Richardson | April 2022

RICHARDSON EDITION

VOLUME 4, ISSUE 8  APRIL 25MAY 22, 2022

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IMPACTS

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Lane closures on US 75 for bridge work

LOCAL VOTER GUIDE 2022 CANDIDATE Q&A TRANSPORTATION

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“WE LOVE PLAYINGAT THEWILDFLOWER FESTIVAL SOMUCHBECAUSE EVERY TIMEWE PLAY THERE IT’S ALWAYS AGREAT CROWD.” DONI BLAIR, TOADIES BASSIST FAR LEFT

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Texas-based alternative rock band Toadies will headline the Wildower! Arts and Music Festival on May 21. (Courtesy Thomas Moore Photos)

Festivals, performances return to Richardson after 2-year absence The month of May represents a mile- stone for the city of Richardson as it relaunches two of its biggest commu- nity events. Cottonwood, a semiannual art fes- tival that showcases work from over 200 artists, will take place May 7-8 at Cottonwood Park. The three-day Wild- ower Festival, featuring live music and more, will be May 20-22 in Gatalyn Urban Park. a city,” Richardson City Manager Don Magner said. In addition to being a community resource, ocials said the festivals also generate revenue for the city. The nationally recognized Wild- ower Festival is among the top enter- tainment draws in the metroplex each year with more than 70,000 visitors CONTINUED ON 16 BY JACKSON KING After being on hiatus for the past two years due of the pandemic, Richard- son’s Cottonwood Art Festival and the Wildower! Arts and Music Festival are back. “The fact that we’re able to plan and implement events of this magnitude is indicative of the reputation we have as

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RICHARDSON EDITION • APRIL 2022

We saw a Marine and father, not cancer. When Jason Julian needed Methodist Health System, we didn’t see cancer. We saw a veteran Marine pilot, husband, and father. After surgery and rounds of chemotherapy for colon cancer in Virginia, Jason moved to Texas. That’s when gastrointestinal oncologists on the medical staff discovered the cancer had spread to his liver, threatening his hard-fought recovery. Within days, surgeons performed robotic surgery to remove the cancer, saving his liver and helping speed his recovery. Keeping our neighbors, like Jason, flying high with

exceptional, innovative care. That’s community. And why so many people Trust Methodist.

To read Jason’s full story, scan the code

Texas law prohibits hospitals from practicing medicine. The physicians on the Methodist Health System medical staff are independent practitioners who are not employees or agents of Methodist Richardson Medical Center, Methodist Health System, or any of its affiliated hospitals. Methodist Health System complies with applicable federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex.

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMBARB: Spring has sprung, and with that comes the anticipation of spending time outdoors. This month, we have a list of indoor and outdoor activities in Richardson (see Page 8). You can also nd out more about the upcoming Cottonwood Art Festival and the Wildower Festival. Barb Delk, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMVALERIE: Part of our mission at Community Impact Newspaper is helping local businesses thrive. This month, we feature Palio’s Pizza Kitchen (see Page 14) and Black Friday Hot Deals (see Page 15). Send us your feedback. Valerie Wigglesworth, MANAGINGEDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • APRIL 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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COURTESY HAWAIIAN BROS

NOWOPEN 1 Any Lab Test Now opened its first location in Richardson on April 18 at 515 W. Campbell Road, Ste. 107. Any Lab Test Now has over 200 locations across the country, including Plano, Garland and North Dallas. The full-service accredited laboratory offers health care lab tests for general health, drugs and alcohol, DNA, STDs and more. COVID-19 tests are offered at this location. 469-935-9912. www.anylabtestnow.com 2 Mr. Broast opened its first Texas location in Richardson at 1801 N. Green- ville Ave., Ste. 100. The Illinois-based restaurant held a soft opening March 31 with limited inventory with a grand open- ing held two weeks later. Mr. Broast’s menu specializes in chicken; burgers; and wraps, including the Zinger Burger. 214-792-9249. www.mrbroast.com

3 Mochinut held a soft opening March 26 at its new location at 1300 E. Belt Line Road, Ste. 400, Richardson, in the Rich- land Village shopping center. The restau- rant specializes in mochi doughnuts and Korean rice flour hot dogs, according to its website. Mochinut has locations across the country, including in Plano, San Marcos, San Antonio and other Texas cities. 945-899-4202. www.mochinut.com COMING SOON 4 Arabica Mediterranean Food is coming soon to Richardson. The restaurant featuring Mediterranean cuisine will be located at 1403 E. Campbell Road, Ste. 101C, Richardson. No grand opening date has been announced. The cafe will offer authentic Mediterranean dishes, such as baba ghanoush, shawarma, gyros, fried chicken, kebabs and more. 214-317-3560. www.facebook.com/arabica.food.dallas

5 Insomnia Cookies is planning to open late this summer in Richardson at 3000 Northside Blvd., Ste. 300. No grand opening date has been announced. The Richardson location will be Insomnia’s third store in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. Insomnia Cookies sells a variety of flavors as well as vegan and gluten-free op- tions and offers delivery until 3 a.m. 469-789-2645 (Deep Ellum location). www.insomniacookies.com 6 Hawaiian Bros is coming to the corner of North Coit and West Campbell roads in Richardson. The restaurant received a special permit from Richard- son City Council on March 28 to open the drive-thru establishment at 2060 N. Coit Road. Hawaiian Bros has locations in Addison, Garland and the Upper Greenville neighborhood of Dallas. No specific date for its grand opening has been confirmed, but he company said it

is hoping to open by late 2022 or early 2023. Dishes at Hawaiian Bros include meals with a main protein, such as mar- inated teriyaki chicken or slow-roasted Kalua pork, and sides, such as jasmine rice and macaroni salad. 214-492-4223. www.hawaiianbros.com 7 Two future restaurants are coming to Richardson later this year. Main Street Deli and Bubbleology will be located at 118 E. Main St. alongside Yummy Burgers & BBQ, whose owner operates the entire building. Renovations to the property are expected to finish by the end of August, according to a Texas Department of Li- censing and Regulation filing. Main Street Deli offers sandwiches, wraps, salads and more. Bubbleology sells specialty drinks, including bubble tea and other blend- ed drinks. No opening date has been announced for the two new restaurants. 214-556-9262.

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Zalat Pizza opened a location at CityLine Market on April 19.

COURTESY ZALAT PIZZA

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Zalat Pizza opened its new Richardson location April 19 at CityLine Market. The pizza franchise is located at 1551 E. Renner Road, Ste. 810, near Piada Italian Street Food. The pizza kitchen oers a range of specialty pies with unique ingredients, such as Elote, Loaded Notato, Nashville Hot Chicken and Pickle, Pineapple Express, Meatza and Pho Shizzle. 972-422-9001. www.zalatpizza.com RELOCATIONS 8 The Camp Transformation Center relocated its Richardson location to 1002 N. Central Expressway, Ste. 499. The fitness gym opened at its new location March 12 after previously operating at 675 N. Glenville Drive, Ste. 155. The business held a grand reopening April 1 to commemorate the new location. The transformation center offers a variety of weight-loss programs focused on group training along with nutrition and supple- ment plans. 469-279-9734. www.thecamptc.com 9 The Great Outdoors Sub Shop is planning to open its new Richardson lo- cation May 1. The shop, which will include a drive-thru and a pickup window for phone orders, is located at 2005 Alamo Road. Great Outdoors closed its previous shop off West Campbell Road on March 13. The Great Outdoors’ menu includes breakfast sandwiches, deli subs, salads, soups, sides and desserts. 972-437-5038. www.greatoutdoorsubs.com EXPANSION 10 Lamborghini Dallas unveiled its new 18,000-square-foot showroom April 9. Construction began last summer for the Lamborghini and used exotic car dealer- ship, which is located at 601 S. Central Expressway, Richardson. 888-400-6950. www.lamborghinidallas.com NEWOWNERSHIP 11 Ye Shire Tavern in The Shire at CityLine in Richardson has rebranded to Gillespie’s Tavern at the Shire . The tav-

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Lamborghini Dallas

COURTESY LAMBORGHINI DALLAS

ern, which came under new ownership in March, is now open at 3600 Shire Blvd., Ste. 112, Richardson. Gillespie’s plans to hold a grand opening May 19 that will include a live performance. The Irish bar offers a variety of traditional pub food, including meatloaf, bangers and mash, shepherd’s pie and more. 469-367-4651. www.gillespiestavern.com CLOSINGS 12 Austin Avenue II Grill & Sports Bar closed its Richardson location effective April 2. The bar and grill was located at 1801 N. Plano Road, Richardson. The restaurant will remain open at its Plano location off West Parker Road. Austin Avenue offers a variety of activities, in- cluding a pool table, arcade games, trivia, poker tournaments and karaoke. The bar also serves 30 beer options with daily specials, happy hours and a loyalty card program. 972-422-8003 (Plano location). www.austinavenue.com

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RICHARDSON EDITION • APRIL 2022

TODO LIST

April & May events

APRIL 30

10THANNUAL EPIPHANY CRAWFISH BOIL EPISCOPAL CHURCH OF THE EPIPHANY

The Episcopal Church of the Epiphany in Richardson is holding its 10th annual Crawsh Boil. The event includes all-you-can-eat crawsh, kids activities, live music and a car show. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $25, $5 (ages 5-11), free (age 4 and younger). The Episcopal Church of the Epiphany, 421 Custer Road, Richardson. www.tinyurl.com/riccrawshboil (Courtesy Episcopal Church of the Epiphany)

oer local, handcrafted and vintage goods. 6-10 p.m. Free (admission). CityLine Plaza, 1150 State St., Richardson. www.citylinedfw.com/events 14 CELEBRATE HAWAIIAN CULTURE AT THE LIBRARY The Richardson Public Library is holding a special Hawaiian cultural event, including a Hula dance lesson. Residents are able to learn about ancient dance traditions from the Ka Pa Hula O Manulani dancers before watching a free screening of the PG movie “Lilo & Stitch.” 2-4 p.m. Free. Richardson Public Library, 900 Civic Center Drive, Richardson. 972-744-4350. www.cor.net/departments/public-library 20 THROUGH 22 ROCKOUT AT THE WILDFLOWER FESTIVAL The Wildower! Arts and Music Festival is returning this year to the Galatyn Park Urban Center. Organized by the city, the three-day festival features live music, a battle of the bands, a songwriting competition and more. This year’s lineup includes Toadies, Neon Trees, Collective Soul and more. Tickets can be purchased online. 6 p.m.-midnight (May 20), 11 a.m.-midnight (May 21), 11 a.m.-6 p.m. (May 22). $35 (single day), $75 (three- day pass), free (age 12 and under). Galatyn Park Urban Center, 2351 Performance Drive, Richardson. www.wildowerfestival.com 26 LISTEN TOHELENE CRONIN ANDHEATHER LITTLE Six Springs Tavern is hosting two female songwriters in concert. Cronin is a Texas folk artist who has drawn comparisons to Lori McKenna, Mary Gauthier and other songwriters who are known for strong lyrics, according to the event’s description. Little has written for Miranda Lambert, Sunny Sweeney and Travis Meadows. 7:30 p.m. $8.50. Six Springs Tavern, 147 N. Plano Road, Richardson. 469-917-3040. www.sixspringslive.com

COMPILED BY JACKSON KING APRIL 29 THROUGHMAY 1 SHOP AT THE FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BIANNUAL BOOK SALE The Richardson Public Library is hosting its biannual book sale. According to the ocial website description, locals can shop for thousands of books, CDs, DVDs and other media at great prices. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. (April 29-30), 2-5 p.m. (May 1). Free (admission). Richardson Public Library, 900 Civic Center Drive, Richardson. 972-744-4350. www.cor.net/ departments/public-library MAY 06 LISTEN TO COVERS OF BILLY JOEL AND ELTON JOHN Michael Cavanaugh is performing at the Eisemann Center in a one-night-only concert. He is known for his performance in the Broadway musical “Movin’ Out,” for which he earned Grammy and Tony award nominations. Tickets are available for purchase online. 8 p.m. $39-$54. Eisemann Center, 2351 Performance Drive, Richardson. 972-744-4650. www.eisemanncenter.com/events-tickets 07 THROUGH08 CHECKOUT THE RETURN OF A JURIEDART SHOW The annual Cottonwood Art Festival features work from the nation’s top visual artists. The festival also includes live music, dining options and a creative children’s area. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. (May 7), 10 a.m.-5 p.m. (May 8). Free (admission). Cottonwood Park, 1301 W. Belt Line Road, Richardson. 972-744-4580. www.cottonwoodartfestival.com 13 ENJOY THE NIGHTMARKETS IN CITYLINE PLAZA Held on the second Friday of each month, this event gives residents a chance to shop with over 45 dierent vendors that

Find more or submit Richardson events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

Bridge construction to cause nightly lane closures onUS 75

BY JACKSON KING

almost to Galatyn Parkway. The bridge over US 75 will help connect DART’s 26-mile Silver Line commuter rail line from the planned stop at The University of Texas at Dal- las to the CityLine station. The Silver Line will give Richardson residents a direct route to the Dallas Fort Worth International Airport. Construction on the $1.89 billion Silver Line is esti- mated to be complete in late 2024.

Road improvements to start in summer Saturdays from 9 p.m.-5 a.m. The northbound lane closures will begin just south of Galatyn Parkway and extend to the PGBT. The southbound lane closure will start in Plano just north of Plano Parkway and extend Construction is set to begin in late April on a bridge over US 75 for the Dallas Area Rapid Transit Silver Line, resulting in weekend lane closures at night, city of Richardson ocials announced April 12. The bridge will be along Spring Creek between the President George Bush Turnpike and Renner Road. Closures are expected to last from April 22-July 24, according to the city. As part of the work, the north- bound and southbound HOV lanes as well as the far-left northbound lane will be closed to trac Fridays and

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BY JACKSON KING

The city of Richardson is nalizing reconstruction plans for West Prairie Creek Drive between West Campbell Road and North Collins Boulevard. Plans include paving improve- ments, underground utility and drain- age work, curb extensions at Lookout Drive, and parking enhancements on West Prairie Creek Drive. The Lookout Drive intersection will also be rebuilt to improve pedestrian safety.

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Timeline: construction expected to start this summer; end date TBD Cost: $5.2 million estimate Funding source: city of Richardson

ONGOING PROJECTS

Oncor utility pole replacements The right lane of eastbound Campbell Road between Lakeside Boulevard and just east of Greenville Avenue may be closed to trac from 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. daily as old utility poles are removed and new poles are installed by Oncor. The work is expected to be complete by early June. Timeline: mid-March-early June Cost: not available because project is privately funded Funding source: Oncor

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(214)-716-2610

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF APRIL 12. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT RICNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • APRIL 2022

CITY&SCHOOLS

News from Richardson & Richardson ISD

Richardson proposesmove of historicMiss Belle’s House

RELOCATION PLAN Current location

LOOKOUT DR.

RICHARDSON The city of Richard- son is recommending a permanent home and a renovation project for Miss Belle’s House. The historic landmark was located on the Owens Farm property at Plano Road and Lookout Drive from 1979 until spring 2021, when it was tem- porarily relocated to the city’s Fire Training and Emergency Operations Center on Lookout Drive. After a year of seeking public input, city ocials provided a

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recommendation to Richardson City Council during its April 4 meeting. As part of the proposed move, Miss Belle’s House would permanently relocate to the southeast corner of Huines Park, which is located at 300 N. Plano Road. The relocation is projected to cost around $850,000 over two phases, ocials said. Funding would come from operational budget savings as well as philanthropy and grants, ocials said.

LOOKOUT PARK

Proposed location APOLLO RD.

HUFFHINES PARK

The city of Richardson recommended permanently moving Miss Belle's House to Huines Park.

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COURTESY CITY OF RICHARDSON

The city recommended the park because it provides opportunities for multiple uses. Miss Belle’s House was originally built at 206 Sherman St., Richardson, the city is hoping to use the station’s proximity to The Richardson Inno- vation Quarter to create a mixed-use development on the site. Upon completion, the new devel- opment at the Arapaho Center Station would include oce space, space for emerging industries, retail shopping, dining and housing, ocials said.

in the late 1800s. The structure was donated to the city in 1979. Miss Belle’s House was designated as historic by the Texas Historical Commission in 1982.

DARTstationarea tobe redeveloped RICHARDSON The city of Richard- son is looking for a master developer for a project at the Dallas Area Rapid Cushman and Wakeeld, that it had issued a request for proposals to

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establish a high-density, transit-ori- ented development on 14.47 acres at the station. Through this request for proposals,

ARAPAHO RD.

Transit Arapaho Center Station. The city announced April 12, in partnership with real estate rm

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DURING A STROKE, SECONDS COUNT. And so does knowing who you can count on.

Methodist Richardson Medical Center is proud to be recognized as an Advanced Primary Stroke Center by The Joint Commission and American Heart Association. Because when it comes to strokes, seconds count and so does quality care. Know the signs and act FAST . A quick call to 911 and the right care can make all the difference.

F ace drooping A rm weakness

S peech difficulty T ime to call 911

Texas law prohibits hospitals from practicing medicine. The physicians on the Methodist Health System medical staff are independent practitioners who are not employees or agents of Methodist Richardson Medical Center, Methodist Health System or any of its affiliated hospitals. Methodist Health System complies with applicable federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex.

2831 E. PRESIDENT GEORGE BUSH HIGHWAY RICHARDSON, TX 75082

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY JACKSON KING

Richardson City Council meets May 2, 9 and 16 at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 411 W. Arapaho Road, Richardson. www.cor.net. The meetings are open to the public and are streamed live online. Richardson ISD meets May 9 at 6 p.m. at the RISD Administration Building, 400 S. Greenville Ave., Richardson. www.risd.org Plano ISD board of trustees meets May 3 and 17 at 6 p.m. at the PISD Administration Center, 2700 W. 15th St., Plano. 469-752-8100. www.pisd.edu MEETINGSWE COVER CITY HIGHLIGHTS RICHARDSON The city is implementing a limit on the residential use of outdoor irrigation systems, including sprinklers, between 10 a .m.- 6 p .m. during the summer. The restriction became eff ective April 1 and will run through Oct. 31. RICHARDSON The city’s parks and recreation department has an online survey for residents to provide feedback on its master plan at www.cor.net/ parksmasterplan through May 8.

RISDapproves guaranteed price for newLakeHighlandsMiddle School

Shafer to retire from nonprotNetwork

RICHARDSON ISD The board of trustees unanimously approved a guaranteed maximum price of a little more than $81 million for the rst phase of construction of the new Lake Highlands Middle School during its April 11 meeting. The rst phase of the project was approved at a price of $81,167,525 and will consist of the complete construction of a three-story middle school on the existing site that can house 1,500 students. The second phase is slated to involve demol- ishing the existing school buildings and redeveloping that area for the campus. “We are very excited for this,” Assistant Superintendent Sandra Hayes said. “This is the rst time that the district has taken on creating a new school since the early 2000s, with the exception of Memorial Park Academy. We’re very excited to get this o and running.”

RICHARDSON Cindy Shafer, president and CEO of Network of Community Ministries, announced April

Work on Lake Highlands Middle School could begin as early as this summer, with the facility to open by August 2024, Hayes said. BUILDING A NEWSCHOOL Richardson ISD is moving forward

4 that she will retire from her position at the Richardson-based nonprot later this year. “During the past 5.5 years, Cindy has fearlessly and eectively led Net- work through unprecedented growth and change,” Board Chair Monica Scott said in a statement. “Cindy has expanded Network’s community presence and placed the organization in an excellent position for continued success.” Network is a nondenominational, community-based nonprot that serves more than 60,000 individuals in the Richardson area with a variety of services every year. Cindy Shafer

with work on the new Lake Highlands Middle School. $81.17M

$94M

guaranteed maximum price

district budget for the project

1,500

2024

students to be housed

estimated completion date

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SOURCE: RICHARDSON ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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RICHARDSON EDITION • APRIL 2022

L O C A L V O T E R G U I D E GUIDE Candidates and information for local elections

M A Y 7 L O C A L E L E C T I O N

D A T E S T O K N O W April 25 First day of early voting April 26 Last day to apply for ballot by mail (received, not postmarked) May 3 Last day of early voting

W H E R E T O V O T E

May 7 Election day May 7 Last day to receive ballot by mail (or May 9 if carrier envelope is postmarked by 7 p.m. at location of election)

Voters in Collin County and Dallas County may cast a ballot at any polling location during early voting and on election day.

SOURCES: DALLAS COUNTY ELECTIONS DEPARTMENT, RICHARDSON ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER For polling locations visit www.dallascountyvotes.org or www.collincountytx.gov/elections/Pages/default.aspx

Richardson ISD board of trustees, District 2

Incumbent

ANSWERS MAY HAVE BEEN EDITED FOR LENGTH AND STYLE. READ FULL Q&AS AT COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

ERON LINN

VANESSA PACHECO

SHERRY CLEMENS

Occupation: Federal relations man- ager at Dallas Area Rapid Transit Relevant experience: Elected to represent District 2 on Richardson ISD board of trustees in 2019; elected in 2015 and again in 2016 to represent Place 5 on RISD board;

Occupation: Vice president Relevant experience: Leadership ISD 2021 fellow, School Board Governance Fellowship, Equity and Inclusion Fellowship MBA, Global Leadership: The University of Texas at Dallas, Scholar with Distinction

Occupation: Small business owner, marketing Relevant experience: Bachelor of Science from Texas A&M Univer- sity, 2002; master of Educational Administration from Texas A&M University-Commerce, 2008;

served on several boards, including the Richard- son Zoning Board of Adjustment, the City Planning Commission, the advisory board to the Richardson Chamber of Commerce, and the board of directors for the Richardson YMCA; Graduate of Inside RISD (2011) and Leadership Richardson (Class XXVII) www.eronlinn4risd.com | eron@eronlinn4risd.com

Graduate; Berkner PTA Board, XIX Society Member, “Getting out the Vote” Steering Committee, National Alliance of Black School Educators Parent Commis- sion, and Reading/Language Arts Supplemental Materials Criteria Parent Committee www.pacheco4risd.com 915-667-0954 | pacheco4risd@gmail.com

teacher, rst and third grade, Forney ISD, 2004- 2010; founded Resolve Consulting in 2014, where I oversee a team that helps businesses of all sizes with social media, marketing and web design, based in Richardson; mom of four RISD children https://sherryclemens.com 214-686-3502 | sherry@sherryclemens.com

Why are you running for oce?

I am running for re-election to the school board because I believe I have the experience, leadership and vision needed to represent District 2 for another three years. If re-elected, I will continue to stand up for what I believe is right, ask dicult questions and vote accordingly. As the father of three RISD students, I want to ensure that RISD schools are focused on providing the best academic outcomes for all students.

I’m running for [the] RISD [board of trustees] because I believe it’s time for new leadership for our Richardson schools. For too long, kids have been treated as data points, and closing achievement gaps hasn’t been made a primary priority. Our students are the future of our community and our economy. We have a responsibility to give them the best education pos- sible and [put them] on a path for a successful adult life.

My husband and I moved to Richardson ISD because it is one of the premier school districts in DFW. We have four children that attend RISD schools. In the last [few] years, I’ve seen a shift from the pillars of excellence that have made RISD a destination district. I want to get us back in the right direction—where RISD provides an outstanding education for every student, partners with parents and teachers, and remains nancially sound.

Richardson ISD board of trustees, District 5

JAN STELL *THE DISTRICT 5 SEAT HAS BEEN VACANT SINCE SEPT. 24, WHEN FORMER BOARD PRESIDENT KAREN CLARDY RESIGNED.

KILE BROWN

RACHEL MCGOWAN

Occupation: Head of IoT business development-North America; IDEMIA America, an identity tech- nologies company Relevant experience: Military and corporate leadership experience: 12 years; nonprot governance: 10

Occupation: Account executive Relevant experience: Served on the PTA since 2007; currently on the RISD PTA council board and serving at the DEI chair; also serving at For- est Meadow Junior High as the DEI chair; a new member (this upcom-

Occupation: Realtor Relevant experience: Master’s in education from Austin College; taught in RISD at Skyview and Brenteld Elementary, and in Plano and Spring ISDs; served on the board of the Lake Highlands YMCA

years; innovative change management and strategic planning: 17 years; executive recruiting/stang: 3 years; parent of three Lake Highlands High School graduates (‘13, ‘14, ‘19) www.kile4risd.com | kile@kile4risd.com

ing year) of the Dallas Jr Women’s League and Young Men’s Service League; and working with a parents in my neighborhood who are interested in starting the Stults Road PTA. Stults Road is special to me as I attended there [for] kindergarten to sixth [grade]. rachelforrisd.com | 214-403-4215

to help with the new facility; participated in Leader- ship Dallas; served as a prison fellowship volunteer weekly at Seagoville Federal Prison; and traveled to Guatemala with Habitat for Humanity. I have “sold” RISD for 30-plus years and am proud to call it home. www.janforrisd.com jan@janforrisd.com | @JanFacebookpage

Why are you running for oce?

My motivation for running for RISD school board is based on my desire to help all students to reach their fullest potential. We need to empower our teachers and sta with the tools they need to help each student. We have a great opportunity with funds provided to our district to aid the “loss of learning.” We want the results to be measurable for all of our students to have a strong foundation on which to build.

I am running to bring focus to the education of our children and to the support of our teachers. My slogan, “Kids First, Teachers Always” brings this home. Preparing kids for the fu- ture is our mission. Our teachers are the day-to-day champions in achieving success in this endeavor.

This community has supported me since I started elementary school at Stults Road Elementary and graduated from Lake Highlands High School in ‘96, and my biggest “why” is wanting to give back to the community that has done so much for me and my family. I’ve been working in this community for over 10 years, and I feel like serving on the board is the next step in my leadership journey. My personal experience in this community, my ability to build strong relationships and trust quickly, and my business background will make me a strong trustee.

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2022

COMPILED BY JACKSON KING

M A Y 7 S T A T E W I D E P R O P O S I T I O N S

Senate Joint Resolution 2 Second special session of 87th Texas Legislature

Senate Joint Resolution 2 Third special session of 87th Texas Legislature

PROPOSITION 1

PROPOSITION 2

Ballot text

What does it mean?

Ballot text

What does it mean?

The constitutional amendment authorizing the Leg- islature to provide for the reduction of the amount of a limitation on the total amount of ad valorem taxes that may be imposed for general elementa- ry and secondary public school purposes on the residence homestead of a person who is elderly or disabled to reect any statutory reduction from the preceding tax year in the maximum compressed rate of the maintenance and operations taxes im- posed for those purposes on the homestead.

Although property taxes are already frozen for the disabled and those over the age of 65, this proposition would allow for additional property tax relief from school districts for the disabled and elderly. If approved, it would allow the Legislature to provide property tax cuts even to those elderly and disabled homeowners with frozen taxes.

The constitutional amendment increasing the amount of the residence homestead exemption from ad valorem taxation for public school purposes from $25,000 to $40,000.

Every homeowner in Texas is already oered a $25,000 homestead exemption on property taxes from public school districts—meaning the rst $25,000 of a home’s appraised property value does not count against a homeowner’s annual property taxes. If approved, that exemption for home- owners would be raised to $40,000.

SOURCES: TEXAS SECRETARY OF STATE’S OFFICE WEBSITE; JOSHUA BLANK, UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS; DALE CRAYMER, TEXAS TAXPAYERS AND RESEARCH ASSOCIATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

M A Y 2 4 P R I M A R Y R U N O F F

R Republican

D Democrat

*Incumbent

D A T E S T O K N O W May 13 Last day to apply for ballot by mail (received, not postmarked) May 16 First day of early voting

W H E R E T O V O T E

May 20 Last day of early voting May 24 Election day

Voters in Collin County and Dallas County may cast a ballot at any polling location during early voting and on election day.

For polling locations visit www.dallascountyvotes.org or www.collincountytx.gov/elections/Pages/default.aspx

SOURCES: DALLAS COUNTY ELECTIONS DEPARTMENT, COLLIN COUNTY ELECTIONSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Commissioner of the general land oce R Tim Westley R Dawn Buckingham D Jay Kleberg D Sandragrace Martinez Railroad commissioner R Sarah Stogner R Wayne Christian* LOCAL U.S. House of Representatives, District 24 D Derrik Gay D Jan McDowell U.S. House of Representatives, District 32 R Justin Webb R Antonio Swad

Texas House of Representatives, District 70 R Jamee Jolly R Eric J. Bowlin D Mihaela Elizabeth Plesa D Cassandra Garcia Hernandez COLLIN COUNTY District clerk R Mike Gould R Lynne Finley* Judge, County Court at Law No. 5

Collin County Democratic Party chair D Caroline Werner D Mike Rawlins* DALLAS COUNTY County Criminal Court at Law No. 10 D Etta J. Mullin D Monique Bracey Hu County clerk D Ann Cruz D John F. Warren County commissioner, Precinct 2 D Andrew Sommerman D Michelle Ocker

STATEWIDE Lieutenant governor D Michelle Beckley D Mike Collier

Attorney general R George P. Bush R Ken Paxton* D Rochelle Mercedes Garza D Joe Jaworski Comptroller of public accounts

D Angel Luis Vega D Janet T. Dudding

R Randy Johnson R Jimmy Angelino

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13

RICHARDSON EDITION • APRIL 2022

DINING FEATURE Palio’s Pizza Cafe Richardson restaurant oers community bond for owner C huno Chi said he never anticipated entering the restaurant industry. Immigrating to the U.S. from South Korea in 1982, Chi grew up in Colorado, where he met his wife, Chungbin. After feeling a calling to the ministry, he moved to the Dallas-Fort Worth area to receive divinity training from the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. Following his graduation, Chi left what he felt was his hometown to pursue a career as a pastor. His work in ministry led to pastor jobs in Virginia and Memphis, where he lived for over six years. In 2019, however, Chi said his career began to change when Chungbin was diagnosed with dementia. Chi said he decided to move back to the metroplex to live close to his two eldest sons, including one who lives in Plano. When he returned to the Dallas area, Chi looked for a way to support his family while also having enough exibility to take care of his wife. After a recommendation from its previous owner, he bought the Palio’s Pizza Cafe in Richardson in February 2021. The cafe located near The University of Texas at Dallas campus has been operating for over 15 years. Because of its location, Palio’s nds its most popular pizzas often cater to the college crowd. Among the favorites is the Lazy Texan BBQ Chicken pizza. Unlike some other places, Palio’s specializes in thin crust pizza. Chi said he was worried about how popular thin crust would be, but was reassured when one of his sons said he loved the pizza at its Plano location. “Now that I’ve been testing our pizza 2-3 times a week, I can never go back to the old style,” Chi said. Working a few hours per week to take care of his wife, Chi said he is glad to maintain a strong rela- tionship with the two managers who have worked at Palio’s since he bought the restaurant. BY JACKSON KING

Palio’s oers a variety of Italian dishes, including gourmet pizzas and garlic bread. Three dishes to try 1 The Lazy Texan BBQ Pizza Chicken ($10.99-$19.99) has roasted barbecue chicken, bacon, roasted corn, onions, jalapenos, cilantro and mozzarella. 2 Garlic Cheese Bread ($4.99-$6.99) has fresh pesto, tomatoes, olive oil, feta and mozzarella. 3 Supreme ($10.99-$19.99) features green peppers, olives and more.

3

2

1

Chuno Chi purchased Palio’s Pizza Cafe in Richardson to help support his wife after she was diagnosed with dementia. (Photos by Jackson King/ Community Impact Newspaper)

Palio’s in Richardson serves tiramisu ($3.99 each).

Vanilla and chocolate cannolis ($2.99 each) are oered.

Palio’s Pizza Cafe-Richardson 1469 W. Campbell Road, Richardson 972-234-4002 www.paliospizzacafe.com/locations/richardson/ Hours: Sun.-Thu. 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.

CAMPBELL RD.

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14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BUSINESS FEATURE Black FridayHot Deals Discount store oers low prices on new items B lack Friday Hot Deals co-owner Ameer Alhazma is used to giving people good pallets that may contain over 20 items in one package.

BY JACKSON KING

“One of the main appeals of the store is its constant shift in inven- tory,” Alhazma said. Receiving two truckloads every week, the store changes its inventory every few days, which provides guests with a new product to buy on any trip, Alhazma said. “The customer likes being able to come back and shop for widely dierent products every time they visit,” Alhazma said. “We just got this couch set two days ago. It’ll be gone soon and replaced with a dierent item, so we’re constantly highlighting new products.” Alhazma said the store’s prices attract people from outside the Dallas-Fort Worth area, with some coming from as far away as Tennes- see. He said he appreciates having a loyal customer base and hopes to build upon the store’s reputation going forward. Despite the low prices, Alhazma said Black Friday prioritizes high-quality products and customer service. Whenever the store receives a shipment, Alhazma and his father check for any damaged or broken items. The store oers a limited policy for exchanges. “We try our best to make sure every customer leaves satised with what they’ve bought,” Alhazma said. “If it doesn’t work, we take it back, and we give them something that works. We don’t like to make the customers upset so that we can guarantee they come back.”

deals on a variety of options. After selling goods at discounted prices with his father at ea markets, Alhazma searched for a way to con- tinue this business in a permanent retail space. He fullled that dream in December 2020 when he opened Black Friday Hot Deals at 1750 E. Belt Line Road, Unit 100, in Richardson. “We basically have a Black Friday sale every day here,” Alhazma said. “The store is full of dierent types of merchandise. People call it a mini-Target here.” Unlike a thrift store, which buys inventory from customers, Black Friday’s merchandise comes by the truckload from big-box stores, such as Target, Walmart and Lowe’s. These items are bought by Black Friday at heavy discounts because they come in a damaged box or are in overstock, Alhazma said. This allows Black Fri- day to oer prices 50%-70% cheaper than online and retail stores for new items, including clothing. “All of the clothes we sell are brand new with tags on them,” he said. “They may be originally priced [at] $60-$80, but [customers] can get the clothes and shoes for $6 brand new.” Since opening in 2020, Black Friday has included a variety of high-priced items, including mattresses, car parts and a generator with a retail value of $3,000. Alhazma said these unique items rarely remain in the store for long periods of time. In addition to individual items, the store also sells

The inventory at Black Friday Hot Deals changes every few days as new items arrive. (Photos by Jackson King/Community Impact Newspaper)

Ameer Alhazma launched Black Friday Hot Deals in December 2020.

Alhazma buys goods from big box stores and oers discounted prices.

Black Friday Hot Deals oers a variety of new clothing at discount prices.

The store’s inventory includes furniture, electronics and more.

Black FridayHot Deals 1750 E. Belt Line Road, Unit 100, Richardson | 469-372-7882 www.facebook.com/ blackfridayhotdealsdfw Hours: 10 a.m.-7 p.m. daily

E. BELT LINE RD.

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15

RICHARDSON EDITION • APRIL 2022

Cottonwood Art Festival The city budgeted the Cottonwood Festival on May 7-8 with tighter nancial restraints this scal year. The semiannual event is held on the rst weekend of May and October. Budget Revenue

Charles W. Eisemann Center Rental and attendance

Budget versus revenue The Eisemann Center’s revenue projections have risen to just under prepandemic expectations.

The Eisemann Center has seen a rise in events and attendance at all three of its venues this scal year.

FY 2017-18

Revenue

Budget

Number of events Total event attendance

$241K

$421K

FY 2018-19

$4.33M

FY 2017-18

FY 2018-19

$2.02M

492 182,549

$252K

$420K

FY 2019-20

FY 2018-19

$3.47M

$142K FY 2019-20 (May 2020 canceled)

459 164,155

$945K

$71K

FY 2020-21 †

FY 2019-20

$2.15M

197 77,704

FY 2020-21 (Oct. 2020 and May 2021 canceled)

$483K

FY 2020-21

FY 2021-22 (Projection)

$173K $305K FY 2021-22 (Oct. 2021 canceled, May 2022 projection)

106 19,529

Cottonwood Festival is the city’s semiannual art festival. COURTESY CITY OF RICHARDSON

$2.49M

$1.10M

FY 2021-22*

125 45,051

.

BELT LINE RD.

K

Number of usage days in FY 2018-19 624

Number of usage days in FY 2020-21 169

COTTONWOOD PARK

Cottonwood Festival was established in 1969

The festival was last held in fall 2019

COTTONWOOD DR.

75

*OCTOBERMARCH  † ESTIMATE SOURCE: CITY OF RICHARDSONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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N

SOURCE: CITY OF RICHARDSONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

superintendent of community events. “However, we are hoping to bring in a lot of fun things for everybody to do, to the point theywon’t realize the stage is missing,” Ayers said. Lawrence said she loves that Cot- tonwood gives local performers an opportunity in addition to the art it showcases. “I know that’s been an initiative and a goal for us,” Lawrence said. Behind the scenes Festival organizers are working with tighter budgets this year. The city budget for Wildower is about 27% less than it was in FY 2018-19, while Cottonwood’s budget is more than 30% less. Ination is also a factor in this year’s plans, Magner said. “Everything from the stages them- selves to the sound technicians are going to cost more this year,” he said.

Being able to hold these events in 2022 has been a major priority for Richardson, Magner said. “It’s an amenity that we’re able to oer opportunities for the community to come together and to celebrate,” Magner said, adding that local compa- nies and sponsors also benet. “It’s a way to bring customers and potential clients to the city and expose them to what Richardson has to oer.” This year, Wildower will feature 39 music acts, including Texas-based alternative rock band Toadies. Bassist Doni Blair said he and the rest of the Toadies group appreciated the opportunity to headline an event, such as Wildower, after missing out on touring for much of the last two years. “It’s always so much fun playing there,” Blair said. “We love [playing at the Wildower Festival] so much because every time we play there it’s

always a great crowd.” What is new this year

CONTINUED FROM 1

annually, according to a 2019 report published by the Dallas Regional Chamber. Citybudget documents show Wildower generated nearly $750,000 in revenue for the city annually in scal years 2017-18 and 2018-19. Other arts festivals, including Cot- tonwood, generated a total of more than $420,000 during those same years, ocials said. The return of these events is expected to provide the city an eco- nomic boost, Magner said. According to Richardson’s scal year 2021-22 bud- get, Wildower will generate nearly $536,000 in revenue. The city’s other arts festivals are projected to gener- ate over $305,000. These two sources account for about a quarter of the city’s budgeted revenue in the category of recreation and leisure service.

Dianna Lawrence, the city’s commu- nity events manager, said organizers have used the past two years to ne- tune services. “We really took time to look through the way that [residents] are experienc- ing the festival and try to enhance each festival for our guests,” Lawrence said. She said this year’s Wildower Fes- tival will feature classic events, such as the battle of the bands, songwriting competitions and an art guitar auction. “Every year, we try to spotlight new artists, newperformers and change our activities in our kids area to keep it new and fresh for everyone,” Lawrence said. A nearby construction project will shut o access to one of the main stages Wildower has used previously, according to Serri Ayers, Richardson’s

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