of next year. 214-702-2339. www.lakesidewhiterock.com 9 Pet Supplies Plus will open by early August at 6464 E. Northwest Hwy., Ste. 170, Dallas. The pet store will oer a va- riety of foods, toys and supplies for dogs, cats and several other animals. Existing

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A Lakewood and Lake Highlands Local Independent Agent since 2007.

Reed Wilcox 214-340-7333 | rwilcox@twfg.com 10233 E. Northwest Hwy., Ste. #516B, Dallas, TX 75238

10233 E. Northwest Hwy Ste 516 Dallas TX 75238 jennifer@jenniferwilcox.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY JACKSON KING, MATT PAYNE & WILLIAM C. WADSACK

The University of Texas at Dallas broke ground May 11 on the Edith and Peter O’Donnell Jr. Athenaeum, which ocials said will serve as the campus’s new “cultural district.”

JACKSON KINGCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Pet Supplies Plus locations oer self-ser- vice dog wash stations and grooming fa- cilities. The brand has locations through- out the North Texas region, including stores in Dallas, Richardson, Plano and elsewhere. www.petsuppliesplus.com 10 Williams Chicken plans to open a new location in the coming months at 9811 Forest Lane, Dallas. The restaurant serves white- and dark-meat chicken pieces, chicken sandwiches and wings as well as sides that include okra, corn and more. 972-437-1716. www.williamschicken.com RENOVATIONS 11 Casita Tex-Mex Bar and Grill is aiming to reopen by August following remod- eling at 5807 Blackwell St., Dallas. An expansive renovation to the restaurant is underway after a 2020 re, according to restaurant sta. The restaurant will continue to use the food truck it brought on during the closure. 214-750-5441. www.casitatexmex.com 12 Walmart is spending millions of dollars this year to update and remod- el nearly 50 stores throughout the Dallas-Fort Worth region, including the FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON The University of Texas at Dallas broke ground May 11 on the Edith and Peter O’Donnell Jr. Athenaeum . Approximately 12 acres in size, the athenaeum will include a performance hall, two museums and a parking garage within a central plaza. The athenaeum will rst host the new location for the Trammell and Margaret Crow Museum of Asian Art. Founded in 1998, the Crow Museum’s collection includes more than 1,000 works of art as well as a library of more than 12,000 books, catalogs and journals. Construction on the new Crow Museum of Asian Art is anticipated to be completed in spring 2024. Phase 2 of the athenaeum construction includes building a 53,000-square-foot performance hall. The performance

hall is expected to include a 600- seat concert hall, practice rooms and rehearsal rooms. The nal phase of construction will add the 50,000-square-foot museum for the traditional arts of the Americas. The athenaeum is supported by a $32 million gift from the O’Donnell Foundation, which has contributed more than $900 million at UT Dallas since 1957, according to campus ocials. UT Dallas’ campus is located at 800 W. Campbell Road, Richardson. 972-883-2111. www.utdallas.edu

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location at 6185 Retail Road, Dallas, the retailer announced May 5. Renovations to stores will make way for expanded shopping options, according to a Walmart news release. www.walmart.com 13 Demolition began in late April on a portion of the Lake Highlands Village shopping center at 8698 Skillman St., Dallas. Owner JAH Realty plans to turn the Tom Thumb-anchored shopping cen- ter into a mixed-use development with the addition of 85 townhomes on the east side of the property next to Audelia Road. A representative from JAH Realty said once demolition is completed, con- struction on the townhomes is expected to be done in several phases beginning next year and lasting into at least 2025. 214-220-2274. www.jahrealty.net CLOSINGS 14 Brickhouse Burgers and Shakes closed its location around March at 9090 Skillman St., Ste. 174A, Dallas, according to JAH Realty. The restaurant served sev- eral specialty burgers alongside chees- esteaks, chicken clubs and assorted sides. https://brickhouseburgersandshakes. business.site

      

        

     EXPIRES 7/15/22



EXPIRES 7/15/22

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LAKE HIGHLANDS  LAKEWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2022

TODO LIST

June events

COMPILED BY JACKSON KING

12 SHOP LOCAL Held every Sunday, the Lakewood Village Farmers Market is a one-stop shop for local produce, such as grass-fed beef, farm eggs, baked goods, goat cheese and more. Organized by the nonprot organization Good Local Markets, the market attracts vendors from within a 150-mile radius of Dallas. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free (admission). 6434 E. Mockingbird Lane, Dallas. www.goodlocalmarket.org 15 ROCK OUT TO DEAN LEWIS AT THE GRANADA THEATER Dean Lewis is performing at the Granada Theater in Lakewood June 15. According to the event’s description, Lewis is an Australian artist with over 6.1 billion streams and 3.3 million albums sold. Tickets can be purchased online. 8 p.m. $29-$129. Granada Theater, 3524 Greenville Ave., Dallas. 214-824-9933. www.granadatheater.com 18 LISTEN TO MUSIC AT VECTOR BREWING Glitter and her band bring their mix of indie, pop, rock and soul to the patio at Vector Brewing June 18. 7-9 p.m. Free (admission). Vector Brewing, 9850 Walnut Hill Lane, Ste. 405, Dallas. 469-676-0797. www.vectorbrewing.com 23 EXPERIENCE BIRDS OF PREY The Blackland Prairie Raptor Center visits the Audelia Road Branch Library June 23. According to its website, the center is an environmental preservation group that provides education about the “conservation of birds of prey and wildlife.” 3-4 p.m. Free. Audelia Road Branch Library, 10045 Audelia Road, Dallas. 214-670-1335. https://dallaslibrary.librarymarket.com 30 LISTEN TO A BEACH BOYS TRIBUTE BAND Sounds of Summer, a Beach Boys tribute show, is performing at the Dallas Arboretum June 30. According to the show’s website, Sounds of Summer includes “over 30 familiar hits and tells the story of America’s band—the Beach Boys.” 7:30-9:30 p.m. $10-$36. Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden, 8525 Garland Road, Dallas. 214-515-6615. www.dallasarboretum.org

JUNE 1819

WORTH THE TRIP MCKINNEY COTTON MILL

JUNE 11 ENJOY A WINE TASTING AT THE DALLAS ARBORETUM Cassaro Winery is hosting a wine testing at A Tasteful Place in the Dallas Arboretum. Attendees will be allowed to test ve dierent kinds of wine and be supplied with pairing suggestions. Charcuterie-style appetizers will be provided during the tasting. 2-4 p.m. $35-$40. Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden, 8525 Garland Road, Dallas. 214-515-6615. www.dallasarboretum.org 11 LEARN EAST DALLAS HISTORY THROUGH A LIVE PERFORMANCE Learn the history of east Dallas through a living history play featuring actors in full period costumes. The play takes place in the historic Aldredge House, which was constructed between 1915-17 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Organizers said the performance “brings to life the people, places and cultural changes in Dallas after the turn of the 20th century.” 11 a.m. Free. 5500 Swiss Ave., Dallas. www.friendsofaldredgehouse.org The Wine and Walls Mural Fest will see artists painting original designs on the historic cotton mill. Noon-6 p.m. Free-$100. 700 Anderson St., McKinney. 202-810-2101. www. millhousefoundation.org/muralfest (Miranda Jaimes/Community Impact Newspaper)

The Forest Green Branch Library is set to host a Slash/O fan ction writing event this month in honor of Pride Month. (Jackson King/Community Impact Newspaper)

FEATURED EVENT Celebrate Pride Month with the Dallas Public Libraries During the month of June, Dallas Public Libraries are holding several in- person and online events to celebrate Pride Month. On June 15, Dallas Public Libraries is hosting a Queer Reads Book Club online event at 7 p.m. Residents wishing to make colorful arts and crafts can also register to make a rainbow-colored wreath. The do-it-yourself craft-making event will be held June 18 at the Skillman Southwestern Branch Library from 11 a.m.-noon. The nal in-person events will be held June 18 and 30, with the libraries hosting a Slash/O fan ction writing event. According to the event description, participants will be tasked to write fan ction based on two characters from pop culture. The event is free and will take place

in the Forest Green Branch Library on June 18 from 1-2 p.m. and at the Skillman Southwestern Branch Library on Jun 30 from 5:30-6:45 p.m. For more information on the Dallas Public Library’s Pride Month activities, visit www.dallaslibrary.librarymarket.com/ event/pride-month. A. Skillman Southwestern Branch Library 5707 Skillman St., Dallas B. Forest Green Branch Library, 9619 Greenville Ave., Dallas 214-670-1400 https://dallaslibrary.librarymarket.com

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Find more or submit Lake Highlands and Lakewood events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION UPDATES

COMPILED BY MATT PAYNE & JACKSON KING

UPCOMING PROJECTS

TxDOT reaches halfway point of ongoing Dallas 635 East Project

Light at the end of the $1.74 billion 635 East Project running through Dallas is beginning to be seen, ocials said in a ceremony marking its upcoming halfway point. Representatives with the Texas Department of Transportation and Dallas ocials on May 19 were among those gathered in a parking lot near the Skillman Street bridge crossing over I-635. Nearby was a new, temporary bridge set to open in late spring that drivers will soon cross as the original bridge built in 1967 is demolished this summer. The 11-mile 635 East Project spans from just east of US 75 in north Dallas to I-30 in Mesquite. TxDOT is aiming to improve mobil- ity, operations and safety along I-635 in Dallas County. Construction began in spring 2020 and will last through late 2024. Mo Bur, Dallas district engineer

for TxDOT, said the new Skillman Street bridge portion of the project will simplify the drive over the highway and provide safer pedes- trian access with a “sleek, modern” design. TxDOT ocials expect steel installation for the permanent bridge to begin in 2023, with trac switching onto it in mid-2024. City Council Member Adam McGough called the Skillman Street and I-635 intersection the most dangerous in the entire region. However, he praised eorts from both past and current elected ocials and engineers who have worked to improve the intersection. “It has represented a lot of what we don’t want, and like and love about transportation,” McGough said. “What it’s moving toward ... is a lot of what we recognize as good about transportation; it gets people where we need to go.”

Construction work on Richmond Avenue from Matilda Street to Skillman Street is expected to be nished in June. Richmond Avenue street resurfacing work nearing end JACKSON KINGCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER Dallas is set to nish replacing the road surface and sidewalks on Richmond Avenue, Matilda Street to Skillman Street, in June. Work will include the addition of safety features to the street, such as speed tables, concrete bump-outs and a bike lane. Timeline: February-June Cost: $1.15 million Funding source: 2017 Dallas bond program

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Ridgecrest Road street project This project will include improvements to the existing asphalt street with reinforced concrete pavement as well as improved drainage and sidewalks. The project includes work on Ridge- crest Road east of Eastridge Drive to Sopac Trail. Timeline: February 2023-November 2024 Cost: $1.53 million Funding source: 2017 Dallas bond program ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MAY 25. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT LHLNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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JacksonSells Team 214.827.2400 scott.jackson@compass.com jacksonsells.com

The JacksonSells Team is a team of real estate agents affiliated with Compass. Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by federal, state, and local Equal Housing Opportunity laws.

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LAKE HIGHLANDS  LAKEWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2022

CITY & SCHOOLS

News from Dallas, Dallas ISD & Richardson ISD

NUMBERS TO KNOW This is the total budget approved May 25 by the city of Dallas for construction at the Willie B. Johnson Recreation Center in Hamilton Park. Senior activity and technology centers; a gymnasium; and a parking lot expansion comprise work underway at 12225 Willowdell Drive. The construction is funded by the 2017 bond program. $8.57M CITY HIGHLIGHTS RICHARDSON ISD The board of trustees unanimously approved more than $31.7 million for the planned expansion and renovation project at Forest Meadow Junior High School during its May 9 meeting. It also approved the nal stage for the J.J. Pearce High School renovation and expansion project for a guaranteed maximum price of just over $99 million. Funds from the 2021 RISD bond will be used to pay for the projects. DALLAS The city’s transportation department is looking to standardize its approach in addressing trac safety concerns of residents. Director of Transportation Ghassan Khankarl said the purpose of the new system is to better track projects and provide a consistent point of contact between the city and residents. DALLAS Businesses, nonprots and churches within residentially zoned areas of the city are now able to be granted a neighborhood market permit. Dallas City Council approved an ordinance that expands areas where markets can be held during its May 25 meeting. Mayor Pro Tem Chad West said he was excited to potentially address “food deserts” throughout Dallas, where grocery stores are not easily accessible.

Dallas ISD seeing declining number of graduates heading to college immediately

COLLEGE ENROLLMENT AFTER GRADUATION The percentage of Dallas ISD students going to college immediately after high school has declined, though four-year college enrollments are on the rise.

Overall college enrollment Four-year college enrollment Two-year college enrollment

BY MATT PAYNE

strategic initiatives, said a “major contributing factor” to the decline was the COVID-19 pandemic. “What we want to do is make sure all students have that path forward to a living-wage job,” Lusk said. Despite the trend, the number of students enrolling in four-year schools has risen. A total of 28% of students in the class of 2021 enrolled in a four-year school, according to the presentation. That is up from 25% of the class of 2020. DISD ocials also reported an ongoing decline in enrollment to two-year schools: from 31% in 2018 to 19% in 2021. District sta attributed this trend to a rising number of associate degrees earned by students still attending DISD schools.

DALLAS ISD The number of the district’s high school graduates immediately seek- ing secondary education has declined in recent years, but the total number of students heading to four-year colleges and universities from Dallas ISD is going up. The DISD board of trustees reviewed college enrollment numbers from recent graduating classes May 12. From the classes of 2018 to 2021, overall DISD graduates who enrolled in college immediately after high school slid from 58% to 46%, a presentation from distract sta showed. The sharpest drop in those years was from the classes of 2019 to 2020. Brian Lusk, DISD chief of

Graduate enrollments

60%

12% decrease since 2018

50%

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1% increase since 2018

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12% decrease since 2018

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SOURCE: DALLAS ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Board approves new sexual education curriculum for students in grades 612

BY MATT PAYNE

DALLAS ISD A new, opt-in sexual and reproductive health curriculum was approved May 26 for district students in grades 6-12. By a vote of 7-2, trustees approved the health education recommen- dations from the district’s School Health Advisory Council. For sex education, students with parental consent will receive instruc- tion based on materials from publisher McGraw Hill. The curriculum was not ocially submitted to the Texas Education Agency, DISD Executive Director Michael Ruiz said. He said the SHAC review found the material emphasized abstinence from sexual activity. Ruiz said TEA code mandates that must be presented as “the preferred choice of behavior.” Trustees Joyce Foreman and Camile White cast the two votes against the new curriculum package.

Improvements for competition gym oor approved at Lake Highlands High School The Lake Highlands High School competition gym oor hosts events for basketball, volleyball and more. (Jackson King/Community Impact Newspaper)

MEETINGS WE COVER

Dallas City Council meets June 15 and June 22 at 9 a.m. at Dallas City Hall, 1500 Marilla St., Dallas. www.dallascityhall.com/ pages/default.aspx Dallas ISD board of trustees meets June 23 at 6 p.m. at 5151 Samuell Blvd., Dallas. www.dallasisd.org Richardson ISD board of trustees meets June 13 at 6 p.m. at the RISD Administration Building, 400 S. Greenville Ave., Richardson. www.risd.org Dallas County Commissioners Court meets June 21 and July 5 at 9 a.m. in the Allen Clemson Courtroom of the Dallas County Administration Building, 411 Elm St., Dallas. www.dallascounty.org

BY JACKSON KING

facilities has become a pressing need. “As demonstrated in both our 2016 and 2021 bonds, we have aging facilities,” Branum said. “Many of our aging facilities are due to water leaks and other infrastructure failures.” Lake Highlands High School’s competition gym serves as the main indoor athletic facility for the school, holding sporting events for the school’s volleyball, boys basketball, girls basketball and wrestling teams.

RICHARDSON ISD The district’s board of trustees unani- mously approved improvements to the Lake Highlands High School competition gym oor during its May 23 meeting. The renovation project is expected to cost $267,390.06 and will be funded from the 2016 bond program, according to district ocials. Interim Superintendent Tabitha Branum said improve- ments to the district’s aging

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY

“ WHILE DALLAS IS A PLACE FOR BUSINESSES TO THRIVE, ... WE MUST ALSO BE MINDFUL OF TRENDS AND PRACTICES AROUND THIS ISSUE.” GAY DONNELL WILLIS, CITY COUNCIL MEMBER

Dallas City Council votes to prohibit retail sale of dogs, cats

BY MATT PAYNE

The retail sale of dogs and cats will no longer be allowed following a vote by Dallas City Council. The ordinance was unanimously approved, though Council Member Tennnell Atkins was absent from the May 11 meeting at Dallas City Hall. The ban will take eect in six months, according to the ordinance. A total of 28 individuals regis- tered to speak ahead of the vote. Employees of the Dallas Petland on Preston Road said their animals are only sourced from licensed and U.S. Department of Agriculture-inspected breeders. Those speaking in favor of the ban denounced so-called “puppy mills” that they said propagate animals in poor health. Jay Suk, the owner of the Dallas Petland on Preston Road, said his business will have to close due to the ordinance. “I understand that the purpose is to stop puppy mills. No one should buy from puppy mills,” Suk said. “By closing my store, more people will buy from the unregulated breeders who sell at ea markets and on Craigslist.” Among the speakers in favor of the ban was Tommy Habeeb, the host of reality TV show “To The Rescue.” The show “follows the story of what it takes to rescue dogs from precarious and dangerous situations,” according to the “To The Rescue” website. “We have to put our foot down today to make a dierence in this horric problem,” Habeeb said.

A kitten with Dallas Animal Services is fed. (Courtesy Dallas Animal Services)

A sign advertises puppies for sale at Petland. (Matt Payne/Community Impact Newspaper)

Petland is located in District 13 of Dallas, which is served by Council Member Gay Donnell Willis. Willis said a ban of this nature is not new and that cities across the state and nation are approving similar ordinances. The retail sale of pets has faced similar scrutiny in Frisco, where the city is also considering stricter rules. Willis encouraged Dallas residents seeking pets to adopt from city shelters or reputable breeders. “While Dallas is a place for busi- nesses to thrive, ... we must also be mindful of trends and practices around this issue,” Willis said. State legislation to address the retail sale of pets has also been considered. House Bill 1818, which was introduced by state Rep. Jared Patterson, RFrisco, in the 87th regular session last year, would have banned pet stores in Texas from sell- ing animals not sourced from animal control agencies, an animal shelter or an animal rescue. HB 1818 passed in both the House and Senate but was never signed by Gov. Greg Abbott, according to the Texas Legislature website.

ANOTHER OUTLET Dallas ocials encouraged residents to adopt pets from city-run animal shelters with the ban of the retail sale of dogs and cats. As of mid-May the number of available dogs in shelters is nearly ve times that of cats.

335 DOGS  74%

Available dogs | shelter capacity lled

A volunteer with Dallas Animal Services is greeted by a dog. (Courtesy Dallas Animal Services)

70 CATS  15%

Available cats | shelter capacity lled

THOUSANDS HELPED City animal shelters from October 2020 to September 2021 processed thousands of dogs and cats, adopting out nearly half of them.

16,433 dogs and cats taken in

Dallas Shelters

1

35E

B

190

121

635

2

7,754

35E

pets adopted

161

A

183

12

A

3

1,888 pets fostered

30

45

N

A 1818 N Westmoreland Rd., Dallas

B 16821 N Coit Rd., Dallas

SOURCE: DALLAS ANIMAL SERVICESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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LAKE HIGHLANDS  LAKEWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2022

BUSINESS FEATURE Big Boy’s Bike Repair Local teen steers rst business toward success L akewood resident Hayden Har- media site Nextdoor advertising his business; that expanded his reach to all of Lakewood and Lake Highlands. Within a year, his customers were traveling from as far away as Frisco and Allen. BY KAREN CHANEY

rison was 15 years old when his school pivoted to remote learning in 2020 due to COVID-19 regulations. That change left Hayden with a lot of free time. “I pretty much did two hours of school [per day],” he said. “I can’t sit still; I have ADHD, [and] I have to be doing something. So we would ride our bikes.” Hayden said he and his

Now that school is in person again, Hayden has resumed his positions on the Bishop Lynch High School football team and the bass shing team. During the school week, he focuses on his schoolwork and saves bicycle repairs

Hayden Harrison, owner of Big Boy’s Bike Repair, said his favorite thing about owning this business is meeting new people. (Photos by Karen Chaney/Community Impact Newspaper)

for the weekend. However, Hayden said he does answer business calls and emails throughout the week. Hayden said his customers range from avid riders

“AT THE TIME, I HAD AN OLD BIKE THAT WASN’T WORKING WELL, AND I PROBABLY PUT 400 MILES ON IT IN TWO MONTHS. THAT BIKE BROKE. I KNEW THE BASIC MECHANICAL STUFF ON A BIKE, SO I FIXED IT.” HAYDEN HARRISON, OWNER

friends rode their bicycles through every street in Lakewood and made numerous trips around White Rock Lake during that time. “At the time, I had an old bike that wasn’t work- ing well, and I probably put 400

Hayden said he cleans o the right amount rust to allow for bicycles to look old, but ride like they are new.

to people who need their chil- dren’s bicycles xed. He said his top three requested services are basic tune-ups for $40, tube repairs for $10 and restorations starting at $100. Hayden said his parents did not anticipate Big Boy’s Bike Repair would grow as much as it has over the last two years. “My dad [Taylor Harrison] loves the idea because he thinks it’s a great experience that I’m working for myself at such a young age and [being an entrepreneur] will drive me to work harder in the future,” Hayden said.

Advice to young entrepreneurs

Hayden oered tips to teens interested in starting a business. • Go for it. • Find something that is your passion. • Be personable. • Be condent. • Have a good support system.

miles on it in two months,” Hayden said. “That bike broke. I knew the basic mechanical stu on a bike, so I xed it.” A neighbor spotted Hayden making the repairs and asked whether she could bring her bike by for a repair. He said yes and soon found himself repairing bicycles for neighbors up and down his street. “I was 15 and about to start paying for gas, so I thought why not make a little money,” Hayden said. With the help of his mom, Megan Harrison, he put a post on social

When bicycles are donated to Big Boy’s Bike Repair, Hayden restores them and donates them to charitable organizations at Christmas time.

Big Boy’s Bike Repair 702 N. Glasgow Drive, Dallas 972-816-8122 www.bigboysbikerepair.com Hours: by appointment only

N

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2022

HEALTH CARE EDITION

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER IS PROUD TO SAY THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSOR

GOLD SPONSOR

Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas is a nationally recognized, faith-based hospital that cares for more than 300,000 people each year. In 1903, the hospital opened with 25 beds; today it is a major patient care, teaching and research center. Baylor Dallas has 914 licensed beds and serves as the agship hospital of Baylor Scott & White Health. It is the only Level 1 Trauma Center in Baylor Scott & White – North Texas, with an 85 bed emergency department. Our care has received many recognitions including but not limited to four consecutive Magnet designations by the American Nurses Credentialing Center, Comprehensive Stroke Center, IBS Watson Health Top 50 Cardiovascular Hospitals, Platinum Center of Excellence in Life Support, Level IV Epilepsy Center, Commission on Cancer accreditation, Level IV Maternity Care and Neonatal ICU. For 29 years, Baylor Dallas has been in U.S. News & World Report’s Best Hospitals list. To learn more or nd a physician, visit BSWHealth.com/Dallas.

HEALTH CARE SNAPSHOT

Local health care data and information

COMPILED BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

2022 STATEWIDE HEALTH CARE RANKINGS OUT OF 244 COUNTIES

COMPARING COUNTY HEALTH These rankings of all counties statewide are updated annually but include data from previous years. The factors listed are not comprehensive.

HEALTH OUTCOMES INCLUDE:

• LENGTH OF LIFE • QUALITY OF LIFE , such as the number of poor mental and physical health days reported

HEALTH OUTCOMES

HEALTH FACTORS INCLUDE:

35 43 83

1 1 1

Length of life Overall

• HEALTHBEHAVIORS , such as smoking, obesity, physical activity, excessive drinking, alcohol-impaired driving deaths, sexually transmitted infections and teen births • CLINICALCARE , including health insurance coverage; number of physicians, dentists and mental health providers; preventable hospital stays; and u vaccinations • SOCIOECONOMICFACTORS , such as educational attainment levels, children in poverty, income inequality and violent crimes • PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT FACTORS , such as air pollution, drinking water violations, housing problems and long commutes

COLLIN COUNTY DALLAS COUNTY

Quality of life HEALTH FACTORS

31 72

2 1

Overall

Health behaviors

40

1

Socioeconomic Physical environment Clinical care

143 164

5

107

SOURCES: ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION, UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN POPULATION HEALTH INSTITUTE, COUNTYHEALTHRANKINGS.ORG, U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

TRACKING VACCINATIONS

HEALTH CARE EMPLOYMENT TRENDS HEALTH CARE AND SOCIAL ASSISTANCE INDUSTRY EMPLOYMENT

While Dallas County has administered more doses, more of Collin County’s population is fully vaccinated. Data is up to date as of May 14, 2022.

COUNTY VACCINATIONS BY WEEK 200,000

PERCENTAGE OF RESIDENTS AGE 5+ FULLY VACCINATED 699,176 - 72.61%

Peak

3,955,651 1,776,082 Total

4/5/21-4/11/21

Dallas and Collin counties each saw a decrease in health care employment from 2019-21.

150,000

89,577

3/29/21-4/4/21

Sept. 2019 Sept. 2020 Sept. 2021

177,068

1,574,088 - 63.99%

100,000

51,473

2-year change -2.20%

48,126 50,341

50,000

17,670,293 - 77.94%

181,574

2-year change -1.37%

176,194 179,086

0

2020

2021

2022

State average

11

LAKE HIGHLANDS  LAKEWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2022

HEALTH CARE FACILITIES

Information on local hospitals ERs, urgent cares & retail clinics

COMPILED BY JACKSON KING

PRESTON RD.

635

8

WALNUTST.

3 11

FORESTLN.

KEY

MEADOW RD.

Hospitals

Retail clinic R

Urgent care center U

Emergency room E

4

ROYALLN.

10

GARLAND

9

6

14

21

Oers COVID19 vaccines V

Oers u vaccines F

Oers COVID19 testing T

WALNUT HILL LN. SKILLMAN ST.

1

LOVERSLN.

20

NORTHWEST HWY.

12

13

RETAIL RD.

HOSPITALS 1 Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas Trauma level: I NICU level: III Total number of employees: N/A Number of beds: N/A 8200 Walnut Hill Lane, Dallas 2143456789 www.texashealth.org/locations/ texas-health-dallas 2 Baylor University Medical Center (Dallas)

Total number of employees: 750 Number of beds: 218 9440 Poppy Drive, Dallas 2143246100 www.whiterockmedicalcenter.com ERS, URGENT CARE & RETAIL CLINICS 6 Preston Hollow Emergency Room E T 8007 Walnut Hill Lane, Dallas 2148913354 www.prestonhollower.com 7 Lakewood Emergency Room E T 6101 E. Mockingbird Lane, Dallas 4693924449 www.lakewoodemergencyroom.com 8 CareNow Urgent Care-Abrams U T F 9323 Lyndon B. Johnson Freeway, Dallas 2145703003 www.carenow.com 9 Watermark Urgent Care U T F 9780 Lyndon B. Johnson Freeway, Ste. 124, Dallas 4693170028

75

15

POPPY DR.

7

WHITE ROCK LAKE

MOCKINGBIRD LN.

16

5

75

35E

19

18

DNT TOLL

30

17

12

ABRAMS RD.

ROSS AVE.

80

DALLAS

2

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

17 Allcare Family Clinic U F 3825 Ross Ave., Ste. 150, Dallas 2145159646 https://allcareclinicsdallas.com 18 CareNow Urgent Care-Lakewood U T F 2221 Abrams Road, Dallas 9726748510 www.carenow.com 19 Frontline Emergency Room E T F 7331 Gaston Ave. Ste. 180, Dallas 2144999555 https://frontlineerdallas.com 20 Citra Urgent Care U T V F 6176 Retail Road, Ste. 400, Dallas www.sinaiurgentcare.com 2149776798 21 Advanced Dallas Hospital & Clinics E 7502 Greenville Ave., Dallas 4692216000 www.advanceddallas.com

12 Texas Health Breeze Urgent Care U T F 6411 E. Northwest Hwy., Ste. 120, Dallas 4694959110 www.breezeurgentcare.texashealth.org 13 Baylor Scott & White Urgent Care-Lovers Lane U T F 5800 E. Lovers Lane, Dallas 9728176260 www.bswhealth.com/locations/urgent-care- lovers-lane 14 Concentra Urgent Care U F 5601 Greenville Ave., Dallas 2148216007 www.concentra.com/urgent-care-centers 15 CareNow Urgent Care-Greenville U T F 4844 Greenville Ave., Dallas 2142959410 www.carenow.com 16 NextCare Urgent Care U F 6350 E. Mockingbird Lane, Dallas 2148280448 www.nextcare.com/locations/tx/ dallas-e-mockingbird-lane

Trauma level: I NICU level: IV Total number of employees: N/A Number of beds: 914 3500 Gaston Ave., Dallas 2148200111 www.bswhealth.com/locations/dallas 3 Medical City Dallas Hospital Trauma level: N/A NICU level: IV Total number of employees: 2,958 Number of beds: 899 7777 Forest Lane, Dallas 9725667000 https://medicalcityhealthcare.com/locations/ medical-city-dallas 4 Kindred Hospital Dallas Central Trauma level: N/A NICU level: N/A Total number of employees: N/A Number of beds: 60 8050 Meadow Road, Dallas 4692326500 www.kindredhealthcare.com 5 White Rock Medical Center Trauma level: N/A NICU level: II

www.watermarkurgentcare.com 10 Dallas Family Medicine U T V 8668 Skillman St., Dallas 4698092254 www.dallasfamilymedicine.com 11 Complete Med Care U F 8989 Forest Lane, Ste. 146, Dallas 9727927777 www.completemedcare.net

This list is not comprehensive.

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12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PEOPLE Rebecca Farrell

2022 HEALTH CARE EDITION

BY JISHNU NAIR

THE DOCTOR IS ONLINE Telehealth usage increased during the pandemic, but usage was not equitable across all populations in 2021. Percentages below show the percentage of groups utilizing telemedicine.

Program and outreach director, National Alliance on Mental Illness, Central Texas

Rebecca Farrell serves as the program and outreach director for the National Alliance on Mental Illness’ Central Texas aliate. The national nonprot, which has over 600 state organizations and aliates across the United States, works to educate and provide resources on mental health. Farrell said the pandemic laid bare existing deciencies in mental health care. But as mental health came to the forefront in the pandemic, conversations about mental health became more “mainstream”—which she hopes will lead to greater education on mental illnesses. Answers have been edited for length and clarity. WHAT DOES THE STATE OF

TELEHEALTH WAS MOST USED BY

TELEHEALTH USE WAS LEAST USED BY

Those without a high school diploma 38.1%

The 18-24 age group 72.5%

Those making at least $100,000 68.8%

The 65 and older age group 43.5%

Black individuals 53.6% Asian individuals 51.3% Latin individuals 50.7%

Those with private insurance 65.9%

overall, the suicide rates are higher amongst white males who are older as well. … Males will have died by suicide at a higher rate than females; however, females are more likely to … attempt suicide. And we are seeing a rise in suicide attempts by African American females and also from our children who identify as LGBTQ. WHAT ARE SOME BARRIERS TO ACCESSING CARE? So when we look at access to care, we want to look at what’s available … instead of quality. The second aspect we consider is of those providers, how many actually look like individuals who are seeking [care] back home? So we know that [Black, indigenous and people of color] members are less likely to seek help, even if it exists, because they may not have a provider who looks like them. … The other reasons that we have a lack of access to health care is insurance. … If you are underinsured, then you’re really limited in the scope of where you can go and receive [care], or even if you don’t have insurance [you’re] really limited. And how many geographical locations or communities oer free health care or have free health care clinics? And then, if you have Medicaid, you know, certain health care systems have a cap on how many Medicaid patients they will accept, you know, and so even having insurance may hinder your ability to receive care, because the providers may not accept those insurances. HOW HAS THE PERCEPTION OF MENTAL HEALTH CHANGED? If we do try to look at silver linings, our experiences of the pandemic has opened the door more in terms

White individuals 61.9%

MENTAL HEALTH CARE LOOK LIKE TWO YEARS INTO THE PANDEMIC? So the pandemic really has brought to light two primary issues. The rst one is how extensive the gaps in our health care systems are, and then the second—which people might not have been aware of—is how we lack the support and resources for addressing our youth and adolescents’ mental health. … And with that, what we have noticed is that there’s been an increase in the number of ER visits, especially amongst our youth and adolescents. … Since 2017, suicide has become the eighth leading cause of death for our children ages 5-11, and it is the second leading cause of death for our youth ages 10-24 since 2018. … So when we look at our health care providers, … what we have wit- nessed during the pandemic is higher, higher levels of empathy fatigue, … And so we have noticed that people are mass-exiting their places of employment, because they’re expe- riencing so much emotional distress, anxiety and depression. … We see long waitlists, because things have moved to telehealth. … What we also noticed when the pandemic hit was that there was a dramatic change in mental health assistance, and then also we saw an increase in mental health, emer- gency consultations and in-home care as well. WHAT POPULATIONS ARE HIT THE HARDEST BY THE PANDEMIC AS IT RELATES TO MENTAL HEALTH? We know that suicide rates are higher amongst males. And then also,

SOURCE: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF PLANNING AND EVALUATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

WHEN THE PANDEMIC HIT, IT REALLY EXPOSED WHAT WE ARE LACKING IN OUR SYSTEM. ” REBECCA FARRELL, PROGRAM AND OUTREACH DIRECTOR, NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL ILLNESS, CENTRAL TEXAS

diagnostic criteria, characteristics of very individual lives. So depression may not look the same between two people, because it’s personal. … And then I like to share with people to remember our ABCs, … so being able to identify dierent types of strategies based on the letters of the alphabet. … Establish those routines; main- tain those routines. And then focus on what you can control, and spend time with your friends and family. Route yourself. Give yourself grace. And then I like to say, humor—let’s laugh. I think sometimes we forget to nd humor, to laugh. … … The other thing that they can do is contact … the closest [NAMI] al- iate. … We are a vital resource, and we provide resources and programs, education support and advocacy for free to those who participate, who partake in them. … And, nally, it’s OK to ask for help—to accept that it is OK to ask for help. And then it is OK to not be OK.

of being able to talk about mental health, about normalizing conversa- tions about mental health. … And then also, we’re beginning to talk about how mental health is really connected to our physical health. So being able to say mental health is health. … We are seeing more people wanting to learn about mental health conditions. … They want to have a better understand- ing of what they are experiencing internally, if they’re having mental health conditions. … If a loved one or friend or coworker is experiencing mental health conditions and is act- ing dierently, they want to have a better understanding and knowledge base of what is going on. SPEAKING OF SELFCARE, WHAT ARE SOME OTHER THINGS WE CAN DO IN OUR DAYTODAY LIVES? It’s important for us to understand how stress aects us, share similar

13

LAKE HIGHLANDS  LAKEWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2022

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