Lake Houston - Humble - Kingwood Edition | September 2022

LAKE HOUSTON HUMBLE KINGWOOD EDITION

VOLUME 7, ISSUE 5  SEPT. 23 OCT. 20, 2022

ONLINE AT

The cost of college nationwide has increased over the past decade, including locally at four-year public universities, such as the University of Houston, and at community colleges, such as Lone Star College. COST OF COLLEGE

SOURCES: LONE STAR COLLEGE SYSTEM, UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

LONE STAR COLLEGE SYSTEM Tuition for 24 credit hours

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON Average annual tuition cost for rst-year students

IMPACTS

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Humble ISD parents raise book concerns

$12,000

$2,400 $1,600 $1,800 $2,000 $2,200 0

$10,856

$2,160

$8,000 $9,000 $10,000 $11,000

$1,756

$8,970

Overall change: +21.03%

Overall change: +23.01%

EDUCATION

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FALL TO DO LIST 2022 GUIDE

Student loan relief on the horizon as cost of higher education rises

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As the cost of higher education con- tinues to rise with more students rely- ing on federal loans to pay for their degrees, short-term relief may be on the way for those struggling to get out of debt, while questions remain sur- rounding a long-term solution. Adjusted for in–ation, the average annual cost of attending a four-year college full time—including tuition, fees, room and board—in the U.S. has risen from $10,231 in 1980 to $28,775 in 2019-20, a roughly 180% increase, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. “We’ve been telling everybody for decades, ‘You have to go to college,’ so the demand has shifted out like crazy, BY WESLEY GARDNER & HANNAH ZEDAKER

EVERYBODY TALKS ABOUT THE STUDENT LOAN CRISIS, AND IT EXISTS, BUT IT’S A SYMPTOMNOT THE PROBLEM. BETSY MAYOTTE, THE INSTITUTE OF STUDENT LOAN ADVISORS PRESIDENT

BOCCA ITALIAN KITCHEN

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and lots of colleges aren’t function- ally much bigger than they used to be, so each spot is more expensive,” said Dietrich Vollrath, a professor and chair of the Department of Economics at the University of Houston. Federal Reserve System data shows more than 45 million borrowers nationwide have contributed to a cumulative student loan debt of

roughly $1.75 trillion with more than $1.6 trillion of those loans issued by the federal government. In Texas, 52% of college graduates in the 2019-20 school year had taken on stu- dent loan debt with an average debt of $26,273, according to The Institute for College Access & Success. In the seven ZIP codes that make up

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LAKE HOUSTON HUMBLE KINGWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

Specialty Care at Kingwood

The care you’ve come to know at Texas Orthopedic Hospital, now available in the Kingwood community. Same great doctors, same great care. Conveniently located with free parking, our Kingwood center offers easy access to a range of specialty services. Our board certified and fellowship trained physicians offer consults for complex shoulder, joint replacement, sports medicine and osteoarthritis treatment of the shoulder, hip, knee and ankle. Please note: Specialty care or services not provided at Texas Orthopedic Hospital – Specialty Care at Kingwood, including surgery, may be referred to Texas Orthopedic Hospital near the Texas Medical Center.

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Kingwood Executive Dr

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Texas Orthopedic Hospital – Specialty Care at Kingwood 22751 Professional Dr, Ste 250 Kingwood, Texas 77339 (713) 395-6610

TexasOrthopedic.com | To schedule an appointment, please call (713) 395-6610

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Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. Now in 2022, CI is still locally owned. We have expanded to include hundreds of employees, our own software platform and printing facility, and over 30 hyperlocal editions across the state with a circulation to more than 2.4 million residential mailboxes.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS MONTH

FROM KIM: Sept. 22 marked the rst ocial day of Autumn. With cooler temperatures, football games and local coee shops serving pumpkin spice lattes, there’s something for everyone to get in the spirit of the season. As you begin planning your fall activities, check out our Fall To-Do List (see Pages 12-13), where you can nd local pumpkin patches, ghost tours and haunted houses for the whole family to enjoy. Kim Giannetti, GENERAL MANAGER

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LAKE HOUSTON  HUMBLE  KINGWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

GENE CAMPBELL RD.

IMPACTS

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Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

etouee. The food truck also has a drive- thru. 346-318-3708. Facebook: Heartland Cajun Cuisine and Seafood COMING SOON 8 California-based company Candeeland will open a new location at Deerbrook Mall Oct. 1. Located at 20131 Hwy. 59 N., Humble, Candeeland will provide a play arena for toddlers and children that will feature slides, tunnels, swings, towers and a ninja course. The business will be located next to Macy’s in the upstairs area of the mall. 714-852-3337. https://candeeland.co 9 Crumbl Cookies will open a 1,280-square-foot store in New Caney in early 2023, according to a Sept. 13 news release from Valley Ranch Town Center, which is operated by developer The Signorelli Co. The store will be located at Valley Ranch Town Center—11985 N. Grand Parkway, New Caney—and it will oer pickup and delivery services. Crumbl Cookies sells a variety of classic cookies as well as unique weekly rotating £avors, such as French toast, banana cream pie and everything bagel cookies. www.crumblcookies.com 10 Cosmic Air Adventure Park is ten- tatively projecting a November opening for its new location in Humble. Located in the Deerbrook Crossing shopping center at 279 N. Bender Ave., the adventure park will feature a variety of attractions, including trampolines, obstacle courses, a zip line, rope courses and a trampoline basketball court. www.cosmicairpark.com 11 Milano Nail Spa is set to celebrate the grand opening of its Humble location Sept. 25. Located at 6947 FM 1960 E., the nail spa will oer a number of services, including manicures, pedi- cures, hot-stone massages, para™n wax treatments, and brow and lash services. All Milano Nail Spa customers are treated to one complimentary drink with options including soft drinks, wine, cocktails, coee and tea. 346-688-6686. www.milanonailspahumble.com 12 A European Wax Center location is coming soon to the Kingwood Place shopping center at 30129 Rock Creek Drive, Ste. 700, Kingwood. The business will oer full-body waxing services for

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Crumbl Cookies

COURTESY CRUMBL COOKIES

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ROCK CREEK DR.

store oers a selection of children’s clothing and accessories tailored to babies and children ages 2-14, includ- ing T-shirts, shorts, jeans, headwear, hoodies, backpacks and footwear. Cotton On Kids is located between Journeys and Abercrombie Kids at the mall. 281-548-6213. www.cottonon.com 5 Supernova Furniture opened its new location in Deerbrook Mall on Sept. 4. Located at 20131 Hwy. 59, Ste. 2290, Humble, the roughly 86,000-square- foot facility oers a number of furniture options, including home decor, mattresses, outdoor items, home o™ce equipment and formal dining ware. 281-805-5559. www.supernovafurniture.com 6 West Fork High School became New Caney ISD’s newest high school upon opening in early August and welcoming its ›rst class of students, who will graduate in 2026. Located at 180 Sorters McClellan Road, Kingwood, the construction of West Fork was estimated to cost $110 million and was funded through NCISD’s 2018 bond. The school’s ›rst phase of construc- tion allows the campus to accommodate up to 1,350 students, while future ex- pansion projects can expand the school’s capacity to 2,250 students, according to district leaders. 281-577-2825. www.newcaneyisd.org 7 Heartland Cajun Cuisine and Seafood opened at 1965 Northpark Drive, Kingwood in late July. The food truck is owned by Timothy and Christina Fontenot and serves Texas- and Louisiana-style eats, such as fried ›sh, shrimp po’boys, burgers, fried pickles, boudin balls and

P A R K

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W. LAKE HOUSTON PKWY.

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MAGNOLIA COVE

TOWNSEN BLVD.

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W. FORK OF THE SAN JACINTO RIVER

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FAIRWOOD CREEK CT.

N . L A K E H O U S T O N P K W Y . 281-623-4191. www.paintedtree.com 2 Jersey Mike’s Subs celebrated the grand opening of its new location in Valley Ranch Town Center on Sept. 7. Located at 21690 Hwy. 59, New Caney, the East Coast-based sandwich shop serves hot subs, such as the Chipotle NOW OPEN 1 Painted Tree Boutiques celebrated the grand opening of its Kingwood loca- tion Aug. 27. Located at 1153 Kingwood Drive, the national franchise houses mul- tiple vendors in each location that oer a variety of items, including home decor, clothing, candles and gifts.

Cheese Steak and the Grilled Portabella Mushroom and Swiss, and cold subs, such as the Stickball Special and the Jersey Shore’s Favorite. 281-601-1174. www.jerseymikes.com 3 X Label Apparel celebrated its grand opening in Kingwood on Aug. 20. Located at 4501 Magnolia Cove Drive, Ste. 108, the luxe womenswear brand is owned by Lindsey Hulquist and oers a variety of women’s apparel from modern workwear to casual and cozy options as well as bags and accessories. www.shopxlabel.com 4 Cotton On Kids opened its new location at Deerbrook Mall on Sept. 8. Located at 20131 Hwy. 59, Humble, the

RALSTON RD.

Find one in your neighborhood.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY WESLEY GARDNER, EMILY LINCKE & HANNAH ZEDAKER

men and women upon opening, although a projected opening date for this location had not been announced as of press time. www.waxcenter.com 13 CareNow Urgent Care will be opening in New Caney, according to a Sept. 13 news release from Valley Ranch Town Center. While a timeline has not yet been an- nounced for this project, CareNow’s Valley Ranch Town Center o™ce will total 4,000 square feet and be at 11985 N. Grand Parkway. CareNow Urgent Care oers adult and pediatric primary care as well as urgent care services, including physicals, X-rays, medical tests, immunizations, and treatments for minor injuries and illnesses. www.carenow.com 14 A new 5,000-square-foot Victoria’s Secret store slated for Valley Ranch Town Center—11985 N. Grand Parkway, New Caney—will be opening in 2023, according to a Sept. 13 news release from Valley Ranch Town Center. Previously, the store was scheduled to open in 2022. Victoria’s Secret is a nationwide chain that sells lingerie, beauty products, perfume, swimsuits and sportswear.

including dresses, tops, bottoms and accessories. Pretty Little Things Boutique also oers greeting cards and gifts for various occasions. 281-608-1057. www.prettylittlethingsonline.com NAME CHANGES 16 Humble ISD trustees approved changing the name of North Belt Elementary School to North Bend Elementary School at their Sept. 13 meeting. A rebuild of the school was included in the district’s $575 million bond referendum approved in 2018. The campus at 8105 N. Belt Drive, Humble, opened in 1968. O™cials said the new campus, which is scheduled to open in 2023, will be located at the corner of Old Humble Road and Bender Road. 281-641-1000. www.humbleisd.net RENOVATIONS 17 Victoria’s Secret is temporarily relocated within Deerbrook Mall—20131 Hwy. 59, Humble—while renovations are being completed at its original location. According to Melissa Godden, a senior property management associate at Deerbrook Mall, the store moved to Suite 1334 during renovations and is scheduled to move back to its original space—Suite 1040—by the week of Black Friday, which will begin Nov. 25. 281-540-1941. www.victoriassecret.com

The Kitchen is among several Houston-based eateries that will be featured in the terminal.

RENDERING COURTESY HOUSTON AIRPORTS

FEATURED IMPACT EXPANSIONS Several new dining options and retailers are slated for the upcoming international terminal at George Bush Intercontinental Airport following a pair of agreements approved by the Houston City Council in mid-August. The construction of the international terminal at IAH, known as the IAH Terminal Redevelopment Program, started in 2015 and is projected to be substantially completed by late 2024, according to an Aug. 24 news release. On Aug. 17, Houston City Council members approved a 10-year contract with SSP America that will bring 16 food and beverage locations to the new international terminal. Several Houston- based eateries will be featured among the new restaurants, including Common

Bond Bakery and Café, The Kitchen, and The Annie Café and Bar. On Aug. 24, council members approved a contract with Paradies Lagardère to develop and operate 10 new retail concession locations inside the new international terminal. The new lineup of stores will include Houston Supply Co., Uno de 50, Be Relax, Lego and iStore. www.Œy2houston.com

www.victoriassecret.com ANNIVERSARIES

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION UPDATES METRO makes weekend use of high-occupancy vehicle, toll lanes permanent

COMPILED BY RENEE FARMER & HANNAH ZEDAKER

UPCOMING PROJECTS

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Following a pilot program this summer that opened the Metro- politan Transit Authority of Harris County’s high-occupancy vehicle, or HOV, and high-occupancy toll, or HOT, lanes for use on weekends, the board voted Aug. 25 to make the program permanent. Under the program, the lanes will be operational seven days a week on a permanent basis. The addition will cost the agency up to $3.3 million, according to Nader Mirjamali, METRO HOV/HOT lane project manager, adding $644,500 to the agency’s contract with TransCore ITS to operate the lanes. “This is part of an eŽort to say that, yes, our job is to connect people to jobs, but it is also to connect people to recreational opportunities, weekend trips, leisure trips, trips to schools, universities, you name it,” METRO board Chair Sanjay Ramabhadran said at the Aug. 25 meeting. The plan includes METRO’s ’ve HOV and HOT lanes along I-45 North, I-45 South, I-69 North/Hwy. 59 North,

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High-occupancy vehicle and high-occupancy toll lanes are now permanently open seven days a week to Harris County commuters. EASING THE DAILY COMMUTE

LOWE RD.

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF AUG. 26. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT LHKNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. once utility conicts are resolved. Timeline: January 2023-August 2023 Cost: $6.8 million (Segment 1), $7.4 million (Segment 2) Funding source: Montgomery County Precinct 4 road bonds Sorters McClellan Road expansion A project to expand Sorters McClellan Road to four lanes with a center turn lane between FM 1314 and Northpark Drive is on hold due to utility conicts. According to Hugo Sanchez, the projects and logistics coordinator for Montgomery County Precinct 4, construction will begin on A Segment 1—FM 1314 to south of Lowe Road—once utility relocations are completed in October, while B Segment 2—south of Lowe Road to Northpark Drive—will go out for bid

INBOUND LANES Open Mon.-Sun. from: • 6:30-8 a.m. to vehicles with at least two people • 5-6:30 a.m. and 8-11 a.m. to all vehicles OUTBOUND LANES Open Mon.-Sun. from: • 4:30-6 p.m. to vehicles with at least two people • 1-4:30 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. to all vehicles

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SOURCE: METROPOLITAN TRANSIT AUTHORITY OF HARRIS COUNTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

I-69 South/Hwy. 59 South and Hwy. 290. The summer pilot ended Sept. 5 with the permanent program commencing Sept. 10. By seven weeks into the pilot period Aug. 13-14, the use of the lanes had increased 82% to 6,379 vehicles on

Saturdays and 70% to 3,419 vehicles on Sundays, according to Mirjamali. The lanes see 70%-80% more use on Saturdays than Sundays. Mirjamali identi’ed I-69 South/Hwy. 59 South and I-45 North as the corridors that saw the most weekend use.

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LAKE HOUSTON  HUMBLE  KINGWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION Humble ISD parents call for books to be removed from libraries

BY WESLEY GARDNER

Of the estimated 1,586 books banned by school districts in the U.S. from July 2021-March 2022, 713 were banned by 16 school districts in Texas, according to an April study released by Pen America.

Humble ISD trustees will con- sider expanding the language of its guidelines regarding the selection of books in campus libraries at an upcoming board meeting. More than half a dozen parents have voiced their concerns about the con- tents of some books available in HISD campus libraries during the board’s August and September meetings, citing what they deemed sexually explicit and vulgar material. Tracy Shannon, a Humble resident who is spearheading the eort to see the books removed, said she has been in direct contact with around 20 parents who have book concerns. “We don’t think that everyone is going to agree with us on every book, and there are some books that might be ones where there’s some room for compromise, … but some of them are so pervasively vulgar and so sexually inappropriate for minors that they shouldn’t be in schools at all,” Shannon said. The board had the opportunity to approve guidelines at its Sept. 13 meeting that stated “Library mate- rials shall not include ‘harmful material’ as de‰ned by Penal Code 43.24(a)(2).” However, Trustee Robert Scarfo suggested adding the state’s de‰nition of harmful material. The Texas Penal Code states “harmful material, when taken as a whole, appeals to the prurient interest of a minor, in sex, nudity or excretion; is patently oensive to prevailing standards in the adult community as a whole with respect to what is suitable for minors; and is utterly without redeeming social value for minors.” “I just think that says even more than what we’re saying here, and I think that makes it very clear of how the district feels about that,” Scarfo said, noting he would also like to see portions of the guidelines relating to parental consent expanded. Board members ultimately tabled the guidelines to give district employ- ees, including library sta members, a chance to review the proposals. HISD Superintendent Elizabeth Fagen said the district has a review process in place to determine what books are available in libraries. “Making a decision to remove

BOOK BANS RISE OF

800 NUMBER OF BOOKS BANNED FROM JULY 2021 MARCH 2022

713

600

456

400

204

200

43 30 18 16 16 15 13

0

SOURCE: PEN AMERICACOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Three of the books parents in Humble ISD are pushing to have removed from campus libraries were among the most-banned books included in Pen America’s April study detailing books banned in the U.S. from July 2021-March 2022. “Beyond Magenta” tells the story of six transgender and gender-neutral young adults, describing their sense of identity before, during and after transitioning.

PROPOSED BANS

IN HUMBLE ISD

“Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens Speak Out” by Susan Kuklin Banned in 11 districts

1

“Lawn Boy” tells the story of Mike Muñoz, a Mexican-American young adult who has faced hardship since his childhood and is going through a phase of self-discovery.

2 “Lawn Boy”

by Jonathan Evison Banned in 16 districts

“The Bluest Eye” tells the story of Black, 11-year-old Pecola Breedlove, who prays for her eyes to turn blue so she will be as beautiful as the blond, blue-eyed children in the U.S.

3 “The Bluest Eye” by Toni Morrison

Banned in 12 districts

SOURCES: PEN AMERICA, GOODREADS, TRACY SHANNONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

District o™cials also noted there is a reconsideration process available that allows parents to request certain books be restricted based on age or removed entirely from campus libraries. At the Aug. 9 meeting, HISD parent Meagan Fast said she had begun the process to have one of about 40 books removed from the Kingwood High School library. “I read the book front to back. I met with a committee, [and] they decided to keep the book on the shelf,” Fast said. Fast said she appealed the deci- sion, noting o™cials ultimately decided to remove the book from shelves and make it accessible only with written parental consent.

something for every single high school student is a decision that no one takes lightly, but we want to make sure every family feels secure and safe in what their children are doing and what they’re reading,” Fagen said. Fagen also said the district has put measures in place to restrict access to books deemed inappropriate for certain age groups. “We have taken books and put them behind the counter that now require proactive parent permission for that child to even look at the book,” Fagen said, noting parents can review the books their children have checked out using the district’s Home Access Center.

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LAKE HOUSTON  HUMBLE  KINGWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

FALL TODO LIST

September & October events

2022 FALL GUIDE

COMPILED BY WESLEY GARDNER

SEPTEMBER 24 ATTEND A FORMAL DANCE Home-school students and graduates are invited to attend the Fall Formal 2022 in Kingwood. Students must be at least 14 years old and in the ninth grade to attend this semiformal event, which will feature dinner, dessert and dancing. 6-11 p.m. $55 (chaperone), $85 (student). The Clubs of Kingwood, 1700 Lake Kingwood Trail, Kingwood. 281-533-3599. www.homerunministries.com FOOD & DRINK OCTOBER 08 RIDE A TRACKLESS TRAIN Bring the family to The Livable Forest’s Kid’s Jubilee event featuring seasonal shopping from local vendors, a trackless train, food trucks and a bounce house. Noon-5 p.m. Free. Town Center Park, 8 N. Main St., Kingwood. 214-734-1917. www.thelivableforest.com FREE KID FOOD & DRINK 09 CHECK OUT COOL CARS Peruse automobiles, listen to live music and shop from an array of local vendors at the Kingwood Fall Car

Lutheran Church, 1901 Woodland Hills Drive, Kingwood. 281-358-6500. www.kwoktoberfest.org KID FOOD & DRINK 22 PLAY AT A PETTING ZOO Good Shepherd Episcopal Church in Kingwood is inviting the public to attend its annual Fall Festival. The free event will feature live music from Howlin’ Howie, bounce houses, face painting, Shortcakes the Clown, magician David G. Wonders, a petting zoo and games. The event will also feature food, crafts and merchandise vendors as well as a silent auction. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Good Shepherd Episcopal Church, 2929 Woodland Hills Drive, Kingwood. 281-358-3154. www.goodshepherdkingwood.org/ fall-festival FREE KID FOOD & DRINK 29 DRESS AS A DISNEY CHARACTER Dress the family in their best Disney character costumes and visit Town Center Park for BooFest Kingwood. The annual event will feature seasonal shopping, a mini pumpkin patch, candy at every booth for trick-or-treaters and a pumpkin carving station. 4-9 p.m. Free. Town Center Park, 8 N. Main St., Kingwood.

There are a number of ways to enjoy fall in the Lake Houston area, whether checking out a family-friendly festival, facing fears at a spooky haunted house or getting out into nature to enjoy the weather. The information for each event is accurate as of press time and is subject to change.

Show. Event organizers noted the streets surrounding the event will be closed, providing patrons a safe area to stroll among booths and vendors. Noon-5 p.m. Free. Town Center Park, 8 N. Main St., Kingwood. 346-600-2366. www.towncenterevents.com FREE KID FOOD & DRINK 15 GET EARLY HALLOWEEN CANDY The East Montgomery County Improvement District’s Tricks and Treats Fall Fair will feature games and activities, a balloon artist, a magician, family photo opportunities, and local business and food vendors. Halloween candy will also be handed out at the event. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Valley Ranch Town Center, 22296 Marketplace Drive, Ste. 100, New Caney. 281-354-4419. www.emctx.com FREE KID FOOD & DRINK 15 EXPERIENCE GERMAN CULTURE Immerse the entire family in German culture at the fourth annual Kingwood Octoberfest. The outdoor festival will feature a live polka band, a children’s area, authentic German food vendors and craft beer from DECA Beer Company. The event will also feature a DJ, games and activities for all age groups. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $3 (children under age 12), $8 (adults). Holy Comforter

346-600-2366. www.unation.com/event/ boofest-kingwood FREE KID FOOD & DRINK 30 PAINT SPOOKY PORTRAITS Painting with a Twist is hosting a special Halloween event at The Living Room Bar Lounge. The event is for guests age 21 and up and will feature tips on how to create an assortment of fall and Halloween-themed paintings and drinks. 8-11 p.m. $20. The Living Room Bar Lounge, 19333 Hwy. 59, Humble. 832-777-1838. www.paintingwithatwist.com/ studio/humble FOOD & DRINK 31 WIN A COSTUME CONTEST Visit the Humble Civic Center on Halloween for the Third Annual Boo Bash. The event hosted by The Gingerbread School will feature food, drinks, face painting, crafts, inatables, and performances by local dance and drill teams. Additionally, Boo Bash will feature a costume contest and free candy. 5-9 p.m. Free. Humble Civic Center, 8233 Will Clayton Parkway, Humble. 281-623-5014. www.thegingerbreadschool.com/ boo-bash FREE KID FOOD & DRINK

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FREE Free KID Kid friendly FOOD & DRINK Food and drink are for sale

Old MacDonald’s Farm’s pumpkin patch opens to the public in October, giving attendees a chance to grab a pumpkin before Halloween. PUMPKIN PATCHES

1 Old MacDonald’s Farm 3203 FM 1960 E., Humble 281-446-4001 www.oldmacdonaldsfarmtexas.com Hours: Mon.-Sun. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. through Oct. 30 • $16.80 per person age 18 months and older 2 Lake Houston United Methodist Church 23606 FM 2100, Human 281-324-1541 www.lakehoustonumc.com Hours: Sun.-Fri. 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-7 p.m. through Oct. 31 • Free

3 Good Shepherd Episcopal Church 2929 Woodland Hills Drive, Kingwood 281-358-3154 www.goodshepherdkingwood.org Hours: Mon.-Sun. 9 a.m.-7 p.m. from Oct. 19-31 • Free 4 Warren’s Southern Gardens 1675 Northpark Drive, Kingwood 281-354-6111 www.warrenssoutherngardens.com Hours: Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. • Free

OCT. 23

EAT, DRINK AND SHOP MEGATON BREWERY

Texas Artisan Markets is inviting the public to attend its annual Fall Artisan Market at Megaton Brewery in Kingwood. The event will feature more than 80 artisan vendors, food trucks, craft beer and two live music stages. The event will also feature a free photography booth to capture all the fun. Noon-5 p.m. Free. Megaton Brewery, 808 Russell Palmer Road, Kingwood. 346-600-5166. www.texasartisanmarkets.com FREE KID FOOD & DRINK

Find more or submit Lake Houston-Humble-Kingwood events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

LHK

PORTER 23611 Hwy 59 • 281-354-0733 KINGWOOD 1420 Kingwood Dr • 281-359-7115 HUMBLE 19322 US-59 • 281-540-7202 ATASCOCITA 7034 FM 1960 E • 281-812-3100

DINING FEATURE

BY WESLEY GARDNER

3 DISHES TO TRY

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Ham and cheese plate ($18): Prosciutto, burrata, onion jam, herb salad and Italian griddle bread make up this dish.

WINE AND DINE Bocca Italian Kitchen’s wine list consists of selections primarily from Italy. Chef Justin Turner outlined the following wine and dish pairings. Carmina Prosecco ($10 per glass, $36 per bottle): Sparkling, pale bright lemon with intense fruit fragrance; pairs well with the octopus and frito misto Chef Justin Turner leads the cooking sta at Bocca Italian Kitchen in Generation Park. Friuli Pinot Grigio Schiopetto ($13 per glass, $40 per bottle): White wine with aromas of bananas and papaya; pairs well with salads, soups, pasta and sh dishes Barbera D’Alba Perpetuae ($14 per glass, $48 per bottle): Red wine with fresh avors of cherries, blueberries and

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Octopus ($18): Octopus is served with Yukon potatoes, spicy tangerine citronette and chives.

Lobster ravioli ($35): This dish consists of Maine lobster, ravioli, jumbo lump crab meat and grilled shrimp in a lemon chive mascarpone cream.

PHOTOS BY WESLEY GARDNERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Bocca Italian Kitchen Local chef brings taste of Italy to Generation Park J ustin Turner said he still remembers the rst time he fell in love with ne dining. oers high-end Italian cuisine in Generation Park, a master-planned community where Turner also serves as the director of hospitality. Despite challenges with

Turner said he hopes to move the menu toward more unique oer- ings, such as spinach lasagna. “We spend a lot of time creating new specials, and our menu will constantly change to adapt to specials that [customers] fall in love with,” he said. Turner said the quality of the ingredients used at Bocca Italian Kitchen is what makes them stand out from typical Italian oerings. “We use great ingredients, not just good, and that is what I know will set us apart,” Turner said. According to Turner, the aim of a great restaurant should extend beyond oering quality cuisine. “This is about creating an experi- ence,” he said.

raspberries; pairs well with the osso-bucco and pork two way

He was 10 years old, and his father had hired a professional chef to cook for his family at their home. “It was the rst time I’d ever seen anything like that,” Turner said. Shortly after, Turner entered the restaurant industry and had worked in three dierent restaurants by the time he was 18. He eventually worked as a personal chef for NBA player Shane Battier and opened his own food truck that eventually became four brick-and-mortar locations until they closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Today, Turner is the head chef at Bocca Italian Kitchen, which

Bocca Italian Kitchen 250 Assay St., Ste. 100, Houston 281-741-0203 www.boccahtx.com Hours: Sun.-Thu. 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m.

the restaurant’s January 2021 opening—including supply and labor shortages due to the pandemic and damage from the February 2021 freeze—Turner said Bocca Italian Kitchen’s success can be attributed to its food. “The inspiration and style come from how [chefs] cook in Italy, but really, we want to pull from our local market and our local produce,” Turner said. The restaurant oers Italian staples, such as spaghetti and meat- balls and chicken Alfredo, though

ASSAY ST.

REDEMPTION SQUARE RD.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Christina Allen, CEO of FamilyTime Crisis and Counseling Center in Humble, has worked for the nonprot since June 2021.

HOW TO HELP There are several ways to help FamilyTime Crisis and Counseling Center in its mission to support victims of domestic abuse.

NONPROFIT

FamilyTime Crisis and Counseling Center promotes the services it o ers throughout the community to help raise awareness of domestic abuse and violence.

Monetary donations: Financial contributions can be made online, by mail

PHOTOS COURTESY FAMILYTIME CRISIS AND COUNSELING CENTER

FamilyTime Crisis and Counseling Center Humble nonprot raises awareness of domestic abuse

or in person. Thrift shop

donations: Located at 23874 Loop 494, Porter, the center’s thrift shop accepts donations of clean clothes, shoes, working household appliances and small furniture. 59

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O ctober is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and FamilyTime Crisis and Counseling Center in Humble is work- ing to spread awareness of the services it provides to victims of domestic abuse. The center, which opened in 1977, o ers services aimed at assisting individuals and families in abusive relationships, including support classes, case management services and a temporary shelter that can house victims of domestic abuse for 60-90 days, said Christina Allen, FamilyTime Crisis and Counseling Center CEO. The center also o ers anger management, parent- ing and divorce classes as well as counseling services for couples, families and children. Group counseling sessions are also available, which Allen said can help individuals open up about their struggles. “By nature, human beings have a tribal mental- ity, and we thrive on knowing that we’re not the only ones dealing with certain things,” she said. “It’s often easier to sit in a room full of complete strangers and share your story than it is to maybe tell it one-on-one to someone.” While Allen said many people only think of abuse BY WESLEY GARDNER

as physical violence, abuse can take on several di erent forms. “Verbal abuse is one of the most common forms of domestic violence, but for a long time, people did not recognize that as violence and abuse,” Allen said. “Words hurt. Words cut deep.” Allen also pointed to emotional abuse—which involves controlling another person by using emotions to criticize, embarrass, shame, blame or manipulate them—as another form of abuse. “We’ve heard some survivors share with us that they would rather [experience] the physical abuse than the emotional abuse because the emotions just sit there within them,” she said. Allen said she is hopeful FamilyTime Crisis and Counseling Center will be able to help educate the public about all forms of domestic abuse and provide victims with the assistance and tools they need to escape abusive relationships. “In October, people are going to start receiving mail-outs from us with some information and facts,” she said. “Hopefully, [the mail-outs will] bring awareness to people that may not have realized what those numbers actually look like and how many people are in need of help right here.”

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Volunteer opportunities: Volunteers are needed in a variety of roles; those interested can contact Ashley Logan via email at alogan@familytimeccc.org.

FamilyTime Crisis and Counseling Center 1203 S. Houston Ave., Humble Main line: 346-220-8205 Crisis hotline: 281-446-2615 www.familytimeccc.org Hours: Mon.-Thu. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri. 9 a.m.-3 p.m., closed Sat.-Sun.

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Nation’s First Women-focused University System

twu.edu

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LAKE HOUSTON  HUMBLE  KINGWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

STRUGGLING TO KEEP UP Since 1980, the total cost of both four-year public and private colleges has nearly tripled. Meanwhile, although Pell Grants once covered nearly 80% of the cost of four-year public college degrees for students from working families, they now only cover one-third.

Costly tuition While in–ation plays a role in the rising cost of attending college, Voll- rath noted two additional factors have led to rising tuition rates. According to Vollrath, rich econo- mies such as the U.S. tend to see faster rates of in–ation for services such as education and health care when com- pared to manufactured goods because the cost of producing those goods diminishes over time. Vollrath said the second contrib- uting factor has been a decrease in ƒnancial support from state govern- ments. Between 2008-18, state spend- ing for higher education in Texas dropped from $9,256 per student to $7,107—a 23.3% decrease, according to data provided by the Center on Bud- get and Policy Priorities. “We’re getting around half the money we thought we might have been getting 20-30 years ago, and you have to account for it, so that ends up getting unloaded on the students usu- ally,” Vollrath said. During that same time frame, the average cost of tuition at public, four- year colleges in Texas increased by $2,302, or 30.4%, CBPP data shows. However, Vollrath said he did not think the blame should be directed solely at declining state contributions to higher education. “I think there are deƒnitely things you can talk about on the university side,” he said, speaking generally about public colleges. “Why are uni- versities paying for things that seem to drive up tuition that don’t seem to contribute towards the baseline of educating students?” Plan basics As outlined in an Aug. 24 news release from the White House, Biden’s three-part plan will provide up to $20,000 in debt cancellation to Pell Grant recipients with loans held by

Public four-year university cost*

Maximum Pell Grant value**

$2,000 $4,000 $6,000 $8,000 $12,000 $14,000 $16,000 $18,000 $10,000 $20,000 $22,000 $24,000

In 1980-81, Pell Grants covered nearly 80% of the cost of four-year public college degrees.

In 2020-21, Pell Grants covered one-third of the cost of four-year public college degrees.

0

1980-81

1990-91

2000-01

2010-11

2020-21

*INCLUDES TUITION, REQUIRED FEES, BOOKS AND SUPPLIES, AND AVERAGE COST FOR ROOM, BOARD AND OTHER EXPENSES **TYPICALLY ONLY AWARDED TO UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS WHO DISPLAY EXCEPTIONAL FINANCIAL NEED AND HAVE NOT EARNED A BACHELOR’S, GRADUATE OR PROFESSIONAL DEGREE; DO NOT HAVE TO BE REPAID EXCEPT UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES

SOURCES: COLLEGE BOARD, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION‹COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FILING FOR FORGIVENESS The U.S. Department of Education is planning to launch an application for student loan forgiveness in early October. Those interested can sign up to be noti€ed of application availability at www.ed.gov/subscriptions . WHO IS ELIGIBLE? • Individuals whose annual income falls below $125,000 • Married couples whose annual income falls below $250,000 WHO NEEDS TO APPLY?

• Students who €iled a 2021-22 Free Application for Federal Student Aid do not need to take any action. • Students who did not €ile a 2021-22 FASFA will need to complete a short application by Dec. 31 . Once a borrower competes the application, relief can be expected within 4-6 weeks .

HOW MUCH ARE THEY ELIGIBLE FOR? • Pell Grant recipients who meet the income threshold are eligible for up to $20,000 in debt cancellation. • Non-Pell Grant recipients who meet the income threshold are eligible for up to $10,000 in debt cancellation.

For more information, visit www.studentaid.gov/debt-relief-announcement.

SOURCE: FEDERAL STUDENT AID‹COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

and 2021-22 school years, while the average annual cost of tuition for ƒrst-year students at the University of Houston has increased by 21% within the same time frame. To provide relief, President Joe Biden announced a plan Aug. 24 that will enable roughly 43 million Ameri- cans to have up to $20,000 in federal student loans forgiven.

Betsy Mayotte, president of The Institute of Student Loan Advisors, said while she supports the plan, it fails to address the root cause. “Everybody talks about the stu- dent loan crisis, and it exists, but it’s a symptom—not the problem,” May- otte said. “The problem is the cost of higher education, and this plan does nothing to address that.”

CONTINUED FROM 1

the Lake Houston area, data shows just over 151,000 people age 18 and older have at least some college expe- rience, or roughly 64.5% of the local population aged 18 and older. Locally, the cost of tuition for 24 credit hours at Lone Star College has increased by 23% between the 2012-13

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