Bay Area Edition | December 2020

BAY AREA EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 5  DEC. 23, 2020JAN. 26, 2021

ONLINE AT

Tracking Houston police reform

On Sept. 30, Mayor Sylvester Turner’s police reform task force released a 150- page report of recommendations to improve accountability in the Houston Police Department. The 90-day deadline is at the end of December.

Goal from task force

1+ year SOURCE: HOUSTON MAYOR SYLVESTER TURNER’S TASK FORCE ON POLICING REFORMCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

90 days or less 6-12 months

Community policing: Engagement and recruitment Independent oversight: Misconduct investigations Power dynamics: Transparency with the public Crisis intervention: Mental health initiatives Field readiness: Training, ocer wellness Accountability: Clear ocer expectations

IMPACTS

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TODO LIST 18 S enior S e i LIVING GUIDE 9 LOCAL FACILITIES

49% view HPD positively or very positively.

30% view HPD negatively or very negatively.

83% of 7,302 respondents support improvements or changes to the HPD.

Citywide survey

Houston police reformeorts point to need for better accountability After Houstonian George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis police custody in May and the nationwide protests that followed, scrutiny of law enforcement policies reached a new level. “People are watching in a way that CONTINUED ON 26 BY EMMA WHALEN they haven’t before,” said Carla Brailey, the co-chair of HoustonMayor Sylvester Turner’s Task Force on Policing Reform. “Being a part of this committee, we knew the results could be a matter of life or death.” In the seven months since Floyd’s death, the task force has proposed changes to focus on better accountabil- ity and discipline measures for Hous- ton police. One relates to the contract between the Houston Police Ocers’

Local homeowners, politicians, architects and students are just some of the people combating climate change and taking steps toward sustainable lifestyles in the Bay Area. The area is home to various industries, with petrochemi- cal at the front and center: the Houston Ship Channel, which stretches from the Gulf of Mexico through Galveston Bay and up the San Jacinto River, is home to the country’s largest petrochemical complex. As local towns and cities ll green spaces with residential CONTINUED ON 28 BayArea educators, builders aiming for sustainable futures BY COLLEEN FERGUSON

18,512 total pounds of carbon dioxide have been absorbed by the native trees along Main Street in League City— equivalent to removing the air pollution caused by 20,800 miles of average passenger vehicle emissions.

DINING FEATURE

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BAY AREA EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

Kindness is a gift that each of us is born with. And when we share it, the goodness that’s released is amazing. Our human connection is important to our well-being, but it’s essential when we’re sick and hurting. For decades, we’ve been proud to bring world-class medical and academic excellence to our communities. But we also know that treating every patient with kindness, empathy, and respect is key to healing. Humankindness is what we call this strength. It has stood the trials of life and the test of time, and it leads us forward every day. Learn more at stlukeshealth.org . thepower of human connection. Never underestimate

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TODO LIST

FROMPAPAR: The holidays are upon us, and we want to wish all our readers a safe and happy holiday season with the happiest new year. We close out the year by covering police reform eorts in Houston. See what eorts are being made on Page 26. Papar Faircloth, GENERALMANAGER

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Papar Faircloth, pfaircloth@communityimpact.com EDITOR Jake Magee REPORTER Colleen Ferguson GRAPHIC DESIGNER Justin Howell ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Lara Estephan

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January events TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 11 PARKS &RECREATION 13

Bay Colony Park EDUCATION

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Clear Creek ISD superintendent CITY& SCHOOLS

METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kristina Shackelford MANAGING EDITOR Marie Leonard ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Kaitlin Schmidt CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across ve metropolitan areas providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

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FROM JAKE: As 2020 wraps up, it’s hard not to be excited to put this historic year to bed. Enjoy reading our stories on Houston police reform eorts and solar power and our guide to senior living facilities (see Page 18) for your loved ones, and then look forward to our Annual Community Guide in January. Merry Christmas! Jake Magee, EDITOR

2020 Senior Living Guide

GUIDE

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Senior living facilities

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Local sources 27

New businesses 8

Community events 7

Senior living facilities 30

BUSINESS FEATURE Paradise Tropical Falls

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DINING FEATURE

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stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON CONTACT US 245 Commerce Green Blvd., Ste. 200, Sugar Land, TX 77478 • 3463682555 PRESS RELEASES baynews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

include newspaper ads; mailbox-targeted sticky notes, inserts and direct mail; and digital options. We also partner with Community Impact Printing for nationwide specialty orders. Our advertising clients self- report 97% satisfaction with their overall experience, and a recent third-party Readex survey proved 78% of paper recipients read three of the last four editions, and from what they read, 83% “took action” of some kind. Contact us today for more info! communityimpact.com/advertising

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We follow CDC guidelines, screen staff frequently, monitor assisted living residents constantly and rely on national labs for testing. Meanwhile, we keep the fun and fulfillment dialed in – and look forward to scheduling your visit. Call 281-672-8481 today to learn more or to get a copy of The Complete Guide to Senior Health and Wellness.

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BAY AREA EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

146, Bacliff. The eatery is an award- winning barbecue smokehouse with a Cajun twist, owner Mark Bearden said. Menu items include ribs, seafood, specialty smoked pizzas and burgers made with ground smoked brisket meat. The original Kickin’ Kajun is in La Porte, according to the restaurant website. 832-864-2862. www.kickinkajunsh.com 7 Go Shabu opened Oct. 20 at 16605 El Camino Real, Ste. A, Houston. Shabu is a Japanese dish consisting of thinly sliced meats, shrimp, vegetables and noodles cooked in homemade broth at the table. Customers are able to choose their soup base, meat and other ingredients. The restaurant also serves alcoholic beverages. 281-954-6242. www.facebook.com/goshabutx 8 Emily T. Krone & Company, PLLC opened at 3027 Marina Bay Drive, Ste. 370, League City, in early October. The practice is a “boutique law firm” of business and commercial real estate attorneys meeting the needs of clients and transactions left behind by traditional firms, according to its website. 281-471-8411. 9 Originally expected to open in late 2020, Alamo Drafthouse Cinema is now expected to begin construction at Victory Lakes Town Center, at the northeast corner of I-45 and FM 646, in early 2021. Due to COVID-19, the project was delayed about a year and is expected to open in late 2021. The theater will feature 10 screens and offer in-seat food and beverage service, themed parties and specialty programming such as Champagne Cinema and interactive movie parties. www.drafthouse.com/houston 10 Caliber Collision will open at 871 FM 517, near the intersection of FM 517 and FM 646 in League City, around mid-2021, according to League City officials. The business repairs vehicles that have been in crashes. Caliber Collision has locations around Houston, including in Webster and Friendswood. www.calibercollision.com 11 Playoff Performance , 1760 W. Walker www.kroneandcopllc.com COMING SOON St., League City, plans to open a larger location at 2801 Calder Road, League City, which is near the site of the incoming

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MAP NOT TO SCALE TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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NOWOPEN 1 Chipotle Mexican Grill in November opened a drive-thru location at 2760 S. Gulf Freeway, League City. It is the first “Chipotlane” in the area. The restaurant also features a pickup area for digital orders, takeout, contactless delivery and dine-in services. 281-332-6597. www.chipotle.com 2 Gyro King opened in early November at 528 Bay Area Blvd., Ste. 600, Web- ster. The restaurant offers Mediterranean food, including gyros, meats over rice, salads, sides, desserts, and fresh fruit and vegetable juices. The eatery has four other locations throughout Houston. 281-575-0700. www.gyroking.com

3 Pizza Lounge opened a location at 4450 E. Sam Houston Parkway, Ste. A, Pasadena, in late October. The restaurant, which also has a Houston location near Pearland, serves soups, salads, sandwich- es, pasta, desserts, beer, wine and pizza. The family-owned eatery has been operat- ing since 2014. 832-831-2939. www.pizzaloungetogo.com 4 League City Eyecare & Eyewear opened Nov. 30 at 3725 E. League City Parkway, Ste. 100, League City. The optometrist office offers full vision and ocular health services, including visual assessments, contact lens examinations, emergency eye health services and comprehensive ocular health evaluations, owner Meagan LeGrand said. The office also offers a range of fashion, safety and

sunglass frame designs in the optical showroom as well as in-house eyeglass finishing services. 281-305-1609. www.leaguecityeyecare.com 5 Chloe’s Cajun Kitchen opened Nov. 23 at 111 W. Bay Area Blvd., Webster. The business is a specialty Cajun and Creole grocer and restaurant, offering both a daily lunch plate special and to-go kitchen items. Customers can purchase refrigerated and frozen Cajun meats, as well as seasonings, mixes and sauces, to cook with at home. Lunch plate menu items include a gumbo of the day and a boudin-stuffed grilled cheese. 832-932-3579. www.chloescajunmarket.com 6 Kickin’ Kajun opened a second South Houston location Sept. 18 at 3435 Hwy.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY COLLEEN FERGUSON & JAKE MAGEE

Bay Colony Park. A timeline has not been revealed. Playoff Performance allows children and young adults to practice and train in sports through lessons, batting cages and more. 281-910-0136. www.playoffperformance.com RELOCATIONS 12 Mediterraneo Market & Cafe is relocating from 18033 Upper Bay Road, Nassau Bay, a few blocks away to 1400 E. NASA Parkway, Ste. D, Houston, by the end of the year. The restaurant’s last day in its existing location is Christmas Eve. Houston Methodist Clear Lake Hospital in Nassau Bay is expanding, forcing some businesses nearby, including Mediterraneo, to close. 281-333-3180. www.mediterraneomarket.com 13 Java Owl Coffee House is relocating from 18021 Upper Bay Road, Houston, to 1354 E. NASA Parkway, Ste. J, Hous- ton, sometime in early 2021. The coffee shop closed its former location Dec. 19 to prepare for the move, and staff is hoping to complete the transition within a few weeks. 281-957-9814. www.facebook.com/javaowlcoffeehouse ANNIVERSARIES 14 The Caroline Luxury Apartments , 1235 E. NASA Parkway, Houston, in No- vember celebrated its one-year anniversa- ry. The 334-unit multifamily facility offers resort-style accommodations, including three pools, outdoor kitchens, business and fitness centers, a pet grooming station and covered parking. 832-539-4992. http://thecaroline.com IN THE NEWS 15 Northern Tool + Equipment , which has a League City location at 200 S. Gulf Freeway, donated items to the League City Volunteer Fire Department on Nov. 19. Do- nated items include waterproof rain pants and jackets along with various equipment. 346-358-4214. www.northerntool.com

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COURTESY CHIPOTLE MEXICAN GRILL Chipotle Mexican Grill

COURTESY MOODY GARDENS Two penguin chicks were added to Moody Gardens’ exhibits Nov. 14.

FEATURED IMPACT INTHENEWS Moody Gardens , 1 Hope Blvd., Galveston, welcomed two healthy Macaroni penguin chicks to its South Atlantic exhibit Nov. 14. The chicks were born to parents Bleu and Feta and Muenster and Gouda, respectively, and this is the second year of successful hatching, according to a media release. The penguins coexist with ve other penguin species inside the Moody Gardens Aquarium Pyramid, which is one of the largest and most diverse

aquariums in the United States, per the release. The aquarium contains more than 1 million gallons of water and marine life including sting rays, sharks, seals and over 200 species of sh. 409-744-4673. www.moodygardens.com

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THIS INFORMATION WAS ACCURATE AS OF DEC. 10. FOLLOW COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM FOR THE LATEST BUSINESS AND RESTAURANT NEWS UPDATES.

COURTESY PIZZA LOUNGE Pizza Lounge

COURTESY NORTHERN TOOL + EQUIPMENT Northern Tool + Equipment

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BAY AREA EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

SEEING A PRIMARY CARE DOCTOR Is Still Important

For everything from annual checkups to managing chronic conditions, taking care of your health should always be a priority. Houston Methodist primary care doctors are still available to provide personalized care for you and your family — safely. We offer a variety of convenient ways to get care from us, from same-day sick visits to extended hours at select locations. And, you can be confident that we are taking every necessary precaution to keep you safe during your visit, including:

Screening all patients, and seeing COVID-19 patients virtually only — allowing us to treat everyone safely

Ensuring social distancing in waiting rooms

Offering video visits with your doctor

Wearing masks while providing care

Adding evening and Saturday hours to space out appointments

Enhanced cleaning of equipment and surfaces

houstonmethodist.org/pcg Call or text: 713.394.6724

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TODO LIST

December & January events

COMPILED BY KASEY SALISBURY

DECEMBER 28 THROUGH 31

Cutsinger, marketing manager for the Bay Area Houston Economic Partnership, to get the scoop on current, future and proposed development projects in the area. An ice cream happy hour will follow. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. $10-$250. La Brisa Mexican Bar and Grill, 501 N. Wesley Drive, League City. www.facebook.com/ events/873621960056235 15 THROUGH 16 YAGAS CHILI QUEST&BEERFEST Head to Galveston’s Historic Strand District to join a quest to nd out who can make the best chili with a cook-o, a 5K fun run, a craft beer festival, live music, vendors, tournaments and more. The annual event has attracted chili enthusiasts from across the nation for the past 10 years. $8-$12 (in advance), $15 (day of). 23rd and Strand streets, Galveston. 6 a.m.-6 p.m. www.yagaschiliquest.com 16 HIGH SEAS VIRTUAL MURDERMYSTERY In partnership with San Jacinto College’s maritime program, Helen Hall Library presents a virtual, interactive murder mystery experience via Zoom set aboard the SS Helen. During the game, participants will try to determine who among them is a murderer. 7-9 p.m. Free. 281-554-1111.

WORTH THE TRIP

WORTH THE TRIP

WINTERBREAKCAMP Children ages 6-12 can spend some of their school break playing games, making arts and crafts, and enjoying other activities at this day camp. The event is geared toward helping kids build teamwork and learn life skills as well as promoting physical, social and emotional development. 7 a.m.-6 p.m. daily. $100 (residents), $150 (nonresidents). Hometown Heroes Park, 1001 E. League City Parkway, League City. 281-554-1184. www.leaguecity.com 31 NEWYEAR’S EVE SIP& SAVORCELEBRATION Celebrate the start of a new year at this upscale Las Vegas-themed soiree with a three-course dinner, live music, dancing, a photo booth, and a balloon drop and champagne toast at midnight. 6:30 p.m.- 2:30 a.m. $129. South Shore Harbour Resort & Conference Center, 2500 South Shore Blvd., League City. 281-334-1000. www.sshr.com JANUARY 14 2021 DEVELOPMENT PREVIEW The Women’s Council of Realtors- Bay Area will hold a discussion with Barbara

This holiday season, guests at Moody Gardens can explore the Festival of Lights, a 1-mile walking trail decked out with 2 million lights and lled with animated displays set to holiday music. Popular displays at this event include nutcrackers, a toy factory, a narrated nativity scene and more. Other attractions include 4D screenings of “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer,” 3D holiday lms, train rides and more. 6-9 p.m. (select days), 6-10 p.m. (regularly). $20-$30. 1 Hope Blvd., THROUGH JAN. 2: HOLIDAY IN THE GARDENS

At this festive event sponsored by TXU Energy, the Houston Zoo will be lit up for the holiday season with lighted pathways, a 125-foot light tunnel, a “4D Enchanted Forest” and more. Timed tickets will help guests maintain social distancing, and increased cleaning protocols will be in place. 5:30-10:30 p.m. daily (last entry at 9:30 p.m.). $12.95-$25.95 (no gate tickets). 6200 Hermann Park Drive, Houston. 713-533-6500. www.houstonzoo.org/events/ zoolights THROUGH JAN. 10: HOUSTON ZOO PRESENTS ZOO LIGHTS

Galveston. 409-744-4673. www.moodygardens.com

Visit https://form.jotform.com/ 203074901686154 to register.

Find more or submit events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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BAY AREA EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Residents shoot down proposedmedian swale along El Dorado REJECTED SWALE

ONGOING PROJECTS

Residents rejected the idea of a median swale, or ditch, along the El Dorado Boulevard widening project. Instead, in-ground detention will be installed at an estimated cost increase of $2.2 million.

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The El Dorado Boulevard widening project between Clear Lake City Boulevard and Horsepen Bayou will not include a median swale, or ditch, following overwhelming opposition to the idea. Over the summer, Clear Lake resi- dents were surveyed about the idea of installing a 2-foot-deep swale along the 17-foot-wide median throughout the 1-mile project length. A swale is a shallow ditch that helps drain storm- water and sometimes includes trees. Of the more than 1,500 residents who responded to the survey, over 80% opposed a swale, according to a press release fromHouston Mayor Pro TemDave Martin. Instead, the project will include in-ground detention to address drainage concerns. “The residents expressed con- cerns with the aesthetics and future maintenance needs of a median swale,” Milton Rahman, the deputy chief of sta for Harris County Precinct 2 Commissioner Adrian Garcia, said in an email. “A survey was conducted and showed the community preferred the in-ground detention option, so plans were changed to honor that.” In-ground detention is more expensive than a swale, which is a common stormwater management technique because swales are fast and cheap to build. It is estimated the El Dorado project will cost $2.2 million more to include in-ground detention, Rahman said. The in-ground detention will be

Hwy. 146 widening The widening of Hwy. 146 between Red Blu Road and Hwy. 96 is now expected to be done by May 2023— more than a year ahead of schedule. When complete, Hwy. 146 will have six main lanes in both directions and two express lane bridges. Timeline: February 2019-May 2023 Cost: $201 million Funding sources: federal government ($160.8 million), Texas Department of Transportation ($40.2 million)

2 feet 17 feet

2 feet

2 feet

The proposed median swale would have been 16 feet wide and 2 feet deep.

RENDERING COURTESY CITY OF HOUSTON

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CROSS COLONY DR.

installed under the hike and bike trail included in the widening project, “maintaining the existing community aesthetic,” the press release reads. Martin identied $585,000 to help fund the increased project cost by delaying two stormwater-related projects in District E, which Martin represents. Another $165,000 will come fromHouston’s general fund, according to the release. Due to the addition of in-ground detention, the widening project has been split into two phases. Phase 1 includes expanding the additional lanes, median and bridge over Horsepen Bayou and will be complete in October. Phase 2 includes the hike and bike trail and in-ground detention

and will begin when Phase 1 is com- pleted, according to the release. The widening project, originally expected to cost $6.6 million and be funded by Houston and Harris County, began in May. When complete, El Dorado will have four 12-foot lanes— two in each direction—with a median. Other than the swale issue, the wid- ening project is proceeding normally, Rahman said. “We are not aware of any other hiccups, and it’s our understanding that the residents are excited about the project being constructed,” he said. “Once it’s complete, it will improve trac ow, increase safety and oer

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF DEC. 7. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT BAYNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. Calder Road widening Calder Road is being widened from Ervin Avenue to Cross Colony Drive. Once complete, the road with have a continuous center turn lane, and the road will be concrete with curbs and gutters instead of asphalt with ditches. As of late November, all re hydrants along the project’s length had been installed. Timeline: fall 2019-September 2021 Cost: $8.95 million Fundin g source: city of League City

another mode of transportation because of the trail addition.”

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BAY AREA EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PARKS&RECREATION

League City proposes 2 plans for future Bay Colony Park and elds

PARK PLANS

Consulting rm TBG Partners has presented two possible site plans for the future Bay Colony Park, which will feature several athletic elds.

Baseball elds Softball elds

Tennis, pickleball courts

Soccer, football, lacrosse elds

Practice elds

Concession stands

Walking loop

Option 1

Option 2

originally proposed for the site. That is because Western Spherical’s plan did not include detention, green space and other requirements based on the site, Parks Director ChienWei said. “If you look at [Western Spherical’s] design, there’s no green space at all,” he said. There are about 99 acres of land at the site of the future park. With the Grand Parkway posed to eventually come through the area, that leaves about 61 acres of developable prop- erty, said Blake Coleman of consulting rm TBG Partners. TBG Partners determined two park plans—one with two soccer-football-la- crosse elds, ve softball elds, four baseball elds and four tennis-pick- leball courts; and a second with two additional tennis-pickleball courts. Additionally, both plans include room for a 5K trail loop for marathons, a playground, concession stands and plenty of green space, plus detention space that could double as practice elds when dry, Coleman said. The major dierence between the two proposals is how the park is laid out. Coleman expressed excitement for the park, saying there is opportunity to make it dierent from other parks. “This park has the opportunity to be dierentiated and really ... give a great perception of what League City is,” he said. Ocials said the top priority from residents for parks is natural green space and trails, which is why Bay Colony Park includes such amenities. Residents had through Dec. 23 to

BY JAKE MAGEE

The plan to turn the Chester L. Davis Sportsplex into a regional attraction is dead, prompting the city to move towards building the rst phase of new athletic elds with $8 million of taxpayers’ money. In 2017, Western Spherical Develop- ers expressed interest in turning the sportsplex and surrounding land along I-45 into a $460 million project dubbed Epicenter League City. The site would have included a convention center, amphitheater, hotels, restaurants and more, city ocials said. With the city already needing more athletic elds for youth and adult sports, part of the deal also would have includedWestern Spherical paying to build new baseball and other athletic elds on city land on the south side of Ervin Street near Calder Road. The sportsplex has 26 sports elds, andWestern Spherical presented a plan that included building up to 40 athletic elds on the site of the new Bay Colony Park. However, in 2019, it became clear Western Spherical was not going to front the money necessary for the project, and city ocials began look- ing into funding Bay Colony Park. The city hired consulting rm TBG Partners, which has designed other parks for League City, including Home- town Heroes Park. The rm has come up with two potential designs for Bay Colony Park—one with 15 proposed elds, and one with 17. TBG Partners’ plans have less than half of the 40 elds Western Spherical

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SOURCES: TBG PARTNERS, CITY OF LEAGUE CITYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

submit comments on both plans. In early 2021, League City City Council will likely vote to approve one of the plans, Wei said. Phase 1 of the park will include ve softball elds, concessions, restrooms, batting cages, parking and a mainte- nance area. Three softball elds at the existing sportsplex will be converted to baseball elds, meaning softball and baseball players will both have more elds on which to play, Wei said. “We knowwe need more ball elds in the community. This is a great way to begin,” Baumgartner said. “Phase 2 won’t be far behind if we’re gonna have any chance to keep up with the community.”

The Phase 1 cost is estimated at $8 million. Construction is expected to begin in January 2023 and nish by January 2024. Money will come from 4B funds, which is funded by a quarter-cent sales tax specically for athletic facilities. The city also applied for a $750,000 Texas Parks andWild- life Department grant, ocials said. There is a chance Western Spherical or another developer could front the money to turn the sportsplex into a regional destination, but to do so would result in fewer athletic elds in the city than exist today. Baumgartner said that would not y. “We would not agree to a net loss in elds,” he said.

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BAY AREA EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION EricWilliams named Clear Creek ISD superintendent, begins Jan. 18

SUPERINTENDENT SELECTION The Clear Creek ISD board of trustees began the process for choosing Eric Williams as the new superintendent over the summer.

JULY 22

The board of trustees meets with a school system reform expert to discuss goals and expectations for nding a superintendent and settles on using a search rm.

BY COLLEEN FERGUSON

required to wait a minimum of 21 days before voting to appoint Williams, its lone nalist. Parents from LCPS and CCISD alike took to social media in the days following his appointment to express dissatisfaction withWilliams, citing his use of critical race theory in schools along with his back-to-school plans amid COVID-19. Local politicians and activists organized protests before the Nov. 16 and Dec. 1 board meetings. “I am so appreciative of the fact that people are willing to meet me and listen to me,” Williams said in refer- ence to town hall sessions held that allowedWilliams to address parents’ concerns. “[Now] it’s all about CCISD, not about any of my experience in another district.” After his approval at the Dec. 1 meeting, board members each spoke about why they are condent in Williams as the right choice for the dis- trict. Trustee Scott Bowen said he was impressed with the level of knowledge and passionWilliams has for the work of educating students. Another reasonWilliams is the best choice, Bowen added, was because he is the only candidate interviewed who was a sitting superintendent during the 2008 economic crisis, when his priorities were protecting the expen- ditures which had the most direct impact on classroom instruction. “Ultimately, [Williams’] job is to execute a vision, and our job is to develop it as board members,” Bowen said during the Dec. 1 meeting. “Policy and politics are our job, and execution is his job.”

While district ocials have expressed disappointment at the pending departure of Clear Creek ISD Superintendent Greg Smith, they have shown equally as much excitement over the arrival of his replacement, Eric Williams, who will start in January. Still, parents and community members expressed various concerns and debated whether Williams was the right t for the district in the days between his Nov. 9 nomination and Dec. 1 selection by the board of trustees. Williams said in an interview with Community Impact Newspaper he is focused on listening to, learning from and connecting with various stakeholders as he enters the district. “The district has many strengths, so it’s not about charting a new course,” he said of CCISD’s future direction under his leadership. “It’s about ... what’s the best way to continue that course.” Williams comes to the district from Loudoun County Public Schools in Virginia, west of Washington, D.C. He will start Jan. 18; Smith’s last day is Dec. 31. During his rst 90 days, Williams plans to meet with special education parents, parent-teacher associations, community service organizations and other districtwide parent groups. He has spent time in the community already, participating in meet-and- greet sessions Nov. 18 and 19 and visiting various campuses. Per Texas law, the board was

SEPT. 17

The board denes 2020-21 superintendent targets to be used in the spring for campus planning and reviewed with the new superintendent once hired.

SEPT. 21

The board approves what desired characteristics the search rm should use to nd a new district leader after board discussion, feedback from several forums and public survey results are considered.

Board members discuss the candidate interview process at an open meeting. OCT. 19

NOV. 9

Eric Williams is named the sole nalist after interviews conclude.

NOV. 18 & 19

Williams participates in town halls following community debate over his selection.

DEC. 1

Williams is ocially appointed as superintendent following a mandatory waiting period as required by state law.

SOURCE: CLEAR CREEK ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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BAY AREA EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

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16

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY&SCHOOLS

News from League City & Clear Creek ISD

District improving educational experiences

NEWSECONDARY COURSES

this year. Data collected by CCISD via sur- veys shows overwhelmingly positive results, with both students and sta seeing signicant stress reduction as a result of the extended lunch period, ocials said Nov. 16. Enrollment trends have remained negative year over year mostly due to the pandemic. The largest decrease is at the elementary level, with nearly 1,500 fewer students compared to last year, although enrollment is also down by about 300 students at both the middle and high school levels, ocials said at the meeting. Overall, nearly 2,000 fewer students are attending CCISD compared to this time last year.

BY COLLEEN FERGUSON

anything, Director of Planning and Development David Hoover said. “There’s really not much around it at the moment,” he said. The west side proposed location had several gas stations within a 1-mile radius. The closest gas station to the new location is a mile away, Hoover said. “In general, this is a much more appropriate place for this,” Council Member Nick Long said. In May, the applicant met with neighbors in the area to discuss the project proposed for the west side. Many residents came forward to say the gas station would add light, noise and trac to an already-con- gested area. From June through September, the applicant submitted several applications sta found to be incomplete and returned for clarication and detail, according to a city memo. The day before the Nov. 10 council meeting, the applicant submitted a new plan, which did not give sta or the council a lot of time to review it, which again contributed to council’s vote to reject the proposal. becoming increasingly prevalent, the district is reviewing its exible learn- ing options—such as Cyber Cafe and the Clear Connections program—and examining current Texas Education Agency guidelines to determine if changes are needed to any of these programs and policies, Deputy Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction Steven Ebell said. An internal review of homework was also scheduled for this year, which Ebell said will be delayed until the spring given current circumstances. For in-person high school students at three of the district’s facilities, an hourlong lunch was imposed starting

At the Nov. 16 board meeting, the Clear Creek ISD board approved ve new courses to be taught at the secondary level. • Peer Assistance for Students with Disabilities II, a one-semester course for juniors and seniors • Patient Care Technician, a course in the health science career cluster that provides students with an alternate pathway for a clinical opportunity • An advanced cybersecurity course • Game Programming and Design, a course replacing the video game design course • Fundamentals of Computer Science, a course replacing the computer science programming course

City Council rejectswest side 7Eleven, approves east side location One of these eorts is the monthly “HealthyU” podcast, through which sta incorporates expert insight into conversations meant to provide con- text about relevant public health and safety issues. Teachers also receive a weekly Mindful Moments email with mental health check-ins. With remote learning opportunities CLEAR CREEK ISD The district and its sta are aiming to provide virtual educational experiences designed to promote social and emotional health for both its remote and in-person learners, ocials said during a Nov. 16 board meeting.

Clear Creek ISD imposes grades-based restrictions on students learning virtually

BY COLLEEN FERGUSON

stronger indicator than attendance of a student’s success learning remotely, Assistant Superinten- dent of Secondary Education Karen Engle said. The evaluation of students at the elementary level will involve nearly the same process as it does for secondary students, examining reading and math as core content areas and assessing learning along the same timeline, Assistant Superintendent of Elementary Education Holly Hughes said.

BY JAKE MAGEE

CLEARCREEK ISD Remote students receiving low grades in a couple classes may be back on campus in the spring. In response to the Texas Edu- cation Agency’s revised guidance released Nov. 5, the district in the coming weeks will implement pro- cedures to restrict virtual learning via Clear Connections as necessary based on student performance. Elementary and secondary students who have averages below 70% in two or more courses—or the equiv- alent for elementary learners—will be mandated to return to in-person instruction based on the new guidelines, ocials said Nov. 16. Parents can apply for exemptions to the mandate for medical and nonmedical reasons. A committee will assess the situation once the appeal is led; the committee would include a campus administrator, a school nurse and a counselor. District leaders said about a quarter of CCISD’s students were learning virtually during the second nine weeks of the year. TEA guidelines allow districts to enforce a mandate on in-person instruction for academically struggling students and those with consistent atten- dance issues. CCISD leaders ultimately felt academic performance was a

LEAGUE CITY Weeks after shooting down a proposal to build a 7-Eleven on the west side of the city, League City City Council approved building one on the east side. On Nov. 10, City Council rejected an ordinance that would have allowed a special-use permit for a 7-Eleven to be built on a parcel zoned general commercial at 2051 W. Main St., at the southeast corner of West Main Street and Newport Boulevard on the west side of town. However, City Council voted unanimously Dec. 8 to grant a special-use permit to allow for the development of a 7-Eleven at 1210 E. FM 518, at the northwest corner of FM 518 and Lawrence Road on the east side of town. Unlike the original location council rejected, the new location is generally not surrounded by

NUMBERTOKNOW

Remote students with averages below this threshold in two or more courses will be mandated to return to in-person classes.

70%

League City City Council meets at 6 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 300 W. Walker St., League City. Watch online at www.facebook.com/leaguecitytexas. Clear Creek ISD board of trustees meets at 6 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month at 1955 W. NASA Blvd., Webster. Watch online at www.ccisd.net/boardmeeting. MEETINGSWE COVER

REJECTED 7ELEVEN SITE

APPROVED 7ELEVEN SITE

518

45

N

N

17

BAY AREA EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

Definitions / key Senior Living

As the number of senior adults nationwide and in the Bay Area continues to grow, so does the demand for residential options. The following list is not comprehensive.

COMPILED BY COLLEEN FERGUSON

5 Independent - living communities cater to older adults with limited care needs. Most include amenities, such as fitness programs, housekeeping, communal meals and more. 5 Assisted-living communities specialize in providing care and supervision. These facilities frequently offer a full range of amenities as well as limited medical assistance.

5 Memory care facilities specialize in providing care to seniors with Alzheimer’s, dementia and other cognitive issues. Staff members are trained to help residents manage these diseases. 5 Hospice care is intended to relieve symptoms and suffering associated with a terminal illness in those who have been given six months or less to live. The patient

must choose to forgo further curative treatment. 5 Nursing home/skilled nursing facilities provide care to those with illnesses or mental conditions requiring full-time monitoring and medical care. 5 Mixed-use facilities offer some or all of these services.

7

VISTA RD.

20

288

3

35

146

45

8

SPACE CENTER BLVD.

REPSDORPH RD.

2

5

SHADOW CREEK PKWY.

NASA PKWY.

4

CRESCENT LANDING DR.

E. WALNUT ST.

26

15

9

ENTERPRISE AVE.

29

28

21

BROWNSTONE PLACE

EL CAMINO REAL

14

2351

22

18

Y D

13

N. TEXAS AVE.

23

12

ALABAMA AVE.

GREENE ST.

518

25B

528

6

17

11

COLUMBIA MEMORIAL PKWY.

N. CLEAR CREEK DR.

WILLOWWICK AVE.

3

1

2ND ST.

27

45

10

96

518

16

646

2004

LANDING BLVD.

W. WALKER ST.

24

GILL RD.

TEXAS AVE

19

25A

MAP NOT TO SCALE TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. N

1 Absolute Hospice 700 E. Second St., Ste. B, League City 409-440-8199. www.absolutehospice.com 2 The Addington Place of Clear Lake 14225 Crescent Landing Drive, Houston 281-938-2800 www.seniorlifestyle.com 3 Atria Friendswood 1310 S. Friendswood Drive, Friendswood 281-301-0560 www.atriaseniorliving.com 4 Baywind Village Skilled

6 Chesapeake Bay Luxury Active-Adult Community 2300 Repsdorph Road, Seabrook 281-957-9488 www.cbluxuryseniorliving.com 7 4004 Vista Road, Pasadena 713-941-4663 www.colonialoaks.com 8 The Colonnades at Reflection Bay 12002 Shadow Creek Parkway, Pearland 713-434-3800 www.cantexcc.com 9 Comfort Keepers 17045 El Camino Real, Ste. 104, Houston 281-218-7400 www.comfortkeepers.com 10 The Cottages at Clear Lake 400 Landing Blvd., League City 281-661-1446 Colonial Oaks Senior Living

www.alzcottages.com 11 The Crossings 255 N. Egret Bay Blvd., League City 281-525-4320 www.mrcthecrossings.org 12 2605 Marina Bay Drive, League City 281-973-0196 www.thedelaneyatsouthshore.com 13 Services 450 N. Texas Ave., Webster 832-224-4756 clearlakehospice.com 14 Heart to Heart Hospice 16441 Space Center Blvd., Ste. C300, Houston 713-984-2100 www.hearttohearthospice.com 15 Heartis Clear Lake 14520 Hwy. 3, Webster

281-488-0762 www.heartis.com 16

Home Instead Senior Care 600 Gulf Freeway, Ste. 105, Texas City 409-762-0444 www.homeinstead.com 17 Lake Haven Apartment Homes 1051 Columbia Memorial Parkway, Kemah 281-538-5559 www.havencommunities.com 18 Lakehouse on Dixie 3504 Dixie Farm Road, Pearland 281-723-3861 www.lakehouseondixie.com 19 Orchard Park at Victory Lakes 2760 W. Walker St., League City 281-369-4404 www.orchardparkatvictorylakes.com 20 The Park at Bay Area 5000 Space Center Blvd., Pasadena 281-721-2500. www.parkatbayarea.com

The Delaney at South Shore

Essential Hospice & Palliative

Nursing and Rehabilitation 411 Alabama Ave., League City 281-332-9588 www.baywindvillagecare.net 5 780 W. Bay Area Blvd., Webster 281-316-9055 www.brookdale.com

Brookdale Clear Lake

18

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