Franklin - Brentwood Edition - March 2021

FRANKLIN BRENTWOOD EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 1  MARCH 16APRIL 12, 2021

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S enioorr LIVING GUIDE

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IMPACTS

LOCAL COMMUNITIES

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RISING COST OF HOUSING Franklin has seen median home values in the area rise by more than 30% in the past ve years, more than twice the increase in local median income over that time, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The city of Franklin approved a new ordinance Feb. 23 to incentivize lower housing prices. SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY 1YEAR ESTIMATES 20152019, CITY OF FRANKLIN, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

$500K

$250K

CALCULATING AFFORDABILITY Franklin’s median income is 57% higher than the Nashville- Davidson-Murfrees- boro-Franklin-Metro- politan Statistical Area average of $65,919. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development use the MSA average when determining who qualies for aordable housing.

Overall change: +34.1%

$400K

$200K

$300K

$150K

$200K

$100K

$100K

$50K

Overall change: +13.1%

Walker Place is an aordable condominium complex underway in Franklin.

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RENDERING COURTESY COMMUNITY HOUSING PARTNERSHIP OF WILLIAMSON COUNTY, GAMBLE DESIGN COLLABORATIVE

Franklin approves ordinance to incentivize more attainable housing

Financial, inventory barriers to home ownership still remain

by only 13% in that same time. City ocials said they are working to ensure there are still options for resi- dents who make less than Franklin’s median income of $103,813 per year. New neighborhoods under construction in Frank- lin reect the rise in prices, according to listings from local homebuilders. One such community, Lock- wood Glen on Carothers Parkway, features home prices from the mid-$300,000s to the $700,000s, and homes in the upcoming neighborhood Terra Vista start in the mid-$600,000s. To help provide a wider range of prices, the Frank- lin Board of Mayor and Aldermen approved an ordi- nance Feb. 23 that would reimburse some city impact fees for developers in exchange for building more

low- to moderate-income housing in the area. The intent of the ordinance is to remove some of the nancial barriers faced by builders in developing such projects. “We have become a very desirable community for many reasons: the quaintness of the city, the friend- liness of the people, the very highly regarded school system, the infrastructure,” said John Besser, chair of the Franklin Housing Commission, a board that works to address the shortage of aordable housing in Franklin and helped develop the ordinance. “What the housing commission is trying to do is make sure there’s at least some housing so we don’t become a one-face type of community.”

BY WENDY STURGES

Home prices are on the rise in Franklin—a signal of higher demand as inventory levels dip, according to data from the Williamson County Association of Realtors. However, the recent rise in competition is compounding Franklin’s existing aordability issues. In the past ve years alone, the median home value in the city of Franklin has risen by more than 30% to $466,400 in 2019, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, outpacing income levels, which have risen

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FROMLACY: Did you know that nearly 1 in 8 residents in Williamson County is age 65 or older? As the local senior population continues to rise, so do the number of communities designed to meet a variety of needs and lifestyles. Our annual Senior Living Guide (see page 10) features local living options as well as demographics and tips on how to nd the best community for your loved one. Lacy Klasel, PUBLISHER

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FROMWENDY: Whether it is new homes or a new retail center, construction activity is up and running in Franklin and Brentwood. Take a look at our monthly Impacts section (see Page 4) for what is now open in your neighborhood and our Development Updates (see Page 8) for info on construction projects coming down the pipeline. Wendy Sturges, EDITOR

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MARCH 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

NOWOPEN 1 Waldo’s Chicken & Beer opened in early February at 1201 Liberty Pike, Ste. 129, Franklin. The eatery, which also operates a location in Germantown, oers fried chicken dishes with signature sides and sauces as well as a drink menu featuring local craft beers. 615-614-8880. www.waldoschicken.com 2 Burger Dandy , a delivery- and to-go- only business, launched Feb. 10 from the kitchen of Americana Taphouse in down- town Franklin. The “virtual restaurant” oers a selection of hamburgers, fries, shakes and bottled soda through delivery services, including DoorDash, Grubhub and UberEats. Customers can also pick up orders at Americana Taphouse, located at 94 E. Main St., Franklin, according to a release from restaurant group A. Marshall Hospitality. The concept for the business comes from the need to utilize unused kitchen space caused by fewer diners due to the coronavirus pandemic. https://burgerdandy.com 3 The newest tenant to open at McEwen Northside, Perry’s Steakhouse & Grille opened Feb. 25 at 5028 Aspen Grove Drive, Franklin. The Texas-based eatery oers a selection of USDA-aged Prime steaks as well as deserts, sides and signature entrees, including Perry’s signature pork chop, which is hand-carved and measures seven ngers high. The 11,000-square-foot restaurant features seating for up to 350 diners as well as four private dining rooms, a wine wall and Perry’s Bar 79, a full bar with handcrafted cocktails, wine and replaces. This is the rst Tennessee location for the company. 615-721-7781. www.perryssteakhouse.com 4 Volunteer State Bank opened its new- est location in Cool Springs at 101 Interna- tional Drive, Ste, 100, Franklin, in February. The bank oers personal and business banking services as well as an ATM. 629-208-8050. www.volstatebank.com 5 SpringHill Suites opened in Febru- ary at 5011 Aspen Grove Drive, Franklin. The new hotel, part of mixed-use center McEwen Northside, features business and tness centers, meeting rooms, a pool and The Library, an on-site bar and restaurant. 615-778-4688. www.marriott.com

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6 OVME , a new medical aesthetics stu- dio, opened March 1 at 1556 W. McEwen Drive, Ste. 112, Franklin, in the Whole Foods shopping center. The studio oers Botox, dermal llers, laser resurfacing, photo facials and hydrafacials as well as a retail section with skin care products for purchase. 615-814-6863. www.ovme.com 7 Hyderabad House opened in February at 9040 Carothers Parkway Ste. B111, Franklin. The Indian eatery oers signature dishes. such as paneers, biryani, samosas, kebabs and Indian street food items. 615-236-9436. www.hhnashville.net 8 Pink Mullet Salon opened a second location in late 2020 at 9175 Carothers Parkway, Ste. 102, Franklin. The business oers hair cutting, coloring and styling services using salon-quality products. 615-771-2513. www.pinkmulletsalon.com Home & Hearth Therapy launched in Brentwood in February. The business oers in-home physical therapy and personal training to help reduce fall risks for seniors. Individual consultations and home modication services are also avail- able. 615-295-9202. www.homehearththerapy.com Dr. DeCozio Heals on Wheels launched in early 2021 in Williamson County. The business, which serves Franklin and Brentwood, oers house and barn calls for veterinary services, including well- ness and preventive care, acupuncture, laser therapy, herbal medicine, nutritional counseling, rehabilitation and perfor- mance medicine. 615-864-7046. www.drdecozio.com Payaru , an online skin care brand, began operations in Franklin in early 2021. The

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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Perry’s Steakhouse & Grille

OVME

COURTESY PERRY’S STEAKHOUSE & GRILLE

COURTESY OVME, CHRISTIAN PENA

A Trader Joe’s is slated to open in Franklin in the former location of a Stein Mart.

it has rebranded to become Awaken Tennessee . The store, located at 434 Main St., Franklin, is now independently owned and oers a selection of bedding and mattresses made with natural and organic materials. 615-807-2393. www.shopawakentennessee.com MERGER 11 In early March, ocials with Ascension Saint Thomas announced that it will enter a joint partnership with Results Physiotherapy , which operates ve locations in Franklin and Brentwood. The medical oces oer outpatient physical therapy. The partnership is expected to allow Results Physiotherapy to expand its oered services, according to an an- nouncement from Ascension Saint Thomas. 615-373-1350. www.resultspt.com

company oers facial scrubs and oils made only with all-natural and sus- tainable ingredients. Gifts sets are also available. www.payaru.com COMING SOON 9 Italian eatery North Italia will open a new location at McEwen Northside, locat- ed at McEwen and Aspen Grove drives in Cool Springs. North Italia oers a number of dishes, including small plates, pizza, sandwiches, pasta and entrees, as well as a bar featuring signature cocktails. An open- ing date for the Cool Springs location has not been announced. www.northitalia.com NAME CHANGE 10 The owners of Sage Sleep Organics’ Franklin location announced in early March

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON Following approval from the city of Franklin for a certicate of compliance to sell wine, an ocial with Trader Joe’s has conrmed the grocery store is eyeing a location in Cool Springs. In an email to Community Impact Newspaper , Public Relations Director Kenya Friend-Daniel said the company is very early in the process of bringing a store to the area. “We are excited to be a part of the com- munity and looking forward to welcom- ing customers, sometime this year, if all goes according to plan,” she said.

During its Feb. 23 meeting, the Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen approved a certicate of compliance from applicants with Trader Joe’s for a site at 545 Cool Springs Blvd., Franklin, in the former location of Stein Mart in Thoroughbred Village.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MARCH 2021

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

ONGOING PROJECTS

2 Franklin Road widening TDOT crews are continuing work in Brentwood to widen Franklin Road from two to five lanes with a continuous center-turn lane. Work on Phase 1—which includes utility work—is slated to wrap up this spring, and the full project is slated to wrap up in the late spring or early sum- mer of 2022. Timeline: August 2017-June 2022 Cost: $27.4 million Funding source: TDOT

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1 Mack C. Hatcher Parkway extension Phase 1 of the Mack C. Hatcher Parkway northwest extension is on track to open late this year, according to the Tennes- see Department of Transportation. The project will extend the roadway from Hillsboro Road to Del Rio Pike in Franklin. Phase 1 of the roadway will create a two-lane road with a multiuse path and a bridge over the Harpeth River. Phase 2, which will add two lanes and another bridge, has been announced but does not have funding or a construction timeline. Timeline: 2019-November 2021 (Phase 1) Cost: $45.1 million (Phase 1) Funding sources: TDOT, city of Franklin

FUTURE PROJECT 3 McEwen Drive extension

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Design work is underway for Phase 5 of a project to extend McEwen Drive near the borders of Franklin and Brentwood. In December, the two cities approved a part- nership agreement to construct a roadway from Wilson Pike to the Franklin-Brent- wood city limits near Clovercroft Creek. The project is estimated to cost at least $10 million; however, total construction costs have not been finalized. Timeline: TBD Cost: TBD Funding sources: cities of Franklin and Brentwood

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF MARCH 9. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT FRBNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION Columbia State aims to add fourth building toWilliamson campus

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BY WENDY STURGES

before we totally celebrate, but we are very excited at this point at the opportunity to see this come to reality.” CSCC will use its portion of the funding to add a new arts and technology building to its campus on Liberty Pike, according to an announcement from the college. Preliminary

The Williamson County campus of Columbia State Community College will add a fourth building in Franklin should it receive funding from Gov. Bill Lee’s 2021-22 budget. The budget, released by Lee on Feb. 13, includes more than $4.8 billion in funding for higher education insti- tutions, including community colleges. Of that proposed funding, CSCCwould receive $26.98million. According to CSCC President Janet Smith, plans for a fourth building have been in the works since 2016. “It’s evolved over the years, and it looks like, now, it is coming to frui- tion,” Smith said. “We will wait until the Legislature nalizes the budget

Columbia State Community College could receive more than $26 million in state funding to add a new building in Franklin. (Courtesy Columbia State Community College)

innovation center is to think futuris- tically: ‘Where is [technology] going, and how do we expose our students to what is coming forward in technol- ogy?’—not just what exists, but what else is out there and how to dream about how those things interact with our world,” Smith said. The new building will also feature a state-of-the-art anesthesia and technology lab. CSCC, which has ve campuses throughout Middle Tennessee, has also announced plans to partner with the Tennessee College of Applied Technology-Dickson for a licensed nursing program, a certied nursing assistant program and other programs to be taught at the campus

in the future. Smith said the programs will oer a wider range of choices to the growing number of students at the Williamson County campus, which has seen a ve-year average enroll- ment growth of just over 15%. According to CSCC, signicant work has already been completed on design and construction plans, which will allow the project to move forward quickly if the budget is approved. The college is also raising funds to meet a required community match of $950,000 for the project. Should funding be approved, CSCC expects break ground on the new building in late summer or early fall, Smith said.

“IT’S EVOLVEDOVER THE YEARS AND IT LOOKS LIKE NOW IT IS COMING TO FRUITION.” JANET SMITH, PRESIDENT OF COLUMBIA STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

construction work is slated to begin in late summer or early fall, pending budget approval by the Tennessee

Legislature, according to

CSCC. The new 41,000-square-foot building will include an innovation center, classrooms, labs, student engagement spaces, and a 150-seat instructional space with a stage and theater-style seating. “The whole concept of the

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MARCH 2021

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

Developments in the Franklin & Brentwood areas

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

PHOTOS BY WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

ALLSTON EAST A new two-story oce building is under construction on South Royal Oaks Boulevard in Franklin. Allston East will feature nearly 80,000 square feet of oce space and a 150-space parking garage, according to leasing company CBRE. Site plans also include plans for Allston West, an additional oce building to be constructed near the rst building.

CAROTHERS CROSSINGWEST Located on the northwest corner of Carothers Parkway and Liberty Pike, Carothers Crossing is a 20-acre mixed-use development that will feature apartment buildings as well as oce and retail buildings, according to a site plan from developer SouthStar. The oce and retail buildings are slated to open this fall, however individual tenants have not been announced.

FAIRFIELD INN& SUITES Construction work is ongoing to complete a new Faireld Inn & Suites along Bakers Bridge Avenue near the CoolSprings Galleria in Franklin. The hotel will feature more than 165,000 square feet of space, according to plans led with the city of Franklin. An opening date for the hotel has not been announced. This will be the rst Faireld location in Williamson County, although the hotel operates in the Columbia and Nashville areas.

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PERFORMING ARTS CENTER Franklin Special School District is working on a new performing arts center at the Poplar Grove campus in Franklin. The new facility will feature a 485-seat auditorium and will be open for use by all schools in the district, according to FSSD. The center is slated to be complete in 2022. Additionally, a new gymnasium is under construction at the Poplar Grove campus and is slated to be complete in 2022.

MCEWENNORTHSIDE Located on McEwen and Aspen Grove drives in Franklin, McEwen Northside is a 45-acre mixed-use development with retail, restaurants, a hotel and a multifamily community. In February, development company Boyle announced that two new eateries, Condado Tacos and North Italia, would join McEwen’s lineup of restaurants, which also includes Shake Shack, Perry’s Steakhouse & Grille, Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams, Just Love Coee Cafe and Vintage Vine 100.

Work on a new headquarters for the Brentwood Police Department is nearing completion. The facility, slated to open later this spring, will feature training spaces, a community engagement room, a custom statue of a lion near the entrance, and a memorial wall to honor fallen and retired ocers. The headquarters will also include a Williamson County EMS ambulance bay.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Franklin, Brentwood & Williamson County

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

MEETINGSWE COVER In accordance with an executive order from Gov. Bill Lee, municipal meetings may be held virtually until at least April 28. Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen Meets March 23 and April 13 at 7 p.m. Workshop meetings are always held two hours prior. 615-791-3217. www.franklintn.gov Brentwood City Commission Meets March 22 and April 12 at 7 p.m. 615-371-0060. www.brentwoodtn.gov Williamson County Schools board of education Meets March 22 at 6:30 p.m. 615-472-4000. www.wcs.edu Franklin Special School District board of education Meets April 12 at 6:30 p.m. at Liberty Elementary School at 600 Liberty Pike, Franklin. 615-794-6624. www.fssd.org MEETINGSWE COVER CITY AND COUNTY HIGHLIGHTS WILLIAMSONCOUNTY The county’s mask mandate expired Feb. 27 and was not renewed by Williamson County Mayor Rogers Anderson, who cited a recent decline in the number of active coronavirus cases in the area. Residents will still be required to wear masks in county buildings and in private businesses that require them. Williamson County Schools and Franklin Special School District will continue to require mask use. FRANKLIN The Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen unanimously passed a resolution Feb. 23 to approve up to $176,652 in incentives for the Franklin Housing Authority to construct new rental units for low- to moderate-income households. BRENTWOOD The city of Brentwood will hold a public hearing April 26 regarding the annexation of approximately 60 acres of land along Split Log and Sunset roads. The property, located along the borders of Brentwood and Nolensville, is proposed to be rezoned as suburban residential, with a development plan that includes 28 proposed lots, which is within the city’s density requirement. NUMBER TOKNOW This is the number of residents statewide who are eligible to receive the coronavirus vaccine following the March 8 opening of Phase 1C. This phase includes those with high- risk illnesses, such as high-blood pressure, asthma and diabetes. County residents can nd a vaccine provider at www.vaccinender.org. 1.1M

District approves consultant to address racial issues

WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS Following requests from parents and teachers and months of discussion, ocials with Williamson County Schools have approved funds for a professional consultant to develop a plan to address reported racism in schools. The WCS board of education voted unanimously Feb. 15 to approve a $55,000 contract with Fostering Healthy Solutions LLC to help the district assess processes already in place and to provide training on diversity and inclusion practices. In recent months, the district has heard from parents who believe the district has not done enough to

address incidents of racism as well as parents who believe the issue is political and not related to education. Board member Eric Welch said the training would be a similar practice to district policies already in place, such as antibullying policies, to ensure that all students are able to receive an education and feel comfortable on WCS campuses. The district has previously implemented processes to address incidents of reported racism; how- ever, board members said the district needs to do more to train employees on how to respond to and prevent future issues. “There’s been much more reported

Candidates le for Brentwood City Commission election BRENTWOOD The city of Brent- wood will have a contested election later this year as four candidates vie for three seats on the Brentwood City Commission. Candidates include Mayor Rhea Little, Commissioners Mark Gorman and Regina Smithson, and Brent- wood resident Gina Starling Gunn, according to ling documents from Williamson County. than is on the report, and I feel it is our job to create an environment of acceptance and inclusion, an envi- ronment where students feel safe so they can focus on their education and growth,” board member Shelia Cleveland said during the meeting. “We have to start somewhere, and we have to start soon. This may not be the perfect solution, but we won’t know what works and what doesn’t until we have a benchmark to start from.” The consulting company is expected to observe board meetings over the coming weeks. WCS Super- intendent Golden said funding for the consultant will come from existing professional development funds. 2021 ELECTIONDATES Last day to register to vote: April 5 Early voting: April 14-29 Election day: May 4

Fire Station No. 7 opened in late February in Franklin. (Courtesy city of Franklin)

John Fitzgerald

Franklin dedicates new road honoring city’s rst Black career reghter

FRANKLIN The city’s newest re station has opened on one of the city’s newest roads at 1972 John Fitzgerald Drive, Franklin. The city of Franklin held a cere- mony Feb. 26 to dedicate the new street in honor of retired Franklin Fire Assistant Chief John Fitzgerald. Fitzgerald, who was hired in 1972 and retired in 2006, was the rst

Black career and paid reghter in Franklin, according to the city. John Fitzgerald Drive leads to the newly opened Fire Station No. 7, which features a Williamson Medical Center EMS wing and is modeled after Station No. 8 in Westhaven, according to the city. The new station cost $6.9 million, the city said.

Brentwood approves contract for newre station on Split LogRoad

BRENTWOOD The city of Brent- wood is moving forward with plans for a new re station on Split Log Road on the east side of the city. During its Feb. 22 meeting, the Brentwood City Commission approved a nearly $250,000 contract with TMPartners to oversee nal design and construction for Fire Station No. 5. Last August, the city approved an

agreement with the rm to complete a needs assessment and schematic drawings. The latest agreement will allow the company to begin work on the nal design, construction bidding and construction administration for the project, according to the city. Funding for the contract will come from the city’s capital projects fund, according to the city. The total project is estimated to cost $4.5 million.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MARCH 2021

Senior Living As the numbers of senior adults nationwide and in the Franklin and Brentwood area continue to grow, so does demand for residential options.

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Definitions / Key

5 Independent - living communities cater to older adults with limited care needs. Most include amenities, such as fitness programs, housekeeping, communal meals and more. 5 Assisted-living communities specialize in providing care and supervision. These facilities frequently offer a full range of amenities as well as limited medical assistance. 5 Memory care facilities specialize in providing care for seniors with Alzheimer’s, dementia and other cognitive issues. Staff members are trained to help residents manage these diseases.

5 Hospice care is intended to relieve symptoms and suffering associated with a terminal illness for people who have been given six months or less to live. These patients must choose to forgo further curative treatment. 5 Nursing home/skilled nursing facilities provide care to those with illnesses or mental conditions that require full-time monitoring and medical care. 5 Home care services offer medical care and other services to seniors who wish to remain at home. Staff members help with care, such as medication administration, meals and transportation to medical appointments. Service offerings vary by company. 5 Mixed-use facilities offer some or all of these services.

Belvedere Commons of Franklin PHOTOS BY WENDY STURGES/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Canterfield of Franklin

1 Avenida Cool Springs 222 Mallory Station Road, Franklin 615-502-2626 www.avenidapartners.com 2 Belvedere Commons of Franklin 303 S. Royal Oaks Blvd., Franklin 615-794-6693 www.belvederecommonsfranklin.com 3 Brighton Gardens of Brentwood 103 Arcaro Place, Brentwood 615-410-4861 www.sunriseseniorliving.com 5 Brightstar Care of South Nashville 615-807-0108 www.brightstarcare.com/s-nashville 4 Brookdale Franklin 910 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin 615-794-6005 www.brookdale.com 5 Canterfield of Franklin 7015 Moores Lane, Brentwood 615-584-8749 www.canterfieldoffranklin.com 6 Cloverland Park Senior Living 6030 Cloverland Park Drive 615-819-5150 www.cloverlandparkseniorliving.com 5 Cornerstone Caregivers 800-410-2570 www.cornerstonecaregiving.com 5 FirstLight Home Care 615-567-5857 www.firstlighthomecare.com

7 Fountains of Franklin 4100 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin 615-567-3717 www.fountainsfranklin.com 8 Franklin Wellness & Rehabilitation Center 1287 W. Main St., Franklin 615-794-8417 www.franklinctrhc.com 9 Harmony at Brentwood 9045 Church St. E., Brentwood 615-338-8450 www.harmonyseniorservices.com 10 The Hearth at Franklin 1035 Fulton Greer Lane, Franklin 615-592-0510 www.thehearth.net 11 The Heritage at Brentwood 900 Heritage Way, Brentwood 615-200-9052 www.theheritagelcs.com 12 The Manor at Steeplechase 314 Cool Springs Blvd., Franklin 844-450-0619 www.holidayseniorliving.com 13 Maristone of Franklin 347 Riverside Drive, Franklin 615-590-8804 www.vitalityseniorliving.com 14 1522 Wilson Pike, Brentwood 615-285-3455 www.morningpointe.com 15 1005 Generations Way, Franklin 615-614-8555 www.morningpointe.com

SOURCE: AARP/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

DEMOGRAPHICS Williamson County has seen a steady increase in recent years in the number of county residents age 65 and older. Williamson

SENIOR POPULATION INCREASE

The numbers of residents age 65 and older are increasing statewide. Here is how the senior population has changed in Williamson County since 2015.

County 28,691 225,389 Age 65 and older Total population

Senior population 12.72%

30,000

0 10,000 20,000

LIFE EXPECTANCY The average U.S. life expectancy rose from

Morning Pointe of Brentwood

Projection

For the first time in U.S. history, in 2035, people age 65 and older will outnumber those age 18 and younger.

68 years in 1950

Morning Pointe of Franklin

to

79 years in 2018.

SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU, CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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Morning Pointe of Brentwood

Symphony

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20 Symphony COMING SOON 1020 Harmony Hills Drive, Franklin 615-791-4430 www.symphonytn.com 21 Traditions of Mill Creek 7110 Southpoint Parkway, Brentwood 615-375-3550 www.vitalityseniorliving.com 22 Wellington Place of Brentwood 209 Ward Circle, Brentwood 615-377-1221 www.wellingtonplacebrentwood.com 23 Willowbrook Hospice 235 Noah Drive, Franklin 615-399-2220 www.willowbrookhealth.com This list is not comprehensive.

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Cool Springs 211 Cool Springs Blvd., Franklin 615-778-6800 www.nhccare.com 17 Somerby Franklin 870 Oak Meadow Drive, Franklin 615-591-2333 www.somerbyseniorliving.com 18 Southern Care Inc. 3595 Carothers Parkway, Franklin 615-791-4430 www.southerncaretn.com 19 Southerland Place 200 Winners Circle S., Brentwood 615-221-9001 www.southernlandplace.com

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Independent-living Assisted-living Memory care Hospice care Nursing home/skilled nursing Mixed-use

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FRANKLIN - BRENTWOOD EDITION • MARCH 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PEOPLE

THINGS TO CONSIDER Assisted Living Locator owner Tim Tuttle said there are several factors to be aware of when choosing a senior living facility. FINDING HELP Searching for a senior living community, particularly online, can be daunting, Tuttle

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

Q&A: Finding senior living Tim Tuttle, owner of Assisted Living Locators For families and individuals who are looking into long-term care for their seniors, choosing a living option can be overwhelming, particularly as there are many options in Franklin and Brentwood. Tim Tuttle, owner of Assisted Living Locators, a company that helps families nd living solutions, said there are a number of factors that families should consider before they choose a new home.

someone’s senior living, or some of them will also pay for home

care services. All of this stu—it’s expensive, and people don’t generally plan for it. HOWHAS THE PANDEMIC CHANGED LIVING SITUATIONS, ANDWHAT SHOULD RESIDENTS BE AWARE OF? One of the things that has changed is how easy it is for families to come visit their seniors, and a lot of that is driven by the local COVID[-19] numbers by county here in Tennes- see. They may not allow families or members of the community to come and visit, which is dicult, and it’s hard on a senior not to be around their loved ones. So there are a lot of people who have found it’s best for their senior to have them continue to live at home with home care and a lot of help from the family. Tim Tuttle

said. Using an independent consultant to help nd local communities can help narrow the search. INDIVIDUAL NEEDS The type of community and the level of care needed for a senior should be among the top considerations, Tuttle said, as this will help determine if assisted-living, skilled nursing or memory care is needed. WHERE TO LIVE Tuttle said geographic preference is important to consider based on proximity to families, doctors and other amenities. WHO THEY ARE Because every person is unique, Tuttle said, it is key to consider what they like to do and match that with local amenities oered. He said many communities oer music, arts classes, gardening and daily scheduled activities.

WHAT ARE SOME COMMON MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT SENIOR LIVING FACILITIES? The assisted-living communities [now] are not the nursing homes that we remember when we were kids. They are really nice, and I would encourage people when they’re even thinking, ‘Somewhere down the line, Mom or Dad isn’t going to be able to live at home anymore. What should we do?’—I would encourage them to contact [a professional] at that point and set up tours, and they can see how nice these places are. There are art classes; in the sum- mer, they have raised-bed gardening; they have a lot of music; plus, they really are communities.

I talk to families, and I know that they are concerned about their parents feeling abandoned or worried [about going to] the kinds of nursing homes that, maybe, we saw our grandparents [live in]. But the places that are here now—the assisted-living industry has really stepped things up and is very competitive for seniors, so they work very hard to make sure the place is nice and clean and safe. WHAT FINANCIAL PREPARATIONS SHOULD FAMILIESMAKE? If they’re further out [from needing placement], I would say to consider getting a long-term care policy, which is insurance that will pay for

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MARCH 2021

BUSINESS FEATURE Bloom&Branch Organic Spa Franklin spa oers organic products, holistic approach A fter years of working in traditional spas and skin care boutiques in Nashville, Lisa Shearer, who now co-owns Bloom & Branch Organic Spa, said she felt there were not enough natural products oered in the industry. “I denitely love natural and organic products, [but] in my rst couple of jobs, they used a bunch of products with chemicals and things, and I was unhappy with putting those chemicals—not only on the clients, but it was all going in to my body, too,” Lisa said. “So when we knew we wanted to venture out and do our own thing, it was very important to me to have all-natural and organic products.” To help ll that void, Shearer and her husband, Paul, started working to create their own spa in Nashville in 2017 before they decided to make the move to Franklin. In February 2020, they opened their shop, Milk & Honey Facial and Wax Parlor, which was rebranded as Bloom & Branch Organic Spa earlier this year. The spa oers dermaplaning, tinting, peels, lash lifts, waxing and a variety of signature facials which Lisa said can help with a number of skin conditions using ingredients with natural enzymes, such as blueberries to help with ne lines, coconut to hydrate and pumpkin to exfoliate and brighten. “Our approach to skin care and the other services we do here is really more about the actual client as a whole, a more holistic approach, and the natural and organic skincare is just one element of that,” Paul said. “Lisa—when she’s with a client, it’s a very healing thing. It’s a restorative thing, and clients can sense that, and a lot of them come back specically for that reason.” Bloom & Branch also carries a number of skin care products for purchase from Ann Webb and One Love as well as facial oils and scrubs developed by the Shearers themselves. In the future, the owners said they hope to expand their in-house products and to provide massage services. While the Shearers said opening at the start of a pandemic and undergoing a name change was not ideal, the support they have received from old and new clients in the Franklin community has helped them to survive their rst year. “It’s been a very uphill climb, but we have die- hard [clients] who drive all the way down to see us, and my new Franklin clients are very good about word-of-mouth. We’ve gotten a lot of support down here,” Lisa said. “A lot of people are happy that we’ve weathered the storm and we’re still open and want to support us, and it’s denitely growing.” BY WENDY STURGES

“SOWHENWE KNEWWE WANTED TOVENTURE OUT ANDDOOUROWN THING, ITWAS VERY IMPORTANT TOME TO HAVE ALLNATURAL AND ORGANIC PRODUCTS.” LISA SHEARER, COOWNER

Owners Lisa and Paul Shearer opened the spa in 2020. (Photos by Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

The spa oers facials, waxing, dermaplaning and other skin care treatments.

The shop also carries a small selection of gifts, including fromNashville-based Paddywax Candles.

NATURAL INGREDIENTS Bloom & Branch Organic Spa uses natural, active ingredients in its signature facials that help to address a variety of skin concerns. Blueberry: helps reduce ne lines with antioxidants Pomegranate: helps reduce acne scarring and dark spots Pumpkin: exfoliates and brightens skin with naturally occurring vitamins A and C Coconut/papaya: dissolves dead skin cells and delivers moisture Spearmint: reduces oil and inammation and helps prevent future breakouts BLOOM & BRANCH ORGANIC SPACOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Bloom& Branch carries skin care products to purchase for at-home use.

Bloom&BranchOrganic Spa 330 Mayeld Drive, Ste. D2, Franklin 615-640-0929 www.bloomandbranch.com Hours: Tue.-Fri. 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., closed Sun.-Mon.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

FIRST LOOKDINING

BY WENDY STURGES

1 Bangkokwings ($13) are deep-fried and tossed with a chili sauce. 3 DISHES TO TRY

2 Drunken noodles ($14) feature either egg or at rice noodles sautéed with onion, peppers, broccoli, basil and a choice of protein.

COURTESY THAI ESANE

3 The larb chickenwrap ($16) includes minced chicken with red and green onions, lime juice and rice powder, and is served with lettuce wraps and rice.

COURTESY THAI ESANE

COURTESY THAI ESANE

Thai Esane New Brentwood eatery oers family recipes, diverse options S ince Thai Esane opened in Brentwood in

more commonly known dishes, such as pad thai or Malaysian noodles. However, she said she hopes as customers return, they will be excited to try more adventurous dishes, such as pad phet, a curry dish with bell peppers, bamboo shoots and onion that can be customized with dierent protein options. “Our curry is so hearty, and people ask, ‘How do you do it?’” Tim said. “It’s a lot of labor that goes into it. We don’t do anything canned, as far as sauces. Everything is handmade.” For diners who want to push their palates, dishes can also be customized with sauces and chili oil to make them “Nina hot,” a term Nina uses for avors that meet her preferred level of spiciness. “‘Nina hot’ is a spice level that is beyond. It’s crazy,” she said. “I brought it to Nashville, and that’s what I’m known for. Our ‘medium’ is every- where else’s ‘hot.’” Thai Esane also includes a full bar with wine, cocktails and a number of local craft beers from the Nashville area. As the weather begins to warm, Nina said, she hopes the eatery’s large patio will become another popular outdoor dining option in the area. Nina said she has enjoyed introducing diners to Thai food and providing a new option for foodies and transplants from other parts of the country. “When we opened, I didn’t realize that there are so many people from out of town coming to Nash- ville to work,” she said. “They love our food and say they can’t nd Thai food or anything like that in Nashville. With our food, we keep the authenticity. I don’t Americanize it.”

February, owners Nina and Tim Singto have been able to introduce diners in the area to a variety of new avors and to accomplish their long- held goal of having a restaurant in the area. “It was a dream,” Tim said. “Me and my wife—we tried dierent careers in our lives, but cooking was it. She started out in King Market as a server, but she’s always been cooking at home, and we’d have guests come over and say, ‘Wow, this is exceptional.’ After that, we knew we wanted a restaurant.” In 2014, with years of cooking and recipes under their belts—and with the help of their family, who also launched King Market, a grocery store and restaurant in Antioch—the Singtos opened Thai Esane. The eatery serves a combination of Thai and Lao cuisines. The eatery’s rst location is on Music Row, and another location recently opened at 5th & Broadway, a new food hall in downtown Nashville. However, the Singtos said they have always wanted to open a location in Brentwood, as many of their regulars work downtown but live in Brentwood. So when a location in Hill Center Brentwood became available, they jumped at the chance, Nina said. “We wanted to come to Brentwood. I didn’t want to go anywhere else,” Nina said. “This is the ‘it’ spot here. The rst week was chaotic, but I knew my food was great, and Brentwood welcomed us so well. They said the food was great and they’ll be back—I’ll take that all day.” Nina said many of her customers gravitate toward

Chef and owner Nina Singto opened Thai Esane in Brentwood in February.

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Thai Esane 203 Franklin Road, Brentwood 615-915-4736 www.thaiesane.com Hours: Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-9 p.m., closed Sun.

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