Franklin - Brentwood Edition - November 2020

FRANKLIN BRENTWOOD EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 9  NOV. 10DEC. 13, 2020

ONLINE AT

Waiting to reopen

INSIDE

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IMPACTS

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November 2020 election results Holiday G I F T G U I D E ELECTION

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Venues, such as The Franklin Theatre, have been shut down during the pandemic. (Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

Local employers adapt to COVID19 Demographics poise area for remote work

Grand reopening Despite the pandemic, companies that announced their relocations or expansions in Williamson County in 2019 and early 2020 went through with them in 2020.

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Announced relocation in 2019; opened new headquarters in May 2 Ramsey Solutions Announced expansion in 2020; expected to be complete in 2021 3 THNKS Announced relocation to Franklin in 2020; opened in 2020 4 Red Collar Pet Foods Announced expansion in Franklin in 2019; opened in 2020

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BY WENDY STURGES

ABBYLEIGH GIFTS

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As the pandemic stretches on, many companies are adapting to a new work environment while looking ahead to how they will grow in an uncertain economic climate. In 2019 and early 2020, a number of companies, such as Mitsubishi Motors North America, THNKS and Ramsey Solutions, announced they would move oces to or expand their CONTINUED ON 16

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SOURCE: TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON . Complete 2020 by joining your neighbors with a contribution of any amount to CI Patron. Funds support Community Impact Newspaper ’s hyperlocal, unbiased journalism and help build informed communities. Choose IMPACT . Make a CONTRIBUTION . Strengthen JOURNALISMFORALL . Contribute today! Snap or visit

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more

FROMLACY: One of the biggest words we have heard this year is “adapt.” Our cover stories this month take a look at how dierent sectors have made pivots to survive this year. With many employees working from home, companies are taking a look at other factors that make Williamson County a unique place to work. Also, with many events canceled, we explore how some of our local arts organizations are staying connected—virtually—this year. Lacy Klasel, PUBLISHER

MARKET TEAM EDITOR Wendy Sturges

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Lindsay Scott ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Maureen Sipperley METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Lacy Klasel, lklasel@communityimpact.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON

FROMWENDY: If you are shopping for loved ones this holiday season, it is more important this year than ever to support a local business if you can. So many businesses in Franklin and Brentwood have lost revenue this year due to closures and the loss of tourism. Our annual Holiday Gift Guide (see Page 10) oers a few ideas on local businesses to support and help keep their doors open. Wendy Sturges, EDITOR

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 6 News, data on local road projects

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES Neighborhood construction projects

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THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

New businesses Places to nd gifts Local elections covered 9 5 18

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

NOWOPEN 1 Kate & Lulu’s Kitchen opened Oct. 6 at 158 Front St., Ste. 110, Franklin, in the Westhaven community. The eatery oers breakfast items and pastries, includ- ing Texas favorites, such as kolaches. Gluten-free and vegan items are also available. 713-647-1077. www.kateandluluskitchen.com 2 Pinspiration opened a new location in Brentwood at 91 Seaboard Lane, Ste. 108, Brentwood, on Oct. 25. The business is a do-it-yourself craft studio where guests can make custom projects, such as canvas paintings, wood art, holiday decorations and other home decor items. Pinspiration also oers a “splatter room” where chil- dren can make painted art projects while wearing protective gear. 629-202-7498. www.pinspiration.com 3 Athenian Nail Spa & Bar opened in October in Cool Springs at 1201 Liberty Pike, Franklin. The salon oers specialty manicure and pedicure services, including paran treatments, sugar scrubs and nail art. 615-401-9054. www.athenianspa.com 4 ALDI opened a new location in Brent- wood at 7117 Southpoint Parkway, Brent- wood, on Oct. 29. The grocery store, which oers fresh produce, frozen goods, staples, snacks and more, is planning to open a second Brentwood location in mid-November, according to a company spokesperson. www.aldi.us 5 Free Flow Yoga opened Oct. 16 in the Berry Farms community at 6041 Rural Plains Circle, Ste. 120, Franklin. The studio oers membership packages for Vinyasa Flow, Power Flow, pre- and post-natal yoga classes, and more. 615-2190-9306. www.freeowyoga.com 6 Oine by Aerie opened its rst brick-and-mortar location in late October inside the CoolSprings Galleria at 1800 Galleria Blvd., Ste. 2130, Franklin. The shop oers women’s athletic wear, in- cluding leggings, bike shorts, sports bras and more. 629-235-6596. www.ae.com Medical House Calls launched opera- tions of its in-home, health care business serving the Franklin area in early Sep- tember. The company, led by Stu Jones and Justin Boggs, specializes in urgent

care, intravenous hydration therapy and other medical visits in the patient’s home for an annual at fee. The company also oers in-home rapid COVID-19 testing while supplies last. 615-838-2375. www.medicalhousecallstn.com COMING SOON 7 Cae’ Artisan is expected to open later this fall at 1113 Murfreesboro Road, Ste. 254, Franklin, near Painted Tree Marketplace. The eatery will oer coee drinks as well as meal options, such as salads and paninis. www.caeartisan.com 8 Body Sugar Boutique is slated to open in November at 30 Mayeld Drive, Ste. 202, Franklin. The salon oers sugar hair removal, a process using organic paste to remove body hair. Body Sugar Boutique also operates locations in Nashville and Mt. Juliet. www.bodysugarboutique.com 9 FYE will open a new location in mid-November inside the CoolSprings Galleria at 1800 Galleria Blvd., Ste. 1120 Franklin. The store carries a selection of apparel, electronics and collectibles. www.fye.com RELOCATION 10 Olivia Olive Oil relocated in October from 443 Cool Springs Blvd., Ste. 103, Franklin, to 118 E. Main St., Franklin, at Harpeth Square. The shop oers a selection of specialty olive oils as well as vinegars and other food products. 615-771-9595. www.oliviaevoo.com EXPANSIONS 11 Curio Brewing Company announced in October it has expanded its seating area in its location at 216 Noah Drive, Frank- lin, to include a back patio. The business oers coee drinks and craft beer on tap. 615-472-1124. www.curiobrewing.com 12 The Coee House at Second and Bridge , located at 144 N. Second Ave., Franklin, announced in October it will launch a drive-thru coee trailer later this year which will travel through Franklin and Williamson County. Customers can nd up- dates on the trailer’s location through the company’s Instagram page. 615-465-6362. www.thecoeehousefranklinshop.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

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COURTESY ALDI

ANNIVERSARY 13 Herban Market celebrated its fth anniversary in late October, according to an announcement from the business. The restaurant and market, located at 3078 Maddux Way, Franklin, oers a breakfast, lunch and dinner menu as well as fresh coee, a selection of groceries and well- ness products and a wine bar. 615-567-6240. www.herban-market.com NEWMANAGEMENT 14 Franklin-based Summit Behavioral Health Care announced in September that Williamson County resident Brent Turner has been appointed CEO of the addiction treatment and behavioral health company. The company—which has corporate oces at 389 Nichol Mill Lane, Stes. 100 and 160, Franklin—operates 21

centers in 15 states. Turner previously served as president of Acadia Healthcare until 2019. 877-463-3553. www.summitbhc.com IN THE NEWS 15 CBL Properties, which owns more than 107 properties in 26 states, including the CoolSprings Galleria in Franklin, an- nounced Nov. 2 that it has begun Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceedings. CBL ocials said in a release they are working to imple- ment a restructuring support agreement, which will help reduce its debt by about $1.5 billion. According to the company, the Chapter 11 process will allow CBL-owned businesses to continue operations, and malls are not expected to close. 855-914-5668. www.cblproperties.com/ restructuring

The partnership is slated to end next year, which will allowWilliamson County to search for new pediatric care options.

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER STAFF

FEATURED IMPACT IN THE NEWS Ocials with Williamson Medical Center announced Oct. 23 the hospital will not renew its partnership with the Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital Vanderbilt. The partnership was established in 2013, when the medical center partnered with Vanderbilt to construct a hospital on the WMC campus, according to WMC. On Oct. 22, WMC’s

board of trustees made the decision to forgo renewing that contract with Vanderbilt University Medical Center, which will expire July 15, 2021. According to WMC, forgoing the contract renewal allows the medical center to “contractually explore all options” to provide pediatric care for Williamson County in the future. 615-435-5000. www.williamsonmedicalcenter.com

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

ONGOING PROJECTS 1 Franklin Road-Main Street- Columbia Avenue repaving

GRANNY WHITE PIKE

development is on track to be completed in fall 2021, according to a recent update from TDOT. The project is split into two phases, the first of which will create a two-lane road with a single bridge over the Harpeth River and the second of which will expand the roadway to four lanes and create another bridge crossing. Access points will be at Hillsboro Road, Del Rio Pike and Old Charlotte Pike, according to TDOT. Timeline: 2019-2021 (Phase 1 only) Cost: $45.1 million Funding sources: TDOT, city of Franklin 3 Franklin Road widening TDOT crews have shifted south of the intersection of Franklin Road and Moores Lane near Brentwood as work continues to widen the road from two to five lanes with a continuous center-turn lane. The roadwork will reduce traffic down to one left-turn lane and one right-turn/thru- lane, and drivers should expect delays. Timeline: January 2020-April 2022 (Phase II) Cost: $27.4 million Funding source: TDOT

The Tennessee Department of Transpor- tation continued work in October on a repaving project along Franklin Road; on Main Street in downtown Franklin; and on Columbia Avenue from Country Road run- ning south to Mack C. Hatcher Parkway. Timeline: Aug. 31-November Cost: TBD Funding source: TDOT

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WENDY STURGES/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

2 Mack C. Hatcher Parkway extension Phase 1 of a TDOT project to extend the Mack C. Hatcher Parkway from Hillsboro Road just outside downtown Franklin to Hwy. 96 West near the Westhaven

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF NOV. 3. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT FRBNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

Developments underway in your community

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

Forty units proposed for new aordable housing development

Tenants have begun opening at McEwen Northside. (Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

With the median home value in the city of Franklin estimated to be about $460,000, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, some developers are looking to add more aordable housing to the area. Hillhaven is a new development being proposed by Community Hous- ing Partnership, a Franklin-based organization that develops aordable housing. The community would be located near the intersection of Liberty Pike and Mack C. Hatcher Parkway. A neighborhood meeting for the community was hosted by the city of Franklin on Oct. 6. Preliminary plans for the 13.8-acre site include 40 housing units—32 condominiums in eight buildings, as well as eight single-family, detached homes. The buildings, dubbed “big houses,” are buildings designed to look like one of Gamble Design Collaborative, the design representa- tive for the project. Gamble said the homes are slated to be for-sale units rather than rental properties. “Homes must be owner-occupied; they cannot be rented to a second party,” he said. The 1,100-square-foot condomini- ums would sell for about $225,000 each, while the single-family homes, house but actually contain four units, according to Greg Gamble, owner

ranging from 1,100 to 1,200 square feet, would sell for about $290,000, Gamble said. The developer is requesting the city of Franklin change the zoning type from estate residential, which provides for single-family lots, to planned district zoning, which allows a combination of building uses. Additionally, Envision Franklin, the city’s long-term land-use plan, categorizes the area as a conservation subdivision, which allows for hous- ing and 50% open space for conser- vation. Gamble said the proposed development would leave about 68% of the site as open space. “Nothing can be developed within that area,” Gamble said. “We’re proposing a dedication to the city of Franklin Parks Department.” Gamble said the city owns an area

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ONGOING PROJECTS

PROJECT PROPOSAL Preliminary plans for a new aordable housing development were presented to Franklin residents in October. The new neighborhood would include:

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McEwen Northside Tenants continue to be announced at McEwen Northside, a 45-acre mixed-use development on Aspen Grove Drive in the Cool Springs area. In October, Boyle, the developer for the project, conrmed burger eatery Shake Shack will open at McEwen in 2021, joining existing tenants, such as Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams, Just Love Coee Café and Ti’s Treats. Additional tenants will include Perry’s Steakhouse and Vintage Vine 100, a wine bar.

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single-family, detached homes

8 buildings with 32 condominium units

SOURCES: COMMUNITY HOUSING PARTNERSHIP, GAMBLE DESIGN COLLABORATIVECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

“HOMESMUST BE OWNEROCCUPIED, THEY CANNOT BE RENTED TOA SECONDPARTY.” GREG GAMBLE, GAMBLE DESIGN COLLABORATIVE

adjacent to the property, which could potentially be converted into hiking and biking trails. The site plan also includes a stormwater detention area. During the

housing while keeping the property values in the area, which are typically above $300,000, comparable. Homes would still be appraised according to fair market value, Gamble said. Additionally, Gamble said the developers are still working to study possible trac eects. “We need to spend some time looking at the trac patterns and adding new trips to these roads, and we plan on continuing to do that,” Gamble said. The project is slated to be pre- sented to the city’s planning commis- sion Dec. 10.

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Carothers Crossing West Construction is ongoing on Carothers Crossing West, a 20-acre mixed-use development under construction near Liberty Pike and Carothers Crossing in Franklin. The site is slated to include more than 300 units of multifamily housing as well as oce and retail space, according to SouthStar, the developer for the project.

meeting, residents raised concerns about the number of cars that would be added to the trac in the area as well as potential changes in property values. Representatives with CHP said the homes will come with equity grants to help homeowners nd aordable

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

CITY& COUNTY

News from Franklin, Brentwood & Williamson County

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

DATE TOKNOW the implementation of the Wil- liamson 2040 plan. The proposed plan would limit residential zoning density in unincorporated county areas to a minimum of one residen- tial unit per ve acres of land. The plan had not been approved as of press time and video is available on the county’s YouTube page. NOV. 9 The Williamson County Com- mission met on this date to vote on CITY& SCHOOL HIGHLIGHTS BRENTWOOD City ocials held a ceremony Nov. 7 to rename the dog park near Tower Park after longtime resident Peggy Howell, who died in 2018. The new name, “Miss Peggy’s Bark Park,” was approved by the board of commissioners in November 2019. WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS The district will have eight ex days through the rest of the 2020-21 school year to give teachers more time for training while students learn asynchronously from home. The dates were approved by the WCS board of education Oct. 19. All ex days are on Fridays.

Franklin approves newpermitting process for public demonstrations

PROTEST PERMITS Under a new ordinance approved by the city of Franklin, organizers who wish to protest in the city must go through a process to obtain a permit.

City of Brentwood approves temporary outdoor dining rules a process in the city’s municipal codes to address public gatherings. The new ordinance requires event organizers to apply for a permit with the city before gathering. FRANKLIN As a number of protests have been held in the city this year, city ocials are looking to balance the need to organize demonstrations and protect First Amendment rights. On Oct. 13, the city of Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen voted 5-4 to approve an ordinance to create BRENTWOOD Since most restau- rants were allowed to reopen in May, many businesses have been operating at limited capacity to allow for more distance between seating to limit the spread of the coronavirus. To help smaller restaurants in the area add more capacity in a safer manner, the city will allow restau- rants to set up outdoor dining areas through the end of the year. The measure was approved unan- imously during the Brentwood City Commission meeting Oct. 12. Through Jan. 1, 2021, restaurants in the city can apply to add outdoor seating. City codes and safety requirements will still be in place. The new guidelines will allow restaurants to set up three to ve tables directly outside.

City ocials said the ordinance is intended to protect participants while allowing time for the city to organize logistics, such as use of public spaces and closures of streets. Under the new rules, permits are required for public gatherings with 20 or more participants or for events requiring street closures. The permit application must be submitted to the city at least 48 hours before the event. There are no fees required for the permit, according to the city.

A permit is needed for groups of 20 or more.

An application for a permit must be led no later than 48 hours before the event. The city must approve or deny the permit within 24 hours of receiving the application. Counterprotesters will have designated areas and will not be allowed to commingle with protesters.

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• Nov. 13 • Dec. 4 • Jan. 15 • Jan. 29

• Feb. 5 • Feb. 26 • March 12 • March 26

Williamson County is constructing a new, 33,000-square-foot animal shelter in Franklin. (Rendering courtesy 906 Studio Architects)

FRANKLIN The city of Franklin approved a budget amendment Oct. 28 to fund 2% pay increases for city employees beginning in 2021; to ll seven vacant sta positions; and to begin preliminary design work on a new City Hall building. The city funded the amendment with local and state sales tax revenue. In accordance with an executive order from Gov. Bill Lee, municipal meetings may be held virtually until at least Dec. 27. Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen Meets Nov. 24 and Dec. 8 at 7 p.m. Workshop meetings are always held two hours prior. 615-791-3217. www.franklintn.gov Brentwood City Commission Meets Nov. 12 and 26 at 7 p.m. 615-371-0060. www.brentwoodtn.gov Williamson County Schools board of education Meets Nov. 16 at 6:30 p.m. 615-472-4000. www.wcs.edu Franklin Special School District board of education Meets Dec. 14 at 6:30 p.m. at Freedom Middle School at 750 Hwy. 96 W., Franklin. 615-794-6624. www.fssd.org MEETINGSWE COVER

Construction begins on newanimal shelter

WILLIAMSON COUNTY Work is ocially underway on the new Williamson County Animal Shelter. Shelter employees and county ocials broke ground Oct. 14 on a $15.4 million facility in Franklin on Old Charlotte Pike Road East. Construction will be complete next fall, and the shelter is expected to move in November 2021. The new, 33,000-square-foot facility, designed by local rm 906 Studio Architects, will include

capacity for 86 dogs and 100 cats. It will also feature a medical wing and exercise areas. “We’re going to have the best in animal housing [and] oce space, ... and I’m honored to be here in this point in history,” WCAS Executive Director Ondrea Johnson said. Funding for the new facility was provided through the county as well as a $1.4 million donation from Friends of the Williamson County Animal Shelter.

Williamson County extendsmaskmandate throughDec. 29 WILLIAMSON COUNTY In a press conference Oct. 22, Williamson County Mayor Rogers Anderson announced the county mask mandate would be reinstated, as the county has seen an increase in active COVID-19 cases. The mandate went into eect Oct. 24 at 12:01 a.m. and has since been extended through Dec. 29 at midnight, which is when Gov. Bill Lee’s order allowing counties to mandate mask use expires. ourselves at a crossroad, and we need to take new action to help ensure that we are headed down the right path again,” Anderson said. The county’s previous mask mandate expired Aug. 24. Active coronavirus cases have been steadily rising over the past weeks, peaking at 847 cases Oct. 26, according to data from the Tennessee Department of Health.

Exemptions from the previous county mask mandate are expected to apply, including that children age 12 and under are exempt unless they are on school property.

“Since early summer, we’ve worked together as a com- munity to bring down these trends; however, today we nd

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

ELECTION

Election turnout in Williamson County

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

TURNOUT HISTORICAL

BREAKDOWN EARLY VOTING On Nov. 3, thousands of Williamson County residents headed to the polls to cast their ballots in the state general and presidential elections. Due to a large number of expected absentee ballots and higher- than-average turnout, all results and statistics are unofficial until canvassed. Voter turnout totals over 80% in 2020election With concerns surrounding the coronavirus pandemic looming over the election this year, thousands of voters opted to cast their ballots early. Early voting reached a historic high in 2020 as compared to past years. Totals have not been canvassed as of press time.

November election turnout in Williamson County is typically higher in presidential election years, according to historic data from the Tennessee Secretary of State’s Office. However, preliminary data shows 2020 turnout as a new high mark.

100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50%

83%

Voter turnout for elections in Williamson County

72.11%

79.71%

77.49%

72.59%

71.81%

SOURCES: TENNESSEE SECRETARY OF STATE’S OFFICE, WILLIAMSON COUNTY ELECTION COMMISSION/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

0%

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2012

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LOCAL

U.S. Senate R Bill Hagerty : 62.25% D Marquita Bradshaw : 35.11% I Yomi “Fapas” Faparusi Sr. : 0.36% I Jeffrey Alan Grunau : 0.14% I Ronnie Henley : 0.29% I G. Dean Hill : 0.16% I Steven J. Hooper : 0.32% I Aaron James : 0.24% I Elizabeth McLeod : 0.56% I Kacey Morgan : 0.32% I Eric William Stansberry : 0.23% U.S. representative, District 7

I Ronald Brown : 2.17% I Scott Anthony Vieira Jr. : 0.57% State representative, District 61 R Brandon Ogles* : 65.93% I Sam Bledsoe : 34.07% State representative, District 63 R Glen Casada* : 59.63% D Elizabeth Madeira : 32.33% I Bradley Fiscus : 8.03% State representative, District 65

ELECTION RESULTS

2008 70,302

2012 65,194

*Incumbent

Winner

2016 81,124

D Democrat R Republican

I Independent

2020 111,473

R SamWhitson* : 68.06% D Jennifer Foley : 31.94%

Two U.S. candidates and three state candidates were chosen to represent Williamson County.

SOURCE: WILLIAMSON COUNTY ELECTION COMMISSION/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

R Mark E. Green* : 69.93% D Kiran Sreepada : 27.33%

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9

FRANKLIN - BRENTWOOD EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

GUIDE

Where to nd gifts in Franklin, Brentwood

6

3

G I F T G U I D E

Curio Brewing Co.

The Bottle Shop at McEwen

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

For the hard-to-shop-for 11 Carpe Diem Records FromWillie Nelson and Waylon Jennings to Ray Charles and Aretha Franklin, Carpe Diem carries thousands of vinyl records as well as CDs, vintage cameras and antiques. 212 S. Margin St., Franklin 6154290157 www.carpediem212.com 12 Walton’s Antique Jewelry For a special gift with a backstory, Walton’s carries antique rings, brooches, watches, earrings and more. The shop is currently open From 19th-century botanical prints and maps to portraits and wildlife, this gallery carries art removed from old and out-of-print books. 420 Main St., Franklin 6154721980 www.rareprintsgallery.com For the new-in-town 14 Katy’s Hallmark Shop The Brentwood shop carries Nashville- and Tennessee-themed gifts as well as holiday decor, apparel, home decor items and more. 241 Franklin Road, Brentwood 6153730481 www.katysgifts.com by appointment only. 410 Main St., Franklin 6157900244 www.waltonsjewelry.com 13 Rare Prints Gallery

7 Hester & Cook For hosts who love to entertain, Hester & Cook oers a wide variety of items for their next event, including vintage glassware, place mats, party supplies and wine stoppers. 340A Main St., Franklin 6159058180 www.hesterandcook.com For the foodie 8 Herban Market In addition to their restaurant, this eatery also operates a market with wine and craft beer as well as spices, coees, teas, and bottles of specialty olive oils and vinegars. 3078 Maddux Way, Franklin 6155676240 www.herban-market.com 9 Olivia Olive Oil This newly-relocated shop oers a selection of extra virgin and infused olive oils as well as pastas, spice blends and other gourmet foods and mixes. 118 E. Main St., Franklin 6157719595 www.oliviaevoo.com 10 Noble Springs Dairy Franklin-based dairy farm Noble Springs Dairy has been creating artisanal goat cheese for the past 11 years. Flavors such as garlic-herb chevre, cheddar and feta are available. The farm also oers goat milk soap and fudge. Cheeses can be found at various Williamson County retailers as well as on the farm’s website. 3144 Blazer Road, Franklin 6154819546 www.noble-springs.com

With many small businesses struggling this year, the holidays are a great time to support a local shop while nding something for everyone on your gift list. Holiday hours and restrictions may vary by location.

4 Rock Paper Scissors Whether teaching virtually or in-person, Rock Paper Scissors oers supplies for teachers, from desk pads and colorful pens to art prints, puzzles and stickers. 317 Main St., Ste 110, Franklin 6157910150 www.rockpaperscissor.com 5 Yarrow Acres This downtown Franklin store carries a wide range of potted plants to lighten up a class- room, from small succulents and ferns to large ddle leaf gs. The shop also carries scented candles, pots and books. 424 Main St., Ste. A, Franklin 6155917090 www.facebook.com/yarrowacres For the host 6 The Bottle Shop at McEwen This beer and wine market carries a selection of bottles to bring to a dinner or holiday gathering, including domestic and internation- al wines and local craft beers. The shop also carries spirits and curates wine samplers each month to help shoppers nd new favorites. 1556 W. McEwen Drive, Franklin 61580701656 www.bottleshop-mcewen.com

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

For a customized gift 1 Sew What Gifts & Stitches

This Brentwood boutique oers gifts, such as wraps, handbags and robes, that can be personalized with monograms and logos in a number of font choices. 6950 Moores Lane, Brentwood 6156615858 www.sewwhatgifts.com 2 Big Frog The locally owned franchise oers personal- ized shirts, bags, face masks and more that can be customized with company logos and personal messages. 9135 Carothers Parkway, Ste, 103, Franklin 6158072698 www.bigfrog.com

For the teacher 3 Curio Brewing Co.

This Franklin coee shop and brewery oers house-roasted coee beans as well as to-go cans of house-made cold brew coee. 216 Noah Drive, Franklin 6154721124 www.curiobrewing.com

NOVEMBER 20 � JANUARY 10

Li g hts Holiday at Cheekwood

Tickets available at cheekwood.org

Presented by MARLENE AND SPENCER HAYS FOUNDATION

Cheekwood is funded in part by

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HolidayGift Guide 2020

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BRENTWOOD

431

MADDUX WAY

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1

65

8

HARPETH RIVER

M O

MACK C. HATCHER PKWY.

2

COOL SPRINGS BLVD.

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Herban Market

Carpe Diem

FRANKLIN

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER STAFF

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER STAFF

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M C

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15 Twine Graphics Shoppers can nd Franklin, Nashville and Ten- nessee shirts that have been screen-printed at Twine’s Franklin-based production shop. The retail store also carries stamped leather goods, embroidered hats and accessories. 304 Public Square, Franklin 6155388031 Owned by singer-songwriter Holly William- son, this general store-style shop carries Southern-inspired gifts, toys, home decor and apparel. 345 Main St., Franklin 6157218028 www.whitesmercantile.com www.twinegraphics.com 16 White’s Mercantile

17 Sanctuary South Located in the Westhaven community, Sanctuary South carries a selection of Ten- nessee-themed apparel, nonperishable food items from Franklin and Nashville companies and small-batch candles named for local neighborhoods. 158 Front St., Ste. 104, Franklin 6154353779 www.sanctuarysouthtn.com 18 Made in Tennessee Gifts This Franklin store oers gift boxes and baskets with curated goods from Tennessee companies, such as Goo Goo Clusters, Colt’s Bolts chocolate, hot chicken seasoning, local coee and more. 230 Franklin Road, Ste. 11X, Franklin 6155406997 www.shopmadeintn.com

96

FRONT ST.

BLAZER RD.

10

65

3

NOAH DR.

SOUTHALL RD.

PUBLIC SQ.

31

15

7

13 12

4

5

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MAP NOT TO SCALE N

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11

FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

BUSINESS FEATURE AbbyLeighGifts Berry Farms boutique aims to become hometown go-to O wner Janis Gaudette said she wanted her new store in Berry Farms to become a community hub where she could get to know her customers. Gaudette and her husband, Dan, previously owned The Shoppes on Main in downtown Franklin, but when their lease was up in 2018, they decided to take the opportunity to nd a new location. “I had always said that I wanted to get away from the hectic Main Street environment, even though we loved it—we loved the business, and we loved the guaranteed customers because there were tourists,” she said. “I always said I wanted a small-town store, a little neighborhood space where I could get to know the customers and not be slinging merchan- dise in a bag and out the door and saying, ‘Next.’” AbbyLeigh Gifts, which opened in November 2019, is named for the Gaudettes’ two daughters, one of whomworks in the store. Gaudette said shoppers familiar with The Shoppes on Main may also see some familiar faces, as some of the employees from the previous store now work at AbbyLeigh. The shop carries a wide array of gifts and home decor, from seasonal items and dishware to greeting cards, puzzles, jewelry and specialty candles. The store also carries a number of specialty brands, such as Warmies slippers and plush animals and hydraAromatherapy bath bombs. Additional brands, including enewton and Thymes goods, are exclusive to the store, Gaudette said. “We’re constantly changing and refreshing our merchandise, and we listen to our customers, and we see what’s trending in the industry,” she said. As she is an avid fan of the holidays, Gaudette said the shop has already begun preparations for Christmas; however, shoppers can still nd fall and Thanksgiving decor if they are not ready to begin decorating for the holidays just yet. “Our goal has always been to enjoy the current season, so we’ll keep fall [items] out until Thanks- giving,” she said. “We don’t want to be like the big-box stores. We try to enjoy our seasons.” Regardless of when they visit, Gaudette said she hopes shoppers who enter the store take their time to walk around and relax, particularly in a year that has been hard for many. She said the store has always taken coronavirus safety guidelines, such as wearing masks and face shields, seriously. “We want this to be just a comfortable, safe environment for our customers,” she said. “We just want to have customers keep coming back, … and when they come in, they just relax and browse and feel happy, calm and excited about something. With all the drama in the world right now, they don’t have to think about it.” BY WENDY STURGES

AbbyLeigh Gifts carries a wide selection of home decor items, from dishes and serving wares to tabletop decorations and linens. (Photos by Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

HOLIDAY TRENDS Janis Gaudette, owner of AbbyLeigh Gifts, talked about some trends shoppers can expect to see in stores this holiday season. Greenery Indoor and outdoor faux plant decor items, such as trees, are expected to be popular this year, especially as people are spending more time at home. Tabletop decor Small items which can be displayed or given as gifts can be found throughout the store. Table runners and tree skirts are often highly requested. Mercury ornaments Glass ornaments can be hung on a Christmas tree or displayed in a bowl, Gaudette said. Water lanterns

Small furniture items, such as lamps and oor vases, are also available.

Small lanterns with Christmas scenes were popular last year and will be returning. Fun doormats Novelty doormats with holiday sayings have been highly requested this year.

Holiday decor is now on display, but fall items will be available through Thanksgiving.

HUGHES CROSSING

431

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AbbyLeighGifts 5015 Hughes Crossing, Franklin 615-465-6502 www.shopabbyleigh.com Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., closed Sun.

The shop has begun stocking Christmas items for the holiday season.

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE

BY WENDY STURGES

“I WAS TAUGHT TO COOK BYMY GRANDPARENTS; I WAS TAUGHT BYMYMOM; I WAS TAUGHT BY JEREMY’S MOM, WHOUSED TO BE A CATERERSOALL OF OUR RECIPES ARE ONES I’VE CREATED, OR THEYHAVE COME FROMOUR FAMILIES, OURGRANDPARENTS.”

Chicken salad ($6.99-$12) can be found in the market’s cooler section.

HAILEY HIETT, COOWNER OF BRENTWOOD MARKET & DELI

Main dishes, such as chicken spaghetti casserole ($25), will feed four to ve people.

Baked goods, such as cake slices, cinnamon rolls, pies and pecan tarts ($3.75), are also available.

Owner Hailey Hiett said many of the recipes used at Brentwood Market on Franklin Road were passed down from family members. (Photos by Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

BrentwoodMarket &Deli Local couple revives longstanding market on Franklin Road O ne of the oldest businesses in Brentwood was revived last year when Williamson County couple Hailey and Jeremy Hiett

The Brentwood shop also carries a small selection of gift items, such as mugs and tea towels.

mom, who used to be a caterer—so all of our recipes are ones I’ve created, or they have come from our families, our grandparents,” she said. Classic oerings, such as the market’s chicken salad and soups, can be found in the shops coolers for customers to grab and go, or guests can grab a hot meal to enjoy at the eatery’s communal farm table. The market also carries a small selection of groceries, including local eggs from nearby farms and milk from Hatcher Family Dairy. Baked goods, such as cinnamon rolls, chess pies and pecan tarts, are available. The Hietts also said they are gearing up for Thanksgiving, when the market will be oering sides, such as dressing, sweet potato casserole and cranberry salads, for pickup. Orders should be placed by Nov. 18. The Hietts said bringing the market back to the community has been a way not only to connect with their neighbors, but to give the community a place to nd easy meals to enjoy with their families. “For us, it was really important to bring that back home and back to the community,” Hailey said. “It was important to us to be a place for everyone. We love it because people come in and say, ‘Y’all are kind of like the Cheers of Brentwood.’ That’s what we are about, and [we’re] letting people know that this is going to be a community place where everybody’s welcome at our table.”

took over the Brentwood Market & Deli on Franklin Road, which has been standing since the 1960s. The couple had previously operated Serve It Up Nashville, an order-based meal company based out of a commercial kitchen in Thompson’s Station, which made casseroles, dinners and baked goods. After the previous owners closed the market in summer 2019, the Hietts said they knew it was time to take their business to the next level. They opened under the same name that fall. “People really liked the product that she had,” Jer- emy said. “The problem came in that we’re living in a world of convenience, and people aren’t planning two weeks out what they’re having for dinner. So, when God opened up this opportunity, it became a way to do that times 100 because people want a local general store that has a hometown feel to it.” Hailey said Brentwood Market & Deli’s menu is inspired by the meals she grew up learning to make for her family. Diners can nd home-style recipes for various items, including burgers and biscuits with “bulldog” gravy, a recipe from Hailey’s grandmother. “I was taught [to cook] by my grandparents; I was taught by my mom; I was taught by [Jeremy’s]

Jeremy and Hailey Hiett took ownership of the Brentwood Market &Deli in 2019.

BrentwoodMarket &Deli 925 Franklin Road, Brentwood 615-645-9967 www.thebrentwoodmarket.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 6 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.-2 p.m., closed Sun.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

ADAPTING

ARTS

DESIGNED BY LINDSAY SCOTT

T R A C K I N G

I N T H E

Tourism brings in millions of dollars in visitor spending to Williamson County each year, but that nancial drive for the area could take a hit due to decreased tourism in 2020. Early projections from the U.S. Travel Association predict a 35%-40% decrease in tourism spending in 2020 for Tennessee.

TOURISM

A preliminary, self-reported survey from Americans for the Arts, a national arts organization, estimated a multimillion-dollar loss in revenue, as well as long-lasting eects on organizations, due to event cancellations statewide. Lost arts revenue

2.5M

$650M

Number of county visitors

Total county visitor spending

2.0M

$550M

$479.8M

$1.8M

$52M

1.43M

$427.25M

1.81M

$497.2M

1.5M

$450M

1.72M

$452.59M

1.51M

lost in Williamson County

lost in revenue in Tennessee

1.0M

$350M

Modified operations A self-reported survey of arts organizations in Williamson County shows that organizations had to make changes to how they operate as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. Respondents were not limited to a single response.

SOURCE: VISIT FRANKLIN COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

*PROJECTED

0

0

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020*

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020*

Adapting to the times While it is not yet known what the full economic eects of losing large events will be for the area, Beasley said downtown shops have already been hit as a result of declining tourism, which is a factor the foundation consid- ered when canceling all of its festivals this year. “Those festivals bring anywhere from 75,000 to 140,000 to downtown Frank- lin on a given weekend,” she said. “So it was a very big decision back in June for the organization to do this.” The foundation also con- trols the Franklin Theatre, which hosts about 600 events each year, such as the Nash- ville Elvis Festival, concerts and holiday movie showings, she said. As the months wore on and business restrictions were lessened, Beasley said, the foundation began working on ways to get people down- town in a safe and socially

due to the coronavirus, one sector remains shut down: arts and entertainment. Events have beenmostly can- celed since March, as health and government ocials have cautioned against large gatherings due to the risk of spreading the coronavirus. The second half of the year is usually a busy time for the arts and for events in Wil- liamson County. Gatherings such as the Main Street Fes- tival, Pumpkinfest and Dick- ens of a Christmas typically draw hundreds of thousands of visitors each year, accord- ing to The Heritage Founda- tion of Williamson County. Visitor spending in the area reached an all-time high in 2019, at nearly $500 million, according to Visit Franklin. This year, however, the U.S. Travel Association pre- dicts the state will see a 35%-40% decline in tourism dollars. Additionally, a sur- vey conducted this year by Americans for the Arts—an

organization dedicated to supporting arts organiza- tions—found that due to the cancellation of nearly all events this year, organiza- tions are expected to lose more than $52 million state- wide, including $1.8 million lost in Williamson County. However, local organiza- tions said this year has led to unanticipated opportunities for education and for engage- ment with a community look- ing for new ways to interact. “We knew that it was such an uncertain time where we weren’t sure if we would even be able to have these events,” Heritage Foundation CEO Bari Beasley said. “We just made the decision that the wisest thing for us to do as a nonprot was to be very frugal and thoughtful of our donor dollars and to be mind- ful of public safety and really just be extremely focused this year on our core mission, which is preservation, advo- cacy and education.”

77%

50%

40%

increased their online presence

used nancial reserves

furloughed or laid o creative sta

30%

20%

30%

reduced salaries and pay

laid o or furloughed other employees

instituted a hiring freeze

SOURCE: AMERICANS FOR THE ARTSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

In a year without events, arts groups pivot to stay engaged

BY WENDY STURGES

pandemic hit. “It’s like, ‘Now, what is the artistic director going to do?’” Cassidy said. “I was very nervous.” As businesses across the state and in Williamson County have largely been able to reopen after closures

When Studio Tenn Artis- tic Director Patrick Cassidy moved to the Franklin area in January, he said he was all set to announce a new performance season for the regional theater group and begin directing. Then, the

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