Lake Travis - Westlake Edition | August 2022

LAKE TRAVIS WESTLAKE EDITION 2022 Lake Travis ISD considers record $703M bond election

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EDUCATION EDITION

VOLUME 13, ISSUE 7  AUG. 18SEPT. 14, 2022

Grappling with growth Lake Travis ISD may hold a bond election in November for three propositions totaling $703 million to address expanding needs within the district. SOURCE: LAKE TRAVIS ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Here are a few of the projects included with Lake Travis ISD’s bond propositions, which span from new schools to technology upgrades. PROPOSITION A: $548.41M • Elementary school No. 8: $50M • Elementary school No. 9: $54.6M • New high school: $176.1M • Campus renovations: $31.8M PROPOSITION B: $60.79M • Sta and student devices: $19.1M • Campus, classroom audio and visual technology: $12.3M • Network infrastructure: $10.6M • High School No. 2 facilities: $56.4M • Cavalier Stadium renovations: $16.3M • Women’s eldhouse addition: $10M • LED lighting replacements: $1.7M NOTE: PROJECTS INCLUDED IN THIS LIST ARE NOT COMPREHENSIVE. • Security systems: $4.6M PROPOSITION C: $93.8M

Bond total $703M

BY GRACE DICKENS

As the student population continues to rise in west- ern Travis County, Lake Travis ISD will consider calling a bond election in November for $703 million worth of facilities, improvements, technology and more. Superintendent Paul Norton said new schools must be built to accommodate this level growth, LTISD gained 1,763 students from 2015-20, making it one of the fastest-growing districts in the region, according to the district’s 2022 demographic report. New schools must be built to accommodate this level of growth, and as Bee Cave and Rough Hollow CONTINUED ON 32

“IT’S A SIGNIFICANT BOND. IT’LL BE THE LARGEST BOND WE’VE EVER HAD AS A DISTRICT.” PAUL NORTON, SUPERINTENDENT OF LAKE TRAVIS ISD ,,

As the school year begins Aug. 16-17, local school districts said safety and security continue to be an area of con- cern for the Lake Travis and Westlake communities. On May 24, 19 children and two adults were fatally shot at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde. School shootings push safety and security to the forefront of conversations for par- ents, but ensuring student and sta safety on campuses is a year-round commitment, said Jeremy Trimble, assistant superintendent of operations CONTINUED ON 35 Districts aiming to bolster campus safety BY GRACE DICKENS

SHOOTINGS ON THE RISE There have been 119 school shootings nationwide since 2018, according to Education Week, an education-focused news organization.

Nationwide school shootings

40 32 8 16 24 0

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022*

*AS OF AUG. 1

SOURCE: EDUCATION WEEKCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SPONSORED BY • International School of Texas • Lake Travis Film Festival • UT Health Austin 2022 EDUCATION EDITION SCHOOL DISTRICT DATA 12

IMPACTS

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LAKE TRAVIS - WESTLAKE EDITION • AUGUST 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. Now in 2022, CI is still locally owned. We have expanded to include hundreds of employees, our own software platform and printing facility, and over 30 hyperlocal editions across the state with a circulation to more than 2.4 million residential mailboxes.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS MONTH

FROM TAYLOR: The annual Education Edition has arrived! In our front-page stories, Reporter Grace Dickens dives into the specics of the $703 million Lake Travis ISD bond as well as updated school safety measures for Lake Travis, Eanes and Leander ISDs. You’ll also nd a Q&A with the new superintendent for Eanes ISD, Je Arnett (see Page 29). Thank you for reading, and cheers to a wonderful year ahead! Taylor Caranfa Stover , GENERAL MANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROM JENN: Our annual Education Edition is packed with lots of data about our area districts so you can see how Lake Travis-Westlake students measure up. Enjoy the rest of the issue where you can nd all your favorite news about area businesses. Jennifer Schaefer, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

WHAT WE COVER

CORRECTIONS: Volume 13, Issue 5 On Page 14 in the story titled “Travis County experts urge conservation amid decreasing groundwater supplies,” the chart that listed the amount of annual groundwater pumped from each level of the Trinity was ipped. The Upper Trinity provides 1.4% of annual groundwater pumped, and the Lower Trinity provides 62.3%. On Page 22 in the Hospital Guide, the photo of the facility picture is of the Baylor Scott & White Medical Center- Lakeway. On Page 27 in the “Baylor, Scott & White opens new NeuroHealth Institute, expands current coverage in Lakeway” story, Baylor Scott & White Health launched its NeuroHealth Institute in 2021 and has providers at many facilities in Central Texas, not just its medical center in Lakeway. The correct website is www.bswhealth. com/neurohealth. Baylor Scott & White also provides training for its residents and fellows through its academic medical centers.

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Taylor Caranfa Stover

EDITOR Jennifer Schaefer REPORTER Grace Dickens

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Sabrina Musachia ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Jacqueline Harris METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Travis Baker MANAGING EDITOR Amy Denney COPY CHIEF Andy Comer SENIOR ART PRODUCTION MANAGER Haley Grace CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PRESIDENT & GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES & MARKETING Tess Coverman CONTACT US 16225 Impact Way, Ste. 1, Pugerville, TX 78660 • 5129896808 PRESS RELEASES ltwnews@communityimpact.com ADVERTISING ltwads@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions

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LAKE TRAVIS  WESTLAKE EDITION • AUGUST 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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Just Mind Counseling

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COURTESY MARCO'S PIZZA

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6 Dog grooming company Scenthound opened a location in the Westlake area at 6317 Bee Caves Road, Ste. 370, Aus- tin, in August. The membership-based service oers monthly care and groom- ing to dogs in ve core areas, including skin, coat, ears, nails and teeth. 512-350-2044. www.scenthound.com COMING SOON 7 ATX Laser Lounge will provide laser hair removal, photo facials, skin tightening and microneedling to Lakeway residents starting in August. Owner Erica Ross will be collaborating in the same oce space as ATX Volume Lash and Brow at 2909 N. RM 620, Ste. 108, Austin. 512-922-8283. 8 Hill Country Volvo , a certied dealer of new Volvo cars including SUVs, sedans, and crossovers, broke ground July 20 at RM 620 and Buckner Lane. Anticipated to open in fall 2023, this will be Volvo’s second location and will serve Lakeway, Cedar Park and the Lake Travis area. It will oer sales as well as a parts and service

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NOW OPEN 1 Action Behavior Center opened a new location in August at 1508 S. RM 620, Stes. 103-105, Lakeway, to provide personalized therapy for children with autism. The center utilizes applied behav- ior analysis, according to the business. 512-920-1880. www.actionbehavior.com 2 Just Mind Counseling opened a sec- ond location Aug. 8 to provide children, teens, adults and couples with compre- hensive psychological care. Located at 7004 Bee Caves Road, Bldg. 3, Ste. 200, Austin, the practice has more than 40 therapists with the majority having over

20 years of experience. 512-843-7665. www.justmind.org

3,000-square-foot Bee Cave location is open from 9 a.m.-9 p.m. daily, including holidays, to service patients of all ages for chronic and acute illnesses, lacerations, fractures, contusions and other non-life- threatening illnesses. 281-783-8162. www.nextlevelurgentcare.com 5 Sage Capital Bank opened a full-service branch at 12233 N. RM 620, Austin, in July. As a community bank, Sage has operated a loan production oce in Cedar Park since 2015. The bank is now expanding its operations to give customers deposit services. 512-240-6625.www.sagecapitalbank.com

3 Marco’s Pizza opened a new location Aug. 2 at 3944 S. RM 620, Bldg. G2, Ste. 110, Bee Cave. Marco’s Pizza is a count- er-service chain restaurant that oers specialty or custom pizzas for takeout or delivery, along with pizza bowls, subs, salads and desserts. 512-649-8588. www.marcos.com 4 Next Level Urgent Care opened the rst of seven Austin-area locations planned for this year in Bee Cave at 15500 Hwy. 71, Austin, in July. The

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY GRACE DICKENS

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The bakery will open in September.

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COURTESY SUSIECAKES

FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON Bakery SusieCakes will open in Westlake in September. The business will be located at 3267 Bee Caves Road, Ste. 123, Austin, in the West Woods Shopping Center. SusieCakes specializes in classic desserts made from scratch by in-house bakers without the use of any mixes, articial preservatives, high-fructose corn syrups or trans-fats, according to the business. SusieCakes sells specialty frosted layer cakes in avors such as southern red velvet, old-fashioned chocolate, carrot, marble and tropical coconut. The shop also oers rotating seasonal oerings such as holiday- inspired treats and a selection of traditional cookies, bars and whoopie NEW OWNERSHIP 14 Level 12 Salonunderwent new own- ership and became Volt Salons in May. The salon has a location in Lakeway at 2009 Main St, Ste. 120, Lakeway, known as A Volt on Main . There is a second location in Bee Cave at 15500 Hwy. 71, Ste. 240, Bee Cave, called B Volt71 . The luxury hair salon specializes in hair extensions, hair color, cuts, treatments and stylings. Lakeway: 512-952-9871, Bee Cave: 512-923-1126. www.voltsalons.com

pies. Founded by Susan Sarich, the rst SusieCakes opened 16 years ago in Los Angeles and has expanded to include locations throughout California and the Dallas-Fort Worth area. 3267 Bee Caves Road, Ste. 123, Austin 800-730-2253 www.susiecakes.com

Pollo Campero

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center to help customers schedule main- tenance appointments at 10600 N. RM 620, Austin. www.volvoaustin.com 9 My Time Kids Academy will open in a new location o Bee Creek Road at 3001 R O Drive, Spicewood, in January. The year-round preschool provides a diverse curriculum for children ages 2.5-7 years old in areas such as Spanish; a science, technology, engineering and math lab; music; and gymnastics. 512–291–7730. www.mytimekids.com 10 Guatemalan-based chicken chain Pollo Campero will open a new location in the fall at 3201 Bee Caves Road, Ste. 142, Austin. The international chain serves a variety of chicken dishes either grilled or “Campero” fried. Work is expected to begin in January and be completed in June 2023. https://campero.com 11 Premier Martial Arts is coming soon to Steiner Ranch at 5145 N. RM 620, Ste. B-120, Austin, in the fall. The practice specializes in teaching children

self-defense, tness and character development through a curriculum com- bining styles of taekwondo, krav maga and kickboxing. 737-205-4304. www.premiermartialarts.com 12 Smokin’ Oak Wood-Fired Pizza & Taproom will open Aug. 25 in the Four Points area at 8300 N. RM 620, Ste. K-200, Austin. The restaurant oers a variety of wood-red pizzas and sand- wiches along with salads, starters and desserts. The self-pour taproom wall will allow customers to choose from a selection of craft and domestic beers, wines and mixed cocktails. www.smokinoakpizza.com NAME CHANGES 13 Wild Bird Center of Lakeway renamed itself to Hill Country Birds in July. The shop at 2127 Lohmans Crossing, Ste. 316, Lakeway, provides a one-stop-shop for backyard birding needs such as bird seed, birdbaths, bird houses, nature-related gifts and more. 512-351-8213. www.hillcountrybirds.com

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CLOSINGS 15 Komal Latin Kitchen & Bar closed its Steiner Ranch location in August. The restaurant was at 5000 N. Quinlan Park Road, Ste. C, Austin. 16 Longtime Lakeway eatery Sandeez Hamburger Hut closed Aug. 13, according to the business. The family-owned estab- lishment opened in 1979 and has since served its locally sourced “bucket list” burgers and hand-cut fries to the commu- nity. 113 N. RM 620, Lakeway.

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LAKE TRAVIS  WESTLAKE EDITION • AUGUST 2022

TODO LIST

August & September events

COMPILED BY GRACE DICKENS

Lake Travis Film Festival will run from Sept. 1518. FEATURED EVENT LAKE TRAVIS FILM FESTIVAL The Lake Travis Film Festival will showcase short lms, documentary features, narrative features and more over four days in Bee Cave and Lakeway. Screenings are supplemented by master classes, table reads and parties. One-day wristbands start at $60, and a four-day badge is $225. Here is a sampling of a few of the events on the lineup. SCREENSHOT COURTESY DELIVERING HOPE AND LAKE TRAVIS FILM FESTIVAL SEPT. 15 Screenwriter Master Class with Owen Egerton, (High 5), 10 a.m.-4:15 p.m. Opening Night Party (The Gramercy), 10 p.m.-midnight SEPT. 16 Short script reading (The Gramercy), 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. “Me to Play,” documentary feature and Q&A (La Quinta), 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m SEPT. 17 Youth Showcase (Bee Cave City Hall), 9:45-11:15 a.m. “Delivering Hope,” lm and Q&A (Bee Cave City Hall), 12:30-2:30 p.m. SEPT. 18 Brunch (Star Hill Ranch, Fitzhugh Chapel and Church), 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. “Fabletown,” narrative feature and Q&A (Star Hill Ranch, Church), 6:45-8:30 p.m.

AUG. 2728

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The Lakeway Arts Committee is hosting its seventh annual Cool Arts Show and Studio Tour. The event will feature live music and ne visual arts created by more than 20 area artists. There will be live music by the Christian Wiggs Trio and food trucks on Saturday. On Sunday, artists will hold studio tours. 1-5 p.m. Free. Lakeway Activity Center, 105 Cross Creek, Lakeway. 512-261-1010. www.lakeway-tx.gov

Located in the Hill Country Galleria, New Origin Shop will host a free cocktail hour with the shop’s favorite cocktail recipes featuring Morris Kitchen cocktail mixers. There will be alcoholic and virgin cocktails for guests, and cocktail mixers are available for purchase in store. 5-6 p.m. Free. 12921 Hill Country Blvd., Ste. D2-110, Bee Cave. 512-276- 2066. www.neworigin.shop

AUGUST 26 MEET THE NEW SUPERINTENDENT The Westlake Chamber of Commerce is inviting residents to a community luncheon featuring a discussion with Eanes ISD’s new superintendent, Je Arnett. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. $40 (member), $45 (nonmember), $400 (reserved table of 8). Riverbend Centre, 4214 N. Capital of Texas Hwy., Austin. 512- 327-3088. www.westlakechamber.com SEPTEMBER 07 PICTURE THIS Bee Cave Public Library will host a nature photography class featuring Kim Ortiz of Kim Ortiz Portrait Art. Ortiz will teach participants how to use their phone to take photos of owers, plants, trees and other natural landscapes. 1-2 p.m. Free. Bee Cave Public Library, 4000 Galleria Parkway, Bee Cave. 512-767-6620. www. beecavetexas.gov/city-government/library 09 ENJOY SOME TEXAS TUNES The Southside Sheiks Band will play at Lake Travis Community Library. The Austin-based group plays old-timey

Blvd., Austin. 512-314-7530. www. lakeway-tx.gov 17 DONATE BLOOD The Lakeway Community Blood Drive will be at the Lakeway Activity Center. Preregistering is preferred, and those with appointments will get priority, but this event also welcomes walk-ins. Residents can schedule an appointment by visiting www.weareblood.org/ donor and searching for Group Code A197 or emailing the coordinators at lakewaycommunityblooddrive@gmail. com. If appointments ll up, residents may use this email to ask to be included on a waitlist. 8 a.m.-noon. Free. 105 Cross Creek, Lakeway. 512-261-1010. www.lakeway-tx. gov/1618/blood-drive 20 SADDLE UP Lake Travis Community Library will hold a screening for the documentary lm “Cowboys,” which explores the role of modern working cowboys in some of America’s largest and most remote cattle ranches. Local director Bud Force will be available for a Q&A after the screening to answer questions about the lm. 6 p.m. Free. 1938 Lohmans Crossing, Austin. 512-263-2885. www.laketravislibrary.org

jugband blues, ragtime and holler blues for individuals of all ages. 3 p.m. Free. 1938 Lohmans Crossing, Austin. 512-263-2885. www.laketravislibrary.org 10 LEARN ABOUT HEALTHIER LIVING Lake Travis Community Library Author Dr. V Thomas George will be at Lake Travis Community Library to discuss his book, "Health in Flames: A Doctor’s Prescription for Living Beyond Diet and Exercise." George draws upon research and ideas from a variety of elds such as nance, psychology, economics and medicine to present solutions for healthier living. 10:30 a.m. Free. 1938 Lohmans Crossing, Austin. 512-263-2885. www.laketravislibrary.org 10 TEAM UP TO COMPETE The Lakeway Parks & Recreation Department is holding a cornhole tournament. Teams of two will compete in a doubles play, double elimination competition. First-, second- and third-place teams will receive a prize and trophy. The event will follow the ocial rules of the American Cornhole Association. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Rough Hollow Welcome Center, 903 Highlands

Find more or submit Lake Travis-Westlake events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION UPDATES Lakeway decides on potential road bond projects City Council has decided to request ROAD PROJECTS

COMPILED BY JENNIFER SCHAEFER

ONGOING PROJECTS

CEDAR ST. PLAZA ON THE LAKE

BUNNY RUN

360

a bond for transportation projects totaling more than $23 million. The council is looking to call a bond Aug. 15 to be voted on by residents in either November 2022 or May 2023. Council Member Gretchen Vance recommended splitting the bond into two items so the more con- tentious items did not prevent more dire projects from being funded. One bond likely will deal with mainte- nance issues with the other grouping involving new construction. Projects range from improvements to existing streets to the expansion of roadways and connecting other thor- oughfares to make travel throughout the city streamlined. While certain projects such as the Main Street and Birrell Street exten- sions had overwhelmingly positive public support, other projects were met with opposition. One such project was an extension on Joseph Drive, allowing for a second entrance and exit out of the

Lakeway City Council has determined these transportation projects are the most crucial to the city’s infrastructure and will come before the citizens who will vote on a bond to nance them.

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WESTLAKE DR.

OTHER PROJECTS

$391K $100K Flint Rock at Wild Cherry: Lohmans Crossing at Main Street: TRAFFIC SIGNAL IMPROVEMENTS

Loop 360 at Westlake Drive/ Cedar Street

Main Street with bridge: Serene Hills widening: RM 620 widening: Delcie Drive paving and drainage improvements: Lakeway Drive box culvert reconstruction: Top O’ the Lake culvert improvements: Flint Rock at Medical Parkway sight distance improvement: Dave Drive sidewalk:

$4.2M $3.8M $3.2M $1.78M

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF AUG. 10. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT LTWNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. Funding sources: City of Austin’s 2016 mobility bond, Texas Department of Transportation The project team is setting up erosion controls and concrete barriers. It also is conducting tree and brush remov- al throughout the project limits. In the coming weeks, crews will begin installation of water lines. The project consists of improvements to the intersections at Westlake Drive and Cedar Street, and includes the removal of trac signals on Loop 360 main lanes and adding an underpass at both intersections. Timeline: spring 2022 to mid-2025 Cost: $72.1 million

Lakeway Boulevard: Lohmans Crossing: Lakeway Drive: RESURFACING WITH CURB

$4.3M $3.2M $1.8M

$1M

$800K

$400K $159K

SOURCE: CITY OF LAKEWAYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Joseph project. Residents also said the lack of sidewalks was dangerous for the neighborhood, which is home to many school-aged children, such as Chloe Scheider, who said she is often worried about walking to her friends’ homes and the bus stop.

Preserve at Lakeway neighborhood. That project was voted against by the council after residents showed up at several meetings where the project proposals were discussed. “Increasing trac on a very steep hill is going to increase the danger,” Thomas Feather said of the proposed

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LAKE TRAVIS  WESTLAKE EDITION • AUGUST 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY & COUNTY

News from Bee Cave, Rollingwood, Lakeway & West Lake Hills

QUOTE OF NOTE

Lakeway passes revised occupation ordinance rules

Bee Cave City Council Meets Aug. 23 and Sept. 13 at 6 p.m. 512-767-6600 www.beecavetexas.gov Lakeway City Council Meets Sept. 12, 19 at 6:30 p.m. 512- 314-7500 www.lakeway-tx.gov www.cityofrollingwood.com West Lake Hills City Council Meets Aug. 24 and Sept. 14 at 7 p.m. 512-327-3628 www.westlakehills.org Instructions for meeting attendance are at each city’s website. Rollingwood City Council Meets Sept. 14 at 7 p.m. 512-327-1838 MEETINGS WE COVER allowing applications from potential replacements. The Bojorquez Law Firm will continue to provide services to the city until a new city attorney is found. CITY HIGHLIGHTS BEE CAVE City Council authorized sta to request applications for architectural rms for the design and construction for a new police station at its July 26 meeting. The facility will be a 17,600-square- foot, two-story building with oces, evidence processing and storage, short-term detention, an investigations area, and interview and interrogations rooms. ROLLINGWOOD Council will consider holding a bond election in November for three propositions. Proposition A totals $5.3 million and is for potable water infrastructure and re ow improvements. Proposition B would allocate $8.9 million for drainage infrastructure. Proposition C proposes $2.5 million for a combined City Hall and public safety building. A decision to hold an election in November must be made by Aug. 22. WEST LAKE HILLS The city accepted the resignation of City Attorney Alan Bojorquez at the July 27 meeting. As a result, the city also approved an item “BASED ON THE CONVERSATIONS THAT WE’VE HAD, ICE RINKS ARE POPULAR ENOUGH THAT IT SHOULD COVER THE EXPENSES WITH RENTALS.” BEE CAVE CITY MANAGER CLINT GARZA ON BUILDING AN ICE RINK AT THE HILL COUNTRY GALLERIA

BY TAYLOR CRIPE

The discussion around the ordinance began in February when day care owner Bianca King sued the city after the board of adjustment denied her appeal for a permit to operate her state-registered at-home day care. During the meeting, King thanked the council for working on revisions to the ordinance and said they were “making great headway.”

LAKEWAY A new subsection for the home occupation ordinance specic to at-home child care was approved during the Lakeway City Council special session Aug.1. The council was divided in its decision, with the major- ity voting for it while Council Member Kelly Brynteson and Council Member Keith Trecker opposed. The subsection was

However, King said she has concerns about the parame- ters of the ordinance. “We’re also concerned this week’s proposal gives the city too much discretion to deny permits based on subjective

amended to state that a listed or registered day care, the only catego- ries of day care allowed in residential areas by the city, may be approved with restric- tions or limitations. Considerations for approval include, but are not limited to, the operator’s proposed

“I DON’T WANT MY NEIGHBOR RUNNING A BUSINESS. THE MAJORITY OF PEOPLE WANT TO GO HOME TO THEIR R1 SANCTUARY AND GET AWAY FROM PEOPLE, NOT TO HAVE EXTRA TRAFFIC AND

factors or because certain neighbors are more vocal than others,” she said. Brynteson said she is concerned about neighbors who live near King. “I don’t want my neighbor running a business,” she said. “The majority of people want to go home to their R1 sanctuary and get away from people, not to have extra trac and extra promotions.”

EXTRA PROMOTIONS.” KELLY BRYNTESON, LAKEWAY CITY COUNCIL MEMBER

business model, the size of the home, the size of the lot, the size of the space available in the yard for outside activities of the children under care, distance to neighboring homes and parking availability.

Lakeway City Council raises homestead exemption for residents age 65 and older

North Tract

Crescent Tract

South Tract

BY TAYLOR CRIPE

SENIORS IN LAKEWAY

LAKEWAY City Council voted Aug. 1 to increase the property tax homestead exemption for those 65 and older from $15,000 to $25,000. The motion was carried unanimously. This is the second time in 12 months the council increased the exemption for residents over age 65. In August 2021, council raised that exemption from $5,000 to $15,000. “There’s only a few ways you can assist the 65-plus [age] group under state law,” Lakeway Mayor Thomas Kilgore said. “My idea was we should just make our homestead exemption more valuable, and if you can save someone—with ination—$40 this year or $50 ve years from now, that will be a meaningful dierence for someone on a xed income.” According to the Travis Central Appraisal District, a homestead exemption is a legal provision that can help individuals and families pay less in taxes on their home.

620

N

Lakeway City Council voted to raise the homestead exemption for residents 65 and older from $15,000 to $25,000. Here are a few facts about the city’s over 65 population.

Bee Cave approves changes to The Pearl

23% number of Lakeway properties with a 65 and older homestead exemption

BY GRACE DICKENS

1

BEE CAVE A request to repeal and replace two ordinances related to zoning of the single- and multi- family development The Pearl, formerly known as the Terraces, was approved by council at the July 26 meeting in a 4-2 decision, with Mayor Kara King and Mayor Pro Tem Andrew Clark opposed. The development o Bee Cave Parkway and RM 620 will feature 10 buildings with 340 multifamily lux- ury apartments and 59 townhomes, a parking structure and a restau- rant, according to city documents. Additionally, there will be on- and o-site public trails and two scenic overlooks of the Balcones Canyon- land Preserve.

30%32% number of Lakeway residents over age 60 2

2,559 number of properties in Lakeway with a 65 and older homestead exemption

3

$19 saved per age 65 and older homestead exemption 4

$6.61M total amount of property taxes collected in Lakeway in scal year 2021-22

5

$48,621 total 65 and older homestead exemption this year 6 SOURCE: CITY OF LAKEWAYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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LAKE TRAVIS  WESTLAKE EDITION • AUGUST 2022

2022 EDUCATION EDITION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER IS PROUD TO SAY THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DISTRICT DATA

Data and information from local school districts

COMPILED BY JENNIFER SCHAEFER

EANES ISD

LAKE TRAVIS ISD

LEANDER ISD

Located in the Westlake region, Eanes ISD is expecting 7,770 students to attend the district in 2022-23. 9 campuses, 7,834 students, 600 teachers

Lake Travis ISD is a school district in western Travis County with more than 11,300 students who attend the district’s 11 campuses. 11 campuses, 11,345 students, 673 teachers

Leander ISD educates more than 40,000 students at its 44 campuses—eight of which fall within the Lake Travis-Westlake region. 44 campuses, 41,780 students, 2,970 teachers

SOURCES: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY, EANES ISD, LAKE TRAVIS ISD, LEANDER ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

STUDENT ENROLLMENT

STAFFING, SALARIES AND SUBSTITUTES

2021-22

2021-22

2021-22

2022-23

Percentage change from 2019-20:

Total number of teachers* 599.85

Starting teacher salary $50,212

Superintendent salary $315,065

Substitute daily pay**

4.85%

$120

673.27

$51,500

$362,890

7.33%

$150

2,970.31

$50,900

$310,000

5.65%

$115

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22

2022-23*

*TOTAL IS THE FULLTIME EQUIVALENT AND MAY INCLUDE PARTTIME POSITIONS. **RANGES VARY BASED ON EXPERIENCE AND OTHER FACTORS.

*PROJECTED

202122 REVENUE SOURCES

202122 STUDENT STATISTICS

$211,290,872 TOTAL REVENUE:

$147,541,822 TOTAL REVENUE:

$368,557,019 TOTAL REVENUE:

Economically disadvantaged students 3.30%

English learners

Special education students

2.41%

10%

18.54% 9.67%

9.64% 7.17%

13.40% 10.79%

$57,034,903 STATE $18,276,797 FLOW-THRU

$200,784,073 LOCAL $8,356,799 STATE $750,000 FEDERAL $1,400,000 OTHER

$137,971,224 LOCAL $8,880,598 STATE

$289,960,319 LOCAL $3,265,000 FEDERAL

Statewide

$20,000 OTHER

60.61% 21.66%

11.7%

$690,000 FEDERAL

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LAKE TRAVIS  WESTLAKE EDITION • AUGUST 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Eanes, Lake Travis & Leander ISDs

2022 EDUCATION EDITION

Districts see increased recapture payments to state

Eanes ISD board of trustees Meets Aug. 23 at 6 p.m. at 601 Camp Craft Road, West Lake Hills • www.eanesisd.net Lake Travis ISD board of trustees Meets Sept. 21 at 6 p.m. at 607 RM 620, Lakeway www.ltisdschools.org Leander ISD board of trustees Meets Aug. 25 at 6:15 p.m. 300 W. South Drive, Leander www.leanderisd.org MEETINGS WE COVER NUMBER TO KNOW increase in recapture payment Lake Travis ISD will pay to the state in 2022-23 46.6% DISTRICT HIGHLIGHTS EANES & LAKE TRAVIS ISDS Tax rates continue to go down in the districts due to House Bill 3, which caps and compresses school district tax rates to equalize wealth levels across all districts. LTISD is set to approve a tax rate of $1.2121 for 2022-23, compared to $1.2301 in 2021-22. EISD is set to approve a tax rate of $1.0046 for 2022-23 versus $1.0608 in 2021-22. EANES ISD The district began preliminary bond discussions at an Aug. 9 meeting for a potential future $110 million to $130 million bond to be held in the next 12-18 months. LAKE TRAVIS ISD District ocials presented results of the 2022 Curriculum Audit at the July 20 meeting, which is a voluntary review which highlights ways the district can improve its curriculum. LTISD has formed a committee of educators to analyze results and develop an action plan to address areas of improvement, according to the district.

BY GRACE DICKENS

RECAPTURE RISING Eanes and Lake Travis ISDs are predicting double-digit percentage increases in 2022-23 payments.

EANES & LAKE TRAVIS ISDS The districts will see larger recapture payments to the state in the coming year. EISD is set to pay $22.2 million more this year, while LTISD is seeing an increase of $21.9 million, representing about a 46.6% increase from the previous year. Schools receive a set amount of money for each student enrolled in the district, which is determined by a formula calculated by the state. This basic allotment per student has been at $6,160 since 2019-20, unadjusted for ination or rising local property values, according to the districts. “We only get to keep the same amount of money [from local taxes], and yet we’re trying to educate in a much more expensive environment,” LTISD Board Member Lau- ren White said. “At the same time, a lot of our taxpayers are seeing higher expenses, and I think a lot of them still think the dollars stay here.” The district collects taxes from homeowners to fund operations. The district is permitted to keep only a certain amount of these funds, determined by what the state calls Tier One entitlements, which include the basic operating expenses of the district and its programs. Tier One entitle- ments are determined by the basic allotment and atten- dance, according to the Texas Education Agency.

EANES ISD

FY 2021-22 FY 2022-23

$102.6M $124.8M

21.6%

LAKE TRAVIS ISD

FY 2021-22 FY 2022-23

$47M $69M

46.6%

TRACKING THE BASIC ALLOTMENT The basic allotment per student has gone unchanged in Texas for the past four years, which is a trend seen throughout the past decade. SOURCES: EANES ISD, LAKE TRAVIS ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

$1,400 $2,800 $7,000 $4,200 $5,600

$0

2006

2009

2012

2015

2018

2021

SOURCE:EANES ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Leander ISD works to ll positions as school begins

vacancies, 87 are teacher positions, according to the district’s data. As for noncampus vacancies such as transportation, custodial services and child nutrition services—there has been a smaller decrease since late July. Noncampus vacancies went from 365 to 345, with the highest number of vacant positions being in child nutrition services, custodial and transportation. Based on the district’s data, avail- able substitute teachers increased from 318 to 425. LISD still has a goal of 750 available substitute teachers by Aug. 18.

FILLING POSITIONS Leander ISD has continued its eort to ll sta positions over the summer. Here is where the district is needing to hire.

Campus vacancies Noncampus vacancies: nutrition Available substitutes transportation, custodial, child

185

BY ZACHARIA WASHINGTON

LEANDER ISD Sta provided the board of trustees with an update on campus and noncampus, or nonteaching, vacancies at its Aug. 4 meeting. The district is now at 185 campus vacancies compared to 208 in late July, according to the latest data available. Out of the 185 campus

345

425

*NOTE: LATEST DATA AVAILABLE AS OF AUG. 4

SOURCE: LEANDER ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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LAKE TRAVIS  WESTLAKE EDITION • AUGUST 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION

2022 EDUCATION EDITION

Eanes ISD tackles stang, grows inclusivity for special education

BY GRACE DICKENS

positions, which are harder to ll due to the pay rate of $15-$20 per hour. To supplement this problem, the district has started a new program allowing teaching assistants with a bachelor’s degree to work at the school while simultaneously pursu- ing their teaching certication. This program will support these individ- uals nancially in these academic endeavors, as well, which district leaders hope will push more people to apply, Zemo said. “We were able to move and support some of those vacancies with some other professionals that we were able to bring in. That was our biggest pain point last year,” Zemo said. “Going into this school year, we’re sitting in a pretty good space.” Special education students can have visible disabilities, such as Down syndrome, or invisible disabilities, such as dyslexia or autism, school board President John Havenstrite said. There are about 780 students served by the special education department, including students with learning disabilities, mental conditions or other disabili- ties aecting them, Zemo said. To qualify as a special education student, the disability must signi- cantly impact at least one area of a student’s life, such as breathing, moving, speaking or learning, said Molly May, assistant superintendent of curriculum, instruction and assess- ment. Students may receive special education services without ocially being part of the program due to not meeting these qualications. “You could have a student with sig- nicant anxiety who needs instruc- tion around executive functioning and needs counseling as a related service, and that student would be served under [special education], versus a student who has anxiety and they need a little extra time on a test,” May said. Catering to the needs of students with stang shortages presented obstacles for the district in 2021-22, but with several positions now lled, Zemo said he is looking forward to the new school year.

In the wake of ongoing stang shortages nationwide, Eanes ISD has continued to expand its support for special education students through all-abilities elective initiatives and talent recruitment, EISD Director of Special Education Matthew Zemo said. “We’re no dierent than any other school districts in the country; however, I do think there is a point of pride for us, our team and the work we’ve done,” Zemo said. “We’re sit- ting in a very fortunate space where we only have a couple more teacher positions to ll.” EISD lost 100 teachers throughout the 2021-22 academic year, a 14% increase since 2018-19, according to a report from the district. Of these 100 teachers, 29 were special education teachers. There were also additional vacancies unaccounted for in these numbers for unlled positions. Following a stream of constant talent searching since January, the special education department had lled around 39 of its open positions as of Aug. 8, Zemo said. Openings still remain for teaching assistant

Eanes ISD held the rst Central Texas Best Buddies Friendship Walk in May, raising $36,000 for Best Buddies. (Courtesy Eanes ISD)

All-inclusive activities In an eort to be more inclusive, the district has also taken an active approach to make extra- and co-cur- ricular activities complimenting curriculum available to all students, Havenstrite said. “We are working to create more opportunities for our physically and intellectually disadvantaged students on the extra- and co-curricular side so that they can begin participating in all the things that are available to general [education] students in those domains as well,” Havenstrite said. Some activities have already seen this integration into unied spaces, such as the Westlake Spirit team and most recently the Westlake Unied Softball team. Additional extracur- ricular activities, such as choir and theater, do not carry the “unied” label, but have long since been places of inclusion for special education students, Zemo said. The district also participates in the Best Buddies program, which pairs a disabled student with a nondis- abled student to foster inclusivity. There has been talk of including this program at the elementary level as well, Zemo said. EISD is also a Unied Champion District, which is a title given to all districts that participate in the Spe- cial Olympics. These sporting events give intellectually and physically disabled students the opportunity to compete in several sports at the local, national and international levels. But to support all EISD students within the district, programs need to be expanded, Havenstrite said.

RECRUITING STAFF With around 780 special education students, Eanes ISD has a high demand for special education providers. EISD lost several special education teachers in 2021-22 but has since lled most of those positions.

9.9% of EISD students

in special education

special education positions lled since Jan. 1 special education teachers lost in 2021-21

29

IDENTIFYING SPECIAL EDUCATION STUDENTS Child Find is a process established by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act to identify students with disabilities, regardless of severity. A parent, doctor, teacher, relative or friend can begin the Child Find process, which looks for the following: • Learning or intellectual disability • Orthopedic, auditory, visual, speech or other impairment • Emotional disturbance • Autism • Traumatic brain injury • Deafness/blindness SOURCE: EANES ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

39 of 41

SOURCE: EANES ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

The full integration of all extra- and co-curricular activities at EISD is going to be a long process, Haven- strite said. However, getting the accommodations in place across the district’s catalog of activities is key to being inclusive, he said. “It’s an area that I’m very excited about,” Havenstrite said. “For a long time, our [special education] students haven’t really had access to the full experience of being a Westlake High School student. We’re now breaking down those barriers and opening up opportunities.”

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LAKE TRAVIS  WESTLAKE EDITION • AUGUST 2022

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