Bay Area Edition | April 2022

BAY AREA EDITION

VOLUME 4, ISSUE 9  APRIL 22MAY 19, 2022

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Riverview along Wesley Drive o I45 in League City includes a couple of apartment buildings, but the city and developer WB Property Group have plans to make the area a destination before the end of the decade. When complete by September 2029, the development will include restaurants, retail shops, a marina, an outdoor gym, an amphitheater and other amenities. COURTESY WB PROPERTY GROUP, ATTICUS REAL ESTATE

OVERDOSES Opioid The number of reported opioid overdose deaths nearly doubled in Texas from January 2019 to October 2021, the most recent data available.

Opioidoverdose deaths continue rising due topandemic, fentanyl

Opioid overdose deaths have risen in Texas since the pandemic began in 2020, but ocials with Gal- veston and Harris counties said initiatives have been implemented during the pandemic to help prevent a dramatic increase in opioid-related deaths. Information from the Texas attorney general’s oce indicates drug overdose deaths had increased by around 32% in 2020 from the previous year, driven primarily by opioids. Additionally, provisional data from the National Center for Health Statistics showed opioid overdose deaths nearly doubled in Texas from BY ALLY BOLENDER, JISHNU NAIR & SIERRA ROZEN

January 2019 to October 2021, and there was an addi- tional 30% increase in deaths from October 2020 to October 2021, the most recent data available. “These are diseases of despair that we’re deal- ing with,” said Tyler Varisco, a health services researcher with The University of Houston. “When people are economically challenged or psychologi- cally challenged as many of us have been over the past two years, we see increased vulnerability in our communities to opioid use and other forms of sub- stance misuse.”

0 1K 2K 3K

2,580

2,160

1,470

1,367

Jan. 2020

Jan. 2019

Oct. 2021 Jan. 2021

*12MONTH PERIOD ENDING IN MONTH INDICATED SOURCE: PROVISIONAL DATA FROM NATIONAL CENTER FOR HEALTH STATISTICSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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LOCAL VOTER GUIDE 2022 CANDIDATE INFO

GrissomRoad to bewidened within a year

IMPACTS

TRANSPORTATION

PEOPLE

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9

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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BAY AREA EDITION • APRIL 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMPAPAR: Election season is here for your local ocials. Historically, voter turnout is much lower for non-presidential elections, but the candidates on May’s ballot are those making the decisions that aect your everyday life, from bonds to drainage to road improvements and more. Our Voter Guide (see Page 16) has brief candidate bios, and their full Q&A’s can be found on communityimpact.com. Papar Faircloth, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROM JAKE: The idea to turn the Chester L. Davis Sportsplex in League City into a destination spot has been dead for a couple years now, but the city’s idea to create a hot spot for residents and visitors alike is far from over. Read our front-page story to learn more about the eort to turn Wesley Drive at I-45 into a location attraction. Jake Magee, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

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Sign up for our daily newsletter to receive the latest headlines direct to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter DAILY INBOX Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Papar Faircloth EDITOR Jake Magee REPORTER Sierra Rozen METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kristina Shackelford MANAGING EDITOR Kelly Schaer ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Kaitlin Schmidt CORPORATE LEADERSHIP GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES &MARKETING DIRECTOR Tess Coverman CONTACT US

BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that aects you

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BAY AREA EDITION • APRIL 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

the next several months. The eatery, which has been closed for over a year after a vehicle struck its building at 213 E. Main St., will reopen not far away at a former drive-thru bank at 401 E. Main St. League City officials said work will be underway this spring and that the restau- rant may open this year. www.facebook.com/laindiabonitalc 8 Gulf Greyhound Park , a former dog racing track that closed in June 2020, is being repurposed. Developer Read King is demolishing the facility at 1000 FM 2004, La Marque, and replacing it with a mixed-use development that will include retail stores, restaurants, entertainment venues, restaurants and an office build- ing. 713-782-9000. www.read-king.com 9 Grand Living at Tuscan Lakes is under construction at 1850 E. League City Parkway, League City. The four-story, 211,000-square-foot building will have over 180 units for senior citizens along with several amenities, including a library, a theater, a fitness center, a spa, a chapel and outdoor spaces. Completion is expected in spring 2023. 346-646-7850. www.grandliving.com 10 Crafty Crab is on its way to League City at 112 N. Gulf Freeway. An open- ing window has not been determined, but the restaurant is pending its final building inspection with the city. The seafood restaurant, which has Hous- ton and Pearland locations, serves catfish, shrimp, oysters, lobster and crab in a variety of styles. Crafty Crab also has locations in Florida, Mary- land and other states. 832-856-1111. www.craftycrabrestaurant.com 11 The Busbys, the League City family behind the TLC show “Outdaughtered,” plan to open a boutique at 3020 Marina Bay Drive, League City. A timeline for the opening has not been determined. Called Graeson Bee Boutique , the business will sell clothes mainly for children. The boutique exists as an online shop and is named for the son the parents, who have five daughters, never had.

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NOWOPEN 1 Pomodoro’s Cucina Italiana opened March 15 at 1001 Pineloch Drive, Hous- ton, with a full bar, a lounge and outdoor seating. Pomodoro’s offers Italian food, including pizza, pasta, chicken and beef entrees and fish. The family-owned and -operated restaurant has been in the Bay Area for more than 10 years with another location at 2700 Marina Bay Drive, League City. 281-954-6278. 935 Lawrence Road, Kemah, on April 9. Owner Shelly Stenger said the business is twofold: a vintage boutique that offers cowhide, clothing, leather handbags and jewelry and a warehouse that sells upscale furniture and home decor. The shop also sells unique artisan-made items. 281-549-4712. www.therusticchair.com www.pomodorosonline.com 2 The Rustic Chair opened at

3 Tako N’ Tequila opened in mid-March at 220 S. Gulf Freeway, League City. The business serves a variety of tacos—called “takos” at the restaurant—along with fajitas, enchiladas, breakfast meals, des- serts and cocktails. The restaurant offers private dining and a drive-thru window. 832-905-5914. www.takontequila.com 4 Warby Parker opened a new location at 700 Baybrook Mall Drive, Ste. B111, Friendswood, on March 26. Warby Parker, an online retailer with about 160 loca- tions in North America, provides vision care such as eye exams and sells various eyewear, including glasses and contacts. 888-492-7297. www.warbyparker.com 5 Bounce N Play opened in March in the Miramar Shopping Center at 2000 Bayport Blvd., Seabrook. The children’s indoor playground allows for open play and hosts birthday parties for babies, toddlers and elementary-age kids. Children can play in pits filled

with rubber balls and foam cubes, and bounce on trampolines. 346-633-8320. www.bouncenplaytx.com 6 Fuji Sushi Asian Cuisine opened a Kemah location in March. Located at 212 FM 518, the sushi restaurant serves teriyaki, tempura, fried rice, sushi rolls and sashimi. It also has a restaurant in La Porte. 281-549-4006. www.fuji- sushi-asian-cuisine.business.site A new OxiFresh started servicing the League City area in March. The carpet cleaning business is mobile and is owned by Eric and Tasha Syrdahl. It serves 11 ZIP codes, including 77565 and 77573, which include League City, Clear Lake Shores and Kemah. 281-407-7444. www.oxifresh.com/locations/tx/ league-city-carpet-cleaning COMING SOON 7 Popular burrito restaurant La India Bonita will return to League City within

www.graesonbee.com RENOVATIONS

12 Clear Lake Medical Spa underwent renovations and reopened March 3. The

Because wrapping your kids in bubble wrap isn’t

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY JAKE MAGEE, SIERRA ROZEN & ANDY YANEZ

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Pomodoro’s Cucina Italiana

The Rustic Chair

COURTESY POMODORO’S CUCINA ITALIANA

COURTESY THE RUSTIC CHAIR

The League City Community Center housed the city’s spring break camp in March.

COURTESY CITY OF LEAGUE CITY

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FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON The League City Community Center as of mid-March is almost ready for a summer opening, allowing for a location for residents and city staers to meet for various purposes. The 30,000-square-foot facility at 400 S. Kansas Ave., League City, was built in 1938. Known as the League City School, the building was used as an elementary and junior high school. As part of Clear Creek ISD’s 2013 bond program, $300,000 was spent to update the building’s air conditioning and heating systems and wireless access, according to city documents. In 2018 and 2019, the facility housed League City Elementary School students while their campus was torn down and upgraded. The building, which is the oldest in CCISD, has not served students since 2019, the documents read. Last summer, CCISD determined the building was too outdated and expensive to renovate as a school and planned to tear it down before the 2021-22 school year began. However, the district expressed interest in renting the facility out for 30-40 years for a “nominal fee.” In June 2021, city sta members toured the facility and collaborated on how

the building could be used to ease overcrowding at existing city facilities while also serving the recreational, educational and cultural needs of residents. In July 2021, the district and city entered an agreement for the city to rent the building for $1 a year. League City has since upgraded the building with new paint, carpeting, furniture and technology, and now it will be used as a community center to house recreational programs, camps and civic club meetings, according to a League City news release. The facility can accommodate about 500 people and has over 20 classrooms and a gym. Multiple city departments spent the last few months preparing the building to host the city’s spring break camp in March to determine what other improvements and repairs are necessary. The community center will ocially open to the public in June. 281-554-1000. www.leaguecitytx.gov

Tako N’ Tequila

Grand Living at Tuscan Lakes

COURTESY TAKO N’ TEQUILA

RENDERING COURTESY GRAND LIVING

spa at 17099 N. Texas Ave., Ste. 300, Webster, offers treatments such as skin resurfacing, facials, dermaplaning, microneedling, chemical peels, fillers and facial plastic surgery. 281-762-7721. www.clmedspa.com 13 The Galveston County North County Annex , located at 174 Calder Road, League City, is undergoing renovations. The annex houses the tax office, the county clerk’s office, the district clerk’s office, the justice of the peace, Precinct 4 and the Precinct 4 constable. In the meantime, the city has set up temporary buildings at 174 Calder Drive that opened to the public on March 21. 409-766-2200. www.galvestoncountytx.gov IN THE NEWS League City City Manager John Baumgart- ner was among five government officials

honored March 11 for their influence on public service in the Greater Hous- ton area. Baumgartner was recognized during the 11th annual University of Houston Master of Public Administration Program’s Public Officials of the Year luncheon. The MPA program each year recognizes local officials who exemplify ethical decision-making; a commitment to residents beyond personal, professional and political motives; and the ability to encourage and maintain supportive rela- tionships across jurisdictional boundaries. Baumgartner has been League City city manager for seven years. Other public officials recognized include Harris County Commissioner Jack Cagle; Houston Public Works Director Carol Ellinger Haddock; Mike Loftin, Galveston assistant city man- ager for finance; and Tim Welch, district EMS chief of Brazoria County. 281-554-1000. www.leaguecitytx.gov

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BAY AREA EDITION • APRIL 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

ABIGAIL LN. TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES GrissomRoad to bewidened within a year This month, workers will begin widening GrissomRoad in northwest League City.

COMPILED BY JAKE MAGEE & JISHNU NAIR

UPCOMING PROJECTS

TURNER ST.

W. NASA RD.

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Today, GrissomRoad fromAbigail Lane to West NASA Road is two lanes wide. By the time work is complete in a year, it will be a four-lane divided concrete roadway complete with sidewalks, street drainage improve- ments and a new 12-inch water line stretching 5,000 feet from the city’s north booster station to West NASA Road, said Sarah Greer Osborne, director of communications and media relations, in an email to Community Impact Newspaper . The project, including the water line, totals $8.53 million, which is more than $1 million less than origi- nally budgeted for the project. League City City Council on Feb. 22 approved a contract to begin work in April and lauded how it came in under budget. “I want to appreciate [by] telling

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF APRIL 5. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT BAYNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. Butler from Turner to Cross Spring Lane and Phase 2 being the rest of Butler. City ocials have moved the anticipated project start date from fall 2022 to this summer. Timeline: July 2022-TBD Cost: $7.31 million Funding source: League City Turner Street and Butler Road Phase 2 reconstruction About 1,800 feet of Turner Street from Hobbs to Butler roads and about 4,300 feet of Butler from Turner to about 400 feet south of Sedona Drive will be reconstructed with concrete curb and gutters. The project may be phased with Phase 1 being Turner and

Grissom Road will be widened from two to four lanes by April 2023. COURTESY CITY OF LEAGUE CITY

[City Manager John Baumgartner] and [his] sta: Good job coming in … $1 million under budget on this partic- ular project,” Council Member Larry Millican said at the Feb. 22 meeting. Coming in so much under budget and having the project scheduled to take only 360 days will allow the city to advance quicker on other projects, Millican said. “We’ve got a great contractor on this one,” Baumgartner said. Project Manager Scott Tuma said in an email the project is cheaper than expected because the city got lucky in its timing, nding contractors wanting

work right when the project was bid. Tuma said the contractor plans to build the westbound lanes rst and then transition trac while construct- ing the eastbound lanes. “Motorists will need to be cogni- zant of construction crews, but very minimal inconvenience is expected,” he said. In the end, residents will benet, Tuma said. “Motorists will benet with two travel lanes each direction, a smoother transition fromWest NASA to Grissom Road, and safer travel from the overall straightening of the roadway,” he said.

Counties allege Texas Central delinquent on property taxes in Supreme Court amicus brief

A group of counties in the path of the planned Houston-Dallas high-speed rail have led an amicus brief March 30 in the Texas Supreme Court case Miles v. Texas Central, accusing the company Texas Central of not paying property taxes for 2021. The case centers on a 236-mile high-speed rail line between Houston and Dallas being planned by the company Texas Central. Filed by landowner JimMiles in 2016, the lawsuit argues Texas Central

does not qualify as a railroad company under state law and therefore cannot use eminent domain to acquire land needed to construct the line. Harris County and Dallas County were included in the alleged tax delinquency, but neither county was party to the amicus brief. Harris County Commissioners Rodney Ellis and Adrian Garcia led a separate amicus brief Jan. 10 expressing support for the project.

The taxes owed come to a total of $622,975 with Harris County making up $216,359 of the money. According to the Harris County Appraisal Dis- trict’s parcel viewer, 47 county parcels are owned by “Texas Central Railroad and Infrastructure,” “Texas Central Railroad” or “Texas Central.” All of the parcels were acquired prior to 2021. Texas Central did not respond to a request for comment from Community Impact Newspaper .

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BAY AREA EDITION • APRIL 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GOVERNMENT Survey shows residents satisfiedwith city services

RANKINGSATISFACTION A 2021 survey of League City shows residents are most dissatisfied with traffic congestion and most satisfied with police and fire services.

Overall satisfaction with...

Satisfied/very satisfied

Neutral

Dissatisfied/very dissatisfied

Flow of traffic and congestion management 29.22% 26.1%

BY JAKE MAGEE

focus its efforts, according to the survey, is ensuring the community is prepared for emergencies. Respondents rated the city’s quality of life, reputation and appearance as the things with which they are most satisfied. Police, fire and parks were the city services respondents were most satisfied with, Davis said. Compared to the 2019 survey, there were notable increases in how quickly the city responds to requests, how easy it is to contact staff and howwell city employees handle issues. “Anytime you use customer service numbers going up, that’s a positive,” said John Bowen, League City City Council member. However, there were decreases in other areas, such as the amount of youth athletic programs and the quality of library programs, Davis said. City Manager John Baumgartner contributed at least some of that to the COVID-19 pandemic. For instance, the city could not offer as many programs at the library at the height of the pandemic, he said. “During this two-year period, COVID had an impact,” Baumgartner said. Overall, 77% of respondents said they felt they were getting their money’s worth for their tax dollars, Davis said. Council Member Hank Dugie said the positive survey results are proof Baumgartner has created a good envi- ronment. Mayor Pat Hallisey agreed. “Certainly, it’s a team effort,” Baumgartner said.

44.68%

The results of a 2021 League City citizen survey—the first since 2019— shows residents are satisfied with the quality of life and city services offered in League City. The survey, which was sent out last fall to a random sample of residents, asked respondents several questions about everything from public safety to roads to drainage. Dawn Davis, project manager for ETC Institute, the entity that conducted the survey, unveiled some highlights during League City’s workshop Feb. 22. “Bottom line: Residents have a very positive perception of the city,” she said. About 90% of respondents said they were satisfied with the quality of life in League City. That is 8% above the U.S. average and 24% above the state average, Davis said. Of those surveyed, 96% said League City is an excellent or good place to live, which is higher than the national average of 73%. Additionally, 94% said the city is an excellent or good place to raise children, which is above the national average of 71%. The top concerns for respondents include fixing traffic and congestion and maintaining streets and sidewalks. This is no surprise to the city, said Sarah Greer Osborne, director of communications and media relations; the 2019 survey also showed residents overwhelmingly wanted traffic congestion addressed. Another top area the city should

Maintenance of streets, sidewalks and utilities

62.32%

21.54% 16.13%

Enforcement of local codes and ordinances

8.09%

66.24%

25.67%

Effectiveness of communication by city

6.09%

72.81%

21.1%

Quality of trash and recycling services

72.85% 16.83% 10.32%

Quality of customer service provided by city

3.42%

74.38%

22.2%

Efforts by city to ensure community emergency preparation

5.72%

78.92% 15.36%

Quality of parks and recreation programs and facilities

81.99% 14.19% 3.81%

Quality of fire services

87.33% 10.46% 2.21% 88.56% 9.13% 2.31%

Quality of police services

Percentage of residents who are satisfied with the city in which they live as...

League City

U.S.

Texas

A place to live

A place to work

74%

96%

73%

60%

56%

48%

A place to visit

A place to raise children

94%

55%

71%

62%

54%

59%

SOURCES: CITY OF LEAGUE CITY, ETC INSTITUTE/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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BAY AREA EDITION • APRIL 2022

Alcohol consumption nowallowed at League City parks CITY&COUNTY News from League City

League City City Council will meet at 6 p.m. April 26 and May 10 at League City Council Chambers, 200 W. Walker St., League City. Meetings are streamed at www.facebook.com/ leaguecitytexas. MEETINGSWE COVER coming months. Phillips has carved hundreds of trees and now does it for a living, he said. After Hurricane Ike, he took fallen trees and carved several of them into works of art, which is how his art career began. CITY HIGHLIGHTS LEAGUE CITY Two diseased, century-old oak trees in League Park were cut down in March, but they will be repurposed into art. Clear Lake resident Jimmy Phillips has been hired to carve the wood into sculptures. One chunk of wood in front of Helen Hall Library will be a carving of a child sitting and reading with a dog named Scout, who was the dog of League City founder J. C. League. Another carving at Hometown Heroes Park is of a 6-foot firefighter holding Scout. Another piece of wood will become a train conductor at League Park, and the design of the fourth piece of wood—also located at Hometown Heroes Park—residents will be able to vote on in the

BY JAKE MAGEE

law. One resident, however, voiced opposition to the ordinance change, saying it may cause residents to become belligerent and start harass- ing other park users. Council Member Hank Dugie, who sponsored the ordinance change com- ing before City Council, said he trusts residents to use alcohol in the parks responsibly and that there are already laws in place to stop “bad actors.” “Taxpayers should not have to ask permission to use taxpayer-funded parks responsibly,” he said. Mayor Pat Hallisey also opposed the ordinance change. He said while some council members wanted to change the ordinance to give residents more liberty, that liberty cannot come at the expense of others’ rights. Hallisey opposed the ordinance change because he is not worried about the residents who responsibly drink at parks but those who do not, he said. “Rules are for responsible people,” Hallisey said.

DRINK DEBATE League City City Council debated allowing alcohol in parks over two meetings. MARCH8 First reading of ordinance allowing alcohol consumption in parks approved. MARCH22

LEAGUE CITY After another debate, League City City Council on March 22 approved the second reading of an ordinance change that will allow alcohol consumption at most city parks without a permit. City Council approved the first reading March 8. A second reading and approval was necessary to make the ordinance change official. The ordinance change does not apply to Hometown Heroes Park, Lobit Park and the Chester L. Davis Sportsplex, which are parks primarily for kids. A few residents spoke about the ordinance. One was former Council Member Greg Gripon, who said under existing League City ordinances, it is illegal for friends to have wine during a barbecue or fishers to drink beer at city parks. Gripon said those things should be legal and favored the ordinance change. Another resident also voiced support, saying these activities are happening anyway regardless of the

Second and final reading approved with 6-2 vote.

Council Member Larry Millican reiterated his point fromMarch 8 that residents should be polled and engaged on this change before it takes effect. Mayor Pro Tem Nick Long said he has concerns and can see both points of view but that he prefers to change the ordinance now and see how it goes. Long said he would help change the ordinance again if problems arise. The ordinance change passed 6-2 with Hallisey and Millican against.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATIONBRIEFS

News from Clear Creek ISD

QUOTEOFNOTE “I APPRECIATE THE CHANGE IN THE PROCESS AND THE CHANGE IN THE TIMING. I THINK THATWILL BE REALLY VALUABLE.” LAURA DUPONT, CCISD BOARD TRUSTEE, ON REVIEWING AND APPROVING SUPERINTENDENT ERIC WILLIAMS’ ANNUAL TARGETS EARLIER IN THE SCHOOL YEAR Clear Creek ISD board of trustees will meet at 6 p.m. April 25 for a regular meeting and at 4:30 p.m. May 9 for a board workshop at the Education Support Center, 2425 E. Main St., League City. Watch online at www.ccisd.net/boardmeeting. MEETINGSWE COVER Clear Creek ISD Superintendent Eric Williams has targets and goals across six different categories for the 2022-23 school year. 6 NUMBER TOKNOW

CCISD superintendent targets approved for 2022-23 school year

BY SIERRA ROZEN

TARGET DETAILS At the March 28 board of trustees meeting, the trustees unanimously approved six superintendent targets for the 2022-23 school year.

ensure success in classes for student academic growth. Literacy develop- ment will be measured by focusing on reading proficiency for students based on benchmarks. Amajor metric for budget devel- opment was being able to create a stakeholder advisory committee to help guide budget-making decisions. The mental health resources and support target will include sending out surveys to see howwell families are able to access mental health resources. Another major target that has been in the works for the past few years is personalized learning, which the district is in the process of evaluat- ing by looking at data and learning walk results. The targets will go into effect for the 2022-23 academic school year. “I appreciate the change in the process and the change in the timing. I think that will be really valuable,” board Trustee Laura DuPont said in reference to establishing the targets earlier in the school year.

CLEARCREEK ISD Superintendent Eric Williams is set to focus on items such as budget developments, student academic growth and personalized learning, as defined by the 2022-23 superintendent targets. The Clear Creek ISD board of trustees unanimously approved the six superintendent targets at the March 28 board meeting. Each target was presented with multiple entries under each metric with specific ones being pointed out that resonated most with district officials. The targets approved were budget development, student academic growth, personalized learning, instructional best practices, literacy developments, and mental health resources and support. Many of the metrics shown with particular targets included faculty and staff working in groups to help improve the district, such as teachers participating in collaborative groups and professional development to help

BUDGET DEVELOPMENT: Create a stakeholder advisory committee to help guide budget-making decisions. STUDENT ACADEMIC GROWTH: Teachers participate in collaborative groups to help ensure success. PERSONALIZED LEARNING: ​ Looking at data and learning walk results. INSTRUCTIONAL BEST PRACTICES: Teachers participate in professional development to implement new strategies. LITERACY DEVELOPMENTS: Focus on reading proficiency for students. MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES AND SUPPORT: Survey families to determine access to mental health resources.

SOURCE: CLEAR CREEK ISD/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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BAY AREA EDITION • APRIL 2022

Saturday, April 30, 2022 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.

You can participate by driving through one of the drop-off sites where law enforcement will take medications for proper off-site disposal. All unused or expired prescription or over-the-counter medications are accepted. NO SHARPS. For your safety, each site will be operated strictly as a contactless drive-thru service. Friendswood Police Department at Hope Lutheran Church 1804 S. Friendswood Dr. / Friendswood Harris Co. Constable Pct. 8 at Bay Area Annex 16602 Diana Lane / Houston

Choose a local consultant you can trust!

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League City Police Department 555 West Walker / League City Nassau Bay Police Department Nassau Bay Municipal Building 1800 Space Park Dr. / Nassau Bay Houston Police Department-Clear Lake 2855 Bay Area Blvd.

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Guaranteed Life Insurance Health Insurance Under 65 Are you Turning 65 soon? Call me! 907 West Main St - League City 346-215-0581 • eva@insuredbyjohn.com John Valdes Agency

For more information, please call the Bay Area Alliance for Youth & Families at 281-284-0370 or visit thealliancebayarea.org

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2022

L O C A L V O T E R G U I D E GUIDE Candidates and information for local elections

COMPILED BY JAKE MAGEE & SIERRA ROZEN

D A T E S T O K N O W April 25 First day of early voting

Voters in the Clear Creek ISD election can vote at any location during early voting but must vote in the district in which they reside on election day. See locations at www.ccisd.net/elections. Nassau Bay voters can vote at 1800 Space Park Drive, Ste. 200, Nassau Bay. SOURCES: CLEAR CREEK ISD, CITY OF NASSAU BAY, TEXAS SECRETARY OF STATE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER W H E R E T O V O T E

May 7 Election day May 7 Last day to receive ballot by mail (or May 9 if carrier envelope is postmarked by 7 p.m. at location of election)

April 26 Last day to apply for ballot by mail (received, not postmarked) May 3 Last day of early voting

V O T E R T U R N O U T Harris County

S A M P L E B A L L O T

*Incumbent

Galveston County

CLEAR CREEK ISD BOARD OF TRUSTEES District 1 Jessica Cejka Misty Dawson At-large Position B

NASSAU BAY CITY COUNCIL

Turnout

Registered voters

Turnout

Registered voters

2020

2020

Position 4 James Abbey John P. Mahon Charles Pulliam Position 6 Matt Prior* Michelle Weller

Mayor Mark Denman Phil Johnson Position 2 Michelle Micheli Lucie Johannes Sommer Bob Wilkinson

1,633,557 2,480,522

153,843 228,482

2018

2018

1,219,209

2,357,199

114,348

210,663

2016

2016

1,304,480

2,234,671

124,547

208,232

2014

2014

Scott Bowen* Kyrsten Garcia Carl Nunn

678,805

2,062,792

64,570

191,961

2012

2012

2,000,011 1,185,722

109,252

185,379

S T A T E W I D E P R O P O S I T I O N S

Senate Joint Resolution 2 Second special session of 87th Texas Legislature

Senate Joint Resolution 2 Third special session of 87th Texas Legislature

PROPOSITION 1

PROPOSITION 2

Ballot text

What does it mean?

Ballot text

What does it mean?

The constitutional amendment authorizing the Leg- islature to provide for the reduction of the amount of a limitation on the total amount of ad valorem taxes that may be imposed for general elementary and secondary public school purposes on the residence homestead of a person who is elderly or disabled to reect any statutory reduction from the preceding tax year in the maximum compressed rate of the maintenance and operations taxes imposed for those purposes on the homestead.

The constitutional amendment increasing the amount of the residence homestead exemption from ad valorem taxation for public school purposes from $25,000 to $40,000.

Although property taxes are already frozen for the disabled and those over the age of 65, this proposition would allow for additional property tax relief from school districts for the disabled and elderly. If approved, it would allow the Legislature to provide property tax cuts even to those elderly and disabled homeowners with frozen taxes.

Every homeowner in Texas is already oered a $25,000 homestead exemption on property taxes from public school districts—meaning the rst $25,000 of a home’s appraised property value does not count against a homeowner’s annual property taxes. If approved, that exemption for home- owners would be raised to $40,000.

SOURCES: TEXAS SECRETARY OF STATE’S OFFICE WEBSITE; JOSHUA BLANK, UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS; DALE CRAYMER, TEXAS TAXPAYERS AND RESEARCH ASSOCIATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Don’t overpay on your property taxes. Protest at ownwell.com/impact and get more savings with lower fees.

Scan before May 16 to get your free savings estimate. Get started today! hello@ownwell.com | 512-886-2282

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BAY AREA EDITION • APRIL 2022

CANDIDATE INFO

Get to know the candidates running in the election

Incumbent

Nassau Baymayor

Nassau Bay City Council, Position 2

Nassau Bay City Council, Position 4

MARK DENMAN

MICHELLE MICHELI

JAMES ABBEY

Occupation: retired business executive Relevant experience: served on Nassau Bay City Council and as mayor along with sever- al boards and committees, volunteer www.mark4nbmayor.com

Occupation: chief business development ocer for Unima Inc., CEO of UnimaDx UK Relevant experience: ood mitigation, economic development, research in higher education www.abbey4nbcouncil.com

Candidate did not respond by press time

PHIL JOHNSON

LUCIE JOHANNES SOMMER

JOHN P. MAHON

Occupation: Atmos Technologies CEO Relevant experience: former mayor, current Nassau Bay City Council member, various committees 281-734-1074 www.philjohnsonformayor.com

Occupation: aerospace engineer Relevant experience: community volun- teer, member of various committees and professional leadership roles 832-338-1828 www.nassaubaylucie.com

Occupation: Kinder Morgan sales director Relevant experience: former council member; serves on various boards and committees www.johnmahonnassaubay.com

BOB WILKINSON

CHARLES PULLIAM

Occupation: retired business owner Relevant experience: serving on Nassau Bay parks and tourism committees 678-735-2992 www.bobwnbtx.com

Candidate did not respond by press time

Responses may have been edited for length and style. Read full Q&A’s at communityimpact.com .

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2 0 2 2 L O C A L V O T E R G U I D E

COMPILED BY JAKE MAGEE & SIERRA ROZEN

Nassau Bay City Council, Position 6

Clear Creek ISD board of trustees, District 1

Clear Creek ISD board of trustees at-large Position B

SCOTT BOWEN

MATT PRIOR

JESSICA CEJKA

Occupation: Realtor Relevant experience: PTA member, two master’s degrees in education, former secondary math teacher, NASA education manager 832-541-6616 • www.jessica4ccisd.net

Occupation: chemical engineer Relevant experience: current CCISD board member, analytical skills from engineering and business background, Eagle Scout 713-825-4470 www.scottbowen.org

Occupation: senior director, employee relations Relevant experience: various councils and

committees, volunteer mprior28@yahoo.com

KYRSTEN GARCIA

MICHELLE WELLER

MISTY DAWSON

Occupation: owner of local pool company Relevant experience: controller for an oil and gas company for over nine years, local business owner 832-517-0451 www.facebook.com/electmistydawsonccisd

Occupation: retired consultant Relevant experience: former CEO and chief operating ocer with 30 years of execu- tive management experience, member of various volunteer groups www.weller4nassaubay.com

Occupation: executive assistant Relevant experience: teacher and substi- tute in area districts, including CCISD, for last seven years 832-481-3150 www.garciaforccisd.wordpress.com

CARL NUNN

Occupation: chief of police Relevant experience: parent, an SLO in CCISD, CCSID Strategic Planning Committee member, veteran, volunteer coach www.carl4ccisd.net

Responses may have been edited for length and style. Read full Q&A’s at communityimpact.com .

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BAY AREA EDITION • APRIL 2022

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