Chandler Edition - September 2020

CHANDLER EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 2  SEPT. 22OCT. 19, 2020

ONLINE AT

THE STEELYARD DEVELOPMENT 3 buildings 11 tenants 26,260 square feet

Chandler USD's staggered reopening plan IMPACTS

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The tenants in the development are expected to open in late 2020 or early 2021. (Alexa D’Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

SOURCE: CAPITAL ASSET MANAGEMENTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

The Steelyard breathes new life into southeast Chandler A rich history lays in the dirt on the southeast corner of Chandler Heights and Gilbert roads. Generations of a prominent Chandler family—the Riggs family—worked on a farm in that loca- tion. Later, the land gave way to a steelyard owned by the Riggs family. As years passed, the steelyard fell out of function, and the familymoved. In 2017, a development group—Cap- ital Asset Management—approached the Riggs family to purchase the land and turn it into a hub for the growing neighborhoods that envelop it. “To keep true to the Riggs family, we tried to keep as much stu that was part of the family history,” said Rach- elle Strole, partner at Capital Devel- opment Group, the development arm of Capital Asset Management based in Phoenix. “That’s why we named the development The Steelyard, and that’s why there is a water tower on the property.” The Steelyard consists of three buildings structured for dining and retail use, and tenants are planning on opening at the end of 2020 or the CONTINUED ON 12 BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

EDUCATION

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VOTER GUIDE 2020

GENERAL ELECTION

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City Council to tackle changes to code for short-termrentals

CHANGING THE CODE Nearly 600 short-term rentals exist in the city with only 16.92% of them registered and taxed. The new code would require registration. 591

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

BURST OF BUTTERFLIES

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100 of those short- term rentals are licensed

Short-term rental properties may soon be facing more restrictions in Chandler as the city looks to crack down on party houses. Chandler City Council was expected to vote this fall on a change to city code that would allow the city to collect tax revenue from short-term rental properties and provide more oversight. Council discussed the topic Sept. 14 and planned to discuss further and possibly make changes to the imple- mentation of the code Sept. 17, after press time.

short-term rentals listed on VRBO and Airbnb as of June

$150,000 collected in taxes from 2018-20

CONTINUED ON 15

SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS IMPACTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more

MARKET TEAM EDITOR Alexa D’Angelo GRAPHIC DESIGNER Isabella Short ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Michelle Johnson

FROMAMY: If you haven’t driven by Gilbert and Chandler Heights roads lately, you may be unaware that a new retail development has gone vertical on the southeast corner. I’m a south Chandler resident, so for me, I’ve been anxiously awaiting the building of new places to frequent that are closer to the house. This is one of the rst developments from the ground up in this area in quite some time. Our front-page story dives into the plans for this center and what it will mean for the community. Amy Ellsworth, PUBLISHER

METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Amy Ellsworth,

aellsworth@communityimpact.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

TRANSPORTATION 6 The latest transportation project updates

FROMALEXA: I spend a good portion of most of my work days talking about COVID-19, looking at COVID-19 data and thinking about COVID-19—as I’m sure many of you do, as well, as it has permeated so much of our daily lives, but news that aects residents is still happening. It was a little strange for me this month that both of our front-page stories had nothing to do with the virus. We reported on a new development that is expected to bring life to a corner of the city that could use restaurant and business options and how the city is planning to implement new code for short-term rentals. I hope that within each of these stories you learn something new and that maybe through our dining or business proles we introduce you to your new favorite places. For daily COVID-19 updates, keep an eye on our website at communityimpact.com. Alexa D’Angelo, EDITOR

EDUCATION

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An update on school reopening plans CITY& COUNTY Updates from the city of Chandler 2020VOTERGUIDE SAMPLE BALLOT Information on November elections

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BUSINESS FEATURE Burst of Butteries DINING FEATURE

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CHANDLER EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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ALEXA D'ANGELOCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMING SOON 5 Kaleidoscope Juice is scheduled to open in downtown Chandler in December. An exact date is not yet known. The juice bar, coee shop and grab-and-go restau- rant will be housed in the bottom oor of The Alexander, the redeveloped oce space at 25 S. Arizona Place in Chandler. www.kaleidoscope.love 6 Pasta78 is scheduled to open Nov. 2 in Chandler, according to the restaurant’s owner. The fast-casual restaurant is a build-your-own pasta concept. Other lo- cations are planned in Gilbert, Tempe and Phoenix, but the Chandler location will be the rst to open. The restaurant will be located at 2870 W. Chandler Blvd., Ste. 6. 480-287-4416. www.pestoeatery.com 7 The Stillery is set to open in early October in downtown Chandler. The Nashville-based business will open in downtown Chandler’s New Square devel- opment. The country bar and restaurant is located along Arizona Avenue. The bar will feature live music acts and country dancing. www.stillerynashville.com ANNIVERSARIES 8 Central Pop! LLC , located at 1929 E. Ray Road in Chandler, is celebrating its one-year anniversary in October. The locally owned business oers craft popcorn, marshmallows and crispy rice treats. Customers who go to the store can ask for free samples to try the product before they buy. The store oers

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TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 Bob’s Discount Furniture opened in September at Chandler’s Crossroads Towne Center located at 2650 E. Ger- mann Road. The store is one of the rst two in Arizona for the Connecticut-based furniture retailer along with a location in Desert Ridge Marketplace in Phoenix. The retailer oers lower prices on furniture and bedding. 480-624-7500. www.mybobs.com

2 The Crowned Egg , a breakfast, brunch and lunch restaurant, opened its second location in Chandler in August. The rst location opened in Gilbert. The eatery is located at 3235 W. Ray Road in Chandler near Loop 101. 480-892-4327. www.thecrownedeggaz.com 3 DeLex Realty , a Glendale-based realty company, opened its Chandler location Aug. 1 after being delayed sev- eral months due to COVID-19. The realty group is located at 6170 W. Chandler

Blvd., Ste. 14. 602-910-3002. www.delexrealty.com

4 Howler’s Restaurant & Sports Grill opened Aug. 28 in the space formerly occupied by Majerle’s Sports Grill. The restaurant oers a menu including appetizers, wraps, salads, pasta, pizza and more. Howler’s is located at 3095 W.

Chandler Blvd. 480-899-7999. https://howlerssportsbar.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

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The Stillery

Central Pop! LLC

COURTESY THE STILLERY

COURTESY CENTRAL POP! LLC

dozens of popcorn avors. 480-726- 1887. www.centralpopalicious.com 9 Antrim Air is celebrating its 10-year anniversary in September. The busi- ness, an air conditioning contractor in Chandler, is located out of 3100 W. Ray Road, Ste. 20. 480-485-6505. www.antrimair.com NEWOWNERSHIP 10 Bahama Bucks in Chandler is under new ownership. The Paredes family took ownership Sept. 1 of the franchise locat- ed at 4040 S. Arizona Ave. in Chandler. The business oers desserts and frozen treats and is one of several locations in

the East Valley. 480-219-5899. https://bahamabucks.com CLOSINGS 11 Coconuts permanently closed its Chandler location. The location had been closed since March due to the corona- virus pandemic. The restaurant still has two locations that remain open. The restaurant was located at 1155 W. Ocoti- llo Road, Ste. 1. 12 Majerle’s Sports Grill closed this summer at its longtime location at Chandler Fashion Center. Other locations across the Valley remain open. Majerle’s was located at 3095 W. Chandler Blvd. https://majerles.com

The Alexander is one of two oce buildings undergoing changes.

ALEXA D'ANGELOCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FEATURED IMPACT RENOVATION Developer George Oliver began work on The Alexander and The Johnathan , two existing oce buildings in downtown Chandler, in the spring. Both are expected to be complete in December. The oce buildings located at A 25 S. Arizona Place and B 55 S. Arizona Place will have a variety of amenities including a gym, a garden, a juice bar and more. Renovations were completed both on the interior and exterior of the

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buildings. Touchless technology will be used where possible so as to prevent the spread of COVID-19 when the oce building is fully occupied.

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CHANDLER EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

60

W. BASELINE RD.

Cost: $4.04 million Funding sources: federal grant, local match

and Arizona Avenue is conducting work on Arizona Avenue to relocate the curbs. Status: The project began Aug. 21, and crews were working to remove and re- pour the curbs on the north and south- bound directions of Arizona Avenue from Riggs Road to W. Wood Drive to the east. Timeline: Aug. 21-Sept. 25 Funding source: developer COMPLETED PROJECTS 4 Loop 101 widening The Arizona Department of Transporta- tion widened Loop 101 by adding a travel lane in each direction on a stretch of the freeway through Chandler, Mesa and Tempe. Status: The Arizona Department of Transportation announced Aug. 26 that the yearlong project was complete after crews finished work on diamond grinding a remaining stretch of the freeway. Timeline: May 2019-summer 2020 Cost: $72 million Funding sources: half-cent sales tax, federal highway funds

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2 Val Vista Drive widening The town of Gilbert is widening Val Vista Drive from Appleby Road—near where Val Vista narrows to one lane in each direc- tion—to Riggs Road. Status: The closure of Val Vista between Appleby and Chandler Heights roads was lifted Sept. 11, which has restored access through the Val Vista and Ocotillo Road intersection. Timeline: March 2020-July 2021 Cost: $25.96 million Funding sources: bonds, town funds and Maricopa Association of Governments funds 3 Arizona Avenue curbs The developer of a subdivision going in on the northeast corner of Riggs Road

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ONGOING PROJECTS 1 McClintock Drive, Kyrene Road bike lane additions The city of Chandler is planning to con- struct two new segments of bike lanes along A McClintock Drive and B Kyrene Road that will connect to the existing

bike lane system at the Tempe city limits. Status: Crews began work on the project July 13 and started with tree removal and utility potholing on the road, according to the city. The work is on both the north and south lanes on the roads. Timeline: July 2020-March 2021

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP-TO-DATE AS OF SEPT. 15. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT CHNNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION Chandler USDelementary students to return in staggeredmodel; secondary students expected to return in personOct. 13

CHANDLER USD PLANS FOR HEALTHAND SAFETY

Here are the ways Chandler USD is preparing for students to be in schools in person.

Staggered elementary reopening The board members who voted for reopening all said closing achievement gaps for students was a priority. David Evans, who proposed the plan the board adopted, said it was important to close those gaps for young students and get young students learning in an environment conducive to their success. With the staggered start, 350 classrooms for preschool, kindergar- ten, and rst and second grades are enrolled, according to the district. There are 117 classrooms of special- ized self-contained students planned with enrollments per class to be between six and 11 students. Both groups began Sept. 14 in person if parents selected the in-person option prior to the start of the school year. Frank Narducci, the CUSD assis- tant superintendent of elementary education, explained to the board that virtual learning is not the best practice for teaching and learning for primary grades and specialized self-contained classrooms. “Achievement gaps begin at these lower grade levels, and if the gaps aren’t closed, it will make it more dicult and require extensive interventions in the future,” Narducci said. Students will maintain social distancing and face coverings as well, according to the district. There will be 590 classrooms for third through sixth grades, according to the district. Social distancing and

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

The Chandler USD governing board voted Sept. 2 to begin a staggered start in person for elementary students and to keep junior high and high school students attending school virtually until the start of the second quarter as long as benchmarks from the county health department continue to be met. The board voted 3-2 with Lindsay Love and Lara Bruner dissenting during the four-hour meeting. Students enrolled in Chandler Online Academy will remain online. To help ensure a smooth transition at campuses, the board voted for stu- dents in pre-K through second grade to start school in person Sept. 14, and students in self-contained classrooms also starting Sept. 14. Students in third to sixth grades were set to start in person Sept. 21, after press time. Secondary students will continue attending school virtually and will plan to return fully to in-person instruction Oct. 13. The board rejected the two hybrid models that were proposed for elementary and secondary students. The change comes after the board voted Aug. 5 to maintain remote learning through the rst quarter. “There are lots of families strug- gling,” board President Barb Mozdzen said. “The data has changed so much; we have to adapt to that. When you nd something that isn’t working, you have to make adjustments.”

SOURCE: CHANDLER USD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

face coverings will be required of this student group as well. The district has the ability to reduce class sizes where there is a higher number of students. All three student groups will continue in person Oct. 13 at the start of the second quarter. Secondary reopening Oct. 13 The board voted to keep secondary students virtual until the start of the second quarter. On Oct. 13, all students not enrolled in Chandler Online Academy would return to the campuses. The district presentation to the board noted social distancing would be dicult at the secondary level, but Craig Gilbert, the CUSD assis- tant superintendent of secondary

education, said eorts to social distance will be made when possible. All students will be required to wear face coverings upon their return. The district is also planning for controlled student movement throughout the campus by assigning directional ow in halls, at lunch and in high-trac areas. The students’ desks will be all facing one direction when feasible as well, according to the district. Grab-and-go lunches will be available with the cafeteria remain- ing open all day. Students will report directly to their classroom when they get to campus, according to the dis- trict, and parent drop-o and pickup areas will have the expectation that drivers remain in cars at all times.

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CHANDLER EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

CITY

News from Chandler

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

NUMBER TOKNOW

Chandler expands industries that can apply for coronavirus relief grant programfor businesses

$3.7M

In a work session presentation

Chandler City Council Oct. 12, 15, 6 p.m. 88 E. Chicago St., Chandler 480-782-2181 • www.chandleraz.gov MEETINGSWE COVER will be drawn from existing city funds and the city’s coronavirus relief allocation from the state. The laptops will support the city’s eort to have a more mobile workforce, according to supporting documents on the agenda. CHANDLER Chandler City Council on Aug. 27 approved the contract for re and emergency medical dispatch services for scal year 2020-21 in accordance with an agreement with Phoenix for $1,237,735.27. softball tournaments Aug. 27. CHANDLER At an Aug. 27 meeting, Chandler City Council approved the use of Maricopa County’s detention services for the booking and housing of inmates in an amount not to exceed an aggregate of $1,477,573 for one year beginning July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2021. CHANDLER Chandler City Council authorized the purchase of Dell laptop computers and peripherals from Dell Marketing L.P. in an amount not to exceed $4,232,356 at the Aug. 27 meeting. The laptops are for city employees, and funding Aug. 27 to Chandler City Council, city sta said it had anticipated losing $10.5 million due to COVID- 19-related reductions in revenue but had instead lost $3.7 million. CITY HIGHLIGHTS CHANDLER Chandler City Council approved a facility use license agreement with Future Stars SportsEvents LLC for the use of Snedigar Sportsplex for youth

CHANDLER The city of Chandler expanded the busi- nesses that could apply for coronavirus relief grants beginning Sept. 9, according to a city spokesperson. Businesses from ve additional industries will be eligi- ble to apply for the I Choose Chandler Hiring & Retention Program. The program provides qualifying businesses with $1,300 per employee retained or hired since Dec. 31, 2019, up to a maximum amount of $10,000 per business. The funding hails from coronavirus relief funding awarded to the city from the state. The city was given $29.98 million from the state in coronavirus relief funding. Chandler City Council elected to spend a portion of that funding—about $9.5 million—on this program. Chandler Chamber Ostrich Festival postponed until March

INDUSTRIES THAT CANNOWAPPLY Here are the industries as determined by the North American Industry Classication System (NAICS) that can apply for the grant funding as of Sept. 9: Construction (NAICS Sector 23)

Wholesale trade (NAICS Sector 42) Educational services (NAICS Sector 61)

Professional, scientic and technical services (NAICS Sector 54)

Other services (NAICS Sector 81)

FOR INFORMATION ON APPLICATION AND QUALIFICATION, VISIT WWW.CHANDLERAZ.GOV

City seeking feedback in diversity needs survey

CHANDLER The city of Chandler is asking the community to partici- pate in a diversity and inclusion survey to gauge community awareness and involvement, according to a news release from the city.

The survey will be open until Sept. 30 and is available online at surveys. chandleraz.gov/ DiversitySurvey.

The Chandler Chamber of Commerce Ostrich Festival has been rescheduled. (Courtesy Steve Levine Entertainment)

In June, Mayor Kevin Hartke and City Council issued a unity proclamation that also tasked the human relations commission to engage with the community and make recommendations to the council to benet the quality of life, economic opportunity and relationships in Chandler, accord- ing to the release. Once the survey is closed, the human relations commission will review the results and provide recommendations to the council in November, according to the city’s news release.

CHANDLER The Chandler Chamber Ostrich Festival, rescheduled due to COVID-19 for this October, has been pushed to March 2021, according to the event organizers. All 2020 tickets will be honored on the new dates. The festival was initially scheduled for March 2020 but was postponed to October after President Donald Trump declared a state of emergency due to the coronavirus. Gatherings with more than 10 people are still discouraged by Gov. Doug Ducey.

ARIZONA

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GUIDE

Candidates and information for November elections

COMPILED BY TOM BLODGETT

VOTER GUIDE 2020

DATES TOKNOW

OCT. 5 Last day to register to vote in the 2020 general election OCT. 7 Early voting for general election begins OCT. 23 Last day to request that an early ballot be mailed for the general election OCT. 30 Last day to vote early in person NOV. 3 General election day

SAMPLE BALLOT

*Incumbent

D Democrat

G Green

L Libertarian

R Republican

State representative, District 18 (vote for 2) D Denise “Mitzi” Epstein* R Don Hawker D Jennifer Jermaine* D Bob Robson Corporation Commission (vote for 3) R Lea Marquez Peterson* D Bill Mundell R James “Jim” O’Connor R Eric Sloan D Shea Staneld D Anna Tovar MARICOPA COUNTY Maricopa County Board of Supervisors, District 1

County sheri D Paul Penzone* R Jerry Sheridan County treasurer R John Allen D Daniel L. Toporek East Valley Institute of Technology Governing Board, District 6 David Lane* Maricopa County Special Health Care District District 1 John B. Farnsworth Mary A. Harden* District 5 Mary Rose G. Wilcox* MARICOPA COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT Member at large Shelli Richardson Boggs Linda M. Thor* District 1 Laurin Hendrix* Jacqueline V. Smith District 5 Tom Nerini*

Invest in Ed Act The Invest in Education Act provides additional funding for public education by establishing a 3.5% surcharge on taxable income above $250,000 annu- ally for single persons or married persons ling separately, and on taxable income above $500,000 annually for married persons ling jointly or head of household lers; dedicates additional revenue to (a) hire and increase salaries for teachers, classroom support personnel and student support services personnel, (b) mentoring and retention programs for new classroom teachers, (c) career training and post-secondary preparation programs, (d) Arizona Teachers Academy; amends the Arizona Teachers Academy stat- ute; requires annual accounting of additional revenue. Franchise agreement with Southwest Gas Corp. (city of Chandler) The city of Chandler is having a special election giving Chandler voters the opportunity to approve a franchise agreement with Southwest Gas Corporation. The agreement will allow the utility to construct, maintain and operate its natural gas system in the city- owned public rights-of-way.

NATIONAL

CHANDLER USD Chandler USD Governing Board (vote for 3) Barb Mozdzen* Jason Olive Joel Wirth BALLOT MEASURES Proposition 207 Smart and Safe Arizona Act This Act permits limited possession, transfer, cultivation, and use of marijuana (as dened) by individuals 21 years old or older; protects employer and property owner rights; bans smoking in public places; imposes a 16% excise tax on marijuana to fund public safety, community colleges, infrastructure, and public health and community programs; authorizes state and local regulations for the safe sale and production of marijuana by a limited number of licensees; requires impairment to the slightest degree for marijuana DUIs; transfers monies from the Medical Marijuana Fund; permits expungement of some marijuana

President D Joe Biden G Howie Hawkins L Jo Jorgensen R Donald Trump*

U.S. senator D Mark Kelly R Martha McSally* STATE U.S. representative, District 5 R Andy Biggs* D Joan Greene U.S. representative, District 9 R Dave Giles D Greg Stanton* State senator, District 17 D Ajlan “A.J.” Kurdoglu R J.D. Mesnard* State senator, District 18 D Sean Bowie* R Suzanne Sharer State representative, District 17 (vote for 2) R Liz Harris

R Jack W. Sellers* D Jevin D. Hodge County assessor D Aaron Connor R Eddie Cook* County attorney R Allister Adel* D Julie Gunnigle County recorder R Stephen I. Richer D Adrian Fontes* County school superintendent D Jeanne M. Casteen R Steve Watson*

violations; and prescribes penalties for violations.

D Jennifer Pawlik* R Je Weninger*

VOTER TURNOUT Arizona Turnout

Maricopa County 2012 presidential election

Registered voters

Turnout

Registered voters

2012 presidential election

1.39M

2.32M

3.12M

1.81M

2014 gubernatorial election

2014 gubernatorial election

1.54M

877K

3.24M

1.93M

2016 presidential election

2016 presidential election

2.66M

1.61M

3.59M

2.16M

2018 gubernatorial election

2018 gubernatorial election

2.41M

1.45M

3.71M

2.25M

2020 primary election

2020 primary election

1.45M

860K

3.99M

2.43M

SOURCES: ARIZONA SECRETARY OF STATE, MARICOPA COUNTY ELECTIONS DEPARTMENTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

For more election information, visit communityimpact.com/vote .

9

CHANDLER EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

BUSINESS FEATURE

BY ALEXA D’ ANGELO

Canvas is one of the mediums creators can use at the shop.

CREATIVEMEDIUMS The business oers customers dierent ways to get creative, including:

Canvas painting

Cheryl Tisland owns Burst of Butteries in downtown Chandler. (Photos by Alexa D’Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

Burst of Butteries Business allows customers to play with the arts and get creative C heryl Tisland said the name of her family’s business— Burst of Butteries—t their situation perfectly when they came up with it in 2013. to create a space that was more than just a place for parties; we wanted our business to really focus on the arts,” Tisland said.

Glass mosaic

Throwing clay

makeover with their time. In May, Tisland said they began oering take-home projects for people. They now oer more than 300 options for people to take home if they are uncomfortable coming into the studio—which is spaced for social distancing, and masks are required. But it has been dicult for the business, Tisland said. They closed the Tempe location that had been open only a year. Still, Tisland is hopeful that the Chandler business will continue to be a creative outlet for the community and be a place where people come and “it feels like family.” “This is a stressful time, and art makes such great therapy,” Tisland said. “We are trying to keep every- body creative.”

Painting clay

Burst of Butteries 141 W. Boston St., Chandler 480-559-8016 https://burstoutteries.com Hours: Fri.-Mon. 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Tue.-Thu. 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

Burst of Butteries debuted in downtown Chandler in 2015. The business oers customers a place to get creative with dierent mediums. “Growing up, my mom painted and did all kinds of crafts,” Tisland said. “She taught me how to crochet and do macrame. For Christmas, I would get just a big bag of miscella- neous crafts.” Tisland said the business, like so many others, was struck down during its peak season this year due to the coronavirus. The family closed the doors for two months, between March and May, and decided to give the interior of the business a

Her sister had been in an accident and suered a brain injury—some- times called a burst of butteries. A burst of butteries can also describe the feeling a person gets when they are excited for something. Tisland and her mother had just retired to care for her sister and were dreaming up a business that would blend their love of art and family. It seemed kismet that the family business be named after that excited feeling and the injury that served as a catalyst for starting Burst of Butteries, Tisland said. “We all love art, and we wanted

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE Grubstak

BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

Restaurant oers stackable meals for customers in unique concept C olton Grubb knew one thing for certain when he was opening Grubstak: He had a unique concept. He loved stacking his food on a base of something—usually potatoes or fries—and he created his business plan back in 2014 around that idea. “For our family growing up, dinner was always the most important meal of the day,” Grubb said. “Eating out always reminds me of my parents and sister. That’s what I wanted to create here.” He opened the rst Grubstak location in 2016 in downtown Gilbert followed by the current Chandler location in 2018. While the Gilbert location is no longer, Grubb said the Chandler location draws plenty of regulars every day. “We are a neighborhood restaurant,” Grubb said. “Especially in the last four or ve months, we’ve really seen the people that have supported us from the begin- ning supporting us now.” Since March, Grubb—like other restaurant owners— has grappled with how best to keep his business alive and ensure customer health and safety during the coronavirus pandemic. Grubstak has moved out tables to promote social distancing and utilized its to-go window during the coronavirus. “It’s been challenging,” Grubb said.” It’s already hard to make it as a restaurant. Ninety-nine percent of them fail. With safety concerns and low consumer con- dence, it’s made it even harder to do business now.” But, Grubb said, Grubstak has been fortunate to keep customers coming in. Grubb even changed the menu to add more to-go items, in addition to the “staks” that the restaurant is known for. The staks can also be made with a vegetable or quinoa base to ensure customers, no matter their dietary restrictions, can nd something on the menu. “We are ghting to make it every day,” Grubb said. “We are trying to evolve and listen to our customers and our sta with what we can do better and what we can do next.”

GRUBB’S FAVORITE: CHILAQUILES

The Mexican dish consisting of corn tortillas cut in quarters and lightly fried was featured on the show “Diners, Drive-ins and Dives,” according to Grubb. It also happens to be Grubb’s favorite item on the menu.

Colton Grubb came up with the idea for Grubstak in 2014. (Photos by Alexa D’Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

Spicy Crispy Chicken sandwich, $11.50

Sweet Lou’s BBQ, $12.99

The restaurant recently added sandwiches to its menu.

Grubstaks can be personalized for every diet.

Grubstak 4165 S. Gilbert Road, Ste. 5, Chandler 480- 454 -3299 https://grubstak.com Hours: Tue.-Sat. 11 a.m.-8 p.m, closed Sun.-Mon. *Hours are subject to change

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CHANDLER EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

INSIDE THE DEVELOPMENT

elementary school and new high school in the south Chandler area to account for expected growth. Three recent housing develop- ments, containing about 200 homes total, are located just south of The Steelyard. “As the pieces of the mas- ter plan were built, we would see homes being built, then once that happens, that forms the demand for retail,” de la Torre said. Jason Hersker, a partner at Capital Development Group, said he believes the tenants in the development will cre- ate a “lifestyle center” for the area. “We have a really great tenant mix. It has really rounded out to be a true life- style center,” Hersker said. “In a typical retail corner, you would see a bunch of smaller retail around a big- box store or a grocery store. These are the smaller busi- nesses that chose not to be around a grocery because they felt the kinship of the tenant mix and liked the development and the area.” In addition to the anchors, tenants include: The Nails Logic, F45 Training, Athlet- ico, TanMax, Jersey Mike’s, Some Burros and Heartland Dental, Hersker said. About 2,500 square feet of the development is still avail- able for leasing in two dier- ent suites, Hersker said. Strole and Hersker said the neighbors they have spoken with at neighborhood meet- ings are excited about the promise of the new develop- ment and the tenants.

CONTINUED FROM 1

All but two of the tenants for The Steelyard in Chandler have been conrmed. Developers anticipate a ribbon-cutting ceremony later this year.

beginning of 2021, Strole said. The space is situated in a corner of Chandler that Strole claims was in “desper- ate need” of restaurants and retail options. “We were hunting for neat dirt, and with the water tower and the steelyard, we thought that this is the third corner in an underserved market and hoped we could make something to honor the family that has owned it for generations out of it,” Strole said. “We wanted to honor the land in a way that keeps the agricultural feel with the water tower that was so important to the fam- ily and the community, and we wanted to build some- thing really cool.” High Tide, a locally owned seafood restaurant, and Pita Jungle, a locally owned fast-casual Mediterranean restaurant, will anchor the development, Strole said. A total of 11 tenants will occupy the 26,000-square- The south Chandler area has been a point of growth in the city over the last few years, said David de la Torre, planning manager with the city of Chandler. The 85249 ZIP code, where this devel- opment is located, has seen a population increase of 7.54% from 2011-18, according to U.S. Census data. New housing tracts in the area have even caused Chan- dler USD to build both a new foot development. Addressing a need

Number of recent new housing developments in the area 3

7.54% The increase in population from 2011- 18 in the 85249 ZIP code, according to the U.S. Census Bureau

E. CHANDLER HEIGHTS RD.

F45 Training

1,073 square feet available

The Nails Logic

About 2,500

Pita Jungle

Athletico

SHOPS A

The amount of square footage left to lease in the development

SHOPS B

High Tide Seafood

Ste. 103 Ste. 101 Ste. 100

TanMax

Jersey Mike's

The development includes amix of restaurant options. As of Sept. 14, JerseyMike’s had a sign up. (Photos by Alexa D’Angelo /Community Impact Newspaper)

SHOPS C

Some Burros

Ste. 104 Ste. 105

1,504 square feet available

Heartland Dental

Ste. 101

Shops C will include a drive-thru at Some Burros and a dental oce.

SOURCE: CAPITAL ASSET MANAGEMENT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

will be great,” she said. “The restaurants t our need. All we have is a lot of chains, so to have some of that extra variety around will be good for us. It gives people options.” KEEPING THE ROOTS David de la Torre, a planning manager with the city of Chandler, said the city is specic when it comes to the way new developments in southeast Chandler look as an ode to the area’s rich agricultural history. De la Torre said that as a master plan comes together, the city starts to see homes being built rst. Following the construction of homes, retail centers begin to pop up. “The southeast Chandler area plan is about 14.5 square miles, and in that plan there are design guidelines for what goes on in that area and what they need to look like,” de la Torre said. “Homes and commercial properties have guidelines, and in that plan it does say that commercial properties need to have a rural, agrarian type of feel. It pays homage to the history of farming in south Chandler while at the same time is progressive and new.” A water tower was on the site of The Steelyard development for years, de la Torre said. The developers were not able to keep the same tower but added a new one. “It’s a modern take on that rural, agrarian feel,” de la Torre said. “We are really pleased.”

“It’s been beautiful in that sense, building something for a community that so desperately wanted it and making it artsy and cool and dierent while staying true to the Riggs’ history,” Strole said. Sara Best-Richerson, whose home backs up to the new development, said she had concerns about construction and the accompanying noise of new businesses behind her home, but the developers made sure to accommodate neighbors. “I was scared, honestly,” she said. “You heard that restaurants and businesses were going in there, and we immediately thought about the noise and pollution. From day one we started working with the develop- ers and lawyers to protect us, and they tried not to interfere with our lives too much. They did the best they could.” Optimism for the future Bassel Osmani, one of the owners of Pita Jungle, said The Steelyard hit all the cri- teria the restaurant looks for when creating a new location. “We were infatuated at ‘hello’ with The Steelyard,” Osmani said. “It’s a small, quaint development, which is perfect for our model versus a big-box, sprawl- ing mall setting. It ts our brand image. We wanted to do something where we could kind of be the anchor and add a nice air instead of

going into a nondescript big center with a Home Depot or a big-box store. We are reverting back to strip malls from the ’60s and ’70s with services a neighborhood needs without invading or changing the character of the neighborhood.” “IT’S BEEN BEAUTIFUL IN THAT SENSE, BUILDING SOMETHING FORA COMMUNITY THAT SODESPERATELY WANTED IT AND MAKING IT ARTSY AND COOL AND DIFFERENTWHILE STAYING TRUE TO THE RIGGS’ HISTORY.” RACHELLE STROLE, PARTNER AT CAPITAL DEVELOPMENT GROUP As Pita Jungle’s 24th loca- tion in 25 years, Osmani said the location will open by the end of the year, but he said he had hopes of opening before that. The prospect of opening a new restaurant during a global pandemic is not textbook, Osmani said. He said the coronavirus and subsequent restrictions and closures have made it a dif- cult year for those in the restaurant industry. “We are lucky to be thriv- ing; we’ve had a to-go and a delivery component by design prior to COVID-19,” Osmani said. The new location will fea- ture a pickup window and a dining room with both

indoor and outdoor seating. “I used to live on Chandler Heights, and we would have to drive miles to get to din- ner,” Osmani said. “There is a need in this area. The whole area has blossomed. It’s an amazing sight to see.” Chris and Kim Glass said bringing High Tide Seafood to the new development will build on what they have cre- ated with the rst High Tide location in Gilbert. “If we take that same model and we take it down to Chandler—which is craving some good food establish- ments that far down—I think that corner right there, with all the building and devel- opment going in will allow us to do well,” Chris Glass said. “We’ve got a lot of peo- ple that come in from that far down to High Tide now and come in once or twice a month. They’ve actually helped convince me to put something down that way.” Chris Glass said they would not even be thinking of a second location if it were not for loyal customers who have continued to support them through COVID-19. “We really appreciate the customers that come in,” Chris Glass said. “Without their loyalty, I don’t know that we would be doing this. We probably wouldn’t be expanding. We’ve got reg- ulars that come in four or ve days a week, and it’s a real kudos to the sta. They wouldn’t come back if it wasn’t for the excellent sta and food.” Best-Richerson said she

believes the area needed new options—outside of Olive Gar- den and Texas Roadhouse— for dining. She said she is glad there will be options within walking distance with the new development. “I love Pita Jungle. It’s one of my favorite places, and to not have to drive 35 min- utes to get to the closest one

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