Grapevine - Colleyville - Southlake Edition - November 2020

GRAPEVINE COLLEYVILLE SOUTHLAKE EDITION

VOLUME 10, ISSUE 9  NOV. 2DEC. 6, 2020

ONLINE AT

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IMPACTS

THE SUNFLOWER SHOPPE 20

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Theunforeseen costs of hunger GRACE tackles food insecurity during the COVID19 pandemic

57.3% of Grapevine families receiving food assistance had children under the age of 18 FOODASSISTANCE

SOURCE: AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

“RIGHTNOW, I’M ATAPOPULATION WHERE 54% OF MYCLIENTS ARE EITHERDIABETIC ORPREDIABETIC.”

BY SANDRA SADEK

Since the coronavirus pandemic began in March, the number of people seeking assistance fromnonprotGRACEhas increasednearly40%. Among its clients is 60-year-old Grapevine resi- dent Ale Reyes, who works two part-time jobs, as a cleaner and a cashier, to make ends meet. However, she said she still visits a food pantry CONTINUED ON 14

The GRACE food pantry is open to residents by appointment only during the pandemic. The pantry oers canned goods, produce and grains for clients. (Sandra Sadek/Community Impact Newspaper)

SHIRLEY ROBERTS, CLINIC MANAGER AT GRACE

Construction continues onmultiyear projects BY IAN PRIBANIC

DALLASFORTWORTH CONNECTOR Est. completion: 2022 Cost: $1.02 billion

Transportation crews are expected to com- plete reconstruction work on Hwy. 26 by the end of the year. While many sectors have been aected by the COVID-19 pandemic, construction crews are considered essential, and that has allowed work to progress even further, said Maria Woodrow, spokesperson for NorthGate Con- structors, which is the contractor overseeing the DFW Connector.

The end of the road is in sight for Grape- vine-Colleyville-Southlake-area residents on a number of multiyear transportation projects. First started in 2010, the $1 billion-plus Dal- las-Fort Worth Connector project has entered the nal phase of construction at the SH 121 and I-635 interchange. The city of South- lake has begun the second and nal phase of construction on an overhaul of North White Chapel Boulevard, and Texas Department of

Work continues on the 12-year DFW Connector project, which began in February 2010. (Ian Pribanic/Community Impact Newspaper)

MORE INSIDE

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North White Chapel Blvd.

Hwy. 26

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COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON . Complete 2020 by joining your neighbors with a contribution of any amount to CI Patron. Funds support Community Impact Newspaper ’s hyperlocal, unbiased journalism and help build informed communities. Choose IMPACT . Make a CONTRIBUTION . Strengthen JOURNALISMFORALL . Contribute today! Snap or visit

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GRAPEVINE - COLLEYVILLE - SOUTHLAKE EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Ana Erwin, aerwin@communityimpact.com EDITOR Ian Pribanic REPORTER Sandra Sadek GRAPHIC DESIGNER Ellen Jackson ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Lexi Canivel MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

FROMANA: We sent this paper to press before Election Day; however you can still get up-to-date information on election results by visiting communityimpact.com/vote. I also want to introduce you to our new editor, Ian Pribanic. Ian is new to covering Grapevine, Colleyville and Southlake. He is also the editor of our Keller-Roanoke-Northeast Fort Worth edition. You can email Ian at ipribanic@communityimpact.com. Ana Erwin, GENERALMANAGER

FROM IAN: Having been a North Texas resident for most of my life, I am very aware of the quality experiences oered by Grapevine, Southlake and Colleyville. I am thrilled to have an opportunity to continue Community Impact Newspaper ’s coverage of these vibrant cities and to continue providing area residents with an accurate and in-depth look at their local community. Ian Pribanic, EDITOR

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TODO LIST

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Local events and things to do TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 9 Colleyville art installation CITY& COUNTY 11 Latest local news

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON

Local sources 18

New businesses 7

Community events 7

Pages of Impact Deals 5

Our local teams tailor campaigns for all business sizes and industries wanting to reach their customer base and accomplish their nancial goals. Our products ADVERTISEWITHUS

Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact

Newspaper’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens

LOCAL GETAWAYS GUIDE Dallas-Fort Worth area attractions BUSINESS FEATURE

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stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON CONTACT US 7460 Warren Parkway, Ste. 160 Frisco, TX 75034 • 2146189001 PRESS RELEASES gcsnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

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CORRECTION: Volume 10, Issue 8 The 2020 Voter Guide sample ballot listed the wrong political parties for Republican incumbent Chris Wolfe and Democrat challenger Lakesha Smith in the race for 213th District Court judge.

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GRAPEVINE  COLLEYVILLE  SOUTHLAKE EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or closing

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LAKE GRAPEVINE

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W. GRAND AVE.

PLAZA PLACE

DOVE R D .

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BETHEL RD.

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MAIN ST.

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D’Ambrosio’s #1 Pizza Pub

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VILLAGE CENTER DR.

SOUTHLAKE BLVD.

COURTESY D’AMBROSIO’S #1 PIZZA PUB

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SOUTHLAKE

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CROSSROADS DR.

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CONTINENTAL BLVD.

WILLIAM D. TATE AVE.

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HANOVER DR.

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GRAPEVINE

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Hall’s Pumpkin Farm

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COURTESY HALL’S PUMPKIN FARM

HALLJOHNSON RD.

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400, Grapevine. 817-576-4730. www.inspireyoga.com/colleyville

GLADE RD.

6 Panda Express opened a second location in Southlake, set at 2325 W. Southlake Blvd., in August. The restau- rant specializes in dishes from Chinese cuisine, such as broccoli beef and orange chicken. The newest Southlake location has drive-thru and dine-in options and is located in the former storefront of Ever- est Burgers. 817-865-1778. www.pandaexpress.com 7 MyEyeDr. opened a store in Oc- tober at 1247 Main St., Southlake. The clinic specializes in prescription glasses, frames, contact lenses and eye exams. The business accepts all insurance. 817-481-2070. www.myeyedr.com COMING SOON 8 Chicago-style pizza restaurant D’Am- brosio’s #1 Pizza Pub is coming soon to 1713 Cross Roads Drive, Grapevine. The restaurant will employ 30 years of Italian and Greek cooking experience to oer customers a friendly environment in which they can enjoy a more contempo-

GLADE RD.

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A R G E R R D .

COLLEYVILLE

TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MAP NOT TO SCALE N

NOWOPEN 1 The L.A.B. Med Spa recently opened at 1910 E. SH 114, Southlake. The spa oers a variety of treatments, including neurotoxins, llers, stem cells, PRP/PRF, lasers, skincare and facials. The L.A.B. Med Spa was founded by husband-wife team Stephen and Sonya Ellis. 817-251-1000. www.thelabmedspa.com 2 Kahuna Chair opened in September at 4709 Colleyville Blvd., Ste. 580, Col- leyville. The store sells massage chairs

4 Aesthetic Specialists opened in September at 245 W. SH 114, Ste. 100, Southlake. The spa oers a wide range of services, including injection-based treat- ments, skincare treatments, laser and light therapy, body contouring, women’s health options and hair removal. 817-912-1200. www.stayageless.com 5 Inspire Yoga opened Oct. 19 at 4902 Colleyville Blvd., Ste. 102, Colleyville. The business oers hot yoga classes from its new 2,000-square-foot studio. There is an additional Inspire Yoga location in Grapevine at 400 E. Dallas Road, Ste.

and near-infrared LED masks. They are open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m.-7 p.m. and Sunday from noon-6 p.m. 682-325-4045. www.bestkmco.com 3 The Lodge Barbershop in Southlake recently opened its second shop, located at 16 Village Lane, Ste. 120, Colleyville. The shop oers haircuts for boys and adult men as well as razor shaves. The Lodge Barbershop is open Tuesday through Friday from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sat- urday from 8 a.m.-3 p.m. 817-576-2000. www.thelodgebarbershop.com BE DFORD R

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY IAN PRIBANIC & SANDRA SADEK

Marriott will open a second Delta DFW hotel location in mid-November at 251 E. SH 114, Southlake. (Courtesy Marriott Hotels) FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON

rary style of Chicago deep-dish pizza as well as pasta, steaks, burgers and other dishes. 817-392-1002. www.dambrosiospizzapub.com 9 A new Chick-l-A is on track to open in January 2021 at 5150 Colleyville Blvd., Colleyville. The new location is antic- ipated to bring in $3.5 million in sales annually, which will result in $70,000 in local annual sales tax revenue for Colleyville—in addition to property taxes collected from the site. 10 Pinspiration will be opening a Southlake location at the Village Center shopping strip at the corner of South Village Center Drive and Hwy. 114. The store oers customers a crafting space to create Pinterest-inspired do-it-yourself projects in a group setting. Reservations are recommended. www.pinspiration.com RELOCATIONS 11 E&A TransPros Inc. , an Illinois-based logistics rm, is relocating some of its operations from Carrollton to Grapevine to be closer to the Dallas Fort Worth International Airport. The rm is leasing Prologis Inc.’s 19,643-square-foot Ha- nover 4 at 801 Hanover Drive, Grapevine. 12 LT Men’s Clinic has relocated to 5604 Colleyville Blvd., Ste H, Colleyville. The general family practice oers various services, including low-testosterone treatments, annual physicals, general Delta Hotels by Marriott has announced the ocial grand opening of its second Dallas location, Delta Hotels Dallas Southlake , which is scheduled to open in mid-November. Located at the intersection of SH 114 and White Chapel Boulevard in Southlake, the six-story hotel will include 240 guest rooms, large workspaces, a chef-inspired grab-and- go food market, a 24-hour pantry, a full-service tness center, an outdoor pool and a lounge area. www.marriott.com

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GATHER TOGETHER AND BE GRATEFUL. First of all, we are thankful for those who have been a big part of the PEAK family, the community we serve and our customers who put their trust in us. Have a blessed Thanksgiving Holiday with your family and stay safe.

illness diagnosis and treatment, quick u tests and u vaccinations, school physi- cals, medical checkups, and HIV and STD screenings. 817-416-5698. www.ltmensclinic.com 13 Women’s lingerie, loungewear and swimwear retailer Soma ocially re- opened in August inside Southlake Town Square at 301 Grand Avenue West. The store was closed during the month of July due to the nancial impact of COVID-19. 817-416-4757. www.soma.com ANNIVERSARIES 14 Hall’s Pumpkin Farm celebrated its 20th anniversary in October. Located at 3420 Hall-Johnson Road, Grapevine, the family-owned pumpkin patch is known for its hayrides, farm animals and corn maze. 817-991-1052. www.hallspumpkinfarm.net CLOSINGS 15 After 15 years at its Southlake Town Square location, Harkins Theatres announced it will ocially close Nov. 1 due to economic diculties. The movie theater, located at 1450 Plaza Place, Southlake, oered showings of current and classic adult and children’s movies and a variety of concessions. It was the only Harkins Theatres location in Texas. 817-310-0345. www.harkins.com

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GRAPEVINE  COLLEYVILLE  SOUTHLAKE EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

TODO LIST

November & December events

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DEC. 04

COLLEYVILLE TREE LIGHTING COLLEYVILLE CITY HALL

The city of Colleyville will host its annual Christmas Tree Lighting celebration at City Hall. Food and entertainment will include carriage rides, a kiddie train, a petting zoo and pony rides as well as snacks and “Santa Swag,” according to city ocials. 5:30- 8:30 p.m. Free. 100 Main St., Colleyville. 817-503-1000. www.colleyville.com (Courtesy city of Colleyville)

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08 DSOON THE GO Join the Dallas Symphony Orchestra, in collaboration with Apex Arts League, for a concert entitled “DSO on the GO Brass Quintet” at the Aria Amphitheater. The event will be held outdoors, and masks and social distancing are required. Attendees are encouraged to bring a chair and a blanket. A virtual recording will be released after the concert. 3 p.m. Free. Aria Amphitheater, The Marq Southlake, 285 Shady Oaks Drive, Southlake. 682-651-5026. www.apexartsleague.com. 13 DIWALI FIREWORKS DISPLAY Celebrate India’s most important festival of the year with a reworks display at Bi Centennial Park, sponsored by the Southlake Foundation. 7 p.m. Free. 450 W. Southlake Blvd., Southlake. 913-385-2200. www.southlakediwali.com 13 THROUGH JAN. 3 LONE STAR CHRISTMAS Celebrate the holiday season at the Gaylord Texan with their Lone Star Christmas events. Explore acres of lights and decorations and enjoy holiday activities. New this year includes the “Yuletide Bright” outdoor light show. Cost and times vary. 1501 Gaylord Trail, Grapevine. 817-778-1000. www.christmasatgaylordtexan. www.marriott.com 23 THROUGH JAN. 10 LIGHT SHOWSPECTACULAR The city of Grapevine is sponsoring a free light show spectacular during the holiday season. Begins at dusk. Free. 200 S. Main St., Grapevine. 817-410-3000. www.grapevinetexasusa.com/ christmas-capital-of-texas/events

You have from October 15 to December 7 to choose your Medicare coverage for 2021! Call today. 1-844-986-0048 (TTY 711) 8a.m.– 8p.m. | 7 days a week Visit WellcareSeminars.com to find a virtual or local event.

NOV. 05

FOURHANDSWINEDINNER HOTEL VIN

COMPILED BY SANDRA SADEK NOVEMBER 07 VIRTUAL GRACE GALA Grapevine-based nonprot GRACE will host its 17th annual gala to benet Grapevine and Tarrant County families in need. Presenting sponsor for the event is Atmos Energy. 7 p.m. Free. Virtual. 817-305-4672. www.gracegala.com is also available to attend for an additional $25. 7-10 p.m. $150 per person. Hotel Vin, 215 E. Dallas Road, Grapevine. 817-796-9696. www.harvesthall.com (Gavin Pugh/ Community Impact Newspaper) Hosted by Hotel Vin, Bacchus Kitchen and Bar and Loveria Cae Taste of Italy, a four-course dinner will feature wine pairings and hand-shaved trues from the Piedmont region of Italy. A pre-reception jazz concert

Plans vary by region and not all benefits are covered on all plans. Hearing benefit per ear.* Ask your licensed representative for details. WellCare Health Plans, Inc., is an HMO, PPO, PDP, PFFS plan with a Medicare contract and is an approved Part D Sponsor. Enrollment in our plans depends on contract renewal. Please contact our plans for details. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call 1-877-MY-WELLCARE (TTY: 711). There is no obligation to enroll. Our plans use a formulary. The formulary and/or pharmacy network may change at any time. You will receive notice when necessary. You have the choice to sign up for automated mail service delivery. You can get prescription drugs shipped to your home through our network mail service delivery program. You should expect to receive your prescription drugs within 10–14 calendar days from the time that the mail service pharmacy receives the order. If you do not receive your prescription drugs within this time, please contact us at 1-866-808-7471 (TTY 711), 24 hours a day, seven days a week, or visit mailrx.wellcare.com. Y0070_WCM_62577E_FINAL16_M CMS Accepted 09132020 NA1WCMADV64076E_WCBA ©WellCare 2020

Find more or submit Grapevine, Colleyville, and Southlake events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY GAVIN PUGH COMPILED BY IAN PRIBANIC

DART to holdmeetings for new rail project

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The Dallas Area Rapid Transit authority will hold six community meetings in November to answer resident questions and provide an update on the Silver Line project, which would connect DART rail lines from Plano to Grapevine and to Dallas Fort Worth International Airport. Part of the 26-mile Cotton Belt Corridor, the Silver Line project will improve mobility and provide accessibility for major employers in North Dallas-Fort Worth, according to

DART ocials. DART rst approved the Silver Line upgrade in 2016. The project is expected to begin in 2022. Community meetings for the Silver Line project are scheduled to be held in Coppell on Nov. 9, Carrollton on Nov. 11, Addison on Nov. 12, Richard- son on Nov. 16, Plano on Nov. 17 and Dallas on Nov. 18. More information on the Cotton Belt Corridor Silver Line project and other DART construction initiatives is available at www.dart.org.

635

Newly installed horse statues pay homage to the city’s equestrian past. (Courtesy city of Colleyville)

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DFW INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

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The city of Colleyville has completed a public art installation at the inter- section of McDonwell School Road and Westcoat Drive. The art installation, entitled “Then and Now,” provides insight into the early rural days of Colleyville, when horse farming was common.

Agency considering CottonBelt Trail extension The North Central Texas Council of Governments is currently accepting public input on a planned bicycle and pedestrian extension to the Cotton Belt Trail in the city of Grapevine and Northeast Tarrant County. which will connect seven North Texas cities, including Grapevine. In September, NCTCOG approved $245,000 for design of the new trail as well as for sound barriers near schools. North Texas residents can voice input on the Cotton Belt Trail extension and other area projects at www.nctcog.org/trans. The planned 26-mile trail would run in conjunction with the new Dallas Area Rapid Transit Silver Line,

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF OCT. 29. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT GCSNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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GRAPEVINE  COLLEYVILLE  SOUTHLAKE EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

ECONOMY Southlake to open applications for grants to help small businesses

BY SANDRA SADEK

employees, be located within the city of Southlake and be registered to do business in the state of Texas. Busi- nesses must have been operational since January 2019 and must be able to show proof of pre-pandemic protability. They must also be able to show a loss of income as a result of COVID-19 and must not have had any unpaid rent before Feb. 29, 2020. In addition, business owners must own at least 51% of the company and be in good standing with the city, Tar- rant County and other taxing entities. According to Cortez, businesses that have already received prior funding from U.S. Small Business Administra- tion grants or from the PPP can still apply for the city grant program. Grants will be distributed in tiers based on need, with the rst tier available to businesses that shut down completely. “We want [our citizens] to under- stand that this is their $1 million ... that we’re giving back to our business community,” Mayor Laura Hill said.

Lend i ng a hand

The city is oering thousands in grant funds for local businesses aected by COVID-19.

The city of Southlake announced Oct. 20 the framework of a new business relief grant program in an amount of $1 million to support local businesses aected by the coronavi- rus pandemic. Southlake Economic Director Daniel Cortez gave a presentation to City Council on an upcoming grant distribu- tion to local Southlake businesses that will use money from the Southlake Economic Development Investment Fund. The grants will be distributed in amounts not to exceed $10,000. Applications are expected to open in December, and distribution is scheduled for February 2021, he said. “What we’ve seen from businesses that are applying for the Tarrant County grant, and even the Paycheck Protection Program, is just the sheer volume of them,” Cortez said. “We feel condent that most that apply should be able to qualify for this.” In order to qualify for the grant, businesses must have fewer than 50

Maximum grant amount per business:

Applications open:

Funding through: Sou t h l ake Economi c Deve l opment I nve s tment Fund

$ 1 0,000 De cembe r SOURCE: CITY OF SOUTHLAKECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

El igibl e Bus inesses :

• Single-member limited liability company (LLC) • LLC treated as a partnership

• LLC – C corporation • LLC – S corporation • Partnership

• Corporations • Individuals • Sole proprietorship

Grant fund uses : Capital, machinery, equipment, payroll, contract labor, healthcare benets, supplier payments Cost of critical business operations (ex. raw materials, marketing expenses, etc.)

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), sanitation supplies, and equipment Business purposes or property rent, lease, storefront mortgage payment, utility payments

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Grapevine, Southlake & Tarrant County

COMPILED BY SANDRA SADEK

WHERE ARE THE ELECTION RESULTS? The Grapevine-Colleyville-Southlake edition of Community Impact Newspaper went to press ahead of

County funds new round of small business grants

TARRANT COUNTY A new application period for small business assistance grants opened the week of Oct. 26. In its second round, the Care 4 Tarrant Small Business Assistance Grant program has expanded its eligibility requirements to allow more businesses to apply for funding. Independently owned and operated franchises are now eligible for the grant, as are local businesses that missed the rst application deadline,

The maximum amount available per business is $10,000. Business owners who previously received a grant are not eligible. “For those businesses who are a part of the Grapevine Chamber … the relief of receiving federal dollars through Tarrant County was immea- surable,” said Grapevine Chamber CEO RaDonna Hessel. “It was a lifeline to be able to keep employees working, rent paid and doors open through such unprecedented times.”

submitted an incomplete application or were denied a grant. The grant is open to all businesses physically located and operating within Tarrant County, excluding those in the city of Fort Worth. Eligible businesses must have been operating and open to the public as of Jan. 1, 2020, and must be able to show a negative nancial impact when business-related deposits from April and May are compared to deposits from January and February. Southlakemixed-use development gets initial approval SOUTHLAKE A new mixed-use development, set at 2450 Crooked Lane, will be built in two phases after it received approval from city ocials in September. The rst, larger phase will construct a new facility for GMi Contractors, a drywall contracting

the Nov. 3 election date. To see complete election results, go to

www.communityimpact.com/vote

or check the Tarrant County Elections website at

www.tarrantcounty.com/elections

NUMBER TOKNOW Carroll ISD is reviewing 45 candidate applications in the district’s search for a new superintendent. Consultants from Thompson and Horton LLP gave a report Oct. 19 to the district’s board of trustees. “As districts get larger, the pool gets smaller,” consultant David Thompson said. “I will say: Your brand is strong, and the interest in your position is very strong.” Consultant Michael Moses gave the board a breakdown of the candidates’ backgrounds. Of the 45 candidates from 10 states, 36 are superintendents, two are interim superintendents, and six are deputy or assistant superintendents. The rest are either directors, consultants or principals. Forty of the candidates have doctorate degrees. The superintendent search comes after current CISD Superintendent David Faltys announced in August plans to retire after serving the district for 15 years. Faltys’ tenure will end Jan. 4. Colleyville City Council Meets at 7:30 p.m. the rst and third Tuesdays of each month. MEETINGSWE COVER men and nine are women. According to Moses, 28 of the candidates are sitting 45 Meets at 7:30 p.m. the rst and third Tuesdays of each month. www.grapevinetexas.gov Southlake City Council Meets at 7 p.m. the rst and third Tuesdays of each month. www.cityofsouthlake.com Grapevine-Colleyville ISD board Meets at 7 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month. www.gcisd.net Carroll ISD board Meets at 5:30 p.m. the rst and third Mondays of each month. www.southlakecarroll.edu www.colleyville.com Grapevine City Council

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MULTIFAMILY HOUSING A new multifamily apartment complex is coming to Grapevine.

47 324 acres

multifamily units

$700,000 in city permit revenue

CROOKED LN.

26

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SOURCE: GREYSTARCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

company already based in Southlake. The proposed 80,000-square-foot building will sit on 7.1 acres and will house GMi’s corporate oce and production line. The second phase of the project will involve the construction of ex oce space across 5.7 acres. Tenants for these spaces have yet to be determined. There are currently two residential properties located near the project, which is also surrounded by various businesses. One of them is owned by Bobby Struempler, who has lived in Southlake since 1982. Struempler said he is concerned about drainage issues, which rst began when Crooked Lane was resurfaced in December 2019. City documents indicate the new development will drain toward South Nolen Drive and Crooked Lane, where the residen- tial properties are located. At a September meeting, the

Ocials greenlight apartment expansion GRAPEVINE In a joint public hearing Oct. 20, City Council and the Planning & Zoning Commission approved the rezoning of 47 acres of land for a multifamily development at 4501 Hwy. 360. Developer Greystar is spearheading the second phase of The Preserve development, which will be called Elan Grapevine. The second phase will include a gated community of 324 multifamily units surrounded by 33 acres of open space, including walking and biking trails. Phase 1 of The Preserve was approved in 2018. Groundbreaking for the project is expected around May or June 2021, with a two-year timeline for comple- tion. The addition of the multifamily units to the site will increase property tax revenue for the city by 166 times and will bring in over $700,000 in permit fees, according to company documents.

Renderings courtesy city of Southlake

applicant stated that a detention pond would “handle most of the site drainage” and that the water would not be discharged onto Crooked Lane.

11

GRAPEVINE  COLLEYVILLE  SOUTHLAKE EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

BUSINESS Tarrant County barswelcome fewer COVID19 restrictions

Hop & Sting Brewing Co. and co-owners Jon Powell, Lane Joseph, and Brian Burton were able to reopen their Grapevine- based brewery in September by changing their business model to meet a 51% non-alcohol sales requirement. CAPACITY 50%

“WE ARE VERY, VERY THANKFUL THAT WE ARE NOW ALLOWED TO BE OPEN AT 50% CAPACITY IN TARRANT COUNTY. WHAT THAT DOES IS ENABLE US TO

CONTINUE TOOPERATE OUR BUSINESS IN THE SAMEWAY THATWE ALWAYS HAD.”

BY SANDRA SADEK

“It [was] a great opportunity for us to hire a high-end chef and go back to work on our food menu,” said Nicholas Kaufman, owner of Wine Fusion Winery. “We expanded our kitchen and fully remodeled it so that we could oer more of a ne-dining experience on top of all of our wonderful wine options.” Jon Powell, co-owner of Hop & Sting Brewing Co. in Grapevine, said his business was able to work with the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission. The brewery requested and received a waiver from the TABC in order to count the sales of food truck partners toward the 51% sales margin for the brewery. The exibility from the TABC and employees allowed Hop & Sting to reopen in early September, Powell said. “We are very, very thankful that we are now allowed to be open at

Local bars and wineries in Tarrant County were permitted to reopen at 50% capacity beginning Oct. 14. The change in restrictions followed an order by Tarrant County Judge Glen Whitley on Oct. 12 that coincided with restriction rollbacks announced by Gov. Greg Abbott in early October. Despite the statewide closure of alcohol-serving establishments in the summer as a result of COVID-19 cases spiking, several entities were able to bypass the restrictions by being reclassied as a restaurant and by meeting the requirement that 51% of their revenue come from non-alco- holic sales. Many businesses, such as Wine Fusion Winery in Grapevine, which previously did not meet require- ments in place to remain open, were forced to rethink their business model in order to survive.

JON POWELL, COOWNER OF HOP & STING BREWING CO.

Hops & Sting Brewing Co.

PHOTOS BY SANDRA SADEKCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

50% [capacity] in Tarrant County,” he said. “What that does is enable us to continue to operate our business in the same way that we always had.” While the brewery has always had

food trucks on-site, it was a challenge to meet the 51% requirement for revenue from non-alcohol sources, he said. “That’s very dicult for us to do

Medicare made easy.

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Nicholas Kaufman, owner of Wine Fusion Winery in Grapevine, saw his business open and close several times over these past few months as he has worked to adapt to the pandemic. LEARNING TO ADAPT

THE BREW

BRINGING BACK

allow alcohol-serving establishments to reopen as long as the respective county’s hospitalization rate remains under 15%. Despite the rising case numbers, many business owners are condent they can reopen safely. “I think as long as we, as a group, continue to make smart decisions for our sta and for our customers, we should be able to continue to open up at higher capacities,” Kaufman said. Businesses should have an opportunity to reopen “as long as they are enforcing the COVID-19 regulations set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and local govern- ment” ocials, he said. Since Oct. 14, when bars were rst allowed to reopen, there’s been an increase in customer attendance, particularly at places that oer outdoor seating, Powell said. “[Oct. 17-18] was our best weekend since the shutdowns back in March,” he said. “There’s no doubt that we are nally having some good days coming. It seems like people are very, very comfortable coming to an outdoor patio.”

Forced to close in June, bars in Tarrant County were given the option to reopen beginning Oct. 14.

MAY 1

After the expiration of stay-at-home orders in eect since March, Gov. Greg Abbott’s rst statewide phase of economic reopening begins.

“I THINKAS LONG ASWE, AS AGROUP, CONTINUE TOMAKE

MAY 18

Wine Fusion Winery

Abbott announces Texas is moving into Phase 2 of its reopening plan, with openings planned for child care services, bars and other businesses.

SMART DECISIONS FOR OUR STAFF AND FOROUR CUSTOMERS, WE SHOULD BE ABLE TO CONTINUE TO OPENUPAT HIGHER CAPACITIES.”

The winery used the past few months to hire

a high-end chef as well as to expand and fully remodel its kitchen.

JUNE 26

As coronavirus cases surge statewide, Abbott issues an executive order closing bars and reducing restaurant capacity from 75% to 50%.

NICHOLAS KAUFMAN,

OCTOBER 7

OWNER OF WINE FUSION WINERY

Abbott announces that Texas bars can reopen beginning Oct. 14 in counties that have COVID-19 hospitalization rates under 15%.

because our main product is alcohol,” Powell said. Conrmed COVID-19 cases in Tarrant County have been on the rise again, with a total of 65,368 cases and

a hospitalization rate as high as 15% as of Oct. 28. According to the latest announce- ment from Abbott, county judges are able to ease restrictions in order to

OCTOBER 14

By order of Judge Glen Whitley, local bars and wineries in Tarrant County are allowed to reopen at 50% capacity.

I N M A I L B O X E S T H I S J A N U A R Y

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GRAPEVINE  COLLEYVILLE  SOUTHLAKE EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

several factors. Families may struggle with low wages, a lack of transpor- tation or nearby grocery stores, and high medical or housing costs. “They’ve got to pay for rent, and they’ve got to pay for utilities,” Pacholick said. “So they scrimp on what they’ll buy in food so that they can pay for these other things.” An unhealthy diet can also lead to complications, including chronic ill- nesses like diabetes andhypertension. “Right now, I’m at a population where 54% [of my patients] are either diabetic or pre-diabetic,” GRACE Clinic Manager Shirley Roberts said. Soaring demand Before COVID-19, mother of three Maria Guadalupe Flores used the GRACE food pantry every three months to feed her family, but limited walk-in hours and increased demands have made visitations harder. Many food banks and pantries like GRACE and the Tarrant Area Food Bank have adapted how theymeet their com- munities’ needs while staying safe. According to the TAFB website, the food bank distributed 60 mil- lion meals during scal year 2019-20, which ended Sept. 30. TAFB President Julie Butner said the demand for food has been “so high” and lots of new people are com- ing for the rst time. “They do get embarrassed, and they are ashamed,” she said. “It’s heartbreaking. People now are begin- ning to understand we have people in our own city that are hungry.” TAFB has increased distribution by 65% through its network of 350 partners and has added 35 emergency mobile food pantries per week to serve com- munities with increased levels of need. Child hunger According to data from Grape- vine-Colleyville ISD, one in four

CONTINUED FROM 1

Riding the

a few times a year to feed herself and her family. “It’s very hard,” she said. “But it’s the only way that you can survive as the head of the family.” The city of Grapevine has a median household income of $85,722 and a poverty rate below 10%. Yet, as of 2018, around 57% of Grapevine fam- ilies receiving food assistance had children under the age of 18, accord- ing to the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2018 American Community Survey. This includes food stamps, receiving free or reduced-price school lunches or visiting food pantries. Since the pandemic began inMarch, demand for food has increased. GRACE is a nonprot in Grapevine that provides food, housing and med- ical assistance to people in need. “It is a city that has pockets of peo- ple that are very food-insecure sur- rounded by pockets of people who are very wealthy,” GRACE Chief Program Ocer Stacy Pacholick said. “You live in an area [where] you’re not getting food—the food that you need or the food that will keep you full—and yet, you look across the street and see the auence that is right there.” Dening food insecurity The U.S. Department of Agriculture denes food insecurity as “the limited or uncertain availability of nutrition- ally adequate and safe foods.” Low food security is less about the quantity of food and more about the quality, variety and desirability, according to the agency. Families are even more susceptible to food insecurity than individuals are, Pacholick said. “[Parents] are more likely to try to give the food to the children than to themselves,” she said. Food insecurity can be a product of

POVERTY LINE

The poverty line is a threshold set by the U.S. Census Bureau that is adjusted based on family size to measure poverty for statistical purposes. A family is considered to be living in poverty if its total combined income falls below the threshold.

Poverty guidelines

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services uses a simplied version of the poverty threshold, “the poverty guidelines,” to determine eligibility for federal programs. The 2020 poverty guideline for a family of four as of Jan. 15, 2020, is

of Grapevine family households receiving food assistance were at or above the poverty line.

66% In 2018,

$26,200.

The median household income in Grapevine is

Overall, Grapevine had a poverty rate,

$85,722. SOURCE: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

10%

which represents those without adequate income for necessities.

The cycle of food insecurity

A low level of food security can be the product of many factors and can lead to several complications, all of which are interrelated.

represents the limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods or limited number of ways to acquire nutritionally acceptable foods. Food insecurity:

Coping strategies • Lowered dietary quality • Poor eating behaviors • Higher stress

Chronic disease • Diabetes • Obesity • Inability

Higher costs • Higher

Lower spending

• Lower

household income

health care expenditures • Lowered employability due to chronic conditions

• Higher

to cover costs of preventitive care

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Here are some local nonprot organizations for those who need food assistance. Those looking to help can contact their local food bank for ways to get involved. GRACE 610 Shady Brook Drive, Grapevine 817-488-7009 www.gracegrapevine.org Recent needs: clothing, household goods, linens, toys, and books First UMC Euless Mobile 1001 W. Ash Lane, Euless 817-283-4421 http://fumceuless.org/mission/ mission-opportunities/ the-food-pantry/ Recent needs: Volunteers; should arrive at 4 p.m. on giveaway days. 6 Stones 209 N. Industrial Blvd., Bedford 817-868-7400 www.6stones.org/get-help/ Recent needs: monthly donations ASSISTANCE Get Give

children in the district are receiving free or reduced-price lunches as of Oct. 1. “That number uctuates yearly based on the number of approved applications,” said Julie Telesca, the GCISD director of nutrition services. In 2018 and 2019, all GCISD pre-K students received free lunches based on a state waiver, which increased the student percentage those years. As of October 2020, all elementary and middle school students will receive free cafeteria meals through June 2021. Free curbside bundles are avail- able to all children in the district. According to Telesca, free and reduced-price meals are planned by the department’s registered dietitian, and meet USDA nutrition require- ments. Meals include fresh fruit and vegetables, whole grains, lean pro- teins and skimmilk. Dr. Erin Kane, a family physician at Baylor Scott and White Community Care, said issues of food insecurity aect not only the healthy develop- ment of children but also their stress level and their ability to concentrate in school. Children with food insecu- rity often struggle with their weight. “We may nd kids growing up in families that actually strug- gle with obesity because they’re

she said, she had no control over her diabetes and suered from tooth loss and bad eyesight. “Now that she’s in the GRACE clinic, she actually eats healthier, and they have helped her control everything,” said Gutierrez’ daughter, Juana Hernandez. According to nonprot Feeding America, Texans who suered from food insecurity in 2019 spent over $200 more on health care annually than those who did not. Certain costs can prove even higher if individuals are uninsured. A 2019 study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ranked Texas among the top ve states with the highest per-capita health care costs associated with food insecurity. Data from the American Commu- nity Survey shows 12.7% of Grapevine residents were uninsured in 2018. “This problem has always been here,” Kane said. “We’re just doing a better job of identifying it and recog- nizing how pervasive hunger and food insecurity really is [… ] and howmuch it ties into a person’s overall health.”

eating unhealthy choices because that’s what the family has access to,” Kane said. “It can also lead to lon- ger-term health outcomes that relate to obesity, such as as diabetes [and] high blood pressure.” Free and reduced-price lunch pro- grams are often a lifeline for some families to feed their children, mak- ing them even more crucial right now, Kane said. “It’s clear that for most families, this is perhaps their healthiest meal of the day—and sometimes their most reliable meal,” she said. Medical costs Part of GRACE’s mission is to teach clients the importance of a nutritious diet, Roberts said. A healthy diet is often a luxury for many patients but is the best way to help people take control of their health. “If we can get people before they get all these chronic diseases, […] we can possibly prevent them from get- ting diabetes,” she said. “Or, if they do get diabetes, it’ll be so controlled that they won’t require insulin.” SanJuana Gutierrez has been dia- betic for the past 30 years. Before receiving medical attention and a caseworker to help her with her diet,

More locations can be found at ta.org/nd-food/

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GRAPEVINE  COLLEYVILLE  SOUTHLAKE EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

BASS PRO DR.

W. BETHEL RD.

GRAPEVINE

REACHING THE ENDOF THEROAD COMPILED BY IAN PRIBANIC DESIGNED BY ELLEN JACKSON

26

635

The cities of Grapevine, Colleyville, and Southlake are each seeing progress on major road construction projects that have been years in the making.

121

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1

by the city of Colleyville. The city has already installed black powder-coated light poles along the corridor and has begun median and right-of-way upgrades, Assistant City Manager Adrienne Lotherty said. “The city knew from beginning we wanted to take this opportunity to beautify and transform our commer- cial corridor,” she said. For many Southlake residents, the progress on North White Chapel Bou- levard has been noticeable. Construction crews completed Phase 1 of the project, which included a new roundabout at Highland Ave- nue, in February. The second phase of the project began in 2019 and will widen the road- way from Highland to Emerald Boule- vard and install new screening walls along the roadway. According to Public Works Director Rob Cohen, the esti- mated completion date is spring 2022.

CONTUNED FROM 1

114

Because they are considered essential workers, TxDOT road crews have continued to complete major portions of the DFW Connector project over the past year. DFW CONNECTOR

In the past few months, work has focused on the SH 121 and I-635 inter- change; drivers can anticipate inter- mittent closures of SH 121 through the end of the year. The project remains on track for overall completion by 2022, Woodrow said. Bass Pro Drive has also entered nal conguration and is now open to traf- c, Woodrow added. In Colleyville, a TxDOT project to widen four miles of roadway on Hwy. 26 from John McCain Road to Brown Trail is expected to wrap up in November, according to TxDOT spokesperson Val Lopez. The project was substantially completed in late spring, and TxDOT work currently consists of upgrading sidewalk seg- ments, Lopez said. The next step for Hwy. 26 will entail a $14 million beautication project

Southbound SH 121 auxiliary open for access to DFW Airport and Hwy. 114 Westbound I-635 bridge access to southbound SH 121, DFW Airport and Hwy. 114. Removal of old southbound SH 121 bridge to eastbound I-635 and old westbound I-635 bridge to southbound SH 121, DFW Airport and Hwy. 114 Full trac access to Bass Pro Drive and new bridge

RECENTLY FINISHED PROJECT GOALS: Completed Jan.-Sept. 2020

TxDOT construction crews have been working on a new bridge to connect SH 121 and I635. (Ian Pribanic/Community Impact Newspaper)

SOURCE: NORTHGATE CONSTRUCTIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

THIS WEEKEND

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