Lewisville - Flower Mound - Highland Village | 2020

LEWISVILLE FLOWERMOUND HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 10  AUG. 5SEPT. 15, 2020

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2020 Guide

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IMPACTS

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Denton County doles out CARES Act funds

Higher Education Guide 2020

Shifting to online learning

Colleges are assessing their courses and shifting many online, but some, including nursing and career and technical education courses, are dicult to transition and are popular among area colleges. For in-person classes, adjustments are being made at North Central Texas College, the University of North Texas, Collin College and Texas Woman’s University.

BY LIESBETH POWERS

Denton County has been distributing its $147 mil- lion in funding from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act during the past three months to those hardest aected by the coronavirus pandemic. The county focused these federal funds in areas of high-need, including housing assistance, food CONTINUED ON 16 BIG PICTURE Denton County is among the 12 counties and six cities in Texas with a population of 500,000 million $147 looking at the

Encouraging social distancing in classrooms and on campus

Requiringmasks on campus

Providing sanitizer

SOURCES: NORTH TEXAS CENTRAL COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS, COLLIN COLLEGE, TEXAS WOMAN'S UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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Liesbeth Powers/Community Impact Newspaper

Colleges prepare for an uncertain semester Colleges are facing uncertainty as they prepare for the 2020-21 academic year amid the continued spread of COVID-19. upon what the current [COVID-19] data is show- ing,” said Ray Martinez, deputy commissioner for academic aairs and workforce education with the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Anticipating enrollment BY LIESBETH POWERS

to Denton County

or more that were eligible to receive funds directly via the Coronavirus Aid, Relief,

Local colleges such as North Central Texas Col- lege, the University of North Texas, Texas Woman’s University and Collin College have worked to recre- ate higher education for the upcoming fall semes- ter with new learning options and additional safety measures. Input from the Texas Higher Education Coordi- nating Board has allowed for exibility in the rules and regulations institutions have decided to adopt. “The plans for [returning to campus] are based

and Economic Security Act.

Texas received roughly $11.2 billion in funds.*

At the most basic level, colleges are still unsure of how many students they will have in the fall. Not knowing nal fall enrollment numbers during the summer is typical, local colleges say, but some, like North Central Texas College, are pre- pared for a 12%-15% decrease in total enrollment. “During normal times of economic recessions, CONTINUED ON 14

$1.8 trillion CARES Act bill

*$3.2 BILLION OF TEXAS’ FUNDS WERE SENT TO ELIGIBLE CITIES AND COUNTIES.

SOURCES: DENTON COUNTY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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LEWISVILLE - FLOWER MOUND - HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • AUGUST 2020

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THIS ISSUE

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HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

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MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Brian Pardue, bpardue@communityimpact.com REPORTER Liesbeth Powers GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tobi Carter ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Jason Lindsay

FROMBRIAN: Community Impact was founded with ve core values that have propelled our growth and fueled the drive in each of our employees; faith, passion, quality, integrity, and innovation. Each is equally important, but our drive to innovate will aect the timing of your next issue. Our printing team has been improving its processes in order to reduce the turnaround time between press days and delivery to mailboxes. We will now be able to include late breaking news that can reach your mailbox in days rather than the previous week-long window. With 33 newspapers now printing at our state-of-the-art Pugerville plant, we are taking this opportunity to realign our printing schedules. This edition will shift to a mid- month publication date, and your next hyperlocal issue will land Sept. 16-18. In the meantime, our newsletter and Facebook page will keep you informed. Brian Pardue, GENERALMANAGER

Road project updates CITY& COUNTY Latest local news

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METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across six metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

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Jinbeh

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • AUGUST 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

COMPILED BY LIESBETH POWERS

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HIGHLAND VILLAGE

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at 2540 Justin Road, Ste. 183, Highland Village. The salon offers threading, henna tattoos, eyebrow tinting and waxing. 972-800-1569. www.soibrow.com 7 Teltech Group , a telecom asset management and supply chain service company, has signed a lease for a nearly 200,000-square-foot space at 1901 Lakeside Parkway, Flower Mound. The company has recently expanded to deliv- er technology solutions for government agencies, disaster relief and health care, according to a July 1 release. 469-713-3801. www.teltech.com 8 Handel’s Homemade Ice Cream expects to open in late August, pending permitting, at 2717 Cross Timbers Road, Ste. 500B, Flower Mound. The Ohio- based company will feature ice cream made fresh on-site daily. In addition to a variety of ice cream flavors, the shop will also serve yogurt, sherbet and flavored ices. Handel’s currently has

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 Flower Mound’s first QuikTrip opened July 23 at 5301 Long Prairie Road, Flower Mound. The gas station offers pizza, toast- ed sandwiches and pretzels from its in- store kitchen as well as ice cream, shakes and specialty drinks. It also has eight fuel pumps, free air and an ATM, according to QuikTrip’s website. The gas station will be part of the Hawks Hill development, which will include nine office buildings. 469-293-0023. www.quiktrip.com 2 Breakfast lovers have a new option with extended hours at the Lakeside DFW development in Flower Mound. The Egg Farm Cafe , located at 2300 Lakeside Park- way, Ste. 150, Flower Mound, opened June

20 with hours of 7 a.m.-2:30 p.m. daily. The menu includes breakfast staples, such as eggs, omelettes, pancakes, waffles and French toast, as well as lunch favorites, such as chicken fried steak. 214-222-5170. www.facebook.com/eggfarmcafe 3 Stop-N-Go Gyros opened June 26 at 2601 S. Stemmons Freeway, Ste. 120, Lewis- ville. The Mediterranean restaurant offers various gyros as well as other sandwiches and salads. Sides include baba ganoush, Greek fries and dolmas. 469-263-1555. www.stopngogyrolewisville.site 4 Lifestyle Furniture opened June 7 at 2414B S. Stemmons Freeway, Lewisville. The store offers contemporary home furniture as well as mattresses and box springs. Lifestyle has had some delays in creating its website due to the coronavi-

MINIMAL WAIT TIME! We utilize the latest Retinal Screening Technology NO MORE DILATION! (Exams, Glasses, & Contacts for all ages. Retinal Screening. Most Insurance Companies Accepted. Walk-Ins AreWelcome) CALL NOW! rus pandemic, but the business hopes to have it online soon. 469-968-5004 5 Rockbox Fitness , located at 1141 Flower Mound Road, Ste. 600, Flower Mound, opened July 20. It offers boxing, kickboxing and functional training for members. Rockbox hosts six-week weight loss challenges. The atmosphere, repre- sentatives say, is “where fight club meets night club.” The fitness studio also offers nutrition assistance and accountability coaching. 469-221-9040. www.rockboxfitness.co COMING SOON 6 SoiBrow Threading Salon expects to open a new location by late August

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The library opened its newly renovated north wing July 6. (Courtesy Flower Mound Public Library)

(972) 628-6200 www.SKArms.com / Sales@SKArms.com 1221 Flower Mound Rd, Ste 140, Flower Mound, TX 75028

FEATURED IMPACT RENOVATIONS The Flower Mound Public Library expects to have all renovations complete by early October. The library opened its new north entrance July 6 at 3030 Broadmoor Lane, Flower Mound, and crews are now working on renovations to the original portion of the building and on finishing the south addition. When complete, the library will stand roughly 40,000 square feet, nearly double its previous size, according to Director Sue Ridnour. Some notable upgrades to the nearly 20-year-old building will include three patios, two of which will overlook the Peters Colony Memorial Park when it is built in the next year or so. The third patio will have its own vendor area with options for drinks and snacks. A teen lounge, a digital maker space, additional study rooms and small-group meeting rooms will also be part of the locations in Plano and Little Elm. 330-702-8270. www.handelsicecream.com RELOCATIONS 9 El Chilero Grill moved June 21 to its new location at 297 W. Round Grove Road, Ste. 170, Lewisville. The restaurant’s menu includes Tex-Mex favorites, such as enchiladas, fajitas, tacos and Mexican seafood offerings. For more information, visit El Chilero Grill’s Facebook page or call 214-515-8164. www.facebook.com/elchilerogrillmexican 10 Prototype:IT relocated from Flower Mound to Lewisville in early May. The group purchased a 23,000-square-foot former Lewisville ISD administration building at 400 Main St., Ste. 100, Lewis- ville, and renovated the building’s exterior and interior. Prototype:IT specializes in consultancy, project management, tech- nical solutions and managed information technology services. 214-270-0850. www.prototypeit.net 11 Danny’s Import Service relocated to 762 E. Main St., Lewisville, in early May. The business had been in its previous location along Texas Street in Lewisville for 24 years. Danny’s services electrical

completed renovation. A children’s story time room and a quiet reading room will also be available for use. Depending on the state of the pandemic, some areas, such as the digital creation space, may have delayed openings or may operate differently than intended. Similarly, hours and the ability to accept donations may continue to be affected by COVID-19 after construction is complete this fall. Updates on library hours and operations can be found on the Flower Mound Public Library website or its social media channels.

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systems, air conditioning, brakes, timing belts, clutches and axles, and it offers maintenance, pre-purchase inspections and computer diagnostics checks. 972-434-4488. www.dannysimport.com ANNIVERSARIES 12 Husband-wife team Jarrod and LaTarsha Davis opened Escape Room 5280 last August at 1992 Justin Road, Ste. 200, Highland Village. Visitors find hidden ob- jects, figure out clues and solve puzzles to escape a room. Groups are currently being booked in private rooms as one of the com- pany’s health and safety measures. 214-414-2031. www.escaperoom5280.com CLOSINGS 13 The Coder School , an after-school computer technology program, has closed its location at 3501 Long Prairie Road, Ste. 104, Flower Mound, and con- solidated operations with its Frisco loca- tion. Flower Mound and Frisco General Manager Bobby Mitchell said The Coder School offers online courses as well. The Frisco location’s address is 3228 Main St., Ste. 110, Frisco. For more information, visit www.thecoderschool.com.

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LEWISVILLE - FLOWER MOUND - HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • AUGUST 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY LIESBETH POWERS

WALTERS ST.

CHURCH ST.

MAIN ST.

121 BUS

MIDWAY RD.

544

QUAIL RUN RD.

PETERS COLONY RD.

PURNELL ST.

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Peters Colony Road roundabout The construction of a roundabout at the intersec- tion of Peters Colony Road, Quail Run Road and Auburn Drive is expected to be complete in August, with the possibility of some delays continuing the work into September. The project includes the installation of the roundabout and eight-foot multiuse trail crossings from Auburn Drive to Peters Colony Road as part of the Town’s Parks and Trails Master Plan. The project was originally scheduled to begin in the summer but got an early start be- cause schools were closed early this year. Timeline: spring-August Cost: $1.1 million Funding source: town of Flower Mound

Main and Mill corridor All paving on Main Street and Mill Street is substantial- ly complete. In the next few months, landscaping work will take place on both streets, as will the installation of pedestrian features and walls at the corners of Main and Mill streets. Bike lanes, pavement markings and traffic signage will also be added. Large, overhead banner poles will be installed on Mill Street, and traffic signals will be worked on at the intersections of Mill and Main; Mill and Church; and Mill and Purnell. Intermittent lane closures are expected on Main Street as well as on Mill Street, and there will be intermittent lane closures at intersections in August and September. Timeline: October 2019-December 2020 Cost: $8.53 million Funding sources: city of Lewisville, North Central Texas Council of Governments

Midway Road Rehabilitation Project This project the includes removal of the existing asphalt pavement and the construction of concrete street with curbs, gutters and sidewalk in the south right-of-way from Huffines Boulevard to Lewisville Firestation No. 6. The project also includes re- alignment of the intersection of Midway Road and Holfords Prairie Road, which was completed in March. All driveways within the street right-of-way are also being reconstructed. The contractor is currently working on the third of six phases of the project. From July-November, construction is expected to take place primarily on the north side of Midway Road from Lewisville Fire Station No. 6 to Holfords Prairie intersection. Timeline: October 2019-July 2021 Cost: $5.2 million Funding sources: city of Lewisville, Denton County

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JULY 29. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT LFHNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Lewisville, Flower Mound & Highland Village

CITY HIGHLIGHTS LEWISVILLE A public hearing for Lewisville’s proposed scal year 2020-21 budget is set for Aug. 14. City sta took a very conservative approach to next year’s budget because of the high amount of uncertainty that comes with the coronavirus pandemic and its economic impact, City Manager Donna Barron said in the budget proposal. DENTON COUNTY Ocials announced July 14 that the county is now using a hybrid system to report coronavirus case recoveries. Using an eight- week post-onset window allows the county to capture recovered individuals that it is unable to reach, Denton County Public Health Director Matt Richardson said. FLOWERMOUND The governor’s oce announced July 15 that Gov. Greg Abbott’s Public Safety Oce is providing $41 million in federal funds to assist cities and counties during the COVID-19 response. Flower Mound is among the rst of those receiving awards, and will get $21,000 of that total for rst responder overtime and hazard pay; equipment and supplies for teleworking technologies; and social distancing and personal protective gear. MEETINGSWE COVER Lewisville City Council Meets at 7 p.m. the rst and third Monday of each month. www.cityoewisville.com Lewisville ISD board of trustees Meets at 7 p.m. the second Monday of each month. www.lisd.net Flower Mound Town Council Meets at 6 p.m. the rst and third Monday of each month. www.ower-mound.com Highland Village City Council Meets at 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesday of each month. www.highlandvillage.org

Lewisville ISD to start year online, one week later

has the ability to choose whether to act on these recommendations, according to Denton County Public Health Director Matt Richardson. Earlier in the month, LISD board members approved an amendment to the 2020-21 academic calendar at a special meeting, pushing the start date back by one week to Aug. 19. This allows for f lexibility for online training and technical prepara- tion for the school year, district

administration shared. Staff are expected to report for professional learning Aug. 4. Addi- tional trainings the week of Aug. 10 will focus on preparing all staff for online learning. “We will continue leaning on public health experts, continue monitoring conditions, and making adjustments to our plans in the best interest of the health and safety for all in LISD,” Rogers said.

BY LIESBETH POWERS

LEWISVILLE ISD The school district is beginning its school year Aug. 19 with remote learning. This decision follows July 27 recommendations from Denton County Public Health oficials to delay in-person instruction until Sept. 8 due to continued high levels of community spread of COVID-19 in Denton County. The district will follow this guid- ance, with all students learning remotely until Sept. 8 regardless of previously selected learning options, Superintendent Kevin Rog- ers shared in an email to students, families and staff. Each district in Denton County

ADIFFERENT SCHOOL YEAR

Start date pushed back from

25 MINUTES In-person class days extended by

UNITL SEPT. 8TH Learning online for all

AUG. 12 TO AUG. 19

SOURCE: LEWISVILLE ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

LewisvilleWestern Days goes virtual

HighlandVillage delays community build planned for Kids Kastle until 2021

BY LIESBETH POWERS

BY LIESBETH POWERS

LEWISVILLE City sta is going forward with plans for a virtual version of the annual Lewisville Western Days festival Sept. 26 following the cancellation of the in-person event. The festival will be broadcast live from the Medical City Lewisville Grand Theater to the city of Lewis- ville’s social media, to websites and to cable channels. It will be produced like a television show, city of Lewisville spokesperson James Kunke said, with bands set up at dierent stages. This will allow for

HIGHLAND VILLAGE The com- munity build for Kids Kastle has been delayed once again due to the coronavirus pandemic. The build has been rescheduled multiple times, and the city is now working with consultant Play by Design to nd a time in early 2021 for the community event. “The residents of Highland Village desire to complete this project as a community build, and we will honor their wishes when it is safe to do so,” Parks and Recreation Director Phil Lozano said in a news release.

In years past, Western Days has featured a cattle drive parade.

FILE PHOTO COURTESY MICHAEL NGUYEN

continuous content, he said. Events other than live concerts are also expected for the virtual version of Western Days, Kunke said. Those include the World Tamale Eating Championship and cooking demonstrations.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE

BY LIESBETH POWERS

Jinbeh Sushi and hibachi restaurant focuses on family

C losing the doors for about a month and a half was a heartbreaking experience for the owner of Jinbeh, a restaurant with more than 30 years of history in the North Texas area. “Every restaurant that’s been around for a long time can tell you they’ve hit lows, and they’ve hit highs, but they’ll nd ways to hang in there,” Jinbeh owner Aya Matsuda said. “This one was a monster—it was a beast—because we were forced to close our doors.” Hibachi and sushi are meant to be eaten directly after they are pre- pared, Matsuda said, so staying open without being able to use the dining room was not feasible. “Once they allowed us to open back up again, we did right away,” she said. The restaurant stayed busy after reopening, according to Matsuda. But as coronavirus case totals have risen again, business has noticeably dropped. “We’re optimistic right now,” she said. “We do have a plan in place if we do shut down. When we’re ready Jinbeh 2440 S. Stemmons Freeway, Ste. A, Lewisville 214-488-2224 www.jinbeh.com Lunch: Mon.-Fri.: 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Sat.-Sun.: 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Dinner: Sun.-Thu.: 5-9 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 5-10 p.m. to open again, we’ll open.” The pandemic has slightly

changed the atmosphere in Jinbeh’s dining room, where strangers used to bump elbows around the open grill. Now, couples sit on opposite ends of the six-foot-long tables, and seats are left open when larger parties come in. “We’re cooking for a lot smaller parties,” Matsuda said. “There’s a little less talking.” One thing the pandemic has not changed is the quality of food that Jinbeh oers, even as the prices of meat and other vendor items rise, Matsuda said. That, and the restaurant’s head chefs, create phenomenal food for their guests, Matsuda said. Because Jinbeh is a family-owned business, many members of the sta have become like family to Matsuda over the years. “It’s just awesome because we all know each other, and we all love each other,” she said. That familial bond makes surviv- ing these tough economic times even more important, Matsuda said. “We nancially sacrice ourselves for our [sta],” Matsuda said. “They’re the most important [part] in the company—they’re all family.”

Jinbeh oers hibachi and sushi, all of which is prepared fresh and, in the case of hibachi, in person at its three locations, including the one in Lewisville. (Photos by Liesbeth Powers/Community Impact Newspaper)

DISHES TO TRY 1 Toad’s Moon Roll ($15) Tempura shrimp with cream cheese and topped with spicy tuna 2 Hibachi scallops, shrimp and fried rice ($28) 3 Poseidon Sea Roll ($17.95) Lobster tempura, spicy tuna and

mango topped with avocado, crabmeat, crunchy akes and sweet ‘n sour Thai sauce

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11

LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • AUGUST 2020

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMADVERTISE 8669896808 SEPTEMBER: PUBLIC EDUCATION FOCUS Contact us today for future sponsorship opportunities! Want to stand out as a supporter of your community?

HIGHER

2020 Guide

Higher Education Guide 2020

COMPILED BY VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

Here is a look at the demographics for student enrollment and degrees and certicates awarded for the four public institutions of higher education in Denton County. White African American Hispanic Asian Other International CAMPUS CLOSEUP

LEWISVILLE, FLOWERMOUND &HIGHLAND VILLAGE

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS 9,457 Degrees/certicates issued scal year 2018-19 39,192 Total enrolled in fall 2019 TEXASWOMAN'S UNIVERSITY 3,770 Degrees/certicates issued scal year 2018-19 15,710 Total enrolled in fall 2019 NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE 1,178 Degrees/certicates issued scal year 2018-19 9,382 Total enrolled in fall 2019 MIDWESTERN STATEUNIVERSITY 1,452 Degrees/certicates issued scal year 2018-19 5,500 Total enrolled in fall 2019

Degrees/certicates FISCAL YEAR 201819

FALL 2019

Student enrollment

4.97% 3.29% 22.3% 50.9% 12.2% 6.34%

6.76% 3.25% 6.81% 24.91% 43.65% 14.62%

Educational attainment among residents age 25 and older EDUCATEDPOPULATIONS

LEWISVILLE

Less than 9th grade 9th-12th grade, no diploma High school graduate (includes equivalency) Some college, no degree Associate degree Bachelor’s degree Graduate or professional degree

23.43% 7.81% 24.92% 9.39% 21.68% 6.98% 5.79%

Degrees/certicates FISCAL YEAR 201819

FALL 2019

27.3% 40.05% 18.06% Student enrollment

9.73% 3.34% 22.18% 46.05% 16.9%

9.4%

FLOWERMOUND

HIGHLAND VILLAGE

2.08% 3.11%

1.8%

16.98% 6.66% 40.28% 21.61%

39.6% 18.2%

FALL 2019

Degrees/certicates FISCAL YEAR 201819

Student enrollment

6.9%

1.95% 2.8% 23.26% 61.12% 9.68%

3.79% 1.51% 3.7% 26.31% 56.01% 8.68%

20.9% 12.2%

11.17% 2.07% 1.23%

0.3% 1.9%

DENTON COUNTY

TEXAS

1.19%

Degrees/certicates FISCAL YEAR 201819

FALL 2019

30.01% 14.46%

19.1% 10.2%

Student enrollment

3.24% 3.72% 16.94% 54.82% 13.36%

2.96% 5.47% 5.62% 20.42% 48.98% 16.55%

7.57%

7.1%

22.34% 18.09% 3.57% 3.96%

21.8% 25% 8.3% 8.5%

7.92%

SOURCE: 2018 AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY 5YEAR ESTIMATESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: TEXAS HIGHER EDUCATION COORDINATING BOARDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Farmer Ready

Guru Academic Advising takes part in a free volunteer program at Lewisville High School Killough called Farmer Ready, in which about 60 students from ninth and 10th grades apply to take part in advising sessions. In that program, they:

Get to explore majors of study

Learn about college options

Guru Academic Advising covers a range of topics, including understanding areas of study, applications and nancial assistance. (Courtesy Guru Academic Advising)

Learn about nancial support from colleges

BUSINESS FEATURE

Build resumes

The advising group also hosts a nancial aid scholarship workshop at Lewisville High School–more than 300 students attended the rst year–as well as smaller-form open learning sessions.

GuruAcademic Advising At the heart of advising group is helping those who need it most E very student and family is unique in the steps they need to take to prepare for college, said Erika Dietz, founder of and lead counselor with Guru Academic Advising. BY LIESBETH POWERS

ground as possible. “The college application process ... is way too convoluted, and it creates a big barrier for access for a lot of families,” Dietz said. Guru also oers a number of opportunities for students to receive free advising, including a few programs at Lewisville ISD, such as Farmer Ready, an application-based program with multiple sessions. In these types of programs, Dietz said, she is able to better educate students on their options for college, such as approaching schools that have higher price tags but may also have more nancial aid opportunities than local schools. For each family and student at Guru, Dietz and her team are upfront about the fact that college counseling is helpful but is not needed for every- one, she said. “We do work with students and help them apply to some very competitive schools every year, and they’re successful in that, but we never want a business like ours to intensify the stress that families already feel,” Dietz said.

Erika Dietz got her start in college advising by working in admissions while studying education.

This is why the students her team advises do not all follow the same curriculum. Instead, she said, advisers talk through general topics with students and their families and then plan an advising timeline with dierent points of focus. “Nobody’s college process takes the same format,” Dietz said. “One student might be applying to a really cool foreign language program. ... Another student might be writing an essay to start working on their [New York University] application.” Students can come to Guru at any stage in their planning process, with many starting between ninth and 12th grades. Roughly a third of Guru’s clients come from LISD and the Flower Mound area, Dietz said. Guru oers a free rst session with one of its eight advisers who do their best to cover as much

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • AUGUST 2020

Higher Education Guide 2020

CONTINUED FROM 1

STUDENTSGO TO COLLEGE? Where do Lewisville ISD

North Central Texas College, the University of North Texas and Collin College had the largest number of Lewisville ISD graduates who stayed in Texas and choose to attend their schools in the fall in 2018, the latest data available showed. Texas Woman’s University was also among the top 10 choices, with 67 graduates attending.

378

North Central Texas College

127

Texas A&M University

*PART OF THE DALLAS COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT

224

Collin College

124

Texas Tech University

176

University of North Texas

67

Texas Woman's University

SOURCE: TEXAS HIGHER EDUCATION COORDINATING BOARD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

161

The University of Texas at Dallas

62

Brookhaven College*

138

The University of Texas at Austin

58

Blinn College

we tend to see community college enrollment rise, but this is not a normal time of recession, so we’re preparing for a decrease in enrollment,” NCTC Media Specialist Elizabeth Abu shared via email. Some recent Lewisville ISD gradu- ates may be taking a closer look at local community colleges, said Jill Adams, the LISD director of counseling and social work services. Based on parent and student inter- actions, a number of students are thinking twice about enrollment at a four-year school as well as at those schools far from home, she said. “A lot has changedover the summer,”

have been moved fully online. The remaining classes are ones that were dicult to transition online, such as the lab portions of courses at the Flower Mound campus, said Jessica DeRoche, the college’s senior director. Those classes have options for syn- chronous online, or streamed, courses; traditional, in-person courses; and hybrid learning, where some of the class is online and some is in person, she said. Collin College, TWU and UNT expect to oer online, hybrid and in-person courses this fall as well. Roughly 25%-30% of Collin College’s course oerings will be fully online,

Adams said. “I think that the shift to community college has to do with nances and safety.” An April study by SimpsonScarbor- ough of roughly 1,000 students across the nation recommended that four- year institutions prepare for a 10% decline inrst-time, full-time students. A similar national poll by Art & Science Group LLC found that one in every six of roughly 500 surveyed college-bound high school seniors were close to giving up on attending a four-year college or university as a full-time student. University of North Texas, Texas Woman’s University, NCTC and Col- lin College have been among the top

choices for LISD graduates in Texas in recent years. Representatives from those schools said they have not seen a signicant change in enrollment so far. Students have until late August and September to make their nal deci- sions, but major changes are not antic- ipated, according to leadership from UNT, TWU and Collin College. Anewwayof learning Students who have classes at UNT, TWU, NCTC and Collin College will have online and in-person learning options, but each college is approach- ing learning a little dierently. At NCTC, roughly 80% of classes

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

While enrollment is still ongoing, extreme changes in enrollment have not been noticed so far, according to a number of local institutions. At the same time, colleges are preparing for the possibility of such changes. enrollment A LOOKAT TOTAL

according to the college, nearly dou- bling the percentage of online oer- ings from 2019. Enrollment for online courses has also grown signicantly, said Toni Jenkins, senior vice president of campus operations. At the same time, about a third of UNT students are choosing a fully online schedule in the fall, Provost Jennifer Cowley said. Roughly 13% of UNT’s courses were online in 2019. UNT has also started a new program that aims to combat any isolation or health issues that freshmen may face in starting the year partially or fully online, Cowley said. Because of the technical nature of many of TWU’s key studies, including occupational therapy, nursing, dental hygiene and other allied health profes- sions, the college is still oering a large number of its courses in person, Vice President for Student Life Monica Men- dez-Grant said. The college will also be targeting rst- and second-year core courses for in-person learning in order to help incoming students form communities, she said. However, so far, more stu- dents have chosen to enroll in online courses when given the choice, accord- ing to the college. This fall, masks will be required on campus at UNT, TWU, NCTC and Collin College, and in-person classrooms will follow some distancing protocols, lead- ers from each institution said. Additionally, all students at UNT will shift to online learning after Thanksgiv- ing to limit viral spread from traveling. Aidingstudents Student nancial need has grown over the course of the pandemic, and colleges have risen to meet that need, institutional ocials said. Colleges worked quickly to distrib- ute Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Eco- nomic Security Act funds throughout the spring and summer: NCTC oered roughly $2 million in grants, and Collin College had distributed close to $5 mil- lion in grants as of July. Campuses are also prepared to assist students with altered nancial situa- tions from when they applied to the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. There is a structured process for these FAFSA changes, and UNT expects to have increased student need for these processes in the fall, Cowley said. The number and amount of scholar- ships given will be upheld in the com- ing year or increased, college ocials

NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE

18,713 Total Fall 2019 and Spring 2020 enrollment Preparing for a 12%-15% decrease in enrollment

COLLIN COLLEGE

50,396 *

Total Fall 2019 and Spring 2020 enrollment

No decrease in enrollment observed so far *INCLUDES WINTERMESTER ENROLLMENT

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS

61,492

Total Fall 2019 and Spring 2020 enrollment

Preparing for a slight dip in international enrollment

TEXASWOMAN'S UNIVERSITY

15,826 Expecting to have at enrollment as compared to the year before Total Fall 2019 and Spring 2020 enrollment SOURCES: NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS, COLLIN COLLEGE, TEXAS WOMAN'S UNIVERSITY stated. Applications for additional emergency funds are also available for students at each of the four North Texas colleges. TWU is prioritizing its retention of student employees in the fall, shifting some student assistants and work- study students into roles with the nancial aid department. As the pandemic presses on into the fall, colleges are doing their best to be prepared and to provide for their stu- dents and families, leadership shared. “We [are trying] to be as exible as we can to support our students,” Cow- ley said. Elizabeth Uclés and Miranda Jaimes contributed to this report.

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

15

LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • AUGUST 2020

FOLLOWING the funds

Allocation of Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act funds in Denton County has led to the creation of programs such as the Denton County Operational Plan for Economic Normalization, or OPEN, and the Denton County Coalition of Agencies to Restore Essential Services, or CARES.

CONTINUED FROM 1

programs, local businesses and non- profits, according to Dawn Cobb, county director of community rela- tions. This funding must be spent by Dec. 31, she said. Many have been helped so far, Cobb said, but the demand for assistance remains high. “Here we are, four and a half months into [the pandemic],” Cobb said. “And it’s serious. And a lot of people have been affected.” Securinghousing Denton County earmarked $20 mil- lion for one of its largest recognized needs: housing assistance. It then tapped United Way of Denton County to distribute those funds. United Way used its own funds to assist with eviction prevention in March and April, but then shifted to distributing county funds, United Way CEO Gary Henderson said. When CARES Act funds were intro- duced in early May, between $30,000- $35,000 in assistance from the county was handed out each week, Cobb said. This amount doubled in June and then increased to roughly $159,000 for the week of July 20, according to Henderson.

$147M in CARES Act funds for Denton County

$45M reserved for or distributed to municipalities at a rate of $55 per capita, excluding residents in parts of Fort Worth and Dallas

Flower Mound also put aside $1.2 million for city-specific business grants from the county.

• Lewisville received roughly $5.8M. • Flower Mound received roughly $4.2M. • Highland Village received roughly $910K. • The remaining $34M is going to other municipalities.

$40M

for the county’s ongoing expenses, personal protection equipment and public health

for local business grants, including $2.2M in existing business grant program funds $24M

More than 400 grants up to $10,000 were awarded during the first phase of Denton County OPEN, representing roughly $3 million in combined grants

$20 million in grants up to $50,000 will be split among businesses in August

was earmarked for a housing assistance program. $20M

This began with $30,000-$35,000 in weekly assistance; it doubled in June and increased to $159,000 in late July.

$10M

Denton and Lewisville have seen a 40%-60% increase in food requests.

for food programs

Denton County works with the North Texas Food Bank and the Tarrant Area Food Bank.

$6M in estimated expenditures to date on COVID-19

A few drive-thru food options may be added in West Denton County.

$2M to support local nonprofit efforts

Roughly $2 million has been awarded to 35 local nonprofits as of July 28.

SOURCES: DENTON COUNTY/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

March 19 A public health disaster is issued for Texas; Denton County issues a similar order. March 27 The CARES Act is passed by Congress and signed into law. April 24 Denton County receives CARES Act funds. Funding from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act has made its way through the county since its issue by the U.S. Treasury in April. DENTON COUNTY From D.C. to

“We know the volume of need is going to only increase throughout the summer and into the fall,” he said. Supportingnonprofits Lewisville-based nonprofit Christian Community Action, which also helps people in need, has seen record lev- els of requests for housing assistance sinceMarch, CEO Gilbert Montez said— largely in south Denton County. The county set aside $2 million for nonprofit efforts and charged United Way with helping to distribute those funds through an online portal called Denton County Cares. County Director of Administration Shannon Joski said officials are mon- itoring need so that if grant funds run low, the county can adjust its alloca- tions. County officials do not antici- pate running out of resources before the end of the year, she said. However, some nonprofits fear that the need for assistance will carry over into the new year, Henderson said. “2021 could be a very, very challeng- ing year for the nonprofit organizations attempting tomeet record level needs,” Henderson said. Sustainingbusinesses The county allotted $24 million in

funds for small business grants. More than 400 businesses received grants through the first phase of Den- ton County’s Operational Plan for Eco- nomic Normalization. Another $20 million is set to be awarded in August, Cobb said. Jesse James, owner of Jesse Fit in Flower Mound and Outlaw Fitcamps in Hickory Creek, Little Elm and other locations around North Texas, said he received funding from the Paycheck Protection Program to help cover pay- roll but not rent. After receiving roughly $8,000 from the first round of Denton County grants, he said he is hopeful that hewill receive another grant to help with his biggest location in Flower Mound. “We were shut down for two months,” he said. “That money helped out, ... [but] we’re still about 30%-38% behind on revenue intake.” Allocating for cities Based on guidance from the Office of the Texas Governor, Denton County also chose to distribute $45 million in CARES Act funding to its cities. County officials decided to allocate $55 per person in each city, giving roughly $5.8 million to Lewisville, $4.2 million to Flower Mound and $910,000

to Highland Village. Each city is allowed to use those funds for COVID-19-related expenses. At the end of May, new guidelines were released to allow cities to use that money on payroll for public safety and health employees as well, Joski said. Flower Mound and Highland Village largely chose to use their funding for payroll expenses. Both municipali- ties also put portions of their funding toward public health and facilitating compliance, among other services, according to officials. Flower Mound also set aside $1.2 million for business grants from the county, Deputy Town Manager Debra Wallace said. Lewisville decided to allocate all of its funding to its existing public safety payroll, freeing up $5.8 million in its budget for unplanned expenses, City Manager Donna Barron said. “We appreciate the CARES [Act] funding,” Barron said. “It will be of great assistance because ... we’ve had not only a significant reduction in our revenues, but unexpected expenses.”

Denton County opens applications for its first round of small business grants.

May 13

Dec. 31 CARES Act funding must be spent or returned to the U.S. Treasury Department. May 22 Gov. Greg Abbott announces no state funding for any city within a county that received direct funding. Those in need can call United Way of Denton County at 940-566-5851 or visit www.unitedwaydenton.org/ DentonCountyCARES.

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

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