Richardson - January 2021

2021 RICHARDSON EDITION

ONLII NE AT

A N N U A L C O M M U N I T Y G U I D E

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 5  JAN. 29FEB. 26, 2021

SPONSORED BY • Baylor Scott &White Health ANNUAL COMMUNITYGUIDE 2021

TOP STORY TO WATCH IN 2021

Twenty-six restaurants in Richardson, or about 9%, closed during the pandemic.

COMMUNITY INFO

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300 restaurants in 2020

SOURCES: RICHARDSON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER STAFF For a map of local closures, see Page 14

TRANSPORTATION

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Former Dog Haus Biergarten server Krystal Cordova took orders masked up during the pandemic. The restaurant implemented a slew of new services this past year to make up for lost dine-in revenue. (Olivia Lueckemeyer/Community Impact Newspaper)

DINING & SHOPPING

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EDUCATION

Restaurateurs brace for change over long term

CITY & COUNTY

BUSINESS FEATURE

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

We’re at the tip of it.” Dog Haus is one of many Richard- son restaurants that have risen to meet the challenges of the corona- virus pandemic, which has inicted unprecedented strife on the local and statewide dining industry. A recent analysis by the city of Richardson’s Retail Committee, com- bined with reporting by Community Impact Newspaper , shows that 26 local restaurants have closed since the start of the pandemic. The Texas

Restaurant Association estimates that more than 10,000 restaurants have closed and 150,000 restaurant jobs have been lost statewide. “Pre-pandemic, the restaurant industry [in Richardson] was run- ning on all cylinders, with optimism abounding,” said Bob Young, execu- tive managing director at Weitzman, a Dallas-Fort Worth-based real estate services rm. “COVID took a roaring economy and stopped it.” CONTINUED ON 14

On any given day at Richardson’s Dog Haus Biergarten, chefs can be found rolling breakfast burritos. For this gourmet hot dog restaurant, moonlighting as a breakfast purveyor is one of the ways it has survived the past 10 months. “It’s about 20% of our sales—it’s signicant,” Dog Haus owner Kirk Hermansen said of the incorporation of virtual concepts, including Bad Ass Breakfast Burritos. “And it will grow.

DINING FEATURE

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Leanne Libby, llibby@communityimpact.com SENIOR EDITOR Olivia Lueckemeyer SENIOR REPORTER William C. Wadsack REPORTER Liesbeth Powers GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chase Autin ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Tracy Ruckel METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON Please join your friends and neighbors in support of CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES &MARKETING DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE Community Impact Newspaper’s legacy of local, reliable reporting bymaking a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON CONTACT US 7460 Warren Parkway, Ste. 160 Frisco, TX 75034 • 2146189001 PRESS RELEASES ricnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2021 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

FROMLEANNE: Our Annual Community Guide brings you stories of positive growth and plans for the future. We chose to not look back—not too much, anyway—but we do want to celebrate those businesses that opened in 2020 with our Dining and Shopping Listings (see Page 10). We’ve included updates on upcoming local elections, bond planning, transportation news and more. We’re thankful to our business partners for their sponsorship of this hyperlocal content. Enjoy, and welcome to 2021! Leanne Libby, GENERALMANAGER

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more

ANNUAL COMMUNITY GUIDE COMMUNITY SNAPSHOT Getting to know Richardson TRANSPORTATION

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FROMOLIVIA: In this issue, we preview the news we think will shape the new year. Our leading story takes a look at how Richardson’s restaurant industry has changed both temporarily and in the long term. The city is home to hundreds of restaurants, many of which are helmed by courageous business owners who have risen to meet the challenges of the coronavirus pandemic. Read their stories in an article beginning on the front cover. Olivia Lueckemeyer, EDITOR

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Latest on the Silver Line EDUCATION

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News fromRichardson and Plano ISDs CITY& COUNTY Bond planning and election news

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BUSINESS FEATURE

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RICHARDSON EDITION • JANUARY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon or relocating

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PLANO PKWY.

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BRECKINRIDGE BLVD.

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Richardson Texas Nutrition

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Velvet Taco

PROTEA ST.

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COURTESY VELVET TACO

BUCKINGHAM RD.

BUCKINGHAM RD.

7 Drink shop Richardson Texas Nutrition opened Dec. 19 at 451 W. Arapaho Road, Richardson. The business offers meal-replacement shakes, energy drinks, protein recovery shakes, herbal teas and more. It also has dine-in and curbside pickup options. 469-792-4244. www.facebook.com/rtxnutrition 8 Fitness studio SPENGA North Dallas Richardson held a soft opening Jan. 18 at 7517 Campbell Road, Ste. 601, Dallas. SPENGA offers one-hour group training workouts that include 20 minutes of spin, 20 minutes of strength training and 20 minutes of yoga. Studio amenities include drinks, aromatherapy and a kids room where children are supervised during workouts. SPENGA plans to hold its offi- cial grand opening Feb. 1. 469-983-2805. https://northdallas.spenga.com 9 Starbucks opened a new location at 205 S. Plano Road, Ste. 100 in Richard- son on Jan. 18. The Seattle-based coffee company’s new location is in the Richard- son Square development in front of the former Sears store. The newly constructed location offers a drive-thru window as well

TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MAP NOT TO SCALE N

Fish & Fizz is open. 469-703-4457. www.british-emporium.com 3 Far East Pizza Co. opened in mid- October at 1500 N. Greenville Ave., Ste. 110, Richardson. The business offers American Italian food with Mediterranean and Indian influences. Menu items include the butter chicken pizza, tikka tok pasta and the chicken seekh meatball sandwich. 469-291-7761. www.fareastpizza.com 4 Grizzly Burger House opened Dec. 19 at 401 W. President George Bush Turnpike, Ste. 119, Richardson. The family-owned and -operated burger house uses fresh-ground meat and offers a variety of hamburgers as well as breakfast dishes, Philly cheesesteaks, chicken strips and more. 214-964-0912. https://grizzly-burger-house.business.site 5 iDanz Performing Arts Studio opened Dec. 8 at 1144 N. Plano Road, Ste. 260, Richardson. The business offers classes

in a variety of dance styles for all ages, including its “Moms With Moves” class for mothers. Instructors specialize in dance, choreography, show production and artistic development. IDanz Per- forming Arts Studio plans to hold an open house for its new space Jan. 30. Contact office@idanzperformingarts.com for more information. 469-206-0210. www.idanzperformingarts.com 6 TheLab.ms held a soft opening in late December for its new, 3,000-square- foot maker space at 999 Arapaho Road, Ste. 300, Richardson. The self-de- scribed “gym for tinkers and makers’’ is a nonprofit organization that provides a collaborative space for people interested in robotics, coding, hardware hacking, 3D printing and more. Visitors can tour the space at a Feb. 2 ribbon-cutting event at 7 p.m., which will also be live- streamed at www.twitch.tv/thelabms. 469-298-9683. www.thelab.ms

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER & WILLIAM C. WADSACK

NOWOPEN 1 Anaya’s Seafood Scratch Kitchen hosted its grand opening Dec. 7 at 3600 Shire Blvd., Ste. 100, Richardson. The business serves seafood dishes, such as calamari, snow crab, fish and chips, gulf oysters and cedar plank salmon as well as chicken entrees and burgers. 214-501-2540. www.anayaseafood.com 2 British Emporium , a pop-up shop that opened inside British eatery Fish & Fizz in Richardson on Oct. 1, is now a perma- nent part of the restaurant’s space. The business hails from historic downtown Grapevine and offers traditional British foods, such as brandy butter, mince pies, crackers and more. The business’s location at 400 N. Coit Road, Ste. 1908, Richardson, will continue operating Thu.-Sat. noon-8 p.m., the same hours

Everything Richardson News, events, local shopping. Sign up for weekly email specials. www.DiscoverRichardson.com Learn • Grow • Lead RICHARDSON CHAMBER of COMMERCE 75 YEARS

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Dallas Skyline Basketball Club recently relocated its headquarters to Richardson. (Courtesy Dallas Skyline Basketball Club)

as mobile ordering and in-store options. www.starbucks.com 10 Velvet Taco opened Dec. 14 at 102 W. Campbell Road, Richardson. The Dal- las-based restaurant serves more than 20 varieties of globally inspired tacos, such as the spicy tikka chicken, the buffalo chicken and the slow-roasted brisket. The restaurant will operate at 50% capacity for the time being, in accordance with state regulations. 469-445-2666. www.velvettaco.com COMING SOON 11 Aspen Dental is slated to open a new office Feb. 11 at 205 S. Plano Road, Ste. 300, Richardson. The business offers a variety of dental services, including rou- tine care, checkups, periodontal disease, tooth extraction treatment, fillings, root canals and dental crowns. It also offers cosmetic dentistry services and dentures. www.aspendental.com 12 Serene Global recently began developing The Village at Abrams neighborhood, which will be located on FEATURED IMPACT RELOCATION Dallas Skyline Basketball Club moved its headquarters in October to 680 N. Glenville Drive, Richardson, in the Arapaho Business Park. The professional basketball team is scheduled to begin its second season as a member of The Basketball League, a nationwide minor professional league, in April. Before the coronavirus pandemic ended TBL’s season last March, the club played its home games at the Alfred J. Loos Fieldhouse in Addison. For the upcoming season, owner Prescott Mack said he would like the team to be able to play its games in Richardson. “We’re really hoping that The University of Texas at Dallas will welcome us—or Richland College, or any of the Richardson ISD schools,” he said. “We want to not only have our headquarters here, but we want to play here as well.”

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the northwest corner of the intersection of Buckingham Road and Abrams Road in Richardson. The gated community is expected to have 34 single-family homes with prices starting at $550,000. Homes will range in size from 2,700- 3,600 square feet. A representative from Serene Global said the neighbor- hood’s model home is expected to be complete this summer. 972-366-4214. www.sereneglobal.com/communities/ the-village-at-abrams RELOCATIONS 13 Commercial office furniture retailer The Benefit Store moved to 561 W. Campbell Road, Ste. 201, Richardson, in mid-December. The store’s inventory includes used items, such as desks, conference tables, bookcases and office supplies. The Benefit Store formerly had locations at 2080 N. Collins Blvd. and 235 N. Central Expressway in Richardson. 972-470-0700. https://thebenefitstore.org The preseason training camp is slated to start March 26. Mack said he expects the team to include an even mix of players from the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex, the nation and the world. “We made a lot of changes during the pandemic and hired a female head coach,” Mack said of Head Coach and General Manager Angela Davidson. “She’s working really, really hard putting together a really good roster.” www.dallasskylinebc.com

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RICHARDSON EDITION • JANUARY 2021

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER IS PROUD TO SAY THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS 2021 A N N U A L C O M M U N I T Y G U I D E

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COMMUNITY SNAPSHOT

Data and analysis on local communities

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

As the city of Richardson’s population grows, its residents are also earning more money, according to census data. More than half of Richardson’s residents are between ages 20-59; however, the city’s youth population is also on the rise, with more than a quarter of Richardson residents under age 19. RICHARDSON

*HISPANICLATINO IS NOT A RACE, BUT THE HISPANICLATINO PERCENTAGE BELOW MAY INCLUDE MULTIPLE RACES LISTED. THE RACES LISTED, HOWEVER, DO NOT INCLUDE HISPANICLATINO RESIDENTS.

** CENSUS DATA MAY NOT ADD UP TO 100% DUE TO ROUNDING

SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY 2019 5YEAR ESTIMATESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COURTESY CITY OF RICHARDSON

Richardson Dallas County Collin County

POPULATION CHANGE

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME $70,959 $85,678 2014 2019

AGE ANALYSIS

12.22% 6.45% 16.37% Five-year change

0-19

20-39 40-59 60-79 80+

3.2%

16.9%

23.9%

30.7%

25.3%

$49,925 $59,607 $84,233 $96,913

2014 2019 2014 2019

13.2% 2.4%

24.9%

30.6%

29%

2.1%

13.6%

29.5%

26.3%

28.8%

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION

Updates on key transportation stories

2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

TOP TRANSPORTATION STORY OF 2021

Silver Line construction ramps up with completion slated for 2023

begin in Richardson in March. The Silver Line is expected to be fully operational in 2023. “The next fewmonths will see a lot more construction for this project,” said Carlos Huerta, DART representative for community aairs, in November. “Up until now, we’ve seen a lot of utility and infrastructure work for the project.” The $1.266 billion project includes the construction of 10 rail stations. In Richardson, a new station will be built at The University of Texas at Dallas. There will also be a Silver Line connection at the existing CityLine/ Bush station. DART expects the UT Dallas station to have 1,205 daily riders by 2040. The CityLine/Bush station should service 1,240 daily riders by that same year.

BY LIESBETH POWERS

Rail deliveries continue in Richard- son as construction ramps up for the DART Silver Line project. The fourth “rail drop” in North Texas for the project happened in Richardson in November. The 1,600-foot segments were unloaded near Renner Road and Shiloh Road. More deliveries are expected locally as well as in neighboring cities. The 26-mile Silver Line aims to connect seven cities and four coun- ties in the North Dallas area, includ- ing the city of Richardson. DART celebrated the start of construction for the future Knoll Trail station in Dallas on Dec. 16. This station is within the central and western portions of the project that are expected to begin build-out this winter. Construction should

Rail deliveries continue to be made in Richardson and surrounding cities as construction begins on the Silver Line project. (Courtesy Dallas Area Rapid Transit)

SILVER LINE

PARKER ROAD

NORTH CARROLLTONFRANKFORD

PLANO

CARROLLTON

GRAPEVINE

12TH STREET DOWNTOWN PLANO

SHILOH ROAD

TRINITY MILLS

KNOLL TRAIL

DFW AIRPORT NORTH

DOWNTOWN CARROLLTON

CITYLINE BUSH

UT DALLAS

ADDISON

CYPRESS WATERS

RICHARDSON

FARMERS BRANCH

FARMERS BRANCH

GALATYN PARK

IRVING

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SOURCE: DALLAS AREA RAPID TRANSITCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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RICHARDSON EDITION • JANUARY 2021

DINING&SHOPPING

Retailers, restaurants that opened in 2020

COFFEETEA 21 Starbucks 800 Synergy Park Blvd., Ste. 101 469-518-8050 www.starbucks.com $ HEALTHFOCUSED 22 Salata 2160 N. Coit Road

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469-399-6349 www.salata.com $$ K 23 Performance Nutrition 2301 Performance Court, Ste. 103 214-484-7992 www.facebook.com/ performancenutritiontx $ ITALIANPIZZA 24 Far East Pizza Co. 1500 N. Greenville Ave, Ste. 110 469-809-5849 www.richardsonpizza.com $$ 25 Mario’s Pizza 4251 E. Renner Road, Ste. 122 469-317-3111 www.mariospizzarichardson.com $$ 26 Rocco’s Italian Cafe 908 Audelia Road 469-886-8209 www.iloveroccospizza.com $$ MEDITERRANEAN 27 Abu Omar Halal 800 E. Arapaho Road, Ste. 120 469-580-7240 www.abuomarhalal.com $ MEXICANTEXMEX 28 Chiloso Mexican Bistro 100 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 104 972-231-3226 www.chilosomexicanbistro.com $$ B H K 29 Chipotle Mexican Grill 1420 E. Belt Line Road 214-453-8249 www.chipotle.com $ K 30 Velvet Taco 102 W. Campbell Road | 469-445-2666 www.velvettaco.com $ B K OTHER 31 Brizo 300 N. Coit Road, Ste. 255 | 469-571-7350 https://brizotx.com $ H 32 Edith’s Neighborhood Bistro 3551 Wilshire Way, Ste. 100

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Average entrees: $ Up to $9.99 $$ $10-$19.99 $$$ $20 or more

B Breakfast/brunch H Happy hour K Kids menu

COMPILED BY LIESBETH POWERS & WILLLIAM C. WADSACK

www.facebook.com/nanascountrycitchen $$ 8 Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen 7975 Belt Line Road 469-506-1818 www.popeyes.com $ 9 Ricky’s Nashville Hot Chicken 100 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 18 214-272-3735 www.rickyshotchicken.com $ B K 10 Tri Tip Grill 1417 Renner Road, Ste. 300 469-460-6441 www.tritipgrill.com $$ H K 11 Trucker’s Cafe 580 W. Arapaho Road, Ste. 406 972-234-1500 www.facebook.com/truckerscafetx $$ 12 Two for the Money BBQ 3613 Shire Blvd., Ste. 100 469-705-1611 www.twoforthemoneybbq.com $$ ASIAN 13 Lohas Teriyaki 1401 E. Arapaho Road, Ste. F 214-272-3635 www.lohasteriyaki.com $$ 14 Monkey King Noodle Company 520 Lockwood Drive

469-372-1334 www.monkeykingnoodlecompany.com $$ 15 Pokeworks 746 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 110 469-872-0159 www.pokeworks.com $$ K 16 Sakhuu Thai Cuisine 1811 N. Greenville Ave. Ste. 400 469-730-2025 www.sakhuuthai.com $$ 17 Tofu Factory Dallas 400 N. Greenville Ave., Ste. 11B 972-231-3888 www.tofufactorydallas.com $$ BAKERIESDESSERTS 18 La Casita Bakeshop 580 W. Arapaho Road, Ste. 230 440-462-2078 www.lacasitabakeshop.com $ 19 SweetStop 201 S. Greenville Ave., Ste. 107 469-372-7557 www.sweetstopdallas.com $$ 20 TrouVi Cookies 580 W. Arapaho Road, Ste. 163 214-552-8814 www.trouvicookies.com $$

DINING AMERICAN 1 Anaya’s Seafood Scratch Kitchen 3600 Shire Blvd. 214-501-2540 www.anayaseafood.com $$ B H K 2 First Watch 202 W. Campbell Road | 469-613-2727 www.rstwatch.com $$ B K 3 Good Vibes Bar & Grill 2121 Buckingham Road | 972-707-7797 www.goodvibesbarandgrill.club $ H 4 Grizzly Burger House 401 W. President George Bush Highway, Ste. 119 214-964-0912 https://grizzly-burger-house.business.site $ B K 5 Hot Crab 714 W. Spring Valley Road 972-231-8989 https://hotcrabrichardson.kwickmenu.com $$ 6 Interurban Bar n Grill 221 W. Polk St. 972-479-9944 www.facebook.com/interurbanbarngrill $$ H K 7 Nana’s Country Citchen & Catering 2148 E. Belt Line Road 469-917-9245

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

469-366-9934 www.edithsbistro.com $$ K

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33 Fusion Vibes Kitchen + Bar 100 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 50 972-543-3888 www.fusionvibes.com $$ H SHOPPING BEAUTY 34 The Barber & Co. 525 W. Arapaho Road, Ste. 23 469-399-0990 www.thebarberco.org 35 Le Beauty Spa 970 N. Coit Road, Ste. 3095A 972-807-9746 www.lebeautyspadallas.com 36 Nails Plus 1235 E. Belt Line Road 469-372-5110 www.facebook.com/nailsplusonline 37 Salon Lace Me 300 N. Coit Road, Ste. 176 214-613-2903 www.salonlaceme.com 38 Zero Gravity Head Spa & Wellness 2126 E. Belt Line Road 469-563-4663 www.zerogravityheadspawellness.com

Tipsy’s Woodworking

Ricky’s Nashville Hot Chicken

Pokeworks

COURTESY TIPSY’S WOODWORKING

COURTESY RICKY’S NASHVILLE HOT CHICKEN

COURTESY POKEWORKS

CBDVAPE 39 Lit It Smoke Shop 516 W. Arapaho Road, Ste. 110 469-970-2183 40 Shell Shock CBD 1601 N. Glenville Drive, Ste. 108 469-708-6219 www.shellshockcbd.com 41 Your CBD Store 2113 Buckingham Road 214-730-0044

HOMEGARDEN 47 Divine Headboards 904 Business Parkway 972-855-0866 www.headboardsdivine.com 48 Tipsy’s Woodworking 1601 N. Glenville Drive 469-708-6219 www.tipsyswoodworking.com OTHER 49 FastSigns 743 Brick Row, Ste. 300 214-499-9724 www.fastsigns.com/2287 50 Saint Sophia Bookstore 1857 N. Plano Road 470-985-4706 www.stsophiastore.com

43 Richardson Family Eyecare & Eyewear 159 N. Plano Road | 469-567-3640 www.richardsonfamilyeyecare.com 44 Simply Grace Thrift Store 580 W. Arapaho Road, Ste. 199 972-685-4030 https://simplygracethriftstore.com HOBBIESGAMESGIFTS 45 British Emporium 400 N. Coit Road, Ste. 1908 469-703-4457 www.british-emporium.com 46 DMH Fiber & Yam 7989 Belt Line Road, Ste. 112, Dallas 469-828-1187 www.dmhberandyarn.com

www.cbdrx4u.com/nd-us/texas/garland CLOTHINGACCESSORIES 42 Perception Eyecare + Eyewear 4150 E. Renner Road, Ste. 300 972-250-0700 www.perceptioneyecare.net

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RICHARDSON EDITION • JANUARY 2021

EDUCATION

News from Richardson & Plano ISDs

OTHER STORIES TO FOLLOW IN 2021

TOP EDUCATION STORIES OF 2021

$750millionRISDbond recommended

PARSING THE PACKAGE The proposed bond would include two propositions.

PLANO ISD’S FINE ARTS FACILITY SET TO DEBUT THIS SPRING The new Robinson Fine Arts Center is scheduled to open to Plano ISD students in March. The 82,200-square-foot building along Alma Drive was approved as part of PISD’s $481 million bond referendum in 2016. It was expected to be built by late 2019, but various factors, such as permits and weather, pushed the start of construction to April 2019, PISD Chief Financial Ocer Randy McDowell said. The main theater will have 1,500 seats and a balcony level. The building will also house an art gallery, a rehearsal space and a studio theater. PISD BOARD TO ELECT 4 MEMBERS Plano ISD voters will cast ballots for four of the seats on the district’s board of trustees this year. Races for Places 1, 2, 3 and 6 will be on the May 1 ballot for at-large voting. Place 1 is currently held by Board President Tammy Richards; Place 2 is held by Angela Powell; Place 3 is held by Nancy Humphrey; and Place 6 is held by Board Vice President Jeri Chambers. Chambers and Humphrey each led Jan. 13 for re-election. Powell said she plans to run again, but Richards said she had not yet made a decision. STAAR TESTING EXPECTED TO CONTINUE The Texas Education Agency said in early December that public school students will take the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness during the 2020-21 school year, though the results will not be used for accountability purposes. TEA further announced Dec. 10 that it will not issue A-F accountability ratings for school districts. Gov. Greg Abbott previously waived the STAAR requirement for the 2019-20 school year due to the coronavirus pandemic.

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

Mohawk Elementary, Brenteld Elementary, Stults Road Elementary, Northrich Elementary and Hamilton Park Pacesetter Magnet. The RISD board unanimously approved a resolution Jan. 11 detailing the district’s middle school transformation plan. Using a phased construction approach, the district will make facility adjustments at junior high campuses over several years to make room for sixth-grad- ers. The goal is to have construction completed at all necessary campuses by the 2030-31 school year. Superintendent Jeannie Stone said the rst phase of construction, which will take place in the Lake High- lands learning community, will be included in the 2021 bond proposal.

$113M

Richardson ISD voters could be asked to approve a $750 million bond package as part of the May 1 election. The proposed package would not include a tax increase and would contain two separate propositions. The rst, for $637 million, would include projects related to teaching and learning, ne arts, athletics, spe- cial education and more. The second proposition for $113 million would cover technology improvements. Based on the committee’s rec- ommendations, schools that could receive capacity or renovation work as part of the bond include Pearce High School, Lake Highlands Junior High, Forest Meadow Junior High,

$750M BOND

$637M

Teaching, ne arts, athletics, special education

Technology improvements

Phases will continue into future bond programs. The tentative date to call the election is Feb. 8. SOURCE: RICHARDSON ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

RISDboard to receive 2 new members in 2021 election

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

Richardson ISD trustees Jean Bono and Kim Caston announced in January they will not seek new terms on the board this year. The races for Bono’s District 1 seat and for Caston’s At-Large Place 7 seat are scheduled to be on the May 1 ballot. Bono was elected to the District 1 seat in 2015 and was re-elected in 2018. Caston was irst elected to the board in 2007. Through Jan. 25, Steve Mitchell, Christopher J. Poteet and Eric Stengel had iled to run for the At-Large Place 7 position, while Megan Timme was the only candidate to

Jean Bono

KimCaston

ile for the Single-Member District 1 seat. The candidate iling period for the May 1 election is Jan. 13-Feb. 12. Board members in RISD serve three-year staggered terms and are not subject to term limits. Early voting for the May 1 election is scheduled to take place April 19-27.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY&COUNTY

News from the city of Richardson

2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

OTHER STORIES TO FOLLOW IN 2021

TOP CITY & COUNTY STORIES OF 2021

Planning unfolds ahead of potential $170Mbond

CITY’S LEGISLATIVE AGENDA PRIORITIZES LOCAL CONTROL City Council approved a set of priorities in December ahead of the state’s 87th legislative session, which began Jan. 12 and will end May 31. The overarching theme of the city’s agenda is to promote and protect its interests by supporting legislation that enforces home rule authority, or the ability of municipalities to manage their own aairs without interference by the state. The agenda includes six areas of focus, including scal management, transportation, economic vibrancy, public safety, environment, education and workforce, and regional and community collaboration. COUNCIL APPROVES EXPANSION OF TAX INCREMENT FINANCE ZONE An additional 835 acres of land was added to one of the city’s tax increment nance zones after City Council approved the change at a Jan. 25 meeting. Property tax collected in this area tied to property improvements or new development is reinvested into public infrastructure improvements and other economic development initiatives, according to the city.

BOND DEVELOPMENT TIMELINE Council and sta are working in tandem to carefully curate a referendum that would go before voters in November.

Sta presents project options to council. JANUARYAPRIL

“GIVEN THATWE ARE INAVERY TRYING TIME FINANCIALLY, I THINKWE NEED FOCUS ONWHATWE REALLYNEED.”

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

The largest bond in city history could appear on a Richardson ballot in November. For the past several months, sta has presented vari- ous projects for council to consider adding to a potential bond package. The referendum will land somewhere around $170 million, Deputy City Manager Don Magner said at a recent council meeting. The last bond, which was approved by voters in 2015, totaled $115 million. Perhaps the most signicant projects are renovations to Richardson’s Civic Campus, which includes City Hall, the Civic Center and the public library. All three buildings are at least 40 years old and are in need of improvements to major systems as well as enhancements to meet modern demands. At a meeting Jan. 4, council showed support for remov- ing Civic Center operations from City Hall. Moving the center to a new location or halting oerings altogether would not only open up City Hall to more oce space but would also increase security in the building, Assistant City Manager Shanna Sims-Bradish said. Sta is also looking into bond projects centered around transportation, drainage, parks and improvements in the

MAYJULY Council approves projects.

AUGUST

STEVE MITCHELL, COUNCIL MEMBER

Council calls election. Aug-Nov: City conducts public education and outreach.

NOVEMBER

Voters decide on the bond.

SOURCE: CITY OF RICHARDSONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Richardson Innovation Quarter and Core District. Between now and April, sta will present several more project options for each area of the bond. When consid- ering which projects to include, sta asked council to use a multi-component litmus test that gauges the project’s cost-eectiveness, urgency, potential to stimulate further investment and ability to be done in phases. Council is expected to nalize a package between May and July and call the election in August.

NEWADDITION

The majority of the new acreage being added to the zone is concentrated in the city’s recently formed Innovation Quarter just south of Campbell Road.

Mayor, council seats up for election inMay

CAMPBELL RD.

Council members and the mayor are permitted to serve no more than six consecutive two-year terms. Steve Mitchell and Mark Solomon will reach their term limits in May. All of Richardson’s council members are elected by voters citywide; how- ever, candidates for Places 1-4 must reside in the corresponding district. The ling period for the election began Jan. 13 and will close Feb. 12. As of this paper’s press time, incumbent

Council Members Bob Dubey, Kyle Kepner, Janet DePuy and Ken Hutch- enrider and incumbent Mayor Paul Voelker had submitted candidate applications. New challengers include Daniel Burdette, Marilyn Frederick and Aren Shamsul, all of whom are vying for Mitchell’s Place 6. Joe Corcoran has led to run for Place 4, which is currently held by Kepner, and Jennifer Justice has led for Place 2, which is currently held by Solomon.

Former zone

75

New addition

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

SPRING VALLEY RD.

Registered voters in Richardson will have the opportunity to cast ballots for the mayor and all six City Council seats as part of the May 1 election.

N

SOURCE: CITY OF RICHARDSONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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RICHARDSON EDITION • JANUARY 2021

TOP STORY

The crisis triggered unprecedented demand for food brought directly to the customer, Hermansen said. Dog Haus already oered delivery through third-party providers, but in the wake of stay-at-home orders, the restaurant sawdelivery orders jump from roughly 10% of total business to 75% at the peak, which came at a hefty cost, Her- mansen said. “Most consumers don’t realize the signicant commissions associated with third-party delivery,” he said. “A lot of restaurants, including ourselves, do mark up the menu online to help oset some of that, but you generally can’t get away with marking up 30%.” Restaurants with well-established to-go and delivery models had an eas- ier time adapting. At Pizza Americana, takeout orders increased from 20% of business to 90%, and partner Jordan Swim said the restaurant expects that trend to outlive the pandemic. “The availability of takeout is not going to go anywhere,” he said. But not all restaurants were equipped to pivot. Jasper’s at CityLine relied heavily on providing customers with an experience, a service that was essentially wiped out amid stay-at- home orders. The business made the dicult decision to temporarily close in April after seeing an 85%-90% drop in revenue, Director of Operations Robert Foltz said. “People go to Jasper’s for an expe- rience and a full ambiance of hospi- tality,” he said. “It was tough for us to make that transition to takeout ... because we were also competing with every other restaurant in Dallas and Richardson that was doing the same thing.” Jasper’s has since reopened, and while it remains committed to pro- viding the same level of quality in food and service that the restaurant is known for, Foltz said sta has embraced new avenues of bring- ing in revenue, such as curbside pickup, family-style takeout meals and reduced prices on popular menu items, such as the prime rib. “Our biggest goal right now is to let residents and our guests know that we are back and that all we want to do is put out great food at a great price,” Foltz said. Flexibility key for industry’s future Restaurants will look dierent as a result of this pandemic, Young said. Plans for projects now include larger

AWAVEOFRESTAURANT CLOSURES Here are some of the Richardson restaurants that have closed since the start of the pandemic.* The shuttered eateries span a range of cuisines and management types, from mom-and- pops to corporate chains.

*THESE LISTINGS ARE BASED ON REPORTING BY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER AND DATA FROM THE CITY OF RICHARDSON’S RETAIL COMMITTEE. THEY ARE NOT COMPREHENSIVE. Look for restaurants that opened in 2020 on page 10

PGBT TOLL

2

21

10

RENNER RD.

15

13

12

4

20

CAMPBELL RD.

14

1 Berrynaked 2 Burgerim 3 Cana Café

11 Mubrooka 12 Murphy’s Deli 13 Pearl Cup Coee 14 Philly Pretzel Factory 15 The Pie Pop Company 16 Popbar 17 Portico Restaurant 18 Rajula’s Kitchen Express 19 Sake Japanese & Korean 20 Stir Café

25

75

4 Chaitime & ZenQ 5 Chang Jing Korean BBQ 6 Creamy Taste of Heaven 7 Fruteria Cano 8 Hiccups Churroholic

ARAPAHO RD.

6

BELT LINE RD.

22

18

8 16

9 Jian Hua Chen 10 Jimmy John’s

24

11

CENTENNIAL BLVD.

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

21 Top Pot Donuts 22 Twin’s Hot Tofu Restaurant

ARAPAHO RD.

5

1

75

CAMPBELL RD.

9

23 Twisted Root Burger 24 Venezia Italian Cafe 25 Wok & Grill 26 Zero Degrees

26

23 3

7

75

MAIN ST.

17

19

Quick pivots sustain business COVID-19 caused “the biggest dis- ruption of retail” the Dallas-Fort Worth market has seen in the last 30 years, Young said during a Jan. 14 Weitzman event. In Richardson, nearly 280,000 square feet more of retail and restau- rant space was vacant at the end of 2020 than at the end of 2019, making it one of the hardest-hit markets in DFW over the course of the pandemic, the Weitzman report concluded. Still, that loss represents only about 4% of the city’s total retail square foot- age, so in the grand scheme of things, Richardson has performed fairly well and is below the state average for clo- sures, said John Jacobs, executive vice president of economic develop- ment for the Richardson Chamber of Commerce. Hermansen, who owns not only Dog Haus Biergarten but also the

entire Richardson Restaurant Park where Dog Haus is located, said the pandemic has been as challenging for landlords as it has for restaurant own- ers. Helping existing tenants survive while seeking to ll vacated space has become a constant balancing act. “It’s hard to nd new tenants in an environment where there is still so much uncertainty,” he said. “You have to make some pretty aggressive deals to get people introduced in the short term.” Rent relief was one way Herman- sen sought to relieve strain on some restaurant owners, but he also encour- aged tenants to embrace new ser- vices. Dog Haus incorporated curbside pickup, alcohol to-go, a food truck, food drives for local charities and vir- tual concepts, which are delivery-only brands that operate out of brick-and- mortar kitchens.

CONTINUED FROM 1

In the wake of the pandemic, restaurant owners have been forced to navigate ever-changing rules and reg- ulations as state leaders scrambled to mitigate spread of the disease. Many of those who survived have done so by pivoting to meet an evolving set of consumer demands, from heightened expectations of cleanliness to embold- ened requests for convenience. Young and other industry experts have said many of these changes are here to stay. The ongoing distribution of vaccines means sales are likely to rebound, but the culture of dining out has seen an irreversible shift. The industry’s survival will depend not only on its individual members’ will- ingness to change but also on exi- bility from entities that govern how restaurants operate.

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

AONCEGROWINGMARKET The number of workers in Dallas County classied as having restaurant or retail jobs grew signicantly between 2006 and 2015, 2006

Number of industry workers

419,230

+156,100

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according to a 2018 report by the Communities Foundation of Texas.

575,330

2015

JOB LOSSES CLIMB

The Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex area’s leisure and hospitality industry, which includes restaurants, saw the most job loss of any key industry in the area between November 2019 and November 2020.

Leisure and hospitality

Education and health services

Manufacturing

Government

Other services

Trade, transportation and utilities

Information

Mining, logging and construction

*NUMBERS IN THOUSANDS

SOURCES: DALLAS COUNTY ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT, U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Professional and business services

Financial activities

outdoor patios, modular indoor foot- prints and convenience amenities, such as drive-thrus. But a restaurant’s ability to respond to post-coronavirus demands will depend largely on exibility from governing bodies, Young said. “[Municipalities] can’t go back to a pre-COVID mentality on certain things—they have to be really sen- sitive on zoning that creates happy places for people,” he said. Since the beginning of the pan- demic, Richardson city ocials have elded multiple requests for relaxed restrictions related to signage and outdoor seating, among other such items, Richardson’s Deputy CityMan- ager Don Magner said. Sta has been understanding of those requests and recognizes the increased need for exibility moving forward, he said. “We are thinking about how we may need to at least evaluate and assess our current regulations and decide if they might need to be updated so they can be contempo- rary and work with some of the more up-to-date business models,” he said. Other changes have seen less municipal approval. In early Decem- ber, Hermansen appeared before council to request a zoning change that would allow for conventional

drive-thrus at the restaurant park. Several members of council were reluctant to accept his argument that the need for this service had been heightened as a result of the pandemic. “The struggle that I have is that we know where we are today, … [but] I don’t think any of us really know what things are going to be like post-COVID,” Council Member Steve Mitchell said. In the meantime, the Richardson Chamber of Commerce is actively working to provide resources to and increase visibility for the city’s restaurants by promoting them online and through weekly email promotions. In recent months, a handful of new restaurant members have joined the chamber, which Vice President of Member Services Bill Ballard said is a positive sign for the local dining industry. “The Richardson [restaurant] community has been really resilient during all of this,” he said. “We’re looking forward to 2021, and we’re optimistic that things are going to continue to improve.”

NOTICE OF DART COMMUNITY MEETING

You are invited to attend a virtual quarterly community meeting in your respective city to review the progress of the DART Silver Line Regional Rail Project. DART and the Design-Build Contractor will be on hand to outline the latest developments and answer your questions. The project will provide regional rail service along the 26-mile long Silver Line Corridor from DFW International Airport to Plano. Presentations during these meetings will include: 1ST QUARTER COMMUNITY MEETING SERIES Notice of DART Silver Line Regional Rail Virtual Quarterly Community Meetings

• Project Facts and Updates • Design-Build Progress • Betterments Program Progress

• Station Design Progress • Construction Progress and Safety • Identification of contacts for FAQs and community concerns

1st Quarter Community Meeting

Monday, February 15 – 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. – Richardson • Phone #: 469-391-0632 • Conference ID: 503 275 608

To find your virtual meeting link, go to DART.org/SilverLine. For additional information: Contact DART Community Engagement at 214-749-2835 , email SilverLine@DART.org or visit DART.org/SilverLine.

Tell us what you think. Comment at communityimpact.com .

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RICHARDSON EDITION • JANUARY 2021

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