Lake Houston - Humble - Kingwood | August 2020

LAKE HOUSTON HUMBLE KINGWOOD EDITION

VOLUME 5, ISSUE 4  AUG. 3SEP. 24, 2020

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Humble, NewCaney ISDsprepare for unknownsof 202021 school year WEIGHING IN

BILLIONDOLLAR

EXPANSION

Humble ISD students can learn online, in-person or a mix of both this year. The district asked parents how they want their children to attend school. 67.9% of families want their students to return to the classroom full time.

38,733 PARENTS

7.1% of families want the hybrid option.

RENDERING COURTESY HOUSTON AIRPORT SYSTEM

$1.3B airport plan could bring international business, construction jobs to Houston region

24.9% of families want their students to learn only online.

DUE TO ROUNDING, SOME TOTALS MAY NOT CORRESPOND WITH THE SUM OF THE SEPARATE FIGURES.

BY KELLY SCHAFLER

essentially combining terminals D and E to expand the international footprint at the airport. “This is the single largest capital development program that the city has invested in at Bush Intercon- tinental since the airport was con- structed and opened in 1969,” HAS Chief Development Ocer Robert Barker said. Ocials said the expansion will also contribute to the Humble area’s and overall Houston region’s econ- omy and job growth. CONTINUED ON 23

SOURCE: HUMBLE ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Contractors are moving forward this summer on a billion-dollar expansion program at George Bush Intercontinental Airport that ocials said could bring construction jobs and economic growth to the region. The Houston Airport System con- tinues its $1.3 billion capital improve- ment program, the IAH Terminal Redevelopment Program, despite travel decline from the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Airport o- cials are pushing forward on one of the biggest parts of the program:

BY KELLY SCHAFLER

as possible, while NCISD ocials have yet to release plans beyond September. Harris County and city of Houston ocials announced July 24 that all public school districts and non-re- ligious private schools must remain closed until after Labor Day—a deci- sion that aects HISD. In a July 24 news release, HISD Superintendent Elizabeth Fagen said the county eliminated on-campus learning as a choice for the district. CONTINUED ON 20

Local school districts are attempting to identify the safest way to send stu- dents and teachers back to school amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic as the 2020-21 school year looms. Humble and New Caney ISDs have both delayed in-person instruction for the beginning of the school year, following a trend shown by various other Houston-area schools. However, HISD has plans to push forward with oering an in-person option as soon

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 7 FM 1960, Lockwood Road expansions CLOSEUP 9 Humble Museum to reopen CITY& COUNTY 16 The latest local news

FROMEMILY: Beginning next month, you'll receive our newspaper on Sept. 25. We're moving the delivery date from the rst week to the fourth week of each month starting with our September issue. Continue to utilize our up-to-date daily news coverage at communityimpact.com and/or subscribe to our daily newsletter at communityimpact.com/newsletter to stay informed all month long. Thank you for being a valued reader. EMILY HEINEMAN, GENERAL MANAGER

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Emily Heineman, eheineman@communityimpact.com EDITOR Kelly Schaer GRAPHIC DESIGNER Ethan Pham ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Lagala Doran

METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company's mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across six metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full- time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

FROMKELLY: School ocials, parents and teachers try to determine a course of action for the 2020-21 school year amid the coronavirus pandemic in one of our front-page stories. We also look at the international expansion at George Bush Intercontinental Airport and how it will aect the Humble area. Readers can also learn about the new Humble Museum (see Page 9), which is close to opening at its new home by the Charles Bender Performing Arts Center. KELLY SCHAFLER, EDITOR

BUSINESS FEATURE

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LAKE HOUSTON  HUMBLE  KINGWOOD EDITION • AUGUST 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

business oers COVID-19 disinfecting and cleaning services for homes and businesses in the Kingwood, Humble and Atascocita areas. Manager Renee Paulden said the company uses electrostatic technology to clean spaces. 832-263-8450. www.sanitizingclean.com COMING SOON 5 Kalera , a national farming company, will open its biggest vertical hydroponic farm in spring 2021 at 7159 Rankin Road, Humble, in the Parc 59 development. Kalera will manufacture lettuce and salad mixes from its more than 83,000-square- foot facility. Kalera products are primarily available at Publix, which are grocery stores located in the eastern U.S. Kalera is the rst tenant in Parc 59, an industrial complex by Jackson-Shaw Development. 407-574-8204. www.kalera.com 6 The Sarah at Lake Houston will debut this fall at 17571 W. Lake Houston Parkway, Humble. Property Manager Kristen Buckley said the 17-acre multifamily development will include 350 units—344 one- to three-bedroom units and six townhomes. The community will also feature an innity pool overlooking a private lake, a clubhouse, a re pit and outdoor living area and an on-site dog park and dog wash station. It will also have a multisport generator where tenants can play sports such as golf or baseball. www.sarahatlakehouston.com 7 MOD Pizza aims to open in mid-September at 12029 N. Grand Parkway E., Ste. 100, New Caney, according to Charlotte Wayte, public relations director for MOD Pizza. The pizza chain will serve individual, artisan- style pizzas as well as beer and wine. The location will also have outdoor seating available. www.modpizza.com 8 El Tiempo Cocina , a licensee of Houston-based restaurant group El Tiempo Cantina, will open a new location in mid-August at 1414 Northpark Drive, Kingwood, in the Centre at Northpark development. Manager Rigo Luna said the Tex-Mex restaurant will have fajitas, enchiladas and quesadillas as well as an extensive drink menu. www.facebook.com/eltiempococinatx

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NOWOPEN 1 Monarch Health & Wellness Boutique opened July 8 at 1414 Northpark Drive, Ste. H, Kingwood, in the Centre at Northpark shopping center. The healthy-living boutique sells chemical- and preservative-free groceries as well as eco-friendly beauty products and household goods. 281-747-7014. www.monarchhealthboutique.com 2 Hash Nash Cafe , a halal food truck, opened in early July at 22730 Loop 494, Kingwood. Owner Johnny Khader said the truck serves a variety of Middle

4 Locally owned business BiJou Nails & Lashes opened July 2 at 10008 FM 1960 Bypass Road W., Humble. Co-owner Khoa Ho said the 11,000-square-foot salon—the largest salon in the area— oers manicures, pedicures, eyelash extensions, eyebrow tinting and full-body waxing. Ho said the business is operating at 10% capacity due to the coronavirus, but he hopes to soon increase it to 20%. In the future, the business will also oer haircuts and blowouts, body wraps and makeup services. 832-308-8896. www.bijounaillashes.com Sanitizing Clean began servicing the Lake Houston area in late July. The

Eastern and Greek food options, including shawarma, kabobs, gyros and Greek salads. The truck also oers American-style dishes, such as hamburgers, sandwiches and fries. 832-208-2927 3 America’s Best Contacts & Eyeglasses , a discount eyewear and eye examination provider, opened June 26 at 21550 Market Place Drive, Ste. 200, New Caney. The national franchise carries a variety of dierent eyeglasses and contact lens brands as well as prescription and nonprescription sunglasses. The business also oers eye exams. 832-432-6065. www.americasbest.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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Chachi’s Next Door oers Mexican cuisine. (Courtesy Chachi’s Next Door)

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FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Chachi’s Next Door opened in mid-June at 2845 W. Town Center Circle, Kingwood. The eatery is a neighbor to longtime business Chachi’s Mexican Restaurant. Luis Jaimes, who owns both businesses, said the new eatery is smaller yet upscale. It oers authentic Mexican dishes as well as specialty cocktails, such as mojitos and ginger margaritas. In the future, all to-go orders for Chachi’s Mexican Restaurant will be picked up or ordered through Chachi’s Next Door, Jaimes said. 346-345-2076. www.facebook.com/ chachis-next-door-108543984269156 RENOVATIONS 12 S&A Nails reopened May 9 at 4423 Kingwood Drive, Kingwood, after being closed for nearly three years. The salon received several feet of water during Hurricane Harvey and had to close. Owners Andre Tran and Francy Le took the time to renovate and expand the salon, making the interior more modern and purchasing the adjoining suite. The nail salon oers manicures, pedicures and waxing services. 281-318-7965. www.facebook.com/sanailskingwood

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ANNIVERSARIES 9 Humble Area Assistance Ministries , an interfaith organization at 1204 First St. E, Humble, celebrated its 30th anniversary this year. Having opened in 1990, the organization provides resources such as job training, nancial help and a food pantry for the local community. Executive Director Millie Garrison said the organization was set to celebrate the anniversary at its Pillars of the Community event in March, but the event was canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic. 281-446-3663. www.haamministries.org 10 Locally owned business Lamp Monkey , located at 114 N. Ave. A, Humble, celebrated its one-year anniversary June 28. The business specializes in custom lighting and furniture pieces that embody rustic, industrial and automotive styles. Owner Lee Kendrick said he is expanding the showroom and moving his workshop to

the neighboring building. The expanded showroom will be completed in late 2020. The showroom is open to the public Monday through Friday. 281-973-9880. www.lampmonkey.com 11 Locally owned business Kid Kreole Kooking celebrated its one-year anniversary June 15. Located at 9739 N. Sam Houston Parkway E., Ste. 100, Humble, the restaurant oers made-to-order Cajun food. Owner Desmond Lee rst began his business as a catering company in 2013 before opening the brick-and-mortar eatery last year, according to the website. The restaurant serves sh, shrimp, crawsh tails, oysters and chicken tenders. Recently, the eatery debuted chicken, seafood and zydeco pastas. It is oering only takeout and delivery during the pandemic. 281-570-2746. www.kidkreolekooking.com

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CLOSINGS 13 Grind Break Cafe announced June 9 via a Facebook post that the business permanently closed. In an April 20 Facebook post, ocials stated the business was closing temporarily due to the eects of the coronavirus pandemic. Located at 114 First St. W., Humble, the cafe opened in 2016. www.facebook.com/grindbreak 14 Zachary’s Cajun Cafe , located at 716 Kingwood Drive, is closed indenitely, according to a June 2 Facebook post from the business. The post cited “nancial problems from COVID-19” as the reason for closing. www.facebook.com/zacharyscajuncafe

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LAKE HOUSTON  HUMBLE  KINGWOOD EDITION • AUGUST 2020

SEEING A PRIMARY CARE DOCTOR Is Still Important

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY KELLY SCHAFLER

KINGWOOD

ONGOING PROJECTS 1 Madera Run Parkway expansion Construction on Harris County’s Madera Run Parkway expansion began May 26. The project expands the road from two to four lanes between Kings Parkway and Boundary Waters Lane, adds a me- dian and creates a bridge near Fernbank Forest Drive. Timeline: May 26-third quarter 2021 Cost: $3.75 million Funding source: Harris County Precinct 2 UPCOMING PROJECTS 2 FM 1960 expansion LAKE HOUSTON On July 9, the Texas Department of Transportation awarded a construc- tion bid to Angel Brothers to complete Phase 1 of a project to expand the FM 1960 East corridor from four to six lanes and add a raised median. Phase 1 includes the road between Business FM 1960 to east of Twigsworth Lane. Phase 2, which will bid this fall, will expand the road from Twigsworth Lane to just west of the San Jacinto bridge and build an overpass over West Lake Houston Parkway. Timeline: Summer 2021-2023 (Phase 1), TBD (Phase 2) Cost: $63 million (Phase 1), $70 million (Phase 2) Funding sources: federal funding, TxDOT

3 Lockwood Road expansion A project to expand Lockwood Road between Beltway 8 and the Union Pacic Corp. railroad from a two- to four-lane road will begin in the third quarter of 2020. Harris County commissioners awarded the project contract to Allgood Construction Co. Inc. at the Feb. 11 Harris County Commissioners Court meeting. Once construction begins, it will take nine months to complete. Timeline: third quarter 2020-mid to late 2021 Cost: $2.47 million Funding sources: Harris County Precinct 4, McCord Development COMPLETED PROJECTS 4 Rankin Road expansion The city of Humble and real estate company Jackson-Shaw Development nished expanding Rankin Road between Hwy. 59 and the Union Pacic Corp. railroad tracks in Humble. The project, which was completed on July 24, expanded a portion of Rankin from two to four lanes and add a raised median. Timeline: April-July 24 Cost: $800,000 Funding sources: city of Humble, Jackson-Shaw Development

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JULY 27. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT LHKNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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LAKE HOUSTON  HUMBLE  KINGWOOD EDITION • AUGUST 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CLOSEUP

Humble Museum New location to open after 3 years of closure

BY KELLY SCHAFLER

Damages fromHurricane Harvey served as the catalyst to relocate the old Humble Museum from downtown Humble to the band hall of the Charles Bender Performing Arts Center. Although the Humble Museum rst opened in the mid-1970s, it has been closed for almost three years. The city allocated $450,000 to ren- ovate the building, and the museum’s board of directors have spent $73,000 so far on the interior. Now, the new Humble Museum is almost ready to open to the public. Robert Meaux, the president of the museum’s board of directors, said he has been working with volun- teers amid the pandemic to get the museum ready to open this fall. “The goal is to make it an integral part of the community,” he said. “It’s been in the community since the mid-’70s; it’s just not been that integral because you come in and you’re like, ‘It’s a junk collection.’” Meaux said the old location saw roughly 2,000 visitors a year, but he hopes the new location with its new logo, well-lit displays and more orga- nized layout will encourage tourists, local residents and students to learn about Humble’s rich history. “I’ve tried to build something that the city is proud to bring people here,” he said.

This replica of the battle of the Alamo was donated by local Boy Scouts. (Photos by Kelly Schaer/Community Impact Newspaper)

Robert Meaux is a local historian and board of directors president for the Humble Museum.

The museumwill feature newmounted displays showing timelines depicting the history of signicant locations and events in Humble.

HUMBLE MUSEUM 601 Higgins St., Humble 281-713-5439 www.humblemuseum.com Hours: TBD (facility to open in fall)

1960

Volunteers began moving pieces into the renovated space in March. The new Humble Museum is projected open this fall, ocials said.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

NEWS BRIEFS

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Harris County voters break records with turnout for primary runoffs

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The July 14 runo determined the Republican and Democratic nominees for Harris County sheri and Texas House District 142, respectively.

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SOURCE: HARRIS COUNTY DISTRICT CLERKCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Harris County voters set a new turnout record during the July 14 primary runo election. Harris County Clerk Christopher Hollins said more than 150,000 ballots were cast throughout the two- week early voting process, including mail-in ballots. About 80,000 total votes were cast in Democratic and Republican primary runos in Harris County in 2016, according to election archives. “Voters felt safe at the polls,” Hollins said. Two candidates representing portions of the Lake Houston area emerged as winners in the races for the Republican nominee for Harris County sheri and the Democratic BY SHAWN ARRAJJ, VANESSA HOLT & KELLY SCHAFLER

nominee for state representative of District 142. Incumbent Rep. Harold V. Dutton Jr. has won the Democratic nom- ination for state representative of District 142 against challenger Jerry Davis. Dutton had 52.27% of the votes, or 5,058, while Davis had 47.73% of the votes, or 4,619. District 142 includes portions of the Humble area as well as the Summerwood and Fall Creek neighborhoods. Dutton will face Republican candi- date Jason Rowe in November. Meanwhile, Joe Danna won the race for Republican candidate for Harris County sheri. The nal tally was 33,118 votes, or 51.32%, for Danna, and 31,412 votes, or 48.68%, for Paul Day. He will face incumbent Democrat Ed Gonzalez in November.

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Lake Conroe lowering draws complaint

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feet as has been in eect. Lake Conroe lowering takes place from April to May and from August to September. The seasonal lowering of Lake Con- roe is intended to act as a preventive measure, preventing downstream ooding by increasing the capacity of Lake Conroe during massive rainfall events, according to the SJRA. The issue has sparked past debate between Lake Conroe- and Kingwood-area residents, and Kingwood residents have said the lowering does help protect their homes from ooding.

The Lake Conroe Association, a nonprot that represents residential and commercial interests pertaining to lake quality, led a complaint with the Texas Commission on Environ- mental Quality on June 30 to end the seasonal lowering of Lake Conroe. In a press release, the LCA claims the lowering does not mitigate ood- ing from hurricanes as has been said by the San Jacinto River Authority. The SJRA in February voted to continue lowering the lake. However, the SJRA modied its order to lower the lake to 199.5 feet instead of 199

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LAKE HOUSTON  HUMBLE  KINGWOOD EDITION • AUGUST 2020

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Humble & New Caney ISDs and San Jacinto College

COMPILED BY KELLY SCHAFLER

NewGenerationPark campus prepares for fall 2020 inaugural semester

Filingperiod for New Caney ISD trustee election ends Aug. 17 NEWCANEY ISD Two New Caney ISD board of positions will be up for election in November, with the ling period opening July 20. Trustee positions 1 and 2, held by Elizabeth Harrell and Creg Mixon, respectively, are up for election. Interested candidates must apply for the trustee positions by 4:30 p.m. Aug. 17 at the New Caney ISD Administration Build- ing, according to the district. Early voting for the Nov. 3 election runs Oct. 19-30. Harrell was rst elected to the board in May 2010 before she left the board in 2016, she said. Har- rell was re-elected to the board in 2017, and she currently serves as board secretary. Meanwhile, Mixon has served two terms on the board since 2014. He currently serves as vice president of the board, district ocials said. Humble ISD The Humble ISD board of trustees meets via video conference at 6 p.m. Aug. 11 and Sept. 8. 281-641-1000. www.humbleisd.net New Caney ISD The New Caney ISD board of trustees meets in person at 6 p.m. Aug. 17 and Aug. 21 at 21360 Valley Ranch Parkway, New Caney. 281-577-8600. www.newcaneyisd.org MEETINGSWE COVER

HUMBLE ISD PBK Architects, the architecture rm chosen to design various HISD projects, presented renderings for Kingwood High School, Kingwood Park High School and Quest Early College High School projects at the school board’s July 14 meeting. The Career and Technical Educa- tion Center is getting a $8.98 million renovation and expansion to become the home for Quest Early College Renderings revealed for Humble ISD schools SANJACINTOCOLLEGE San Jacinto College is preparing to open its newest campus in the Generation Park devel- opment o Beltway 8. But opening a new campus amid a pandemic is challenging, said Destry Dokes, the executive director of the campus. Construction on the $26 million campus will be completed Aug. 1, after press time. Soon after, students can choose from an online asynchronous model, which is the traditional online learn- ing option; an online synchronous model, where students will tune in to a live video; and a ex campus model, where in-person courses are available for specic courses. Students and teachers will also be required to wear masks while on campus, Dokes said. Ocials estimated in late 2019 that the campus would enroll 2,000 students in its rst semester. Dokes said the college still hopes

to bring on 1,500-2,000 students— with 821 students enrolled as of press time July 27. However, if enrollment does decline due to the virus, it could aect the future build-out of the cam- pus, Dokes said. The Generation Park campus had planned to oer work- force programs and have a second building on the 57-acre campus. “We’re also being lean in our thinking; that is that we’re constantly looking at the information and data to determine what we should do in the future,” he said. Dokes said he is excited to begin the inaugural year at the campus. “We get an opportunity to help build an area, to really provide learn- ing spaces and learning opportunities in the far northern sector of our ser- vice area,” he said. “The organization has decided to move in that direction to make sure that we are responsive to the community.”

COURSEOPTIONS Students attending the San Jacinto College Generation Park campus will have several ways to attend courses in the fall. Option 1: Asychronous learning allows students to learn in the traditional online learning method. Option 2: Synchronous learning allows students to attend live, virtual classroom settings. Option 3: The ex model allows students to attend some on-campus classes.

SOURCE: SAN JACINTO COLLEGE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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Kingwood High School is planning an $8.8 million renovation.

High School students. Construction will begin in Sep- tember and will be substantially completed by July 2021. The $8.43 million Kingwood Park High School renovation will include

a new entrance and an auxiliary gym, and Kingwood High School is getting an $8.8 million renovation. Construction on both Kingwood campuses will be completed by November 2021, ocials said.

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LAKE HOUSTON  HUMBLE  KINGWOOD EDITION • AUGUST 2020

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CITY& COUNTY

News from Harris & Montgomery counties

Harris Countybegins exploringvoter registration, electionalternatives

MontgomeryCountypurchasesportable shelteraheadofpossiblesurgeneeds

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

BY EVA VIGH

administrator. The system change would not go into eect until Nov. 18—two weeks after Election Day—to allow the elec- tion administrator to observe the county’s current election process as a bystander. In a split 3-2 vote, the court authorized the county to move forward with a study of what would be needed to perform the duties of the oce. Upon the study’s return, the court will need to vote on the approval of the report and plan before proceed- ing with the process of creating an elections administrator oce. Additionally, if the new system is pursued and does not pan out as planned, with a majority vote, the Commissioners Court can opt to return to the current system at any time, Ellis said.

Montgomery County commissioners approved purchasing a portable shelter to be used for overow patients if hospitals reach capacity. • Cost: $476,000 • Funded by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act • Can hold up to 75 patients • Can be used during COVID-19, ooding and re • Will be located in a hospital parking lot to reduce costs SETTING UP A SHELTER

MONTGOMERY COUNTY As Montgomery County hospitals brace for an anticipated inux of coronavirus patients, county com- missioners approved the purchase of a portable shelter. The purchase was approved June 23 for overow patients if hos- pitals reach full capacity. The cost is $476,000, and the shelter can hold up to 75 patients, said Jason Millsaps, chief of sta for County Judge Mark Keough. Funding will come from the federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, which stipulates items purchased with its

HARRIS COUNTY Harris County Commissioners Court has begun exploring alternatives to the county’s current system for running elections. Under the existing system, the duty of running elections and registering voters is split between the Harris County clerk and tax- assessor collector, both of which are elected positions. Precinct 1 Commissioner Rodney Ellis proposed three alternatives to the county’s current system. Ellis said he favored the option of an election administrator, which would create a board comprising the county judge, county clerk, county tax-assessor collector, Republican Party chair and Demo- cratic Party chair. The board would search for and appoint an election

SOURCE: MONTGOMERY COUNTY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

funds must be specically related to COVID-19. Millsaps said the vendor esti- mated delivery in four to ve weeks.

$65Mprogramcould ‘functionallyend chronic homelessness’ inHarris County

ELECTION ALTERNATIVES

EXPLORING

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

people at various stages of home- lessness, including 1,700 newly homeless people, 1,000 people awaiting supportive housing and 1,000 people who need help with rent to avoid losing housing. Other funding will be used to provide enhanced mental health services and additional support for COVID-19 emergency shelters. On top of the $58 million, another $6.5 million will come from private donors. City and county funding will be reimbursed with federal dollars through the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act.

Harris County is considering the following alternative options, proposed by Precinct 1 Commissioner Rodney Ellis, to its existing election and voter registration process, which is currently divided between two elected oces: the county clerk and the county tax-assessor collector.

HARRIS COUNTY Harris County commissioners agreed June 30 to commit $18 million to a new program that will rapidly increase access to housing for up to 5,000 homeless individuals. One day later, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner announced the city will commit another $40 million. The eort will be part of an initia- tive called The Way Home, a group of more than 100 partners formed in 2011 with the goal of ending homelessness locally. The initiative is broken up to help

Option A

Pursuant to an order to create the Oce of the Harris County Election Administrator under the Texas Election Code Chapter 31, Subchapter B.

Option B

Option C

Adopt an order to transfer the duties and functions of the county clerk to the tax assessor-collector with their consent, pursuant to Texas Election Code Chapter 31, Subchapter C.

Designate the county clerk as the voter registrar for Harris County if the county clerk and tax assessor-collector agree to the designation, pursuant to Texas Election Code Chapter 12, Subchapter B.

SOURCES: HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS ELECTION CODECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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16

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BUSINESS FEATURE Paco Pops Porter shop serves 80-plus avors of handmade ice cream, pops W hen Paco Pops co-owner Francisco Sanchez was 13 years old, he moved from Guadalajara, Mexico, to work at his aunt’s popsicle shop in Chihuahua. For six years, Sanchez worked with his cousin, making the pops from scratch. After getting in a serious car accident in 2018 that left Sanchez unable to continue working in construc- tion, he said he thought back to when he was younger and dreamed of opening a shop like his aunt’s. “It’s what I always wanted to do—to open my own business—and I know how to do ice cream and popsicles,” he said. Exactly one year after his accident in 2019, San- chez opened Paco Pops, an artesian frozen pop and ice cream shop, on Loop 494 in Porter. The shop also serves Mexican-style snacks, including bionicos—or fruit cocktails—and more than 60 cream- and water- based pop avors. The shop features more than 60 pop avors, including Gansito and avocado, which can be dipped in rich Mexican chocolate and coated in a variety of toppings. Sanchez said the shop also collaborates with local businesses to source unique ingredients for the pops. The shop also oers 20 handmade ice creams and one sorbet. Ice cream avors include the cookie monster made with Chips Ahoy cookies, Oreos and vanilla ice cream. Sanchez said the variety of sweets and the authentic avors keep customers coming back. “I always say that coming to Paco Pops is like taking a trip around the world one popsicle at a time,” he said. “Coming up with new avors is a combination of me mixing ingredients in the kitchen or feedback from customers.” Although his aunt has not had a chance to visit his new shop due to the coronavirus, Sanchez said he knows his aunt is proud of what he has created. “Oh, she’s happy,” he said. “She’s proud.”

BY KELLY SCHAFLER

Paco Pops oers more than 60 avors of cream- and water-based pops. (Photos by Kelly Schaer/Community Impact Newspaper)

Starting when Sanchez was 13 years old, he spent six years working in his aunt’s pop shop in Chihuahua, Mexico.

Co-owner Francisco Sanchez opened Paco Pops in April 2019.

SEASONAL FLAVORS Paco Pops oers various seasonal pop avors. In September, the shop will phase in the fall pops.

PacoPops 24022 Loop 494, Ste. C, Porter 832-856-4488 www.facebook.com/pacopops01 Hours: Mon.-Sun. noon-9 p.m.

Summer

Fall

Winter

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494

Pumpkin spice, apple pie, green apple caramel, sweet potato and arroz con leche, or rice pudding

R D .

Pickle pops and nonalcoholic margarita pops

S’mores and hot chocolate

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LAKE HOUSTON  HUMBLE  KINGWOOD EDITION • AUGUST 2020

DINING FEATURE Manuel’sMexican Restaurant Family-owned restaurant thrives for decades in Lake Houston area F or Jose Guadalupe Reyes, managing his family’s restaurant with his brother, Juan Javier Reyes, is continuing the legacy their father created. The family has been operating Manuel’s Mexican Restaurant in the Lake Houston area for more than 25 years. “We’re just trying to keep the legacy going that my dad started,” Lupe Reyes said. Restaurant founder Jose Ramon Reyes and his brother migrated from Durango, Mexico, and opened the original Manuel’s Mexican Restaurant—a family name—in 1987 o FM 1960 in Spring. “We worked all our lives in the restaurant busi- ness, bussers and dishwashers and then cooks,” Ramon Reyes said. “Then in 1987 we decided to open our own business.” Ramon opened a second location in 1993 in Atascocita, followed by the Summerwood location in 2004. The Summerwood eatery is now the only one in the Houston area. Lupe and Javier now manage the day-to-day operations at the restaurant, and Ramon has entered semi-retirement. The eatery serves a mix of Tex-Mex fare as well as authentic Mexican food. However, the ongoing coronavirus pandemic has put stress on the family-owned business. The Reyes family made the dicult decision to oer takeout only—despite restaurants being allowed to have 50% dine-in capacity as of press time. Lupe said he believes the restaurant will stay in the community because of its consistent food and loyal customers. All the food is prepared by Rafael Perez, the same cook hired to work in Atascocita back in 1993. “I’ve gotten customers that still come in from when I was a child,” he said. “We’re still here; we haven’t gone anywhere.” BY KELLY SCHAFLER

$11.50

Carnitas plate: Fried pork is served with rice, beans, pico de gallo, tortillas and avocado slices. (Photos by Kelly Schaer/Community Impact Newspaper)

$12.50

Chile relleno: A fried poblano pepper is stued with beef or cheese, covered with red sauce, and served with rice and beans.

Ramon Reyes (center) opened Manuel’s with his brother on FM 1960 in 1987. His two sons, Lupe (left) and Javier (right), run the Summerwood-area eatery.

Manuel’sMexicanRestaurant 13083 W. Lake Houston Parkway, Houston 281-225-4491 www.facebook.com/manuelsmexican Hours: Tue.-Fri. 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.-2 p.m., closed Mon.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PEOPLE

BY MATT DULIN

Cherry Steinwender Founder, Center for the Healing of Racism Over three decades ago, Cherry Steinwender and a collection of friends from diverse backgrounds sat around a kitchen table in Houston’s Third Ward and asked the questions: What is racism? How can it be healed? That conversation continues today, and the organization that sprung from that eort, the Center for the Healing of Racism, conducts workshops across the country to generate even more conversations. Community Impact Newspaper spoke with Steinwender to learn about her work with the center, which has become even more vital in recent weeks. The organi- zation has worked with Lone Star College-Kingwood and spoken to students at Quest Early College High School several times over the years, Steinwender said. WHENANDHOWDID YOU BEGIN THISWORK?

I bel ieve in hope. I believe people can change if given the right information. I bel ieve that. I ’ve seen it happen too many times. ” “

CHERRY STEINWENDER, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR AND FOUNDER, CENTER FOR THE HEALING OF RACISM

people of all ages. We’ve been all over. We’ve been everywhere. We’ve conducted workshops in 45 states, Austria and Canada. With Zoom, we’re doing that even more. We have worked with faith-based groups, corporations, universities, any one. It’s a one-stop shop for anyone who wants to have that real dialogue. We have a set curriculum, the training manual for facilitators, and once you truly understand that curriculum, you will be able to understand any form of racism and the way that it is. We can pull out individual parts and do a standalone session for a couple of hours, but having the whole experience is where you truly see the impact. HOWDO YOU SEPARATE RACIST ACTS FROMBEING SIMPLIFIEDAS “BAD COPS” OR “BAD PEOPLE”? This is important. People used to think it’s just individual acts of meanness. But it’s not just that; it’s a system, institutionalized racism. And we’re nally seeing more people recognize that. Merriam-Webster is changing its denition of racism to ‘a system of advantage based on skin

color,’ and that is more like the word that we think of when we talk about racism. Now we’re naming it. Now we may be able to do something. Out in the arena doing the work- shops, you make that distinction. These systems were created long before we were in the world. But the bottom line is, every day of our lives, we are at an advantage or disadvantage based on the color of our skin. For white people, you didn’t have anything to do with it, but you cannot deny the fact that you benet from it. That’s what white privilege is, and that’s so hard for white people to hear, and we have so much pushback. HOWDO YOU ADDRESS THE FEAR THAT COMESWITH TALKING ABOUT RACE? We always we want to create a safe space. Martin Luther King Jr. said men hate each other and fear each other because they don’t know each other. In order to do anything about racism, you have to break the walls of separation. You must have a safe, respectful atmosphere. The other thing, we never have in 31 years— never—attacked anyone and called

them a racist. There’s no way you can use ‘healing racism’ in your name and then retraumatize white people by calling them racists. ... But we have to be honest, and we have to have these dicult conversations. The fact is they have been conditioned to think this way. HOWDO YOU KEEP THE FAITH AFTER ALL THESE YEARS? What I can say is I believe in hope. I believe people can change if given the right information. I believe that. I’ve seen it happen too many times. For me, I live for one more workshop. I’ve seen that change in so many people, and you hear them tell you over and over; they say you changed their life. There are other signs of hope, too. We are nally calling it what it is. A lot of people were sick and tired of these companies saying they care about “cultural diversity,” which is nice, but it’s a uy name, and now they’re using the word “racism” in the political arena. Everyday citizens, faith-based communities are all speaking out, and they’re naming it. If you can’t name it, you can’t do anything about it.

We started in 1989. It was started by a very multiethnic group ... Afri- can, European, Japanese and Latino or Latinx. These are the people who started the work, though never in our minds did we think about a nonprot and what it is today. We were friends, and we decided we wanted to take the journey and really look at racism, to take it apart piece by piece and be very transparent with each other in the process. This group would meet around the kitchen table at each other’s homes. Eventually we did more. We started a lm series and started to get people to attend ... and nally we recognized we needed to form a nonprot in order to meet the demand of people really wanting to talk about racism. WHAT DOES THE GROUP OFFER? One of the commitments early on was to establish Dialogue: Racism, a 16-18 hour workshop series where we work with groups. ... Then we created programs for a much younger audience, including high school and young children. We work with all

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