Chandler Edition - September 2021

CHANDLER EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 2  SEPT. 21OCT. 18, 2021

ONLINE AT

Chandler’s ‘nal frontier’

CHANDLER AIRPARKAREA Chandler’s Airpark Area is the fourth-largest employment corridor in the city, and area ocials are eyeing plans for growth in the future.

IMPACTS 4 Chandler names deputy city manager

Office Inventory (SF) 1,331,984 Vacancy rate 4.9% Flex Inventory (SF) 292,339 Vacancy rate 28.6%

Industrial Inventory (SF) 2,870,156 Vacancy rate 20.1% Retail Inventory (SF) 2,351,375 Vacancy rate 4.5%

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SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

E. QUEEN CREEK RD.

CITY & EDUCATION

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Fourteen new oce, industrial and commercial developments are underway in the Airpark Area. The area is the city’s “nal frontier” in terms of land for employment, ocials say. (Alexa D'Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

A process started in 2020 to update the area plan, which serves as a guiding force for City Council and the planning and zoning commission as developers bring plans for that 9-square-mile area to the city. Updating the document— which was last updated in 1998—is expected to be complete in the next

several months. It will be brought before City Council for a vote in Octo- ber, but the council was briefed on the plan during a work session in August. Council Member OD Harris, who also serves on the city’s airport commis- sion, said the city must have a “clear CONTINUED ON 12

Jolie Grant is at a loss. She is hiring for nearly every position at her bar and restaurant—Jolie’s Place, a sta- ple of the Chandler community for nearly a decade. Grant has needed help since the business rst reopened after being shut- tered for weeks due to the governor’s coro- navirus mandates in the summer of 2020. A year later, she is still looking to ll positions. “We’ve [the owner and general man- ager] spent numerous hours in the kitchen CONTINUED ON 15 Businesses struggle tondworkers BY ALEXA D'ANGELO AND TOM BLODGETT Chandler ocials call the Chandler Airpark Area the city’s “nal frontier.” The employment corridor holds about 18% of the city’s overall remaining land, and the city’s plan for the area aims to preserve as much of that land as possible for employment purposes.

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Shortage across industries A U.S. Chamber of Commerce report shows Arizona employment down overall from February 2020 to June 2021 and most industries in the state followed the same trend.

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SOURCE: U.S. CHAMBER OF COMMERCECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMAMY: We all see the signs in the windows of local businesses all over the Valley—”Help wanted” is nearly everywhere. In one of our front-page stories this month, we talk to local experts, business owners and the Chandler Chamber of Commerce about the shortage in the workforce and what factors may be contributing to it as the economy recovers from the impacts of COVID-19. Amy Lawson, PUBLISHER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMALEXA: The city of Chandler and Chandler City Council have been going through the process of updating several plans—from the airport to parks to transportation. Master plans and area plans serve as guiding documents for City Council as it makes decisions. Our front-page story this month gives you the latest on the airpark area plan update. Alexa D’Angelo, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

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Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

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BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION &DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

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CHANDLER EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, renovating or expanding

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east corner of Cooper and Germann roads. According to documents submit- ted to the city of Chandler, the business will be a “ghost kitchen” concept. It is not yet known when the business will open. 11 Bap and Chicken will open in Chan- dler, though an exact opening date is not yet known. The restaurant will be at 960 N. 54th St., Chandler—occupying the space that used to be held by Habit Burger Grill. The restaurant specializes in Korean food. www.bapandchicken.com RELOCATIONS 12 Now Financial relocated and opened a Chandler oce at 2450 S. Gilbert Road, Chandler. The business oers a variety of nancial planning services. 480-245-6829. www.nownancialaz.com NAME CHANGE 13 Alamo Drafthouse Cinemas will become Majestic Theaters after the East Valley owners of three locations cut ties with the Texas-based movie theater com- pany. One of the locations that will see a name change is in Chandler at 4955 S. Arizona Ave. The business will still serve food and screen movies. 520-213-8129. www.majesticphx.com EXPANSIONS 14 Elements Massage-Chandler West located on Ray Road and I-10 in the Casa Paloma Shopping Center at 7131 W. Ray Road, Ste. 4, Chandler, renovated and

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6 Hotworx Chandler opened its loca- tion Sept. 4. The 24-hour infrared tness studio is located at 2040 S. Alma School

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Road, Ste. 8. 480-207-1187. www.hotworx.net/studio/ chandler-ocotillo COMING SOON

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7 Cooper’s Hawk Winery & Restaurants is expected to open its Chandler location Sept. 27. The restaurant and wine bar is located near Chandler Fashion Center at 3325 W. Chandler Blvd., Chandler. This location will be the second in Arizona for the company; the rst is in Scottsdale. 480-936-7711. https://chwinery.com 8 Downtown Chandler will get a new business this fall when d’Vine Gourmet opens its store in the space previously oc- cupied by Sibley’s West. d’Vine Gourmet will open the location at 72 S. San Marcos Place, Chandler, in late September with a soft opening. The store sells a variety of goods from Arizona businesses 480-275-5320. https://stores.dvinegourmet.com 9 Andretti Indoor Karting & Games, a go-karting and arcade facility, is plan- ning a Chandler location. The company purchased a little more than 10 acres on the southwest corner of Cooper Road and the Loop 202 freeway in August. An opening date is not yet known. https://andrettikarting.com 10 Crave Chandler, a business planning to have multiple “concept” restaurants within the building, secured 2.2 acres of Chandler land in August near the south-

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MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. NOWOPEN 1 Hi 5 Tea opened this summer in Chandler. The Asian restaurant serves a variety of boba tea as well as traditional Asian entrees. The restaurant is located at 225 W. Warner Road, Ste. 102, Chan- dler. 480-534-4269. http://hi5tea.com 2 Inchin’s Bamboo Garden made its debut the week of Aug. 23 in down- town Chandler. The restaurant serves pan-Asian cuisine and is located at 17 E. Boston St., Chandler. 480-786-4008. https://bamboo-gardens.com 3 A new Chipotle location opened in Chandler the week of Aug. 23 with a pickup lane—known as a “Chipotlane”—at 1055 W. Chandler Blvd., Chandler. The

fast-casual Mexican restaurant is hiring, according to a news release from the company. 602-742-3574. www.chipotle.com 4 Tat Wong Kung fu Academy opened a school in Chandler at 2160 N. Alma School Road, Chandler, on Aug. 8. Tat Wong Academy teaches authentic tra- ditional Chinese kung fu and has taught students for four decades. Classes are available six days a week. 480-899-3311. https://twkungfu.com 5 Veggie Village , an Asian fusion eatery specializing in vegetarian and vegan cuisine, opened in late July at the new 99 Ranch Market on the northeast corner of Chandler Boulevard and Dob- son Road in Chandler. The restaurant is located at 1920 W. Chandler Blvd., Ste.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

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d'Vine Gourmet

ALEXA D'ANGELOCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

expanded its location. After 10 years in business, the studio added a larger lobby, three additional massage rooms and a new couple’s massage room. With the expan- sion, the studio also updated the look with new furnishings, artwork, and xtures. The studio was expected to reopen Sept. 20 after being closed several weeks. 480-219-9931. https://elementsmassage.com/chan- dler-west RENOVATIONS 15 Chase’s Diner reopened after renova- tions Sept. 14. Renovations included new ooring. The diner is located at 2040 N. Alma School Road, Chandler, and serves breakfast and lunch. The restaurant closed at the end of August for renovations. Some delays caused it to open a day or two later than anticipated. 480-855-3663 www.chasesdiner.com

A new tenant will take over the Flix Brewhouse location in downtown Chandler. (Alexa D’Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

FEATURED IMPACT A new tenant has inked a deal for the space formerly occupied by Flix Brewhouse in downtown Chandler at 1 W. Chandler Blvd. Look Cinemas will open its rst Arizona location in the space “as soon as possible,” said Kim Moyers, cultural development director at the city of Chandler. “We are really looking forward to a great relationship with Look Cinemas,” Moyers said. “We appreciate them making downtown Chandler their new home.” The business oers a full-service

restaurant and movie theater experience, similar to Flix Brewhouse. Flix closed the Chandler location during the COVID-19 pandemic and never reopened. The company currently operates four California locations and one location in Dallas. Look Cinemas 1 W Chandler Blvd, Chandler, AZ 85225 (682) 816-0111 www.lookcinemas.com

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CHANDLER EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

60 TRAN PORTATIONUPDATES W. BASELINE RD.

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

W. GUADALUPE RD.

Funding source: city of Chandler 2 Cooper Road improvement

Lindsay Road and Gilbert Road. Status: Traffic restrictions on Lindsay be- gan in March and will remain throughout the remainder of the project. The project is coordinating traffic control with the Germann Road improvements project. Timeline: October 2020-November 2021 Cost: $18.15 million Funding sources: town of Gilbert bonds and funds, Maricopa Association of Gov- ernments, developer contributions 4 Val Vista Drive widening The town widened Val Vista Drive from Appleby Road to Riggs Road. Traffic sig- nals were installed at Appleby, Ocotillo and Chandler Heights roads. Status: Traffic signals were energized Aug. 27. Permanent striping will be laid down by Oct. 8. Timeline: March 2020-October 2021 Cost: $25.96 million Funding sources: town of Gilbert, Maricopa Association of Governments funds

W. ELLIOT RD.

An effort is underway to expand Cooper Road to four lanes—two lanes in each di- rection. The project begins about 3,500 feet north of Chandler Heights Road to Riggs Road. Improvements include the construction of raised medians, bike lanes, left-turn lanes, sidewalks and traffic signals. Status: Crews have completed instal- lation of a water line on Cooper from Blue Ridge Way to Chandler Heights and are conducting pipeline testing over the next week or two to put the newly installed line into service. Residents will be notified in advance of any planned disruption to water service. Grading crews are working to grade for block wall foundations on the west side of Cooper from Victoria to Chandler Heights, and as the foundation work moves north, block wall installation will follow, which began the week of Aug. 9. Timeline: February 2020-September 2022 Cost: $17.17 million Funding source: city of Chandler 3 Lindsay Road/Loop 202 interchange An interchange at Lindsay Road and Loop 202 will be built to provide access to Loop 202 and a frontage road system on the north side of Loop 202 between

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MAP NOT TO SCALE

ONGOING PROJECTS 1 Milling and paving on Ray Road The work on Ray Road is part of an an- nual effort to patch asphalt on Chandler streets. The work is being done on Ray in small sections, allowing crews to work on a small section for a day or two at a time and then move on, according to the city.

Status: Patching work is happening on small segments on Ray throughout September. Construction work is largely taking place between Kyrene Road and Price Road. Lane disruptions are expect- ed along Ray Road for the duration of the project.

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF SEPT. 14. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT CHNNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& EDUCATION

News from Chandler & Chandler USD

COMPILED BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

QUOTEOFNOTE

Chandler USDboard votes to stay the coursewith COVID-19plan

Chandler City Council approves electric scooter, bike program CHANDLER Chandler City Council approved a resolution that could bring rentable electric scooters and bicycles to Chandler on Aug. 26. The council unanimously approved a resolution regarding the shared mobility licensing program. The coun- cil previously approved this resolution one year ago, but the coronavirus pandemic resulted in companies being wary, according to the agenda item. The program expired in Decem- ber. City Council also approved an amendment to Chapter 12 of the city code that established parking and operating rules for electric scooters and shared mobility devices. The code amendment remains in effect. The licensing program requires shared mobility companies to obtain an approved license agreement with the city prior to staging and renting devices within city right of way, according to the agenda item.

“I WOULDHOPE THAT PARENTSWOULD BE COGNIZANT OF OTHER CHILDREN ANDOTHER FAMILIES, BECAUSEWHEN THEY MAKE ADECISION NOT TOMASK THEIR CHILD, THEY CANBE IMPACTINGOTHER CHILDREN’S LIVES.” BARB MOZDZEN, CHANDLER USD GOVERNING BOARD PRESIDENT

Chandler names Dawn Lang deputy citymanager “We know that this can change,” Superintendent Frank Narducci said. “We can make those changes as needed ... as we see any rates take a turn.” CHANDLERUSD After nearly two hours of presentations and discussion, the Chandler USD governing board voted 3-2 to not make any changes to the district’s COVID-19 mitigation plan after many school systems across the state implemented mask mandates in August. Board members Lindsay Love and Lara Bruner dissented. The plan calls for 3 feet of social distancing and daily updates on the district’s COVID-19 dashboard, and it strongly recommends masking for teachers, students and staff following guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last month. CHANDLER Chandler City Manager Josh Wright named Dawn Lang as deputy city manager and chief financial officer for the city. In this new role, Lang will continue to oversee the management services department, and the information technology department and facilities and fleet division will now report to her. “Chandler’s financial management

The special board meeting came after Gov. Doug Ducey issued an exec- utive order preventing local governing bodies from implementing mask mandates Aug. 16 following a ruling from a Maricopa County Superior Court judge stating a law prohibiting mask mandates does not take effect until Sept. 29—90 days after the end of the legislative session. Ducey then announced Aug. 17 the state would offer $163 million in grants to district and charter schools that remain open for in-person instruction—without mask mandates. CUSD Chief Financial Officer Lana Berry told the board that if a mask mandate was implemented, the worst-case scenario could result in the district losing up to $60 million in funding.

CITYHIGHLIGHTS

CHANDLER Chandler City Council approved Aug. 26 a $50,000 contract with Voatz Inc. for a mobile voting pilot program the city will try later this year. CHANDLER Chandler City Council approved Aug. 26 a contract with Lyft for the city’s first mile, last mile program in an amount not to exceed $49,000. The program kicked off in September 2020 as a one-year agreement with Lyft, with four one-year extension options. This partnership program extends the transit reach in south Chandler, where bus service is currently limited, by providing Chandler residents with discounted Lyft trips to and from bus stops south of Pecos Road. Chandler City Council Oct. 11, 6 p.m. 88 E. Chicago St., Chandler 480-782-2181 • www.chandleraz.gov Chandler USD board Oct. 13, 7 p.m. 1525 W. Frye Road, Chandler 480-812-7000 • www.cusd80.com MEETINGSWE COVER

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Dawn Lang

major rating agencies,” Wright said in a news release. “Dawn’s leadership is a major reason Chandler has achieved the fiscal prosperity we enjoy today, and I am excited for her to take on this opportunity. This new role recognizes her responsibilities as our CFO while offering expanded leadership capacity within the city manager’s office.”

SOURCES: NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CITY TRANSPORTATION OFFICIALS, CITY OF CHANDLER/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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CHANDLER EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

DINING FEATURE Nando’sMexican Café Families old and new mark success of restaurant T im Shaughnessy was a nervous 16-year-old when he was met at a Scottsdale restaurant by a gru 24-year-old Fernando “Nando” Rios for a busing job interview.

TOM BLODGETT

by trade, did the metal work in the restaurants, including constructing a “tree of life” sculpture for each. For Shaughnessy, family does not stop at the blood lines. He said the “Nando’s family” includes the employees, many of whom have stayed on long term. “The kids running the stores—nah, I shouldn’t say that anymore—the folks, the managers running the stores now all grew up with us,” he said. “[They started as servers], bartenders, bus boys, whatever.” Some met their spouses at one of the restaurants, had their weddings catered from them and now bring their children in. Shaughnessy said that is what makes the restaurants special. Jessy Forman, who manages the bar at the Gilbert location, said that liking her job is an understatement.

When his mother picked him up, he was sure he had blown it. But a few hours later he was called and asked if he had black shoes and black pants and, when he answered in the armative, told to be there by 6 p.m. A couple months later, Shaugh- nessy nally got up the nerve to ask the intimidating man why he had hired him. “Because I had two people call out that day, and I needed someone,” Rios answered. They became the best of friends over the next 17 years. Then they became business partners for the

Owner Tim Shaughnessy (right) enjoys loyalty from employees such as (from left) General Manager Rosi Gibson (10 years), Assistant Manager Tony Gomez (ve years) and Bar Manager Jessy Forman (5 1/2 years).

PHOTOS BY TOM BLODGETTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

The Faja Pasta ($14.95) is a Nando’s creation served on a bed of fettucine.

El Numero Dos ($14.95) has a taco, cheese enchilada and bean tostada.

past 18 years in Nan- do’s Mexican Café in Gilbert, which has grown to four restaurants in the East Valley, includ- ing Chandler in 2012. A fth opens in Mar- icopa next year. While the partner-

Her aunt, who for- merly worked at the restaurant, referred her a week after she moved to Arizona. “This was sup- posed to be my

“WE’VEALWAYSHAD GOODKIDS, AND HOPEFULLY THAT’S AREFLECTIONOF OWNERSHIP.” TIM SHAUGHNESSY, COOWNER

EAST VALLEY REACH Nando’s Mexican Café has grown from one Gilbert location.

4 current locations 1 on the way 221 employees 250 employees when fully staed

2003 Gilbert opening 2012 Chandler opening

steppingstone job, just something to get me by,” she said. “And I’ve been here ve and a half years.” Forman is putting herself through school, and Shaughnessy said stories like hers make him proud. “We’ve always had good kids, and hopefully that’s a reection of own- ership—Nando, Sean and myself,” he said.

ship is among three friends—third friend Sean Whalen joined in when they opened the Mesa location in 2009—families are critical to the success. The recipes come from Rios’ mom and dad, who helped established the restaurant, although both have since passed. Shaughnessy’s dad, a welder

Nando’sMexican Café 1890 W. Germann Road, Chandler 480-855-4344 www.nandosmexicancafe.com Hours: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-10 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.-9 p.m.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

The spin roomat Flo Yoga & Cycle is a place where people come together and ride stationary bikes whilemusic blasts and lights ash to create a fun environment. (Alexa D’Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

BUSINESS FEATURE

Eddie and Debbie Davis own and run Flo Yoga & Cycle. They can be found behind the front desk.

Flo Yoga&Cycle Fitness studio aims to create connection, community O n any given day, customers can nd Debbie and Eddie Davis behind the counter at Flo Yoga & Cycle. They are there to check their BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

BUILDING COMMUNITY Owners Debbie and Eddie Davis are proud of the community they have created with their members. They even let them write on the studio walls.

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across the city and working to build connection and community among gym-goers. “We set the tone by being here every day,” Eddie said. “One of us is always here. Nobody will repre- sent Flo like us. It matters how you are greeted when you walk in somewhere. It’s culture building.” The studio oers spin classes, strength training classes and yoga classes at various times throughout the week. “We are dierent, and our

members in, hear about their days and make sure they have everything they need for their spin, yoga or strength training class. Eddie is known as the “front

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desk guy”—an inside joke between him and longtime members. He is also the go-to guy for tightening spin shoes. Most people at the studio know each other, the Davises and the instructors. “People look out for one another here,” Debbie said. “It really is a community, even though that sounds kind cliche, it really is true here.” The couple wanted to turn their shared passion for tness

3

FLOYoga&Cycle 71 E. Frye Road, Chandler 480-907-5645 www.oyogacycle.com

members see that,” Eddie said. “People of all races, creeds and colors and body types come here.” Flo has pivoted too many times for Debbie and Eddie to recall after the coronavirus pan- demic closed down gyms last year and then limited capacity for months. They did classes outdoors and worked with other

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into a business and leave their corporate jobs. In January 2018, they opened Flo Yoga & Cycle in a redeveloped downtown Chandler space. Since then, the duo and their business have become a staple in the Chandler community—bringing pop-up events

local business owners to do events and pop-ups. “It’s exhausting howmuch we pivoted, but it worked, and ultimately it was what got us through everything,” Debbie said. “We wouldn’t be here if it weren’t for our members.”

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CHANDLER EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

V O T E R G U I D E

CHANDLERVOTER GUIDE

COMPILED BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

D A T E S T O K N O W F O R A L L M A I L E L E C T I O N Oct. 2 Last day to register to vote in the Nov. 2 election Oct. 6 Ballots mailed to registered voters Oct. 26 Last day to mail in ballots Nov. 2 Election Day/deadline to drop o ballots

For stories on both ballot measures visit communityimpact.com

C I T Y O F C H A N D L E R B O N D

The city’s bond is sectioned into ve parts, asking voters to vote yes or no to ve separate questions. This is the language that will appear on the ballot.

MUNICIPAL FACILITIES BONDS AMOUNT: $33.57 million Purposes : to construct, improve, renovate, replace and remodel municipal buildings and facilities including performing arts and cultural facilities, oce buildings, senior and community recreation centers, libraries, and other municipal buildings and facilities, including such improvements as HVAC systems, roong, plumbing, electrical systems and generators, technology, and other building components related thereto; to furnish and equip such municipal facilities, and improve the grounds thereof

PUBLIC SAFETY/FIRE BONDS AMOUNT: $25.16 million Purposes : to construct, improve, renovate and remodel re stations and other re safety- related facilities; to furnish, equip and improve re stations, re safety-related facilities and radio infrastructure; and to acquire vehicles and land for re and public safety purposes

PARKSANDRECREATION IMPROVEMENTS/COMMUNITY SERVICESBONDS AMOUNT: $72.98million Purposes : to construct, improve and acquire community, neighborhood, regional and aquatic parks, including recreational facilities, buildings and improvements; to acquire land for parks, recreational facilities, buildings and open spaces; to make improvements, additions and replacements to existing parks and recreational facilities and buildings; to

PUBLIC SAFETY/POLICE BONDS AMOUNT: $55.19 million Purposes : to construct, improve, renovate and remodel police stations and other police-related facilities; to furnish, equip and improve police stations, police-related facilities and radio infrastructure; and to acquire vehicles and land for police and public safety purposes

PUBLICWORKS/STREET AND TRANSIT IMPROVEMENTS BONDS AMOUNT: $85.78 million Purposes : to design, acquire, improve, construct, reconstruct and rehabilitate the streets, avenues, alleys and highways of or within the city; to design, acquire, install, construct and reconstruct street lighting, trac signal/control systems, underground utility lines, landscape improvements and transit/bicycle program improvements, including shared- use paths and trails; to acquire land and interests in land for transportation purposes

landscape, furnish and equip existing and new parks and recreational facilities and buildings C H A N D L E R U S D O V E R R I D E

An override is a voter-approved initiative that generates additional tax revenue to fund projects and operations. The district is currently operating under a 15% override; this would be a continuation. This is how the question will appear on the ballot.

in Article IX, Section 18, Constitution of Arizona. Based on the current net assessed valuation used for secondary property tax purposes, to fund the proposed continuation of the increase in the school. District’s budget would require an estimated continuation of a tax rate of $1.24 per $100 of assessed valuation used for secondary property tax purposes and is in addition to the school district’s tax rate that will be levied to fund the school district’s revenue control limit allowed by law.

school district budget by $0. The amount of the proposed increase will be based on a percentage of the school district’s revenue control limit in future years as provided in Section 15-481(P), Arizona Revised Statutes. Any budget increase continuation authorized by this election shall be entirely funded by a levy of taxes on the taxable property in this school district for the year for which adopted and for six subsequent years, shall not be realized from monies furnished by the state and shall not be subject to the limitation on taxes specied

CHANDLERUSD 15%OVERRIDE Shall the governing board of Chandler USD No. 80 of Maricopa County, Arizona (the “school district”), adopt maintenance and operations budgets which allow the school district to continue to exceed the revenue control limit specied by law in the amount of not more than 15% per scal year for scal year 2022-23 and the next subsequent six scal years thereafter? The 2022-23 proposed continuation of the budget increase of the school district budget will exceed the alternate proposed

SOURCES: CHANDLER USD, CITY OF CHANDLERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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CHANDLER EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

T

RECENT PROJECTS

Fourteen projects are underway, complete or recently approved in the Airpark Area, according to a rough draft of the master plan update.

Square footage

OFFICE

Available parcels

Watermark at Chandler Park

220,000 400,000 180,000 92,000 210,000 224,471 234,390 1,219,364 362,880 201,152 251,066 113,000 unknown

1

Ascend at Chandler Airport Center

9

2

10

8

Chandler Airport Center Allred Airport Center II

3

R

4

Mach One

13

5

12

7

INDUSTRIAL Parc Germann

6

AZ 202 Commerce Park

7

Chandler Airport Commerce Center

8

2

Ferguson Enterprises RMB Business Park

6

9

AIRPARKAREANOW

3

4

10

The Airpark Area has the most opportunity for growth of any other employment corridor in Chandler, according to city ocials. The area is currently the fourth- largest employment corridor.

5

1

SOLLiD Cabinetry

11

800 E. Germann Industrial Falcon Storage Condos COMMERCIAL Arches Climbing & Fitness

12

14

13

11

320 businesses

10,000 jobs

14

36,000

Harris said building out the area around the airport is important to the viability of future employment and growth in the city. “I think it’s going to send life that way and excitement that way, and also it’s an economic driver, so it’s going to boost everything around it,” Harris said Aug. 9 during a council work session. City Council echoed his sentiment in its discussion Aug. 9. “I’m just really excited to see the future of this area,” Vice Mayor Mark Stewart said. “I really think it’s going to be great.” According to a draft of the master plan update, the number of jobs in the area is expected to more than double by 2055. Newdevelopments Chandler Planning Administrator Kevin Mayo said the Airpark Area was “slow to start” in terms of new devel- opments compared to the city’s other employment areas. “Two things aected its progress in the last 20 years,” Mayo said. “Before Loop 202 was expanded, it was only accessible by county arterial roads, and so with the arrival of Loop 202 in the rst part of the decade, growth started. If everything was normal, you would have seen that area a lot further along. But very shortly after that, the Great Recession happened. It took four or ve years for that segment of the market to rebound, and it’s only been in the last three or four years, before the coronavirus, that growth

MAP NOT TO SCALE

SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Around 900,000 square feet of industrial development was com- pleted in 2020, according to a rough draft of the Airpark Area plan update. More than 2.5 million square feet for oce, industrial and commercial projects have been recently approved in the area, according to the plan. “Currently, there’s quite a bit of development in the employment cor- ridor, and part of that Airpark Area plan, at least from an economic devel- opment perspective, clearly articu- lates the types of employment we are looking to have within that employ- ment corridor,” Miranda said. Planning for the future The area plan update rough draft discussed by City Council in August suggests a majority of the avail- able land in the Airpark Area is pre- served for high-wage, high-intensity jobs. The plan also sets forth design guidelines—including guidelines for “Google campus”-type oce devel- opments that oer amenities such as restaurants or coee shops and walk- ing paths to employees. Harris said these new areas of inno- vation are important to the growth of the airpark employment corridor. “With the city of Chandler approaching [build-out] and less than 10% of available land left, it is important to maximize and capitalize

on these resources,” Harris said. “In Chandler we have a saying: ‘Employ- ment drives growth.’ The Airpark Area plan update creates a new land-use category, innovation, which encour- ages collaborative employment cam- puses that will provide the home for the employment of tomorrow.” And while the Airpark Area plan deals with the land surrounding the Chandler Municipal Airport, it does suggest the construction of one or more hotels in the area might bolster the employment use of the general aviation airport. Currently, there are no hotels in the area. The airport master plan was updated in April and called for a potential expansion of the south run- way by 680 feet from 4,870 feet to 5,550 feet. This improvement would allow the same size and type of air- craft currently using the airport in cooler months to use the airport year- round, according to the master plan. Miranda said because Price Corri- dor—the city’s largest economic cor- ridor anchored by Intel—is so close to build-out, the Airpark Area has become a “de facto Price Corridor,” attracting similar high-wage, high- skill jobs and developments. Miranda said the key for the city is to be selec- tive in the kinds of projects that get approved in the area as land becomes limited.

CONTINUED FROM 1

and rened” vision for the Airpark Area employment corridor as the city continues to near build-out—less than 10% of Chandler’s overall vacant land remains. “[We need a] development com- munity that embraces that vision and can adjust and respond to the chang- ing dynamics of employment in the future,” Harris said. “High-tech, inno- vative technologies and aeronautical industry-related users will represent the focus of that growth.” The Chandler Airpark Area encom- passes 9 square miles surrounding the Chandler Municipal Airport. It includes land beyond the gates of the airport, but not the airport itself. “It’s the nal frontier; it has the largest uncommitted and vacant land for future employment devel- opment,” Chandler Economic Devel- opment Director Micah Miranda said. “As Price Corridor lls up and builds out, which it has almost done, the Air- park Area will be the largest landmass available for employment.” The Airpark Area is the city’s fourth-largest employment corridor with more than 10,000 jobs and 320 businesses as of 2019, the latest data available, according to Miranda. More development in the area is on the horizon, Miranda said.

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMMERCIAL DEMAND FORECAST

PLANNING FOR GROWTH

The Airpark Area is the city’s fourth-largest employment corridor as of 2019 and accounts for 18% of the city’s remaining undeveloped land. According to a draft of the master plan update, the number of jobs in the area is expected to more than double by 2055.

The draft of the Airpark Area master plan update shows a forecast of where experts think the area will be in the next 30 years.

Other 0.4% | 50

Chandler population and job growth, 2018-55

Airpark population and job growth, 2018-55

Transportation 11.9% | 1,500 Manufacturing 19.7% | 2,474

Percent of area employment |

Population

Jobs

POPULATION

JOBS

30K 25K 20K 15K 10K

350K 300K 250K 150K 200K 50K 100K

Number of employees

Health care 6% | 760

Business services 58% | 7,300

Retail/hospitality 4% | 500

5K

0

0

2040 2050 2020 2030 2055 2018

2040 2050 2020 2030 2055 2018

SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

was happening.” Mayo said the area is seeing a lot of oce and exible industrial space requests and a surge in construc- tion of those projects in spite of the pandemic. Five oce projects have been approved and are in various stages of development, including the Watermark at Chandler Airpark development. “There is quite a bit of vacant land already zoned and planned; we are just waiting for the market to get there and are even starting to see some of that built,” Mayo said. “Out of 9

square miles, 700 [vacant acres] is not really a whole lot of property.” The area plan update builds in a zoning mechanism to protect certain available lands from residential uses, according to the plan. As of August, 14 developments had been approved, and some were under construction— all of which were commercial, indus- trial or oce uses, according to the plan. “I love the rewall against residen- tial,” Mayor Kevin Hartke said during the Aug. 9 meeting. “That will be a big asset for our sta and for us. I can’t

think of a piece of ground in Chandler yet that we haven’t been told that the only thing that can go there is residen- tial or apartments. I think the rewall is excellent there. … This makes it clear, and I think it holds our wishes and previous councils’ wishes and says we are after employment, and this is one of our best, last employ- ment areas to be developed.” Miranda said using the updated master plan as a guiding document, his team and ultimately City Council will be responsible for making sure the uses of that land go toward the

industries that will best serve the area. “We have to be willing to say no to those projects that don’t align with the long-term economic development plan for that area,” Miranda said. “We are retaining what has been desig- nated for employment and making sure it remains employment instead of ipping to residential. Then we have to make sure it’s the right type of employment.”

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

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13

CHANDLER EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

La Ciudad de Chandler llevará a cabo una Elección Especial de Bonos el 2 de noviembre de 2021 Una elección de bonos es una oportunidad para que los contribuyentes de impuestos decidan qué mejoramientos o realces comunitarios están dispuestos a pagar a través de los impuestos sobre la propiedad. ¿Aumentarán sus tasas de impuestos sobre la propiedad? No . Aprenda más sobre lo que esta elección de bonos significa para usted y nuestra Ciudad en el sitio web a continuación.

The City of Chandler will hold a Special Bond Election on Nov. 2, 2021 A bond election is an opportunity for taxpayers to decide what community improvements or enhancements they are willing to pay for through property taxes.

Will your property tax rates increase? No .

Learn more about what this bond election means for you and our City at the web address below.

chandleraz.gov/BondElection

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CHANDLER EMPLOYMENT The city of Chandler, like many other cities or towns, has seen a uctuation in employment since the coronavirus gripped the nation in March 2020. The city has recovered from its highest unemployment rate in April 2020, but it is still above pre-pandemic unemployment.

Chandler Labor Force compared to Employment

Chandler Unemployment Rate

132,506

150,923

12.9%

Labor force

Employment

160,000 155,000 150,000 145,000 130,000 135,000 140,000

14% 12% 10%

2% 4% 6% 8%

4.9%

Pre-pandemic level

0

0

SOURCE: ARIZONA COMMERCE AUTHORITYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Aected inmore ways than one Grant said Jolie’s Place is not only seeing a shortage in workers, but the business is also seeing industry shortages and price hikes—as is the case of chicken wings, the price of which has shot up during COVID-19 recovery. In some cases, Grant is hav- ing trouble getting beer because of a shortage of glass bottles. “So we have nothing to put [the beer in], no one to deliver it, no one to stock it and no one to serve it,” Grant said. “It’s not funny. It’s just so sad and frustrating, especially for small businesses like ours.” Because of shortages and increases in product costs, Grant said the restaurant may have to raise some of its prices. But that is not the only thing causing increases in the cost for customers. Minimum-wage increases are also driving that, Grant said. “I know my husband went to [Panda Express], and positions there start at $15 an hour,” Grant said. “That’s good. I’m not saying that’s not good, but if the pay keeps going up then we have to make sure we raise our prices to address for what we are paying out in labor costs.” Additionally, Grant said because restaurants are so short-staed, they are seeing more negative feedback. “We have such patient customers and sta that does work here,” Grant said. “If there was one thing I would want to say to everyone is that to please, please have some patience and some grace and some under- standing. Restaurants are doing the best we can.”

to work. And when we start to see the stimulus money is not owing through the economy, like it has been so far, then you’re going to see peo- ple looking for work, and that’ll put downward pressure on wages again.” Rounds said some social factors that came through the pandemic have had an eect on the labor mar- ket as well. “We went through a very tough time, and people re-evaluated their need to work in general,” he said. ‘It’s every industry’ Terri Kimble, president and CEO of the Chandler Chamber of Commerce, said the labor shortage is aecting industries across Chandler—from manufacturing and engineering to hospital employees and line cooks. “It’s not just one industry,” Kim- ble said. “It’s every industry that’s feeling this. There is a shortage of workers all across all venues. We are seeing it across the spectrum.” Employment in Arizona is down 1.5% overall from February 2020 to June 2021, according to data from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, with employment declining in most sec- tors statewide. Hardest hit beyond leisure and hospitality at 9.9% was professional and business services down 2.1% and construction and extraction 1.2%. Trade and trans- portation, which includes shipping activities, was the lone sector that saw growth, up 5%. Kimble said she believes the labor shortage is “complex and can’t be linked to just one thing.” “I think in COVID-19, it has forced everyone to re-evaluate what their priorities are,” she said. “We are

seeing an increase in the number of people who want to start their own businesses. They may not go back to the workforce; they are doing what they can to start their own. We are also seeing businesses have shifted and are looking at processes and internal things that maybe need shifting. We are also seeing a lot of employee fatigue and burnout.”

CONTINUED FROM 1

helping sta doing whatever it takes to stay aoat,” Grant said. “It’s been tough. It’s really frustrating. You’re trying to keep people working and stay open.” Like Jolie’s Place, “Help wanted” signs can be found in the windows of many Chandler restaurants and businesses as owners struggle to ll positions. Although the Arizona Commerce Authority reports unemployment is down 3.5 percentage points to 4.9% from June 2020 to June 2021, econ- omist Jim Rounds of the Rounds Consulting Group in Tempe cautions that numbers must be compared to pre-pandemic levels. Comparing Feb- ruary 2020 to June 2021, unemploy- ment is up 1.7 percentage points with employment down nearly 200 jobs and labor force up 2,500 workers. In Chandler, the city still has yet to see unemployment dip back down to pre-COVID-19 levels. As of July, the city had an unemployment rate of 4.9%, compared to 3.5% in February 2020, according to the Arizona Com- merce Authority. Rounds said he believes an eco- nomic imbalance was brought on by the pandemic and subsequent stimu- lus packages. Those monies allowed lower-wage workers to not have to work. He said the imbalance could work itself out over time, especially as stimulus money goes away. “You’re going to end up with higher wages, which is going to draw people back into the market—temporarily,” he said. “It’ll put pressure on prots and is going to put pressure on small businesses, but that’s the way it has

“IT’S EVERY INDUSTRY THAT’S FEELING THIS. THERE IS A SHORTAGE OF WORKERS ALL ACROSS ALL VENUES. WE ARE

SEEING IT ACROSS THE SPECTRUM.” TERRI KIMBLE, CHANDLER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE PRESIDENT AND CEO

A Pew Research Center survey released in February found that 66% of the unemployed had “seriously considered” changing their eld of work—a greater percentage than during the Great Recession. “People are really looking inter- nally at what is best for them and looking to nd a balance,” Kimble said. Kimble said the Chandler chamber is doing what it can to help business owners and workers connect. It hosts a virtual job fair and continually posts positions for businesses seek- ing employees.

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

15

CHANDLER EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

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