Lewisville - Flower Mound - Highland Village | February 2021

LEWISVILLE FLOWERMOUND HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION

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VOLUME 4, ISSUE 4  FEB. 15MARCH 16, 2021

ONLINE AT

Health ocials navigatemass vaccine clinics

RAMPING Health ocials in Denton County have scaled up their vaccine distribution eorts in recent weeks as the state has increased the supply provided to the county. Denton County still lags behind a number of other highly populated areas in Texas.

Flower Mound Town Council mem- bers were moving swiftly to interview nalists to ll the town’s top execu- tive position, thinking that interim Town Manager Debra Wallace would soon retire. But then, Wallace said, her personal plans changed, which prompted her to approach the council in January with an alternative: an extended period with her at the helm. “I told them I could do it for a year or two years, even,” said Wallace, who has been with the town for nearly eight years, including her current dual role as chief nancial ocer and interim town manager. “It’s an indenite time. Wallace leads town through transition BY DANIEL HOUSTON

BY DANIEL HOUSTON

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24 36 Doses administered per 100 residents age 16+ 12

48

Tens of thousands of Denton County residents have received their rst doses of COVID-19 vaccine in recent weeks, but more than 200,000 people remained on Denton County’s waitlist as of Feb. 11. As health ocials worked to admin- ister a limited supply of the vaccine to the area’s most vulnerable, ocials have conrmed an even more infec- tious strain of the coronavirus that originated in the United Kingdom has been identied within the county, Director of Public Health Matt Rich- ardson told commissioners Feb. 9. The existence of this U.K. variant and other quick-spreading strains makes an eective vaccination eort even more urgent, Richardson said. “We have to redouble our eorts on prevention, and we have to keep up the great work on vaccination and get to herd immunity as soon as we can,” Richardson said. The mass drive-thru clinics at Texas Motor Speedway in Fort Worth this monthwere part of an eort by Denton CONTINUED ON 14

DENTON COUNTY 8.9 Doses administered per 100 residents, age 16+ Doses administered to Denton County residents 61,983 697,330 Denton County residents age 16+

Dallas County 13.9

Collin County 15.6

CONTINUED ON 16

Who is Debra Wallace? Roles: interim town

Rank among 254 Texas counties

Collin County: 99th Dallas County: 130th Tarrant County: 160th Denton County: 215th

manager, chief nancial ocer Joined town: 2013 Appointed interim town manager: September 2020

Tarrant County 12.1

Statewide average 14.2

NUMBERS CURRENT AS OF FEB. 10. SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMBARB: It’s been a year of challenging adjustments for all educators this school year. This month, we look at what that has meant for private schools. See our noncomprehensive list of private school options in our area (Page 12) that serve multiple grade levels. As always, please let us know what else you would like to read about. Barb Delk, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMDANIEL: Public health ocials in Denton County are working to get vaccines to as many residents as possible as vaccination eorts ramp up across the nation. Tens of thousands have been vaccinated, but many more are still waiting for their turn. Learn more in our story on the county’s rollout (see Page 1). To share a story idea with us, reach out to lnews@communityimpact.com. Daniel Houston, EDITOR

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CORRECTION: Volume 4, Issue 3 A story on Furst Ranch on Page 16 misidentied one of the roadways near the project. That roadway is US 377.

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

COMPILED BY DANIEL HOUSTON

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HIGHLAND VILLAGE

LEWISVILLE LAKE

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JUSTIN RD.

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EAGLE CT.

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JONES RD.

LLELA NATURE PRESERVE

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Motor City Pizza

COURTESY MOTOR CITY PIZZA

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DOMINION CT.

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SKILLERN BLVD.

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New York Pizza and Pints

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

GRAPEVINE LAKE

COURTESY NEW YORK PIZZA & PINTS

NOWOPEN 1 Cristy’s Cake Shop opened its Flower Mound location Jan. 19 at 3721 Justin Road, Ste. 150, Flower Mound. The business sells cakes for all occasions. Options range from butter cake with pineapple filling to red velvet cakes and dulce de leche, among others. The busi- ness also sells cookies. 214-513-2253. www.cristyscakesdfw.com 2 Flower Mound’s Fire Station No. 7 opened in early February at 2777 Skillern Blvd., Flower Mound. The new station was originally scheduled to open in spring 2020. The station will primarily serve the area west of Flower Mound High School. www.flower-mound.com

hospitals, hotels, schools, homeowners, hobbyists and others. 469-830-0722. www.metalsupermarkets.com/lewisville 5 A new Taco Bell opened in Lewis- ville at the beginning of January. The fast-food restaurant, located at 1025 W. Round Grove Road, Lewisville, offers tacos, burritos, quesadillas and nachos, among other items. Desserts and drinks are also available. 469-830-7900. www.tacobell.com 6 Ketamine Wellness Institute opened its new office Feb. 1 at 4961 Long Prairie Road, Ste. 110, Flower Mound. The office offers ketamine infusions, a treatment intended for people with medication-re- sistant depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and other mood-related conditions. This treatment is primarily for

those for whom commonly prescribed medications have not been effective. The office will also offer non-medical nutrient

3 Motor City Pizza opened a pop-up location in October at Seven Loaves Catering, located at 1305 S. SH 121 Busi- ness, Lewisville. The vendor specializes in Detroit-style pizza—a deep, rectan- gular pizza with a light, airy quality, according to a news release announcing the opening. Motor City Pizza is open for carryout Fri.-Sat. from 5-9 p.m. Orders can be placed online. 972-654-6276. www.motorcitypizzatx.com 4 Metal Supermarkets is now open at 1501 Eagle Court, Ste. 1101, Lewisville. The small-quantity metal provider is the company’s fourth store overall. The store sells metals of various shapes, grades and types. The company’s clients include maintenance and repair shops,

infusions. 800-975-3859. www.ketaminetexas.com COMING SOON

7 The London Baker is expected to open its second location later this year at The Realm at Castle Hills, located at 4440 SH 121, Ste. 60, Lewisville. An opening timeline is not yet available, but in state construction filings, the business said the effort to finish out the interior could last through the end of May. The Lewisville business sells luxury cakes for weddings and other celebrations at its other location at 2540 King Arthur Blvd.,

     

  

  

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P.F. Chang’s To Go is expected to open in Flower Mound this summer. COURTESY P.F. CHANG’S

FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON Flower Mound will soon be host to a relatively new dining concept for P.F. Chang’s. P.F. Chang’s To Go , which opened its rst location in Chicago last year, will open in Flower Mound this summer. The restaurant will operate with a smaller footprint than a traditional P.F. Chang’s full-scale restaurant. Its menu will feature lettuce wraps, Mongolian beef and Chang’s Spicy Chicken, among other items, according to a P.F. Chang’s news release. Customers will be able to order online, takeout, catering and delivery.

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“Asian has always been a go-to takeout cuisine and o-premise dining is a model where P.F. Chang’s shows its strength, which has allowed us to continue to meet consumer demand for elevated Asian cuisine in an easily accessible way,” P.F. Chang’s CEO Damola Adamolekun said in the release. “P.F. Chang’s To Go provides a platform for us to strengthen and grow that oering.” An exact address for this location has not yet been conrmed. www.pfchangs.com/pf-changs-to-go 85 parking spaces shared among all the tenants in the retail center, fewer than the 133 spaces previously required. A parking study presented by Lambeth Engineering found that adequate parking existed for the businesses at the center. The company offers phone plans, devices and other telecommunications services. www.verizon.com RENOVATIONS 12 Dick’s Sporting Goods Store’s lo- cation at 5801 Long Prairie Road, Flower Mound, is expected to undergo an ex- tensive renovation project in mid-March. The renovations are expected to cost $350,000 and include a remodel of the store’s footwear and fitness departments. The project will also see a renovation of the stock room. The store sells equip- ment and clothing for a variety of athletic and outdoor activities. 972-355-1111. www.dickssportinggoods.com IN THE NEWS 13 The town of Flower Mound will provide incentives worth $155,000 for Communications Test Design Inc. to finish out a new space at 1001 Lakeside Parkway, Flower Mound, according to town docu- ments. The Pennsylvania-based company, which serves clients in the communica- tions industry, is Flower Mound’s largest private employer. The new space would al- low for 110 additional company employees to work in the town. www.ctdi.com

Amanda Hargrove, O.D.

4401 Long Prairie Road Suite 400 • Flower Mound (940) 800-2020 www.visionpartnerstexas.com

Ste. 111, Lewisville. www.thelondonbaker.com

8 Spenga is expected to open a Flower Mound location in April at 2450 Cross Timbers Road, Ste. 130. The fitness con- cept focuses on cardio, high-intensity interval training and flexibility exercises in one-hour sessions, according to the company website. The session is broken down into 20 minutes of spin class, 20 minutes of strength training and 20 minutes of yoga. 214-513-5003. www.spenga.com 9 New York Pizza and Pints is expected to open a new location in April at 2717 Cross Timbers Road, Ste. 410, Flower Mound. The pizza restaurant specializes in New York-style crust and sauce and offers variety of craft beers and growlers to go. The restaurant also has locations in Carrollton, Frisco, McKinney and Allen. www.nypizzaandpints.com 10 Frenzel Consulting & Tax Services is expected to open a new office in May at 2100 Village Parkway, Ste. 103, Highland Village. The company offers help with taxes, accounting and financial planning, among other services. The company has offices in Flower Mound and Denton. 940-382-4311. www.frenzelcpa.com 11 Verizon is working to bring a store to the Arbor Crossing shopping center in Flower Mound, located at 5810 Long Prairie Road. The Flower Mound Planning and Zoning Commission voted to allow the business to operate with a total of

EXPIRES: 3/15/2021

EXPIRES: 3/15/2021

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LEWISVILLE - FLOWER MOUND - HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

TODO LIST

February & March events

C E L E B R A T I N G O V E R 3 0 Y E A R S I N T E X A S

MARCH 27

EASTER EGG SCRAMBLE JAKE’S HILLTOP PARK

The town of Flower Mound will host its 37th annual Easter egg scramble for families at Jake’s Hilltop Park. The event will feature candy for children to nd as well as an appearance by the Easter bunny. Children age 12 and younger will be allowed to participate. Free. 1:30-3:30 p.m. 4975 Timber Creek Road, Flower Mound. www.ower-mound.com (Courtesy town of Flower Mound)

will consist of cold reading from the production’s script. Audition materials, signup directions and other information are available at the website below. Participants must bring a resume, audition form, headshot and signed copies of Studio B waivers. 10 a.m. Free. 2400 FM 407, Ste. 1, Highland Village. www.studiobtheater.com MARCH 12 RAY PRIMPERFORMANCE Self-described “singer-soulwriter” Ray Prim will perform for a socially distanced audience in the performance hall at Lewisville’s MCL Grand Theater venue. Prim’s music is a series of melody-based short stories intended to be “inspiring, meaningful and thought- provoking.” Guests will undergo temperature screenings and will be required to wear a mask at all times. $20. 7:30-9 p.m. 100 N. Charles St., Lewisville. 15 THROUGH 19 SPRING BREAK CAMP AT LLELA The Lewisville Lake Environmental Learning Area will host an outdoor adventure camp during spring break for children ages 7-12. The “high-energy” outdoor camp will involve running, jumping, building and more activities throughout the nature area. Registration is required at the website below. 9 a.m.- 3 p.m. each day. $30 (per day); discounts available if a child registers for the entire week. 201 E. Jones St., Lewisville. www.llela.org

COMPILED BY DANIEL HOUSTON FEBRUARY 19 SALSADANCE CLASSES FOR COUPLES The city of Lewisville is hosting a series of salsa dance classes at its new Thrive recreational center. The classes, which will focus on teaching this Latin dance format, will be open to those with Thrive memberships. Registration is available at the website listed below. In addition to couples salsa classes on Fridays in February for age 18 and older, the facility is also hosting beginners classes for individuals on Saturdays in February for those age 17 and older. $25 (per drop-in class with Thrive membership). 7-8 p.m. 1950 S. Valley Parkway, Lewisville. www.playlewisville.com 20 BLACKHISTORYMONTH CELEBRATION Music City Mall will host a Black History Month celebration hosted by Kindred Creatives Art and Literary Press. The event will include yoga, storytelling, cultural dancing, multiple panel conversations and a family-friendly open mic period for singing, dancing, poetry and reading. Free. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 2401 S. Stemmons Freeway, Lewisville. www.kindredcreativeszine.com 20 THEATER AUDITIONS: “PLAY ON!” Studio B Performing Arts will hold adult community theater auditions for a production of “Play On!” by Rick Abbot. Those who would like to audition must be age 18 or older. The auditions

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Find more or submit Lewisville, Flower Mound or Highland Village events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

Prices and availability subject to change without notice.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY DANIEL HOUSTON

ONGOING PROJECTS

CHANCELLOR DR.

COLLEGE ST.

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MCL GRAND THEATER

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WALTERS ST.

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Midway Road project A project to reconstruct a portion of Midway Road stretching from FM 544 to Huffines Boulevard in Lewisville is nearing completion. Crews are con- tinuing to work on the south side of Midway Road between Huffines and Holfords Prairie Road. Part of this project has also involved a realignment of the Midway-Holfords Prairie intersection. The project is

Forest Vista Drive project, Phase 2 Crews have continued to lay steel and have relocated a school zone flasher and light pole base before they move on to paving a portion of Forest Vista Drive in Flower Mound. The full project extends from Morriss Road to Chancellor Drive. These reconstruction efforts were approved after town staff identified pavement failures and poor drainage along the street. The project will also include the replacement of the roadway’s aging water line. Completion timeline: May Cost: $2.7 million Funding source: sales tax revenue

Main & Mill project Crews are wrapping up landscaping and streetscaping on three major stretches of road in Old Town Lewis- ville. Pavement work was substantially completed in December. The total project encompasses a portion of Mill Street that extends from Purnell Street to just past Walters Street; a stretch of Main Street from Mill to the rail station to the east; and the portion of Charles Street in front of the MCL Grand Theater. Timeline: January 2019-March 2021 Cost: $8.5 million Funding sources: city of Lewisville, North Central Texas Council of Governments

expected to be completed in March. Timeline: November 2019-March 2021 Cost: $5.2 million Funding source: city of Lewisville

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF FEB. 1. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT LFHNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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http://span-transit.org 940-382-1900            

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LEWISVILLE - FLOWER MOUND - HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

VOTE FlowerMound toelect newmayor; Lewisvilleschedules special race

ELECTION ESSENTIALS

• Lewisville City Council • Flower Mound Town Council Institutions holding elections May 1:

• Highland Village City Council • Lewisville ISD board of trustees

BY DANIEL HOUSTON & FRANCESCA D’ANNUNZIO

need to work to attract high-paying employers to the town and to facil- itate efficient and respectful Town Council meetings. Dixon has served with the town since 2004. Five candidates had filed to run for his seat as of this paper’s print deadline. In neighboring Lewisville, Mayor Rudy Durham announced Jan. 8 that he would not run for re-election, bringing to a close his six-year period in that role. In a statement, the city said Durham has not announced what he will do next. He said he would continue to be active in the community. Durham first ran for Lewisville City Council in 1994 after a period of time on the city’s Planning and Zoning Commission. A week after Lewisville City Council called the May 1 election, Council Member TJ Gilmore filed his candidacy for the opening. His bid

First day of early voting: April 19

Filing period for Lewisville’s Place 3 special election: closes March 1

March 1

April 19

Flower Mound Mayor Steve Dixon will not seek re-election, he said in a Feb. 2 statement. In a Facebook post announcing his decision, Dixon said he was leaving the position to focus on “other proj- ects” and to spend more time with his wife and his two daughters. “If 2020 has had a silver lining for many of us, it is that we’ve been able to spend more time as a family, something I’ve not been able to do as much as I’d like,” Dixon said in the statement. The next mayor will preside over a town government that faces several challenges, Dixon said, including guiding growth on the town’s western and southern borders, investing in town infrastructure and maintaining a strong economy. Dixon also said the next mayor will

May 1

Election day: May 1

Filing for other local races:

now closed closed

Last day to register to vote: April 1

For complete lists of candidates in each race, visit communityimpact.com.

April 1

SOURCES: TEXAS SECRETARY OF STATE’S OFFICE, CITY OF LEWISVILLE/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

for the mayoral office requires that he resign from his Place 3 seat and that a special election be held for that council place, according to the Texas Election Code. Under state law, Gilmore will be allowed to continue to serve on coun- cil until the election. Tiffanie Fowler, Delia Parker-Mims and Timothy M. Freibel Jr. had also filed to run for

mayor as of this paper’s Feb. 11 print deadline. The special election to fill the remainder of Gilmore’s unexpired Place 3 term will be held in conjunc- tion with the May 1 City Council election. For complete lists of the candidates who have filed in each race, visit communityimpact.com.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

AT THE CAPITOL

Q&A: What virtual learning and remote learningwill look like

FOOD SCARCITY IN TEXAS Below are the percentages of adults in households where there was either sometimes or often not enough to eat in the last seven days at the time of the survey.

Texas

United States

BY ANNA LOTZ

Bob Popinski is the director of policy for Raise Your Hand Texas, an Austin-based orga-

nization committed to improving public education. He spoke with Community Impact Newspaper about the 87th legislative session. WHAT ARE SOME OF RAISE YOUR HAND’S LEGISLATIVE PRIORITIES? Our rst and foremost [priority] is to make sure public education is funded fully, especially during the time of COVID. I lived through the 2011 budget cuts with public education when [the state] cut $5.4 billion from school districts. ... It really took about 10 years to recover from the Great Recession and what occurred in 2011. ... First and foremost, we’re going to protect and be vocal about protecting some of the programs that are near and dear to Raise Your Hand’s heart, which is full-day prekindergarten. That was passed during House Bill 3 [in 2019]. ... A fairly big issue this session is, ‘What does virtual learning and remote learning look like moving forward?’ ARE YOU SEEING SCHOOL DISTRICTS ACROSS THE STATE FALL SHORT OF ENROLLMENT PROJECTIONS? I think it’s denitely happening in a lot of urban and major suburban districts. I know the Texas School Alliance, which is an association of 40 or so of the larger districts in the state, did a survey, and I think, on average, it was about a 4% enrollment decline. So a lot of these larger districts are having the same issues. ... We actually base our funding on average daily attendance, so if the kids aren’t in the seat, they’re not getting credit for that per-student funding. WHAT ARE THE LONGTERM CONCERNS ABOUT STUDENTSWHOMAY NOT BE SHOWING UP DURING THE PANDEMIC? A school district’s perspective is, ‘We’re going to hopefully nd all of these students and get them back to the system. And then, what targeted interventions are we going to need to help them catch up? ... Once you get those kids back in the classroom, how do you ramp it up? Do you extend the day? Do you extend the school year?’ Hannah Zedaker contributed to this report. Bob Popinski

11.5%

11.6%

12.8%

12.5%

14.4%

14.5%

13.9%

16%

16.5%

10.3%

10.5%

10.1%

10.3%

10.9%

12%

11.9%

12.7%

13.7%

Aug. 19-31

Sept. 16-28

Oct. 14-26

Nov. 11-23

Dec. 9-21

Sept. 30-Oct, 12

Sept. 2-14

Oct. 28-Nov. 9

Nov. 25-Dec. 7

2020

SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAUCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Hunger relief organization Feeding Texas to propose legislation addressing hunger BY ADRIANA REZAL

Program. The group has proposed that the grant be restored to its full funding amount of $4.5 million in scal year 2020-21 and into the next biennium. Feeding Texas has also proposed increasing the accessibility of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program to seniors and those with disabilities. The group is asking lawmakers to shorten the initial SNAP application, extend the certication period to 36 months, waive the recertication interview and notify seniors on Medicaid of their SNAP enrollment eligibility. Senate Bill 224 and House Bill 701, both of which deal with this issue, have already been led. The organization has asked that certain vehicle asset limits be reduced or abolished for SNAP eligibility. Another proposal would end the full-family sanction of SNAP benets based on ineligibility. To maximize the amount of benets awarded to eligible recipients, the organization has proposed that lawmakers consider ending full-family bene- t sanctions based on the head of household. Feeding Texas is also asking lawmakers to improve the SNAP employment and training program and expand college student eligibility. Ocials from the group have said that the state could accomplish this by designating community college employment programs as eligible for SNAP benets for some students.

The state of Texas’ largest hunger relief organi- zation, Feeding Texas, is looking to propose bills during this year’s 87th legislative session that increase funding and accessibility for hunger relief benets in Texas, according to a Jan. 19 webinar on food policy hosted by the organization. According to Feeding Texas CEO Celia Cole, reduced access to foods for healthy living can be exacerbated by the added pressures felt during the coronavirus pandemic, such as job loss. Cole said the eects of food insecurity often dispro- portionately impact vulnerable communities, including low-income households, seniors, people with disabilities, families with children, and college students. “In a nutshell, food insecurity forces tough choices for families and can have devastating consequences,” Cole said in a Jan. 19 webinar. “Hunger reaches deep into every community across Texas. There are hungry people in all 254 counties. Every legislator has hungry constituents.” According to data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau’s Household Pulse Survey, food scarcity in Texas amid the pandemic increased from 11.5% in late August to 16.5% in late December. Some of Feeding Texas’ legislative priorities, according to the webinar, are as follows. One priority would involve increasing fund- ing to the Surplus Agricultural Products Grant

9

LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

CITY& COUNTY

News from Lewisville, Flower Mound & Highland Village

HighlandVillage seeks single House district for its residents

A PLAN FOR THE FUTURE Several residential and mixed-use

JUSTIN RD.

407

developments are already planned for the Northern Gateway area, and city officials said they hope more are on the way. Residential developments underway • The Villages of Lewisville • Heritage Trails • Heritage Towers Mixed-use development beginning summer 2021 • Fronterra

BY DANIEL HOUSTON

receive results from the 2020 U.S. Census. The Highland Village document, a statement of what policies the city would support in the ongoing session, also included a number of other legislative priorities centered around the principle of local control. “The main theme throughout is cities are the level of government that is closest to the people it serves, and therefore are the level of government best able to identify the needs of a community and appropriate means to address those needs,” the city said in a Feb. 10 news release. TOP AREAS OF PRIORITY The city of Highland Village has outlined its priorities for the ongoing legislative session. They fall into six main categories. For a detailed list, visit www.highlandvillage.com. • Local authority; public rights of ways • Local revenue caps, revenue reduction and online sales tax • Public safety

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HIGHLAND VILLAGE The city is asking state lawmakers to allow its residents to be represented by a single district in the Texas House of Representatives. This request is part of a detailed list of city priorities for the 87th legislative session. Highland Village City Council approved these priori- ties at its Feb. 9 meeting. “Our community is only 5.5 square miles with a population of 15,820 people, yet is represented by two House Districts,” the city’s legislative program reads. “High- land Village is a very homogeneous city and would be better served by having one State Representative.” Highland Village residents are currently split between District 63, held by Rep. Tan Parker, R-Flower Mound, and District 65, held by Rep. Michelle Beckley, D-Carrollton. Beckley’s district includes the eastern portion of Highland Village, most of Lewisville and parts of Castle Hills and Carrollton. Parker’s district includes the western part of Highland Village as well as Flower Mound and a number of other cities, towns and unincorporated areas in southwest Denton County. This request would not become law unless the Texas Legislature were to approve it. Lawmakers will draw up new districts once they

GRANDYS LN.

SOURCE: CITY OF LEWISVILLE/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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City approves $9Mto preserve land for NorthernGateway plan

BY DANIEL HOUSTON

Gateway and provide the city the opportunity to work with developers to implement that vision,” Barron wrote in a letter to council members before their vote. The property’s current zoning allows for warehouse construc- tion, which is not one of the city’s preferred uses for the land in the long term, according to the plan. Developers have already expressed interest in purchasing the property, which city officials said is what prompted them to move forward with the purchase. Much of the area around this land is already being developed, or will soon be developed, in accordance with the Northern Gateway plan, the city said. These projects are expected to bring more than 2,000 residential units within a half-mile radius of the property, according to Barron’s memo. The city is expected to sell the land to a master developer within a year and a half of the purchase, Barron said.

LEWISVILLE The city intends to buy a large piece of undeveloped land off I-35E to prevent warehouse developers from deviating from the city’s vision for the Northern Gateway area. On Feb. 1, Lewisville City Council authorized City Manager Donna Barron to purchase the land southwest of where I-35E meets Justin Road at a cost of nearly $9.3 million. The city intends to sell the property to a master developer at a later date, which would help it recoup the costs of the purchase, according to a staff memo. Officials described the land purchase as critical for the success of the Northern Gateway, a city development plan that outlines preferred uses for a collection of properties bounded on three sides by I-35E, McGee Lane and the rail tracks to the south. “The purchase of the property will accommodate and secure the city’s long-term vision for the Northern

• Transportation and the Denton County Transportation Authority • Water • Parks funding

SOURCE: CITY OF HIGHLAND VILLAGE/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FlowerMound begins construction on Canyon Falls Park near US 377

BY DANIEL HOUSTON

FLOWERMOUND The town has started a one-year construction project to bring a new public park to its western side. Crews began work in January on Canyon Falls Park, a 10-plus-acre property that will primarily serve a group of residential neighborhoods near US 377 about a mile north of Cross Timbers Road. The construction should last through January 2022.

CANYON FALLS PARK

Lewisville City Council Meets at 7 p.m. the first and third Mondays of each month. www.cityoflewisville.com Lewisville ISD board of trustees Meets at 7 p.m. the second Monday of each month. www.lisd.net MEETINGSWE COVER

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Flower Mound Town Council Meets at 6 p.m. the first and third Mondays of each month. www.flower-mound.com Highland Village City Council Meets at 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month. www.highlandvillage.org

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When completed, the park will have a pavilion, a basketball court, a playground, a splash pad, a fitness area and restrooms.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

RECENT HIGHLIGHTS

Events in your community

COMPILED BY DANIEL HOUSTON

NEWTAKE ONA FRIDAY TRADITION Students and sta at Camey Elementary School have replaced one pre-pandemic tradition with another. When the Lewisville ISD school reopened this fall, it had to pause its weekly Friday pep rally as part of a districtwide eort to cut down on large gatherings that carried a heightened risk of viral spread. “This was a chance for us to recognize students and sta members, recite grade-level cheers and, most importantly, have fun and dance,” Principal Angela Cortez said. But the pause on pep rallies has not stopped the campus in The Colony from having fun on Fridays. Now, school sta members have taken to dressing in inatable costumes of dinosaurs, unicorns, amingos and other colorful creatures to see students o as they are picked up from school on Friday afternoons.

Children interact with sta members in inatable dinosaur costumes as part of a new spin on a Friday tradition at Camey Elementary School. (Courtesy Lewisville ISD)

A sta member at Camey Elementary School holds a stop sign and waves at cars while wearing an inatable dinosaur costume. (Courtesy Lewisville ISD)

Students run out to greet sta members in inatable costumes during pickup hours at Camey Elementary School in late January. (Courtesy Lewisville ISD)

BOOKS FOR KIDS, RECOGNITION FOR TEACHERS Students came away with new materials to read and one teacher received a special recognition at a recent, socially distanced gathering at Southridge Elementary School in Lewisville. Campus sta wheeled in boxes of books donated by the First Book organization, the Ford Motor Company Fund and Sam’s Pack Five Star Ford of Lewisville. The event was held in the school’s gym, where students and administrators also gathered to recognize their teacher of the year. DeVonna Keirsey, a physical education teacher, received the honor for the 2020-21 school year.

DeVonna Keirsey was recognized as the Southridge Elementary School teacher of the year. Keirsey teaches physical education at the school. (Courtesy Lewisville ISD)

Students gather in the gym at Southridge Elementary School for the presentation of newly donated books. (Courtesy Lewisville ISD)

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

GUIDE

A noncomprehensive guide to Lewisville & Flower Mound private schools

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Parents in Lewisville, Flower Mound and Highland Village have several options for private schools for their children. The list below includes schools that serve multiple grade levels in elementary, middle and high schools. This list is not comprehensive.

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LEWISVILLE 1 Lakeland Christian Academy Grades served: pre-K-12 Religious orientation: Christian Extracurricular activities: athletics, ne arts, interest clubs, student council, honor societies Current enrollment: 382 Tuition: $3,816-$6,744 annually 397 S. Stemmons Freeway, Lewisville 972-219-3939 www.lakelandchristian.org

2 Pinnacle Prep School Grades served: pre-K-8 Religious orientation: none Extracurricular activities: art, lm stud- ies, soccer, basketball Current enrollment: 60 Tuition: $8,525-$10,725 annually 1310 S. Stemmons Freeway, Lewisville 940-453-5887 www.pinnacleprepschool.com FLOWERMOUND 3 Coram Deo Academy Grades served: pre-K-12 Religious orientation: Christian Extracurricular activities: football, soft- ball, band, choir, speech and debate Current enrollment: 679 (in person), 48 (virtual) Tuition: $5,715-$10,205 annually 4900 Wichita Trail, Flower Mound 682-237-0232 www.coramdeoacademy.org

4 Explorations Preparatory School Grades served: Pre-K-8 Religious orientation: none Extracurricular activities: This school contracts with outside organizations to provide chess, Destination Imagination and other activities. Current enrollment: 70 Tuition: $10,000-$12,000 annually 1501 Flower Mound Road, Flower Mound 972-539-0601 www.explorationsprep.org 5 Grace Christian Academy Grades served: pre-K-12 Religious orientation: Christian Extracurricular activities: boys basket- ball, girls volleyball, performing arts Current enrollment: 48 Tuition: $5,500 annually (for 2020-21 school year) 3200 Firewheel Drive, Flower Mound 972-539-7284 www.gcapatriots.org

6 Temple Christian Academy Grades served: pre-K-12 Religious orientation: Christian

Extracurricular activities: soccer, volley- ball, basketball, music, speech, drama Current enrollment: 105 Tuition: $6,410 annually 2501 Northshore Blvd., Flower Mound 972-874-8700 www.templechristian.com

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Students use a microscope at the Dallas location of CoramDeo Academy.

Students run down the court of the gym at Temple Christian Academy.

COURTESY CORAM DEO ACADEMY

COURTESY TEMPLE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

Parents should gure out what type of school they are interested in, such as religion-based, Montessori, Waldorf or college prep. Parents should research the mission of the school and make sure it aligns with what they want. Parents should ask about the tuition costs and fees as well as whether the school oers nancial aid, as many do. Parents should ask what tests the school administers. Most private schools do not administer the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness but may have students take some sort of norm-referenced test that compares them with other students of their age group nationally.

Parents should nd the school’s calendar, which may dier from those of area public schools. Some schools may also go year-round with longer breaks. Parents should encourage the entire family to visit the school to get a feel for the atmosphere and to see if they can envision their children in that setting.

WHAT QUEST IONS TO ASK WHEN C HOO S I NG A PR I VAT E S C HOO L Texas has more than 1,400 accredited private schools, about 900 of which are also nonprots. To help parents choose the right school for their children, Laura Colangelo, the executive director of the Texas Private Schools Association and of the Texas Private School Accreditation Commission, oers a few tips and suggestions.

OTHER QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER:

• Is the school accredited? • What is a typical day like?

• How much homework do students have? • What extracurricular activities are there? • How much time do students get to spend outdoors? • How are teachers hired? • Are there any volunteer opportunities?

SOURCE: TEXAS PRIVATE SCHOOLS ASSOCIATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PEOPLE Laura Colangelo Executive director, Texas Private Schools Association

BY MATT STEPHENS

Like most of the state, Texas private schools have been forced to adapt during the coronavirus pandemic. Laura Colangelo, executive director of the Texas Private Schools Association, said private schools statewide have made dicult decisions, pivoting to oer remote learning options, spending millions on personal protective equipment, and seeking federal assistance to make up for declining enrollment and revenue. Some have even closed their doors. Colangelo, a lobbyist for Texas private schools, discussed challenges they have faced during the pandemic and priorities ahead of the state’s 2021 legislative session. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

HOWHAVE PRIVATE SCHOOLS BEEN AFFECTED BY THE PANDEMIC DIFFER ENTLY FROMPUBLIC SCHOOLS? Private schools are not required to follow the [Texas Education Agency] guidelines because we’re private. But those guidelines TEA publishes set what’s called a standard of care for school children in Texas. So private schools need to be really careful and make sure that they are doing at least … some- thing similar to what the TEA is recommending for public schools. Otherwise you risk some liability. … So we were kind of swept in early on in the pandemic. We were swept in with the public schools and the governor’s executive order. And then over the summer, I worked really hard with the attorney general and the governor’s oce to say ‘OK, we need to be private again. We need to go back to our normal operating procedure.’ And so another executive court order came out in June … that took us out of sort of being regulated by the TEA because we don’t want that. We’re not public schools. AREMOST PRIVATE SCHOOLS OFFERING SOME KINDOF REMOTE LEARNING OPTION OR AREMOST REQUIRING ALL STUDENTS TO BE ON CAMPUS? So all private schools that I’m aware of oer a remote option for families that want it. But most … are also open to in-person learning and have been since mid-August. I think the rest of them opened up on that Sept. 8 date. … So that has been won- derful, because, you know, we depend on tuition, parents paying tuition. And parents aren’t going to be really excited about paying tuition when school is not fully operational. … They’ve spent a ton of money. I think about $64 million private schools have spent statewide on mitigation strategies, on cleaning and masks and gloves and all the things. The plastic separators and things that are enabling them to stay open. … It’s worked well so far, and they’ve been able to stay open and educate kids. HOWHAS ENROLLMENT AT PRIVATE SCHOOLS BEENAFFECTED BY THE PANDEMIC? Statewide, the data we have is that enrollment is down 9%. I think that’s due to economic reasons. Now I do think there are parts of the state where enrollment is up, and certain schools’ enrollment is up signicantly. And I think that depends on

whether the public schools opened or were com- municating early on that they were going to open, because … nobody knew it was happening for a really long time. And I think parents got frustrated and enrolled their kids in certain private schools. But overall enrollment is down. HAVE PRIVATE SCHOOLS SOUGHT OUT PAYCHECK PROTECTION PROGRAMFUND ING OR OTHER ASSISTANCE? Many schools did seek the PPP loans, and that has been incredibly helpful, especially with all the extra money they’ve extended that wasn’t expected. You know, we weren’t budgeting for a pandemic last year when the budgets needed to be made for this year. So, yeah, they have sought that out, and a lot of them are cutting … fundraisers. Private schools depend not only on tuition, but donations from fundraisers and things, and those were canceled in the spring, so they’re hurting in a lot of dierent ways. WHAT HAVE PRIVATE SCHOOLS LEARNED FROM COPINGWITH THE PANDEMIC? We’ve all become health experts in the last eight months, so that was unexpected. But I think they’ve learned how important the community is. ... They’ve worked really hard to reach out, even when they weren’t allowed to be in person this summer and early before Sept. 8. So they were being more creative about keeping a community online, because a lot of parents seek that out for the smaller class size and the teachers knowing your kid and that kind of thing. So it’s been a challenge to shift it online, but they’ve done it well. And, well, we’ve all learned how to do online learning, that’s for sure. Just like the public schools. They’ve pivoted quickly, and … they were up and running early, early on. … It was around spring break when it happened, and most schools had started back online learning by the time the kids were back from spring break even though they couldn’t be in the building. … We’ve learned how to be exible and, you know, make some hard decisions and do it well. WHAT ARE YOUR PRIORITIES FOR THE STATE’S 2021 LEGISLATIVE SESSION? Two things. One, we passed a do-not-hire list last session that is a database of teachers that have

Private schools across the state and country have been aected by the coronavirus pandemic, spending millions on personal protective equipment, seeing declined enrollment and even closing in some cases. The data below is accurate as of Nov. 16. P R I VAT E S C HOO L ST RUGG L E S

$64 MI LL ION spent by Texas private schools on PPE

18, 527 STUDENTS , Total enrollment at closed schools nationwide SCHOOL CLOSURES in U.S. during pandemic, including 7 in Texas 9% STATEWIDE Texas private school enrollment down 120 PRIVATE SOURCES: LAURA COLANGELO, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, TEXAS PRIVATE SCHOOLS ASSOCIATION; CATO INSTITUTE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

had inappropriate relationships with students. These are both public and private school teachers. So that was a big victory last session, and I’d like to sort of improve on that next session if possible. … Right now it’s teachers, administrators, librar- ians and counselors. I would like to expand it to coaches, janitors, school bus drivers and anyone who’s around children. … The second one is immunity from liability for COVID[-19]-related claims because private schools—unlike public schools that have sovereign immunity—we can be sued. And so I think a lot of businesses and nonprots are interested in this as well that will be part of the stakeholder group on immunity from liability bill that goes through the Legislature.

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

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