McKinney February 2021

MCKINNEY EDITION

VOLUME 6, ISSUE 11 ! FEB. 24 " MARCH 21, 2021

ONLINE AT

EXCEEDING capacity Population growth within the central portion of Collin County has caused increases in current and projected tra ! c volumes on US 380. Tra ! c currently exceeds the capacity of the road between Coit Road and FM 1827.

A B C D E F According to o ! cials, US 380 currently operates at an

From 2010-16, the number of crashes on US 380 in McKinney increased +404 %

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380

IMPACTS

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level of service. The level of service measures the quality of tra ! c based on performances, such as: Vehicle speed

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From 2016-19, US 380 experienced this range of higher crash rates compared to the urban U.S. highway statewide average. 137 % -245 %

Congestion

High tra ! c volumes

These crashes can be attributed to over-capacity, closely spaced driveways and a lack of separation between high- speed and low-speed tra ! c within the corridor.

SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION " COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

TRANSPORTATION

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Limited roadway capacity

Texans struggle throughERCOT power gridstrain WEATHER 11

In the face of what o ! cials have called staggering growth, the Texas Department of Transportation and Collin County commissioners are weighing their options for US 380. Commissioners agreed in Febru- ary on an alignment for the future US 380 freeway along County Road show that the thoroughfare experi- enced a 30% increase in the number of cars on the road from 2010 to 2016. Two years ago, US 380 near US 75 was estimated to have an average daily tra ! c volume of 49,436 vehicles. This is expected to increase to more than 86,000 vehicles by 2045. CONTINUED ON 18 County to acquire land for upgradingUS 380 inMcKinney BY MIRANDA JAIMES 164 and Bloomdale Road in McKin- ney. At the urging of the city of McK- inney, the county is now working to purchase land along this corridor to avoid future developments that may be a " ected when TxDOT begins con- struction of the new freeway. US 380 has been a pain point as Col- lin County has grown rapidly. Studies

Vaccine rollouts to resume after storms BY MIRANDA JAIMES Collin County’s COVID-19 vaccine allocations are expected to resume after shutting down during the week of Feb. 15 due to win- ter storms. No new doses arrived in Collin County during the closures. Allo- cations overall remain inconsistent as low supplies continue to fall short of meeting high demand. In late January, the Collin County COVID-19 vaccine waitlist sur- passed 200,000 names, leading commissioners to pause new registra- tions on Feb. 8. As of press time Feb. 19, registrations remain paused. Vaccine allotments from the state vary week by week. The week CONTINUED ON 20

FARMHOUSE FRESH

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Pat Smith, a resident at the Oxford Grand senior community in McKinney, is given her COVID ! 19 vaccine. (Courtesy Oxford Grand McKinney)

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FROMVICKI: Our hearts go out to everyone a # ected by the winter storm. Most of this month’s issue was planned and written in advance, but included on Page 11 is a story about the Texas power grid that sheds some light on how electricity is managed and supplied in this state. As our community recovers, we encourage you to continue supporting local businesses that have faced extenuating hardships for nearly a year now. Together, we will get through this. You can count on us to provide continuing coverage at www.communityimpact.com. Vicki Chen, GENERALMANAGER

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MCKINNEY EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

is available, as are desserts. 469-796-5041. www.facebook.com/tastycasa COMING SOON

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8 Amazon will open a new delivery station later this year at 1398 Industrial Blvd., McKinney. The delivery station is among six new Dallas-Fort Worth sta- tions planned to open in 2021, according to an Amazon announcement. Amazon said these stations will help increase the e " ciency of deliveries for customers. Hundreds of full- and part-time jobs starting at $15 per hour will be available. www.amazon.com 9 Fair ! eld by Marriott is expected to open in August at 1600 Hardin Blvd., McKinney. Construction has continued to progress on the 105-room inn and suites. www.fair # eld.marriott.com E . V I R GI N I A S T . 10 Orangetheory Fitness is expect- ed to open by early March at 3625 W. University Drive, Ste. 100, McKinney. The # tness company o % ers technolo- gy-tracked, total-body group workouts designed to boost caloric after-burn and results. The new gym’s sta % is currently accepting membership signups and said the opening date is contingent upon reaching a certain number of members. 972-474-0691. www.orangetheory.com 11 TeaLatte Bar plans to open by the end of February at 7001 S. Custer Road, Ste. 400, McKinney. The cafe combines several blends of Hawaiian-inspired tea and co % ee. More than a dozen blends of tea can be customized with di % erent $ avors, boba and jelly. Specialty co % ee drinks include a 100% Kona brew and $ avored lattes. www.tealattebar.com REOPENINGS 12 Tacos El Gordo reopened Jan. 20 at 1434 N. Central Expressway, Ste. 113, McKinney. The family-owned and -oper- ated Mexican food restaurant will open for business again after being closed due to COVID-19 precautions, owner Denise Sanchez said. Tacos El Gordo specializes in street-style tacos, tortas, burritos, burg- ers and more. 214-842-8961. www.tacosdelgordo.net LOGAN ST. E . L O U I S I A N A S 5 5

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5 Krust Pizza Co. opened Jan. 21 at 7701 Stacy Road, Ste. 300, McKinney. The build-your-own pizza shop features pre- mium toppings, including meatballs, alba- core tuna, feta cheese and other options. Beyond plain crust, some varieties include Parmesan and everything-bagel crust. Signature pizzas include elote and chicken alfredo pies. Pizza is sold alongside subs, wings, calzones and additional entrees. 214-548-5253. www.krustpizzaco.com 6 Melodic Bake Shop opened Jan. 21 at 1550 S. Custer Road, Ste. 600, McKinney. The family-owned bakery bakes themed cakes for special and everyday events. Melodic Bake Shop also serves from- scratch sweets, including cupcakes, tarts and other pastries. 214-548-4232. www.facebook.com/melodicbakeshop 7 Tasty Casa opened Jan. 24 at 1213 S. McDonald St., McKinney. The sit-down and drive-thru restaurant serves a collection of Mexican favorites, including tacos, nachos, burritos and quesadillas. All-day breakfast

3 Collin County Law Group o " cial- ly opened Jan. 1 at 105 N. Benge St., McKinney. The criminal and family law # rm accepts cases in Collin County, the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex and all over North Texas. The # ve partners who comprise Collin County Law Group have over 100 years of combined criminal and family law experience, a news release stated. They have helped clients through custody modi # cations, divorces, felony allegations, drunken-driving arrests and other legal situations. 972-548-7167. www.collincountylaw.com 4 Hello Boba opened Feb. 5 at 260 Coit Road, Ste. 100 McKinney. This loca- tion is an extension of the original store in Allen and features an identical menu of boba tea drinks in more than a dozen $ avors. Frappes, co % ee-based drinks and smoothies are also featured on the Hello Boba menu. 214-548-4066. www.facebook.com/helloboba

NOWOPEN 1 B&B Cafe opened Feb. 1 at 1411 N. Custer Road, Ste. 100, McKinney. The breakfast and lunch restaurant is owned by Benny Polisi, who also owns Ital- ian Garden on Custer Road. The menu includes an array of egg dishes, wa ! e and pancake plates, burgers, sandwiches, salads and wraps. 214-842-8337. www.facebook.com/bennysitaliangarden 2 BeBalanced Hormone Weight Loss Center opened Feb. 15 at 3610 W. University Drive, Ste. 150, McKin- ney. BeBalanced, a women-centered health and wellness service, focuses on natural hormone-balancing to promote well-being, according to a news release. The business features a nonmedical weight-loss program; a whole-foods, hormone balancing diet; and sound wave relaxation therapy. 214-592-8889. www.bebalancedcenters.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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RELOCATIONS 13 Carpe Diem Comics will relocate to a larger location by April 1 at 208 E. Louisiana St., McKinney. The new store will be three times larger than the current location on North McDonald Street, Carpe Diem Comics announced. Normal opera- tions are still running up to the move-in date. The retail store sells comic books, board games and role-playing games. 214-856-4519. www.carpediemcomics.com 14 ContraForce relocated in November to 6401 W. Eldorado Parkway, McKinney. The cybersecurity platform, with help from the McKinney Economic Develop- ment Corporation’s Innovation Fund, plans to create 20 high-tech jobs over the next three years, according to a news release from the city of McKinney. “Our goal is to make your current cyber risk management strategy more e % ective,” ContraForce CEO Stan Golubchik said in the release. “By streamlining insights and data, we’re able to gain a far better understanding on how to act on company threats, resulting in a reduction in overall costs to our customers and number of 15 Wishful Thinking closed at 200 E. Louisiana St., McKinney, on Jan. 24. The 2,400-square-foot space o % ered hand-designed goods, including jewelry and home decor. Wishful Thinking down- security tools required.” www.contraforce.com FEATURED IMPACT EXPANSIONS Independent Financial is expanding its McKinney headquarters to double its size to accommodate its growing team. The six-story, 198,000-square-foot building represents the second phase of the company’s headquarters construction plan. It will more than double the company’s existing presence at McKinney Corporate Center Craig Ranch, according to a news release, and will allow the organization to consolidate its banking operations teams. Independent Financial o ! cials said its workforce is expanding, and there will be future growth opportunities down the line. The cost of this project is $59.5 million, the release said. In total, Independent Financial said, $112 million has been spent for the two buildings, excluding land costs. “The completion of the second

building will allow us to bring all of our Independent Financial corporate employees together in one location, improve operations and recruit premier- level talent,” Independent Financial Chair and CEO David Brooks said in the release. “We have experienced strong growth in recent years, and it had become readily apparent that it was time to expand our campus.” Ground has been broken at TPC Drive, and the project is expected to be completed by 2022. The design will match the original building, also six stories, but will be about 20% larger, according to the release. 972-562-9004. www.i " nancial.com

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sized and reopened as a vendor booth at Painted Tree Marketplace in Frisco. The new shop is located at 2930 Preston Road, Unit 200B, in Frisco. 469-661-1588. www.wishfulthinkingstar.com

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MCKINNEY EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

TO ! DO LIST

February, March & April events

COMPILED BY FRANCESCA D’ANNUNZIO

cast-iron cooking on Wednesdays in this virtual event. The host will share some crepe- and pizza-making tips and stories of growing up in a Louisiana restaurant. Free. Online event. 972-547-5752. www.facebook.com/collincofarmmus 20 THE GHOSTLY HAUNTINGS AT CHESTNUT SQUARE Those seeking a spooky adventure can ! nd one at McKinney’s Chestnut Square on March 20. Ghost hunters and thrill- seekers can learn about the paranormal history of the area on a two-hour tour with audio and video clips of paranormal activity in and around the homes on the square. $20. 315 S. Chestnut St.,

THROUGHAPRIL SMITHSONIAN EXHIBIT: ‘I WANT THE WIDE AMERICAN EARTH’ A Smithsonian Museum exhibit that tells the story of the country’s ! rst Asian Americans has made its way to McKinney. Those who attend will receive a free e-book adaptation of the exhibit that features the work of seven comic artists. Free. Heard-Craig Center for the Arts, 205 W. Hunt St., McKinney. 972-569-6909. www.heardcraig.org MARCH 07 AND 14, 21, 28 SELF ! GUIDEDNATURE PRESERVE HIKE Nature lovers can roam the Heard’s prairie preserve to observe local " ora, and if they are quiet, they may be able to spot local fauna as well. $9-$12; free (children age 2 and under). Heard Natural Science Museum & Wildlife Sanctuary, 1 Nature Place, McKinney. 972-562-5566. www.heardmuseum.org/events 10 AND 17 LET’S TALK CAST IRON COOKING The McKinney-based Collin County Farm Museum will teach attendees about

McKinney. 972-562-8790. www.chesnutsquare.com 27 THROUGHAPRIL 10 2021 ONLINE SPRING PLANT SALE

As part of a fundraiser, Collin County Master Gardeners are selling plants online for two weeks. The sale o # ers a variety of plants, including annuals, perennials, herbs, daylilies, ground covers, shrubs and succulents. Aspiring plant parents can pick up their purchases curbside at the Show Barn in Myers Park in McKinney. 7117 CR 166, McKinney. 972-548-4792. www.ccmgatx.org

MARCH 13

MCKINNEY ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE TUPPS BREWERY

For St. Patrick’s Day, the city of McKinney is hosting its annual 5K and beer walk on the square and at Tupps Brewery. This year, the event is divided into two parts to help guests maintain social distancing. Runners can race around the Cotton Mill, and drinkers can sip and stroll around town and taste 20 craft beers. McKinney Performing Arts Center, 111 N. Tennessee St., McKinney; Tupps Brewery, 721 Anderson St., McKinney. www.mckinneystpatricksday.com (Photo courtesy SBG Hospitality)

Find more or submit McKinney events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

The Dallas North Tollway in Frisco is being extended north with a bridge over US 380. (Courtesy North Texas Tollway Authority)

NTTAworks to expandDallas North Tollway

GUNTER

MAIN ST.

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BY MATT PAYNE

The Dallas North Tollway is being expanded north of Frisco through Pros- per, Celina and into Grayson County. The North Texas Tollway Authority is extending the tollway via the construction of a new four-lane bridge over US 380. Construction began in February 2020, according to NTTA Media Relations Manager Michael Rey. This project will extend the tollway 13.7 miles north of US 380, according to NTTA project documents. Once the bridge is complete, the NTTA will add another four-lane segment of tollway between US 380 and FM 428 in Celina, o ! cials said. Construction on a two-lane frontage road from FM 428 to the Grayson County line is part of the project. The NTTA Board of Directors selected Mario Sinacola and Sons Excavating for construction of the frontage road and CONSOR Engineering for con- struction management. Coordination with stakeholders and partners is ongoing, documents indicate. Crews continue to work on the DNT extension project over US 380 as well as to perform environmen- tal engineering work. Rey said project completion is scheduled for 2022.

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MCKINNEY EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

CITY& COUNTY

News fromMcKinney & McKinney ISD

Collin County Commissioners Court Meets March 1, 8 and 15 at 1:30 p.m. MEETINGSWE COVER which means that learning does not require real-time interaction, the school board voted to opt in at a Jan. 19 meeting. The ! rst independent learning day was Feb. 1. Feb. 16 was also planned, though all instruction was canceled that day due to weather. The next dates are scheduled for March 15 and April 12. O " cials said the waiver allows teachers to regroup, engage in professional development or catch up on planning. This move will alleviate some of the stress teachers have felt with teaching and planning in person and virtually, district sta # said. Meets Feb. 23, March 2 and March 16 at 6 p.m. www.mckinneytexas.org McKinney ISD Meets March 23 at 7 p.m. www.mckinneyisd.net www.collincountytx.gov McKinney City Council HIGHLIGHTS MCKINNEY ISD The district’s school board of trustees approved ! nal updates for elementary school renovations using funds from the district’s 2016 bond program. Caldwell Elementary School, built in 1961, has not been renovated since 2002—with the exception of the kitchen, which was renovated in 2020. Vega Elementary School, built in 2002, has never had renovations. Projects include energy-e " cient LED lighting, ! re alarm upgrades, new countertops and cabinets and new plumbing ! xtures. The total cost expected is $1.8 million for Vega Elementary School and $1.7 million for Caldwell Elementary School. Renovations will begin on the last day of school, May 21. MCKINNEY ISD Following the announcement of a new Texas Education Agency waiver that allows certain districts to schedule periodic asynchronous school days,

City postpones decision on its Confederate statue

BY FRANCESCA D’ANNUNZIO

MCKINNEY Following months of research, City Council voted for a second time to postpone any decision concerning the statue of James W. Throckmorton. The Feb. 2 vote pushes the decision until at least May. The statue is located downtown in front of the McKinney Performing Arts Center. Throckmorton served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. This summer, the city began conducting research related to the statue after a number of residents asked for its removal. The ad hoc advisory board—com- prised of community members—was put together to oversee the research. A survey was sent out to receive feedback on what should be done with the statue. The majority of people who responded to the survey were in favor

McKinney City Council voted Feb. 2 to postpone any decision regarding the Throckmorton statue. (Miranda Jaimes/Community Impact Newspaper)

Four council members—Frederick Frazier, Rainey Rogers, Rick Franklin and Charlie Philips—voted to postpone a decision on how to proceed. The other three council members, Angela Richardson-Woods, Scott Elliott and Mayor George Fuller, voted against tabling the decision.

of leaving the statue in place, city sta ! said. The council did not reach a decision concerning the statue when these results were presented in October. Nor did council members reach consensus on how to move forward at their Feb. 2 meeting.

Population grows to 198,507 residents in 2021

GROWTH STATISTICS In a year McKinney’s population has grown by 1.62% , according to

BY MIRANDA JAIMES

at McKinney and have the desire to make us their destination, and the numbers suggest that they are,” City Manager Paul Grimes stated. In addition, a total of $852 million in new construction value was added to McKinney in 2020, an increase of about 17% from the prior year, the city reported. New commercial growth was up about 49% from 2019 to 2020. By 2040, McKinney’s population is expected to grow to approximately 284,000 residents, an increase of more than 80,000 people, reports showed.

city estimates. 2020: 195,342

MCKINNEY The city’s population has grown by 1.62% in the past year, per the city’s most recent estimates. In January 2020, the population was estimated to be 195,342. Now, it is estimated to be 198,507. Over the past 20 years, the city’s population has more than tripled. Since 2001, when the population was 58,438, it has increased by more than 239%, according to a city news release. “It is always our hope that families, companies and investors will look

2021: 198,507

The city’s population has grown by 239% since 2001, according to city estimates. 2001: 58,438

2021: 198,507

SOURCE: CITY OF MCKINNEY $ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

WEATHER Winter conditions bring outages to isolated Texas power grid

The Electric Reliability Council of Texas manages an electric grid that covers most of Texas and is disconnected from larger interconnections covering the rest of the U.S.

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Winter collapse A Feb. 11 press release from ERCOT stated the agency issued notices from Feb. 8-11 about the cold weather expected to hit Texas and that gener- ators were asked to prepare for it. ERCOT followed with a Feb. 14 notice asking customers to reduce electricity through Feb. 16. The next day, ERCOT announced the council had begun rotating outages at 1:25 a.m. Feb. 15. More than 4.3 million Texans were without power the morning of Feb. 16, according to poweroutage.us. Despite early warnings, Ramanan Krishnamoorti, a chemical engineer- ing professor and chief energy o # cer at the University of Houston, said he believes the state’s reliance on market conditions to manage supply and demand is partially responsible for outages given providers’ lack of incen- tive to begin production in advance of the supply shortage. He and Cohan also cited a low supply of natural gas. “The shortfall in natural gas supply is about 20 times as large as the shortfall in wind supply compared to expectations for a winter peak cold event,” Cohan said. Planning ahead The statewide outages were the fourth such event in ERCOT’s history. One result of the most recent event in February 2011—also caused by win- ter weather—was the publication of a federal report outlining past failures of power generators and recommending ERCOT and other authorities make winterization e " orts a top concern.

BY BEN THOMPSON

WESTERN INTERCONNECTION Includes El Paso and far West Texas 1 EASTERN INTERCONNECTION Includes portions of East Texas and the panhandle region 2 3

Widespread power outages prompted by severe weather across Texas in February led to increased focus on the Electric Reliability Coun- cil of Texas, which manages statewide electric power ! ow. The failure of portions of the state’s power grid left millions of Texans without electric service the week of Feb. 15-19. As blackouts and power restoration e " orts continued, public o # cials, including Gov. Greg Abbott, called for an investigation of ERCOT. ERCOT did not respond to phone calls or email requests for comment. An independent system Texas’ power grid has long been controlled within the state, separate from eastern and western North Amer- ican interconnects. Founded in 1970, ERCOT operates under the supervision of the Public Utility Commission of Texas and the Texas Legislature and manages most of the state’s electric system and retail market. ERCOT o # cials have highlighted bene $ ts of the insular system in the past, although its disconnect from the continent’s larger grids has left it prone to isolation issues during high-demand events, such as Febru- ary’s winter storms, experts said. “Staying independent keeps the management of our power systems within Texas. But it means that we can barely import any power when we need it most,” Daniel Cohan, a Rice University civil and environmental engineering professor, said via email.

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ERCOT INTERCONNECTION

ERCOT’s grid provides electric power to the majority of Texans.

ERCOT man- ages 90%

ERCOT provides for 26 million customers.

ERCOT’s grid includes 46,500 miles of transmission.

of the Texas electrical load.

Real-time data varies, but more than half of ERCOT’s generation capacity comes from natural gas. Experts cited a natural gas shortage in February’s power outages.

POWER BREAKDOWN

2021 ERCOT grid power generating capacity 51% Natural gas 4.9% Nuclear

24.8% Wind 3.8% Solar

13.4% Coal 1.9% Other

0.2% Storage

TRACKING THE OUTAGES Millions of Texans lost power during winter storms Feb. 15-18.

• At 1:25 a.m. Feb. 15 , ERCOT began rotating outages from customers statewide • As much as 16,500 megawatts removed from the grid due to forced outages Feb. 15

• 1 megawatt can power about 200 households during peak demand • 4.3 million Texans were without power at 9 a.m. Feb. 16

SOURCES: ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL OF TEXAS, PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION OF TEXAS, POWEROUTAGE.US ! COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Beyond just following previous recommendations, the state and power suppliers could have further incentivized preparation for the record-breaking conditions experi- enced, Krishnamoorti said. “We knew that this polar vortex was coming at least a week ahead. We

could have planned,” he said. Cohan said he hopes the state will take a broader range of issues into consideration for potential updates to its energy systems. “We need to look beyond the elec- tricity system and realize that this is an energy systems crisis,” he said.

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MCKINNEY EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

GUIDE

A noncomprehensive guide to McKinney private schools

2 0 2 1 P R I VAT E S C H O O L G U I D E

2 0 2 1 P R I VAT E S C H O O L

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WH AT I S A C HART E R S C HOO L ?

Charter schools are di ! erent from public and private schools. In Texas, charter schools are public schools that are open to any student and that may not charge tuition, according to the Texas Education Agency. These schools receive state funds based on their average daily attendance of students, and they may also accept donations from private or public sources, according to the TEA. Charter schools also administer the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness. LOCAL CHARTER SCHOOL Imagine North Texas An International Baccalaureate organization Grades served: K-12 Extracurricular activities: National Honor Society, National Junior Honor Society, Youth and Government, HOSA (Future Health Professionals), chess Current enrollment: 1,415 2860 Virginia Parkway 214-491-1500 www.imaginenorthtexas.org

G U I D E

Private schools around McKinney o ! er a variety of types of specialized instruction, from di ! erent religious a " liations to various sorts of curriculum. This guide features primary and middle schools with grade levels through eighth grade and high schools with grade levels through 12th grade.

Cornerstone Christian Academy

COURTESY CORNERSTONE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

KEY

Montessori

Religion-based

Tuition: $7,200-$15,000 annually 3601 Bois D’Arc Road 214-544-2658 www.mckinneychristian.org 4 Montessori School of Excellence Grades served: pre-K-8 (currently fully online) Religious orientation: Islam (no particu- lar sect) Extracurricular activities: art classes, extracurricular reading, theater Current enrollment: unavailable Tuition: $4,800-$8,000 annually 7701B W. Virginia Parkway, McKinney 214-491-6090 https://montessoriexcellence.com

Religious orientation: nondenominational Christian Extracurricular activities: football, bas- ketball, volleyball, baseball, soccer, golf, fencing, track, cheer, archery Current enrollment: 347 Tuition: $5,035-$6,635 annually 808 S. College St. 214-491-5700 www.ccawarriors.com/ 3 McKinney Christian School Grades served: pre-K-12 Religious orientation: nondenominational Christian Extracurricular activities: all sports, # ne arts, band, choir, graphic design Current enrollment: 550

COMPILED BY FRANCESCA D’ANNUNZIO

1 Acton Academy Grades served: ages 4-14 Religious orientation: none

Extracurricular activities: music, dance, art, Children’s Business Fair, Krav Maga, Global Elementary Model United Nations,

nature classes, acting Current enrollment: 22 Tuition: $7,200 annually 192 Industrial Blvd., Ste. 103 515-707-8970 www.actonmckinney.org/

2 Cornerstone Christian Academy Grades served: K-12

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12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HISTORY

Neworganization seeks to promote history ofminority communities

BY MIRANDA JAIMES

tandem with the city so that in spite of the physical changes coming to this part of McKinney, “the heart” remains the same, she said. “[Change] is happening, so what can we do to preserve it?” she said. “This way, people always know what was important to this community—not just to the people of the east side, but to the whole community.” Legacy Keepers had its ! rst event in early February, a sacred walk at Ross Cemetery facing Old Mill Road near Pecan Grove Cemetery. On the walk, participants were able to learn about some of the people and fam- ilies buried in the once-segregated cemetery for Black people, including former slaves, veterans, professors, entrepreneurs and multiple genera- tions of families, Bentley said. Many individuals in attendance said it was their ! rst time there, Bentley said.

One local group is seeking to shine a light on some of the landmarks and buildings on the eastern portion of McKinney. At a Jan. 5 McKinney City Council meeting, Beth Bentley announced during public comments the formation of an organization that will document, honor and promote the historical legacies of McKinney’s Black and Mexican communities on the east side of the city. “There are many of us whose hearts are attached to east McKin- ney,” she said at the meeting. The organization, Legacy Keepers of Old East McKinney, was formed in light of the upcoming redevelop- ment opportunities coming to the part of the city east of Highway 5, including the Tupps Brewery expan- sion and the new City Hall, Bentley said. Legacy Keepers will work in

McKinney native Shirley Mack attends the Feb. 6 sacred walk event at Ross Cemetery in McKinney. (Courtesy Legacy Keepers of Old East McKinney)

Legacy Keepers will present blues and gospel music on the Square in Historic Downtown McKinney. 2-4 p.m. Free. McKinney Performing Arts Center, 111 N. Tennessee St. Contact Beth Bentley with questions at 214-498-3540. UPCOMING EVENT FEB. 27

More events to continue the mis- sion of preserving and document- ing the history of the east side are planned to take place throughout the year for all to attend, Bentley said. As McKinney’s east side moves through redevelopment in 2021, Bentley said she will do what she can through Legacy Keepers to help preserve the history and culture of this side of the city. “We want to bring people together from all walks of life and create a collaborative space to celebrate all cultures within the community,” she said.

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MCKINNEY EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

BUSINESS FEATURE

BY FRANCESCA D’ANNUNZIO

Fresh fromthe farm FarmHouse Fresh grows organic microgreens on the ranch and harvests them early, when the plants are more nutritious. These plants are used in about 90% of the company’s products.

Micro-kale: High in vitamins A, C, B6 and K

FarmHouse Fresh grows microgreens used in some of the company’s products.

FarmHouse Fresh owner Shannon McLinden runs an animal rescue operation at the ranch. Among the ranch animals is her mischievous donkey, Arlo. (Francesca D’Annunzio/Community Impact Newspaper) FarmHouse Fresh McKinney resident builds international skincare brand S hannon McLinden knew she had entrepreneurial and resourceful instincts the time. She has since expanded to o ! er more than 240 products, from lotions and face masks to body

COURTESY FARMHOUSE FRESH

for animals since she was a child, she said. As her way of giving back to her community, she uses some of her pro " ts to adopt abused and abandoned animals. She keeps them on her farm and hires farmhands to tend to them. “We " nd a lot of di ! erent circum- stances, so they all have a story,” McLinden said. Making her dream business and philanthropic venture become a reality wasn’t easy though, McLin- den said. “I worked my tail o ! . … I didn’t pay myself for the " rst " ve years. Every birthday I’ve had, I’ve been on the road at a trade show,” McLinden said, adding that 2020 was the only exception because of the pandemic. “But I love what I do, you know?”

from a young age. When she was 8, she said, she walked around her neighborhood selling homemade, crocheted goods. Nearly a decade later, in college, McLinden’s running hobby caused the skin on her feet to crack. She found a solution to her problem: a foot scrub made of sea salt and rice bran oil. That product, along with three others, eventually became the basis for her business years later. In 2006, the foot scrub landed a spot on Oprah Winfrey’s “O List.” For several years, McLinden ran her FarmHouse Fresh skin care and cosmetics company out of a house in Frisco, where she lived at

washes and fragrances, many of which are used in spas and hotels across North America, the Caribbean and the Middle East. As her business operations and ideas expanded, so did her work space. In 2014, she purchased four acres of land on county property, where zoning laws are more lenient. Her ranch sits on a pocket of unin- corporated land surrounded by the city of McKinney. Other than its need to reside within a special zoning district, the McKinney-based ranch has another unorthodox quirk: it is an animal rescue farm. McLinden has had a soft spot

The LustreDrench® Instant GlowDryOil contains an extract fromred amaranth, which is grown in FarmHouse Fresh’s greenhouse.

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14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE Layered Layered o ! ers breakfast,

Chicken and wa ! es ($12.50) are served with orange juice and co " ee.

brunch and family-like bonds N ir Sela, owner of Layered in downtown McKinney, called working in the city refreshing as compared to his past days running coffee shops in the Big Apple. The breakfast and brunch restaurant, located at 111 E. Virginia St., McKinney, sees regulars visit on any given day, and Sela said he is always eager to chat with them and offer his service. The former New Yorker said he decided to move to North Texas for its more homely, friendly atmosphere back when he opened his restaurant in downtown McKinney in 2017. “That’s what I like more, so that’s the reason for McKinney,” Sela said. “It’s really amazing. We have a lot of repeat customers, and we have a lot of new faces.” On the square in McKinney, Sela said families will often walk along the city’s promenade of small businesses before they step inside Layered. He said they might stop in for a coffee with several shopping bags, often with several family members, before they head out again to do more shopping at local businesses. In a way, McKinney is a microcosm of New York City, Sela said, where there is plenty of commer- cial activity and tourism. “I didn’t want to be up in a place like a mall or a strip center,” Sela said. “Being here in downtown McKinney reminds me, on a small scale, of New York City.” Guests enjoy decadent breakfast and brunch fare, from sweet potato pancakes and banana foster Belgian waffles to what Sela called “the best coffee in McKinney.” In addition, Sela said, acting as a catalyst for small-town connections adds to his pride. “We have people that work here who are still here from Day One—just like family,” Sela said. “We just like to see people interact with people.” BY MATT PAYNE

Chicken and wa ! es are drenched in syrup. (Photos courtesy Layered)

Corned beef hash ($12.25) is served with eggs.

Hummus at Layered ( $7.50 ) is served with pita bread.

LAYERED 111 E. Virginia St. 972-542-6317 www.layeredtx.com

BUILT TO SERVE Layered has amenities for a variety of guests.

Full drink menu

Spacious, dog-friendly patio

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Layered’s Nir Sela poseswith his kids.

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MCKINNEY EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PEOPLE

BY MIRANDA JAIMES

“YOUDON’T JUST HAVE TOBE A BUSINESS OWNER. YOUDON’T JUST HAVE TOBE A HIGH ! RANKING OFFICIAL TOMAKE CHANGE IN THE COMMUNITY.”

Angela Richardson-Woods InterimMcKinney City Council member discusses focus and initiatives Angela Richardson-Woods was sworn in Dec. 21 as McKinney’s new council member for District 1. This was a historic appointment, as Richardson-Woods is the ! rst Black woman to serve on McKinney City Council. Richard- son-Woods formerly served as the treasurer of the McKinney Community Development Corp. board. She will serve as the interim District 1 council member until the term expires in May. She did not ! le to run for a full term. Richardson-Woods is involved in the Collin County Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc., Far North Dallas Chapter of Jack and Jill of America, and the Collin County Chapter of the NAACP. Community Impact Newspaper spoke with her in January about her new role and how she plans to lead the city over the next few months.

Angela Richardson-Woods is the newest face on the McKinney City Council. (Courtesy city of McKinney)

females in leadership, serving civic leader opportunities, and also I just want to promote and foster an inclusive spirit, where more minorities feel that their talents and skill sets are valued. WHAT ARE THE BIGGEST CHALLENGES FACING THE CITY? The biggest challenges that I’ve noticed are workforce and affordable housing options, such as starter home options for very low-, low- and moderate-income buyers. ... The average starter home in McKinney is no less than $250,000 and that does not necessarily get you a modern-day home. I think addressing some of the food desert and service disparities on the east side of McKinney are some of the challenges that we face. Transpor- tation, and also the compassion of addressing the concerns of the diverse and the rich culture in

WHAT ARE YOU MOST LOOK ! ING FORWARD TO DURING YOUR TIME ON THE COUNCIL? I want to have a voice in the legislative [issues] and policies that impact our city. I think as a double minority I bring a valuable perspec- tive that is needed on the council. I want to ensure the proposals and actions that meet the community needs for public service and pro- grams, economic and community development are met. And ensuring equitable distribution of resources that are directed across the city, in particular in communities where it’s needed the most. For me as a female, and speci " ically a Black female, I want to bring diversity to the council to ensure other female leaders in the community are afforded opportunities to serve at the highest level in the community. ... I think it is important that our children see minority women and

because it ultimately can roll over into the community and the city as a whole. So I think it is important that they look for opportunities to lead. You don’t just have to be a business owner. You don’t just have to be a high-ranking of " icial to make change in the community. One of the things I will be sharing when I get the opportunity to do some type of town hall or some type of intro- duction meeting with them is to say, ‘We need you here in the good times, the bad times and in the ugly times. We need you here all the time, not just when it’s a hot topic that interests you at the moment.’ So I just think the inclusiveness of being engaged in the things that are happening in our community is imperative.

history of McKinney. We have a rich culture of African Americans, the Hispanic community, and we need to ensure that that compassion is carried on into the decisions that are made in the city. I think some of the challenges that we’ve had in the last couple of years are the transparency, trust, accountability and providing adequate and trade employment opportunities for individuals in the community. Also, creating partnerships with employ- ers and new employers to create a second chance, re-entry career path program for felons. They want to work, too. They want to contribute. And I think it’s important because they add to the sales tax and the tax base in our community. HOW CAN RESIDENTS OF DISTRICT 1 BE INVOLVED? I would encourage that all constituents be engaged in every- thing that is happening in the city

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MCKINNEY EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

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