Sugar Land - Missouri City Edition | Sept. 2020

VOLUME XX, ISSUE XX  XXXXXXXXXX, 2020 SUGAR LAND MISSOURI CITY EDITION 2020

PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION

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VOLUME 8, ISSUE 1  SEPT. 9OCT. 6, 2020

BY CLAIRE SHOOP Learning loss

The coronavirus pandemic has left Fort Bend ISD students, families and district sta navigating edu- cation in a completely new online environment. The 2020-21 school year began mostly online Aug. 17 with the majority of the district’s 79,000 students and 5,000 teachers logging in from their homes amid the ongoing pandemic. As of press time Sept. 4, the district had applied for a waiver to allow online-only learning until Oct. 9. FBISD will phase in students who chose face-to- face learning by Oct. 12. All students will have the option to remain remote for the entire school year. FBISD Superintendent Charles Dupre said district ocials believe it will take two years to remedy the learning loss that happened when school closed for nine weeks at the end of the 2019-20 school year. “We’re not seeing this as we come back to school, everything’s going to be back to normal quickly,”

Online learning reveals challenges, inequities, learning gaps in Fort Bend ISD

“We recognize that things will gowrong; that’s what the rst week of school is always about. Even if we weren’t in a pandemic, we’re always working out those kinks that come alongwith new routines. And this year, of course, technology just gives us another layer towork through.” Amanda Bubela, FBISD director of external communications and media relations

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TESSA HOEFLECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Missouri City amends street-namingpolicies

Council unanimously approved changes to two sections of city code related to the street-nam- ing and -renaming process. Council’s actions come after some street and subdivision names have come under scrutiny from council members and the community for containing the word “plantation” or bearing names of Civil War battles and Confederate generals. Throughout Missouri City, eight subdivi- sions and 20 street names include the word

8 SUBDIVISIONS 20 STREET NAMES in Missouri City contain the word “plantation.”

BY CLAIRE SHOOP

Missouri City residents will now be able to more easily apply with the city to change an existing street name, following recent action by the City Council. In July and August, Missouri City City

SOURCE: CITY OF MISSOURI CITY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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CLAIRE SHOOPCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

EDUCATION E D I T I O N 2020 PUBLIC

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Business group calls for public-privatemobility partnerships

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No matter the circumstance, Fort Bend ISD has answered the call to provide support and stability, and continue our District’s mission. Today, school looks different - but the learning continues. You can trust that whatever comes next, we are ready and prepared to do what we have always done: support our students, families and staff. We are truly reimagining education – together, with our community . In 2017, a natural disaster. In 2020, a global pandemic.

Learn more about our efforts at fortbendisd.com/reimagined

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

It takes all 16,705 of us to be ranked one of the nation’s best. We’re not just the largest children’s hospital in America. For 12 straight years, we’ve also been recognized as one of the best by U.S. News & World Report. This year, we’re ranked # 4 overall and in the top five in seven specialties—including # 1 in pediatric cardiology and heart surgery. It takes great technology, facilities and expertise to be recognized year after year, but the most important thing it takes is great people. People who care deeply about caring for children. And we’re honored that so many people like that choose to work here.

Learn more at TexasChildrens.org/best

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SUGAR LAND - MISSOURI CITY EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

WHERE DO YOU GO WHEN HEARTBURN COULD BE SOMETHING MORE THAN HEARTBURN?

Our ERs are ready for whatever, whenever. With convenient locations across the Greater Houston area, trusted emergency care, and a safe environment, our ERs are ready 24/7, every day of the year. Because when an emergency happens, your health is too important to wait.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Amy Martinez amymartinez@communityimpact.com EDITOR Beth Marshall REPORTER Claire Shoop GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chase Brooks

FROMAMY: Even though most of us usually return to school in August these days, September will always remind me of back to school. While this year certainly looks very dierent for most of us, there is still a lot happening in our K-12 education community. Make sure you visit our annual education section (see Page 15) for all the details. Amy Martinez, GENERALMANAGER

PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION

METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kristina Shackelford MANAGING EDITOR Marie Leonard ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Tessa Hoee SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Anya Gallant CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company's mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON Please join your friends and neighbors in CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE support of Community Impact Newspaper’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON CONTACT US 245 Commerce Green Blvd., Ste. 200 Sugar Land, TX 77478 • 5129896808 PRESS RELEASES SLMnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher. SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more

FROMBETH: As this school year gets underway, we understand the toll online learning can take on families. We have provided a noncomprehensive list (see Page 21) of in-person and online resources in the Fort Bend ISD area for families to turn to for extra help with school work. Beth Marshall, EDITOR

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 9 Ongoing and completed projects

DISTRICT DATA

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Fort Bend ISD 201920 snapshot SPECIAL EDUCATION 17 Some students return to the classroom CAMPUS DEEP DIVE 18 FBISD campus enrollment and demographics

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Local sources 21

New businesses 7

Fort Bend ISD schools 77

New school updates 4

Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

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GUIDE 23 Online and in-person learning resources

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

COMPILED BY CLAIRE SHOOP

NOWOPEN 1 A new KIPP Texas Public Schools cam- pus at 14030 Florence Road, Sugar Land, began the 2020-21 school year virtually Aug. 24. The new campus is home to two school buildings: a KIPP Journey Primary school for students in kindergarten and rst grade and a KIPP Journey Collegiate school for students in fth and sixth grade. Over time, the KIPP Journey program will grow so students from pre-K through 12th grade will attend two schools on one campus. The school plans to invite small groups of students to campus from Sept. 21-Oct. 9. The goal is to have in-person learning phased in by Oct. 19. KIPP Journey Primary: 832-392-2662. KIPP Journey Col- legiate: 281-900-0490. https://kipptexas. org/our-schools/houston/ 2 iCode , a computer coding school, opened in early August at 4899 Hwy. 6, Ste. 113C, Missouri City. The national fran- chise provides coding education through after-school programs, online classes and camps for students in grades K-12. Both on-site and online coding classes are available, and iCode is serving as a remote learning center—a place where students can engage in their district curriculum during the school day. 281-584-6618. www.icodeschool.com/sugarland117 3 UFC Gym Sugar Land had a soft open- ing of its facility at 16566 Hwy. 59, Sugar Land, on July 25 but has delayed a grand opening celebration due to the coronavirus pandemic. The family-friendly, MMA-in- spired tness center is open to patrons and enrolling new members. Gym amenities in- clude a wide variety of exercise equipment, free weights, personal training services, and mixed martial arts classes. UFC Gym has additional Houston-area locations in Pearland and the Heights. 346-340-8323. www.ufcgym.com 4 Evolution Pain and Spine opened an oce at 17510 W. Grand Parkway S., Ste. 320, Sugar Land, on July 6. The practice, led by Dr. Sunil Thomas, an interventional pain management and physical medicine and rehabilitation expert, aims to help patients recover from injuries or degen- erative conditions by treating the root cause of nerve, back, neck and joint pain. Evolution Pain and Spine has other loca- tions in League City and Lake Jackson.

281-916-1012. www.evopain.com 5 Mattison Avenue Salon Suites & Spa has opened a second-oor location at 2181 Texas Drive in Sugar Land Town Square. With 11,000 square feet and 50 furnished suites, the upscale salon leases space to independent beauty contrac- tors such as hair stylists, aestheticians, massage therapists, makeup artists and nail technicians. While the salon had its rst tenants move in in early January, the business was closed from March 27-May 8, per Gov. Greg Abbott’s coronavirus orders. Since then, 25 suites have been leased, and many providers are serving customers. The Sugar Land location is the rst of four planned Mattison Avenue locations in the Houston area. 281-907-3294. www.mattisonsalonsuites.com 6 Service First Automotive had a grand opening for its Missouri City ser- vice center Aug. 3. The new location at 9450 Hwy. 6, Missouri City, was initially scheduled to open in mid-March but was delayed because of the ongoing corona- virus pandemic. Service First Automotive oers a full range of automotive repair services, oil changes and state inspec- tions while prioritizing customer service and satisfaction. There are eight other Service First locations in the Houston area as well as locations in Dallas-Fort Worth and San Antonio. 346-245-7723. www.servicerstautomotive.com 7 Bank of America opened an Ad- vanced Center at 11563 Hwy. 6, Sugar Land, on Aug. 3. Advanced Centers are not staed with full-time bankers. Instead, digital greeters assist customers with their transactions or connect them to banking specialists via video conference. Dennis Johnson, Bank of America’s consumer banking executive for the Houston region, said the Advanced Centers are a part of the company’s growing digital presence and improve the overall customer experience. During the coronavirus pandemic, Johnson said Advanced Centers allow customers to complete their banking transactions with- out getting in front of a teller in person. 281-201-3123. www.bankofamerica.com REOPENINGS 8 AMC Fountains 18 , located at 11225 Fountain Lake Drive, Staord, reopened

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Aug. 20 following a ve-month tem- porary closure caused by the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Nationwide, AMC Enterprise Holdings Inc. will reopen its 630 locations in phases based on local and state health guidelines. The AMC Safe & Clean program requires all movie- goers and employees to wear masks and includes enhanced cleaning protocols, upgraded air ltration and reduced the- ater capacity. 281-240-0761. www.amctheatres.com CLOSINGS 9 Stein Mart Inc. announced Aug. 12 that it has led for bankruptcy. A press release from the company said it expects to close “a signicant portion, if not all” of its stores and has launched a store closing and liquidation process. Stein Mart has 281 stores in 30 states, includ- ing a location at 12656 Fountain Lake Circle, Staord. The company has not yet announced a timeline for closing specic store locations. 281-240-7779. www.steinmart.com

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Business group calls for public-privatemobility partnerships

COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ AND CLAIRE SHOOP

ONGOING PROJECT

RIVERPARK DR.

99 TOLL

With the state of Texas facing a projected budget shortfall of $4.58 billion—which comes with the threat of declining mobility funds as key tax revenue sources are weakened—a new group has emerged, calling for more public-private partnerships to keep crucial mobility projects from being curtailed. The group, Keep Texas Moving, was announced at a July 20 virtual press conference by the Texas Asso- ciation of Business, an Austin-based advocacy group that pushes for pro-business policies. With congestion levels worsening and a mobility crisis looming, TAB Vice President Aaron Cox said private partnerships could help advance projects such as optional toll lanes, which he said could be built faster and at no cost to taxpayers. “We would love to build free roads, but the reality is our tax revenues are just not keeping pace with the need and the growth we are experiencing, especially now that COVID-19 and lower energy prices are really hammer- ing the state and our transportation funding sources,” Cox said in a July 20 virtual press conference. The Texas Department of Transpor- tation has engaged in similar projects in the past, Cox said—including on a project to expand Hwy. 288 in Hous- ton—but the department’s authority to enter into public-private partnership projects expired in 2017. However, indi- vidual projects can still be approved by the Legislature. Texas voters approved a pair of statewide propositions—Proposition 1 in 2014 and Proposition 7 in 2015— that diverted portions of oil and gas

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“Wewould love to build free roads, but the reality is our tax revenues are just not keeping pacewith the need and the growthwe are experiencing, especially now that COVID19 and lower energy prices are really hammering the state and our transportation funding sources.” Aaron Cox, TAB Vice President

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In June, the Fort Bend County Toll Road Authority began construction on a proj- ect to expand the frontage road to the Grand Parkway between Riverpark and Hwy. 59. The project will add a third lane on both the north and southbound sides of the road. Ocials with the FBCTRA said construction is contained to the side of the road with little to no obstruction of existing lanes. Timeline: June-fall 2020 Cost: $1 million Funding source: Fort Bend County Toll Road Authority

Keep Texas Moving ocials cited a toll lane expansion project along Hwy. 288 as an example of how public-private partnerships can be used to address mobility problems. (Courtesy Brazoria County)

COMPLETED PROJECT

severance taxes, general sales taxes andmotor vehicle sales taxes to the State Highway Fund, which is used in part to fund one-third of TxDOT’s annual budget. Funding projects Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar told state ocials July 20 to expect a historic drop in state revenue by the end of scal year 2020-21, with motor vehicle sales tax revenue and sever- ance tax revenue among the hardest hit. The highway fund is projected to get about $1.1 billion in transfers this scal year based on collections from the previous scal year, Hegar said. However, next year’s transfer—which will be based on collections from this year—is projected to fall to $620 million, he said. Cox said funding was insucient to address gridlock on Texas roads even

before the oil price woes. “The need for improving and expanding Texas roadways is outstrip- ping available funding,” he said. “That was true before Texas was hit by the double-barrel assault of COVID-19 and the worldwide fall in energy prices.” Keep Texas Moving is not advo- cating for any specic projects to be prioritized, a decision Cox said would be up to TxDOT and local metropol- itan planning organizations, such as the Houston-Galveston Area Council. He said a good starting place could be looking at the annual Most Congested Roadways report released by the Texas A&M Transportation Institute. With overall state revenue on the decline, Cox said more private funding for road projects would also allow the state to preserve its tax dollars for other needs.

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF AUG. 19. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SLMNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. Missouri City. The roadway is open, and city ocials said motorists will experience an easier commute and fewer trac delays in the area. Timeline: November 2019-August 2020 Cost: $2.5 million Funding sources: city of Missouri City, Fort Bend County Independence Boulevard Segment 2 Construction on the project to convert a section of Independence Boulevard from a two-lane concrete road to a four-lane concrete curb and gutter road wrapped up in August, according to ocials with

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

INSIDE INFORMATION

COMPILED BY CLAIRE SHOOP

cases In an Aug. 5 press conference, Fort Bend County ocials warned coronavirus case numbers would “exponentially increase” due to a change in the system used to track case data at the state level. Jacquelyn Minter, Fort Bend County Health & Human Services director and local health authority, said the county experienced a backlog after it received access to Texas Health System, which gave local health departments access to state- collected lab reports. “We began to identify the COVID[-19] cases attributed to Fort Bend County that weren’t previously to or by us,” Minter said. “A few of these cases date back to March and April. Some of these cases occurred in May, but the majority of these cases occurred in June and July, when the spikes were occurring throughout our region.” catching up with

seven-day new case averages IN FORT BEND COUNTY

4,589 of the county’s total cases are located in the ve ZIP codes that make up the Sugar Land and Missouri City communities.

Rolling seven-day new case averages are used to account for daily uctuations that appear in data, such as no new case information being reported on Sundays.

As of Sept. 4, Fort Bend County had reported a total of 15,081 coronavirus cases

total Coronavirus cases in Sugar Land and Missouri City Missouri City ZIP code 77459 has seen the most coronavirus cases in the area. ZIP CODES 77498 AND 77489 INCLUDE CASES FROM HARRIS COUNTY.

500

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A backlog in cases has skewed the average number of new cases per day upward. While Minter said the majority of the cases identied in the backlog occurred during the surges in June and July, the county has not released when those cases were originally from.

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77498: 997

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From Aug. 5-19, Fort Bend County reported 5,760 cases, 3,738 of which ocials attributed to the Texas Health System backlog.

77478: 429

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77479: 1,161

CONFIRMED CASES

Newly conrmed cases Backlog cases

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77459: 1,316

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So far, there has been 1 coronavirus case for every 57 residents of Sugar Land and Missouri City ZIP codes.

84%

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13 14 15 17 18 19

CASES ARE NOT REPORTED ON SUNDAYS.

covid-19 hospitalizations decline after July surge

icu beds in use

CAPACITY: 122

JULY 28: 118

SEPT. 3: 109

The number of people being treated for suspected and conrmed coronavirus cases in Fort Bend County hospitals has receded to mid-June levels after seeing a surge in July.

On Aug. 20, there were 18 coronavirus intensive care unit patients in Fort Bend County hospitals. The last time this number was 18 or fewer was June 17.

AVERAGE NUMBER OF COVID-19 PATIENTS IN HOSPITAL BEDS FROM APRIL-AUGUST: 111

1,250

125

1,000

100

SEPT. 3: 735

750

75

ICU beds in use in Fort Bend County Total ICU beds in use

Total beds in use in Fort Bend County All patients

SEPT. 3: 20

500

50

ICU beds in use by suspected or conrmed COVID-19 patients COVID-19 patients

SEPT. 3: 65

250

25

Beds in use by suspected or conrmed COVID-19 patients COVID-19 patients

0

0

APRIL

MAY JUNE

JULY

AUG. SEPT.

APRIL

MAY JUNE

JULY

AUG. SEPT.

NOTE: DATA ON THIS PAGE REFLECTS WHAT THE COUNTY IS REPORTING AS OF SEPT. 4. SOURCES: FORT BEND COUNTY HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, SOUTHEAST TEXAS REGIONAL ADVISORY COUNCILCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

Celebrating Over 30 Years in Texas!

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News fromMissouri City, Sugar Land & Fort Bend County

Numbers to know

ON THE BALLOT

Fort Bend County Commissioners approve mobility, parks bonds for Nov. 3 ballot

59 projects account for the $218.2M mobility bond.

24 projects account for the $38.4M parks bond.

COMPILED BY CLAIRE SHOOP

BY BETH MARSHALL

during the meeting. A total of 59 mobility projects account for the $218.2 million mobility bond, and 24 projects are on the list for the parks bond. One countywide mobility project is the installation of an emergency network infrastructure monitoring system for $5.4million. Two of the costliest parks bond projects include a $6 million Rosenberg Area Youth Center and a $4million Sugar Land Area Regional Park. The mobility bond and parks bond will appear separately on the Nov. 3 Election Day ballot as Proposition A and Proposition B, respectively.

In addition to electing federal, state and countywide representatives during the Nov. 3 general election, Missouri City residents will also cast ballots for mayor and the city's two at-large City Council positions.

SOURCE: FORT BEND COUNTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FORTBENDCOUNTY The Fort Bend County Commissioners Court unanimously approved a $218.2 millionmobility bond proposal along with a $38.4million parks bond proposal to be placed on the Nov. 3 ballot during a special calledmeeting Aug. 17. Precinct 3 Commissioner Andy Meyers made the motion to approve, and Precinct 2 Commissioner Grady Presage seconded the motion. “Everyone on the court has had an opportunity to review, provide input and revisions, and the list of projects that we currently have are the nal submission for consideration,” County Auditor Ed Sturdivant said

Sugar Land City Council 2700 Town Center Blvd. N., Sugar Land Sept. 15, 22, 5:30 p.m. Missouri City City Council 1522 Texas Parkway, Missouri City Sept. 21, 7 p.m. Fort Bend County Commissioners Court 401 Jackson St., Richmond Sept. 22, 1 p.m. Fort Bend ISD board of trustees 16431 Lexington Blvd., Sugar Land Sept. 21, 6 p.m. MEETINGSWE COVER

The elected ocials will serve a two-year term from November 2020 to November 2022. DID YOUKNOW?

LOCAL CANDIDATES

MAYOR • Robin J. Elackatt • Yolanda Ford (incumbent) • Fred G. Taylor CITY COUNCIL MEMBER ATLARGE, POSITION 1 • Vashaundra Edwards (incumbent) • Reginald Pearson CITY COUNCIL MEMBER ATLARGE, POSITION 2

Sugar Land City Council approves $731K for 3 roof replacement projects

• Lynn Clouser • James Mable • Chris Preston (incumbent)

BY BETH MARSHALL

“These are the highest-priority [projects],” Assistant City Manager Chris Steubing said. The overall budget for these proj- ects is $1.2 million, Wolf said. About $51,000 is going toward design services with Building Exterior Solutions Inc., and $731,752 is going toward construction costs with Lessman Roong and Sheetmetal LLC. With the remaining $416,647 balance, Wolf said the T.E. Harmon Center will need a third-party mechanical contractor with a crane to lift the air conditioning units on the roof out of the way for construction.

PROPOSITIONS: Adoption of the reghters' and police ocers' civil service law Texas Gov. Greg Abbott extended early voting by a week because of the coronavirus pandemic. DID YOUKNOW? DATES TO KNOW • Early voting for the Nov. 3 election runs from Oct. 13-30. • The last day to register to vote is Oct. 5.

SUGARLAND The Sugar Land Police Department, the T.E. Harman Center and Fire Station No. 2 will receive roof repairs, as they have experienced weather concerns and leaks, said Lane Wolf, the city’s vertical construction manager, during an Aug. 18 City Council meeting. Wolf said the average warranty period on these commercial-use buildings is between 20 to 25 years. The police department’s roof—the youngest of the three buildings—is 24 years old, while the T.E. Harman Center roof is 36 years old, and the re station roof is 34 years old.

ROOFING REPLACEMENTS The average warranty period on commercial roofs is 20-25 years. Cost of construction: $731,752

Fire Station No. 2 roof: 34 years old

T.E. Harman Center roof: 36 years old

90

MATLAGE WAY

59

Police Department roof: 24 years old

6

N

SOURCE: CITY OF MISSOURI CITY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: CITY OF SUGAR LAND COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2020 PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION

F O R T B E N D I S D S N A P S H O T DISTRICT DATA

COMPILED BY CLAIRE SHOOP Over the past ve years, Fort Bend ISD has seen steady enrollment growth, reaching an enrollment of 77,756 in the 2019-20 school year. Explore this growth as well as data about the student population, teachers and the superintendent below. SOURCES: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY, FORT BEND ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

201920 TEACHER STATS 5,045 TOTAL NUMBER OF TEACHERS

STUDENTENROLLMENT

201920SUPERINTENDENT ANNUAL SALARY

STARTING TEACHER SALARY $55,500 NEIGHBORING DISTRICT COMPARISON KATY ISD: $55,200 NEIGHBORING DISTRICT COMPARISON KATY ISD: 5,603

NEIGHBORING DISTRICT COMPARISON

RETENTION RATE

82.1%

2017-18 2018-19 2019-20

2016-17

2015-16

FROM 201516 +6.3%

201920 ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS

SCHOOLBONDUPDATES 2018 Fort Bend ISD bond 31 of the 52 bid packages, or bond project groupings, are under construction.

TOTAL: $992.8 MILLION

43.5%

$677 million of the bond has been committed

60.24%

STATE AVERAGE

$275 million , or 27.7%, has been spent.

201920 ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS

15.9%

Follow the FBISD 2018 bond dashboard at www.fortbendisd.com/page/108534 for live updates.

20.26%

STATE AVERAGE

NEWSCHOOL UPDATES

HOWMUCH DO FORT BEND ISD HOMEOWNERS PAY IN SCHOOL TAXES?

MEADOWS ELEMENTARY REBUILD 12037 Pender Lane, Meadows Place Opening: January 2021 LAKEVIEW ELEMENTARY REBUILD 314 Lakeview Drive, Sugar Land Opening: January 2022 HIGH SCHOOL NO. 12 South of Hwy. 6, east of FM 521 Opening: 2022-23 ELEMENTARY SCHOOL NO. 53 Riverstone community Opening: 2022-23

This chart displays the amount of school district taxes the average homeowner has paid annually over the last four years based on the median home value in the district. Tax rates are listed per $100 valuation.

Tax rate: $1.34

Tax rate: $1.32

Tax rate: $1.32

Tax rate: $1.27

Tax rate: $1.24

Amount paid on median taxable value Median taxable value: $240,962

Median taxable value: $253,912

Median taxable value: $255,111

Median taxable value: $261,013

Median taxable value: $268,756

$3,352 $3,367 $3,315 $3,333

$3,229

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

SERVING SPECIAL EDUCATION STUDENTS Some special education students returned to classrooms for their education progress.

EDUCATION FBISD special education students return to campus

8,520

total special education students in Fort Bend ISD

BY CLAIRE SHOOP

through the district for his attention decit hyperactivity disorder and dyslexia, was not recommended for online learning at this time. “He wasn’t quote unquote special enough to qualify for [in-person learning], but he’s also not suited for the format that they have now,” Graham said. Graham said beginning the school year online was dicult for her family as Bruno needs frequent reminders to stay on task, and she and her husband work outside the home. Prior to returning to the classroom, the district was facing stang short- ages among special education teachers and support sta because of anxiety about returning during the coronavi- rus pandemic. However, Hill said after declaring these employee’s jobs “vital” most of these positions have been lled. “We communicated with teachers that we needed themback,” Hill said. “We needed themhere to do what our main goal is—to serve students.”

middle and 96 high school—had agreed to return for face-to-face learning. Hill said teachers and special educa- tion sta looked at factors to determine which students would be best served in the classroom, including how they handled online learning in the spring, communication and functional skills, and reading andmath level. “Based on some of those consid- erations, that’s howwe made the recommendation to the parents,” Hill said. Hill said because of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, some families opted for their students with special education service to not return to the classroom. These students, along with those not recommended for face-to- face learning at this time, will engage in online learning with accommoda- tions, Hill said. The district’s online curriculumhas been designed tomeet the needs of all students, she said. Angela Graham said her son Bruno, who receives accommodations

While the majority of Fort Bend ISD students began the 2020-21 school year online, the district welcomed some students who receive special education services back to campuses on Aug. 24. Deena Hill, executive director of student support services, said the district felt it was important for some students to return to the classroom so they could progress in their education. “Some of our students … they really need someone to provide direct instruction and to be prompted, and it’s dicult sometimes to do that through the computer,” Hill said. “So, we believe that there’s certain kids that just needmore than the online program can oer.” FBISD has a total of 8,520 students who receive some formof special education services, according to data presented at an Aug. 10meeting. Of these students, the district identied 1,506 students who are recommended for face-to-face services. As of Sept. 2, 899 students—570 elementary, 233

1,506

17.7% of FBISD’s special education population

were recommended for face-to-face services

899

59.7% of those recommended

parents agreed to face-to-face

Elementary school

570

of 911 recommended agreed to face-to-face

Middle school

233 96

of 350 recommended agreed to face-to-face

High school

of 245 recommended agreed to face-to-face

SOURCE: FORT BEND ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

A N I N S I D E LO O K AT F O R T B E N D I S D D ATA A N D D E M O G R A P H I C S B Y C A M P U S CAMPUS DEEP DIVE

COMPILED BY CLAIRE SHOOP As Fort Bend ISD’s enrollment continues to grow each year, reaching nearly 78,000 in 2019, the student population at large reects the diversity found in the community—but that diversity is not always evenly distributed throughout the district. The following tables show enrollment and demographic data per FBISD school.

2 0 1 8  1 9 S T U D E N T  T E A C H E R DEMOGRAPHIC BREAKDOWN

DISTRICTWIDE STATE AVERAGE

STUDENTS

TEACHERS

27.23%

12.6%

30.4%

10.6%

AFRICAN AMERICAN

0.37%

0.4%

0.2%

0.3%

AMERICAN INDIAN

ASIANPACIFIC ISLANDER

26.48%

4.7%

5.9%

1.9%

26.46%

52.6%

15.1%

27.7%

HISPANIC

3.3%

2.1%

1.1%

2.4%

MULTIPLE RACES

16.15%

27.4%

46.2%

58.4%

WHITE

SOURCE: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

ACCOUNTABILITY RATINGS FOR 2020 AND BEYOND

B FORT BEND ISD OVERALL RATING Exemplary performance Recognized performance Acceptable performance In need of 2019 RATING

All Texas school districts and campuses will receive a Not Rated: Declared State of Disaster label for their 2020 accountability ratings, according to the Texas Education Agency. Texas students take the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness each year to measure standards in reading, writing, math, science and social studies and are traditionally given letter grades ranging from A-F based on performance. Although the coronavirus pandemic is ongoing, the state has said all students will be required to take the STAAR exam in 2021, as of press time. The ratings are based on several categories, including Student Achievement, School Progress and Closing the Gaps, all of which compare student performance.

improvement Unacceptable performance

18

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Public Education Edition 2020

DEMOGRAPHICS

DEMOGRAPHICS

MIDDLE SCHOOLS 201920 DATA*

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 201920 DATA*

1 Armstrong

536 91.4% <1.9% 2.6% 19.6% 73.1% <1.9% 2.4% <1.9% 62, 74 725 23.2% <1.4% 43% 18.5% 14.1% <1.4% 6.1% 17.8% 56, 69, 71 549 46.1% <1.8% 42.6% 11.5% 22.6% <1.8% 2.9% 19.3% 55, 65, 70, 73

52 Baines 53 Bowie 54 Crockett

1,242 30.1% <0.8% 19.3% 25.7% 28.4% -

<4% 22.5% 75

2 Austin Parkway 3 Barrington Place

1,440 31.9% <0.7% 14.9% 29% 23.6% <0.7% 3.3% 28.5% 76

1,012

60% <1% 16.1% 36.4% 39% <1% 3.3% 4.5% 68

4 Blue Ridge 5 Brazos Bend 6 Briargate

272 90.1% <3.7% -

70.6% 24.3% -

<3.7% <3.7% 61, 77

55 Dulles

1,454 49.9% <0.7% 29.7% 28.1% 23% <0.7% 3.6% 15% 70 1,209 23.3% <0.8% 42.4% 13.2% 16.4% <0.8% 5.8% 21.8% 69, 71

711 33.9% <1.4% 42.3% 10.4% 16.9% <1.4% 4.6% 25% 64, 76

56 First Colony

394 93.1% -

<2.5% 72.8% 23.1% -

<2.5% <2.5% 61, 77 4.7% <4.7% 60, 72

57 Fort Settlement 1,375 8.6% <0.7% 62.1% 6.6% 8.9% -

<4.4% 18.5% 69, 71

7 Burton

424 73.1% <2.4% 3.3% 65.6% 23.3% -

58 Garcia

1,363 37.4% <0.7% 42.9% 22.6% 16.5% <0.7% 3.3% 13.8% 67, 76 1,102 77.9% <0.9% 12.8% 33.8% 47.5% <0.9% 1.7% 3.6% 68, 73 1,258 65.1% <0.8% 3.5% 55.9% 35.5% <0.8% 3% 1.7% 71, 72 930 92.2% <1.1% <1.1% 43.5% 53.4% <1.1% 1.1% 1.2% 77 1,002 86.2% <1% <1% 61.2% 35.2% <1% 1.2% <1% 74

8 Colony Bend

551 30.9% <1.8% 41.4% 6.9% 18.7% <1.8% 8.3% 24% 56, 69 744 11.8% <1.3% 50.7% 5.6% 9.5% <1.3% 5.9% 27.8% 57, 69 1,072 6.7% <0.9% 75.3% 2.5% 6.3% <0.9% 4.3% 10.9% 64, 69 45% <1.3% 56.4% 15.2% 9.9% <1.3% 3.3% 14% 65, 73 707 58.3% <1.4% 24.2% 37.9% 24.8% <1.4% 3.5% 8.8% 55, 70 997 6.1% <1% 69.3% 4.5% 6.2% - <4% 16% 57, 69, 71 787

59 Hodges Bend 60 LakeOlympia

9 ColonyMeadows 10 Commonwealth 11 Cornerstone 12 Drabek 13 Dulles 14 Fleming 15 Glover 16 Goodman 17 Heritage Rose

61 McAulie

62 Missouri City 63 Quail Valley 64 Sartartia 65 Sugar Land

1,119

34% <0.9% 33.8% 33.8% 15.9% <0.9% 3% 12.8% 71

576 77.3% -

16.7% 19.3% 60.1% -

1.9% 2.1% 58, 59, 67, 73

1,300 16.8% <0.8% 56.6% 8.2% 10.6% <0.8% 4.5% 19.6% 67, 69, 76 1,191 55.6% <0.8% 29.3% 14.3% 37.3% <0.8% 2.9% 15.8% 73

427 83.8% <2.3% <2.3% 80.1% 13.1% <2.3% 3.5% <2.3% 62, 74

736 80.4% <1.4% -

37% 59.1% -

2.2% <1.4% 60, 72

66 Thornton

1,223 27.1% <0.8% 6.8% 24% 26.8% -

<4.9% 38.1% 75

1,128 79.9% <0.9% 2.6% 21.4% 69.2% <0.9% 2.9% 3.2% 52, 66, 75 654 33.5% <1.5% 28.9% 11.9% 23.5% <1.5% 5.8% 29.4% 55, 70 423 85.8% <2.4% <2.4% 83% 12.3% <2.4% 2.6% <2.4% 62, 74 606 87.6% <1.7% 2.3% 52.1% 42.7% <1.7% 1.7% <1.7% 62, 74 797 80.6% <1.3% 10.5% 29.6% 54.3% - <2.5% 3% 58, 59, 67, 68

18 Highlands

DEMOGRAPHICS

19 Holley

20 Hunters Glen

21 Jones 22 Jordan 23 Lakeview

HIGH SCHOOLS 201920 DATA*

552 63.9% <1.8% 19.7% 35.5% 34.2% -

<5.4% 6.7% 54, 68

500 55% <2% 28.2% 24% 23.8% <2% 4% 19% 58, 65, 67, 73

24 Lantern Lane

432 74.8% <2.3% <4.6% 55.3% 31% - 771 12.7% <1.3% 14% 25.3% 16.3% -

2.8% 7.4% 63, 71 <7.8% 36.6% 66, 75

25 Leonetti

67 Austin 68 Bush

2,225 30.7% <0.5% 43.8% 16.9% 17.2% -

<2.3% 19.7% 98.6%

26 Lexington Creek

613 36.1% <1.6% 31.6% 26.6% 13.1% <1.6% 4.7% 23.3% 55, 70 812 16.5% <1.2% 57.9% 15.3% 8.4% <1.2% 5.2% 12.6% 58, 67, 76 565 18.8% <1.8% 72.9% 9.7% 6.5% <1.8% <1.8% 8.5% 58, 67, 76 419 54.7% <2.4% 22% 14.1% 33.7% <2.4% 3.6% 26% 55, 70

2,514

63% <0.4% 13% 40% 41.4% <0.4% 1.6% 3.7% 94.1%

27 Madden 28 Malala 29 Meadows

69 Clements

2,524 13.9% <0.8% 53.9% 6.7% 12.1% <0.4% 3.6% 23.2% 99% 2,599 36.9% <0.4% 41% 20.5% 19.7% <0.4% 3.2% 15.4% 97% 2,437 25.9% <0.4% 37.6% 29.1% 15.2% <0.4% 3.2% 14.4% 96.7% 2,013 55.5% <0.5% 7.5% 62% 27.3% <0.5% 1.5% 1.3% 95.5%

70 Dulles 71 Elkins

30 MissionBend 31 MissionGlen 32 MissionWest

329 79.9% <3% 4.3% 31.6% 54.4% - 478 72.4% <2.1% 18.4% 36.6% 35.1% - 728 79.7% 2.1% 8.2% 22.4% 61.5% -

<6.1% 6.4% 59, 68 <4.2% 5.4% 59, 68 2.5% 3.3% 54, 59, 68

72 Hightower 73 Kempner 74 Marshall 75 Ridge Point

2,060 52.2% <0.5% 30.2% 18.2% 35.5% -

<2.4% 13.7% 94.4%

1,300 78.5% <0.8% 1.2% 65.9% 30.2% <0.8% 1.2% <0.8% 92.6% 2,991 24.3% <0.3% 13.9% 22.4% 27.5% <0.3% 3.7% 32.2% 97.6% 2,828 28.7% <0.4% 26.3% 26.7% 19.9% <0.4% 3.5% 23.1% 98.1%

33 Neill

909 30.6% <1.1% 22.9% 27.8% 22% <1.1% 4.5% 22% 53, 76 880 28.8% <1.1% 16.4% 25.9% 23.6% <1.1% 5.7% 27.6% 53, 76 747 45.2% <1.3% 32.4% 21.7% 21.2% <1.3% 3.6% 20.3% 58, 67

34 Oakland

35 Oyster Creek

76 Travis

36 Palmer 37 Parks

597 639

41% <1.7% 20.9% 46.6% 15.7% <1.7% 6.2% 10.1% 60, 71, 72

77 Willowridge

1,277

86% <0.8% <0.8% 44.4% 53.2% <0.8% 1.3% <0.8% 84.4%

7% <1.6% <1.6% 55.6% 37.4% -

2.2% 2.7% 60, 72

38 Patterson 39 PecanGrove 40 Quail Valley 41 Ridgegate 42 Ridgemont 43 ScanlanOaks 46 SettlersWay 47 Sienna Crossing 48 SugarMill 49 Sullivan 50 Townewest 51 Walker Station 44 Schi 45 Seguin

785 50.3% <1.3% 22.7% 49% 20% <1.3% 2.5% 5% 53, 54, 68, 76

*THE TEA MASKS SOME DEMOGRAPHIC DATA TO COMPLY WITH THE FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT. BECAUSE OF THIS, ONLY A RANGE AS REPRESENTED BY A NUMBER FOLLOWING A < IS AVAILABLE.

747

25% -

6.4% 12.7% 21.2% - 5.4% 39.7% 28.1% -

5.1% 54.6% 53, 76 7.4% 19.4% 63, 71

459 53.4% -

560 91.4% <1.8% <1.8% 27.9% 67.9% <1.8% <1.8% 2% 61, 77

**GRADUATION RATES LISTED ARE FOR STUDENTS WHO GRADUATED IN FOUR YEARS IN 2018.

295 92.9% -

<3.4% 23.4% 73.6% -

<3.4% <3.4% 61, 77

859 6.3% <1.2% 8.5% 16.5% 13% <1.2% 6.1% 55.2% 66, 75 22% <1.2% 36.9% 26.7% 11.3% <1.2% 3.8% 20.4% 52, 75 873

60.24% Percentage of economically disadvantaged students statewide

Fort Bend ISD campuses have a higher percent of economically disadvantaged students than the state average 26 OUTOF 77

548 40.7% <1.8% 22.1% 39.1% 20.6% - 744 23.1% <1.3% 43.5% 12% 16.9% -

<7.3% 11.7% 54, 68 <6.7% 20.8% 56, 69, 71

1,069 10.6% <0.9% 20.1% 16.6% 15.3% <0.9% 5% 42.2% 52, 75

643 49.3% <1.6% 21.6% 9.2% 35.3% -

<7.8% 27.4% 65, 73

1,301 6.3% <0.8% 69.9% 8.8% 6.6% <0.8% 3.6% 10.4% 56, 57, 71

633 82.8% -

7.4% 12% 69.2% <1.6% <3.2% 9.3% 65, 73

837 15.2% <1.2% 48.1% <6% 11.2% -

5.6% 28.9% 64, 67

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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