Franklin - Brentwood Edition - May 2021

FRANKLIN BRENTWOOD EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 3  MAY 11JUNE 14, 2021

ONLINE AT

Brentwood invests $34million in public safety improvements

After a year and a half of construction, the city of Brentwood has completed its largest capital project in city history: the new Brentwood Police Department head- quarters on Heritage Way. City ocials held a grand opening for BY WENDY STURGES CONTINUED ON 12 City debuts Brentwood PoliceDepartment HQ

IMPACTS

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Brentwood City Commission election results

CITY & COUNTY

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Brentwood and Williamson County ocials celebrated the completion of the city’s new $29 million police headquarters April 29.

COURTESY CITY OF BRENTWOOD

Work on Fire StationNo. 5 to begin this fall INSIDE 15

GUIDE

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WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Franklin approves rezoning plans for Chadwell project

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BY WENDY STURGES

Joining the fast-growing south side of Franklin, plans for Chadwell, a 140-acre mixed-use development, are moving forward along Goose Creek Bypass. On April 27, the Franklin Board of Mayor and Alder- men approved the nal reading of a rezoning request for the development, which will allow work to begin. The CONTINUED ON 17

Chadwell, the next phase of the Berry Farms community, received zoning approval from the city of Franklin in April.

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ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMLACY: Williamson County’s growing population has led to a need for more roads, more housing and more services for residents. Our front-page stories this month takes a look at more than $30 million the city of Brentwood is dedicating toward re and police infrastructure, including the city’s newest police headquarters, which opened in late April. Lacy Klasel, PUBLISHER

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FROMWENDY: As more and more people begin dining out again, spring is a great time to take advantage of some of the locally owned eateries in Franklin and Brentwood. Our Breakfast & Brunch Guide (see Page 9) features a number of locally owned spots to grab a bagel on the go or share mimosas with friends on the patio. Wendy Sturges, EDITOR

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MAY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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Hattie Jane’s Creamery

Mountain High Outtters

COURTESY HATTIE JANE’S CREAMERY

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NOWOPEN 1 Coaltown Pizza & Public House opened in early April at 187 Front St., Ste. 103, Franklin, in Westhaven. The eat- ery, located along Westhaven Lake in the Town Center, oers signature pizzas such as Bualo chicken; margherita pizza; and Smashed Potato Pizza made with garlic ricotta sauce, bacon, cheese and smashed potatoes. 615-807-2445. www.coaltownpizza.com 2 Hattie Jane’s Creamery opened April 9 at 3078 Maddux Way, Ste. 100, Franklin, next door to Herban Market at Camden Commons. The ice cream shop oers signature avors, such as Nana Puddin’, Toasted Coconut Minty Chip and Chocoholic as well as seasonal avors, such as Blood Orange Mimosa and Strawberry Jam. Hattie Jane’s also operates locations in Columbia and 3 Mountain High Outtters opened in early April on the upper level of the CoolSprings Galleria, located at 1800 Galleria Blvd., Ste. 5020, Franklin. The store oers outdoor and active apparel, shoes and accessories as well as hiking, biking, shing and climbing goods, and equipment. Mountain High Outtters has 15 locations; this is the rst Tennessee location for the company. 615-614-3070. www.mountainhighouttters.com 4 Bu City Soap opened May 6 at 4091 Mallory Lane, Franklin. The store sells soaps, scrubs, bath bombs, lotions, laundry soap and epsom salts made from natural ingredients that are free of animal Murfreesboro. 615-567-6749. www.hattiejanescreamery.com

products. Bu City Soap also operates locations in Columbia and Nashville, with plans to open another shop in the Green Hills area, according to the company web- site. www.bucitysoap.com 5 Tyler York Real Estate Brokers opened in May at 3401 Mallory Lane, Franklin, in the Spaces building. The company oers real estate services for residential buyers and sellers. This is the second oce location for the company, which is based in Nashville. 615-200-8679. www.tyleryork.com 6 AMG Ketamine & Wellness Center opened in Cool Springs at 1909 Mallory Lane, Ste. 300, Franklin, in February. The medical oce oers ketamine treatments for conditions such as depression, pain, obsessive compulsive disorder and other conditions. Patients must be referred by a physician, according to the company. 615-813-5006. www.amg-ketamine.com 7 Downtown Franklin eatery Red Pony announced that as of May 3, it has reopened in a temporary location at 108 Bridge St., Franklin. The restaurant, which has a permanent location at 408 Main St., Franklin, has been closed since Jan. 23, when a re and small explosion caused damage to the building, according to the eatery. The temporary location, also known as McConnell House, will allow the restaurant to reopen while making repairs. 615-567-6787. www.redponyrestaurant.com COMING SOON 8 Waldo’s Chicken & Beer will open a second location later this year at 108 New Hwy. 96 W., Franklin, in the

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WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

former location of Captain D’s. The eatery opened a location on Liberty Pike earlier this year, but an exact opening date for this location has not been announced. Waldo’s oers fried chicken dishes with signature sides and sauces as well as a drink menu featuring local craft beers. www.waldoschicken.com 9 A Chase bank location will open at 3030 Mallory Lane, Franklin, just south of Cool Springs Boulevard, according to permits led with the city of Franklin. This branch will be one of two locations opening in the city; another location is also under construction on Center Point Place near South Royal Oaks. Opening dates for the locations have not been announced. www.chase.com RELOCATIONS 10 Health care company Advanced Cor- rectional Healthcare Inc. will relocate its oces to Franklin, according to an April 21 announcement from the Tennessee Department of Economic and Commu- nity Development. ACH will move from Peoria, Illinois, to 720 Cool Springs Blvd., Franklin, bringing 58 new jobs and in- vesting approximately $2.5 million in the area. The company is the largest county jail health care provider in the U.S. and operates in a variety of correctional facil- ities, according to the TDECD. An exact relocation date has not been announced. www.advancedch.com ANNIVERSARIES 11 Community Child Care Center , located at 129 W. Fowlkes St., Ste. 1270, Franklin, celebrates its 50th anniversary

in May. The not-for-prot organization oers child care for children from 6 weeks old to preschool age. The com- munity organization is currently accept- ing monetary donations as well as toys and classroom supplies. 615-794-8986. www.childcarefranklin.org 12 Firey Pediatric Dentistry , located at 3000 Stansberry Lane, Ste. 105, Franklin near the Camden Commons shopping cen- ter, celebrated its rst anniversary in May. The medical oce oers dental cleaning and exams, restorative work, X-rays and special needs dentistry for children from infancy to age 18. 615-236-9150. https://reydentistryforkids.com IN THE NEWS 13 With the opening of its last remain- ing buildings and a new lakefront park, Town Center in Westhaven is ocially complete. Developers marked the build- out of the area with a celebratory event and the dedication of the area’s new lake- front park, Magli Green, located along Front Street near Westhaven Lake, on April 28. According to Southern Land Co. founder and CEO Tim Downey, the park was named for his longtime friend, Boyce Magli. www.westhaventn.com Franklin Mayor Ken Moore was recog- nized for his work surrounding mental health April 20 with an award from The Refuge Center for Counseling during its Hope Grows event. Moore began the initiative Find Hope Franklin in 2020 to help connect residents with mental health resources in the area, such as local

Duck Donuts opened in Brentwood on April 17.

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Duck Donuts opened April 17 at 101 Creekside Crossing, Ste. 1000, Brentwood. The bakery oers fresh- made doughnuts made in its open kitchen with signature toppings and avors. Duck Donuts also oers coee drinks, breakfast sandwiches, milkshakes and sundaes. Local owners and Brentwood residents Matt and Allison Davenport said they decided to open the area’s rst Duck Donuts after visiting a location on the East Coast. The North Carolina-based bakery has more than 200 locations nationwide. “You come in; decide how many doughnuts you want; we drop them in the fryer and make them for you and top them while they’re hot and send you o with them,” Allison said. 615-964-7873. www.duckdonuts.com Fourteen cheer teams from Williamson County Schools and Franklin Special School District placed in the 2021 UCA National Cheerleading Championship, held April 23-25. Teams from Centennial High, Franklin High, Independence High, Grass- land Middle, Poplar Grove, Woodland Middle and Spring Station Middle schools competed against 430 teams nationally. www.wcs.edu, www.fssd.org

Owners Matt and Allison Davenport opened Duck Donuts on April 17.

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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CLOSINGS 14 Kate and Lulu’s Kitchen , located at 158 Front St., Ste. 110, Franklin, closed in early spring after ve months of business. In an announcement on the restaurant’s website, owners Laurie and Jacob Starkey cited family reasons for closing the eat- ery. The bakery oered breakfast items. www.kateandluluskitchen.com

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MAY 2021

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

ONGOING PROJECTS

2 Mack C. Hatcher Parkway extension The Tennessee Department of Transpor- tation is working to complete the first phase of the northwest extension of the Mack C. Hatcher Parkway from Hillsboro Road to Hwy. 96 West in Franklin. The project will initially include a two-lane road, with future plans to expand to a four-lane road. Timeline: 2019-November 2021 (Phase 1 only) Cost: $45.1 million (Phase 1 only) Funding sources: TDOT, city of Franklin FUTURE PROJECT 3 East McEwen Drive Phase 4 improvements The city of Franklin will widen McEwen Drive from the roundabout at Cool Springs Boulevard to Wilson Pike. The roadway will feature four lanes with some center turn lanes throughout as well as sidewalks, a multiuse path and street lighting. Timeline: spring 2023-mid-2026 Cost: $34.05 million Funding source: city of Franklin, Federal Surface Transportation Block Grant

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WENDY STURGES/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FRANKLIN

1 Southeast Municipal Complex access road construction This city of Franklin project, located near the intersection of Carothers Parkway and Lockwood Lane, will create an access road and bridge over the Harpeth River that will travel through the future Southeast Municipal Complex, a new park that is slated to measure approximately 200 acres. The project will also relocate some sanitary sewer lines in the area, according to Franklin City Administrator Eric Stuckey. Timeline: April 2021-May 2024 Cost: $31.2 million (for total complex project) Funding source: city of Franklin

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF MAY 5. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT FRBNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Brentwood, Franklin & Williamson County

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

NUMBER TOKNOW residents who have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19 as of May 5, according to the Tennessee Department of Health. Williamson County health ocials announced April 27 appointments are no longer required for up to 100 people per day at the Ag Expo Center at 4215 Long Lane, Franklin. 35% This is the percentage of Williamson County CITY HIGHLIGHTS FRANKLIN Alderperson Dana McLendon announced April 27 he will not run for re-election this October. He has served as the city’s representative for Ward 2 since 1997. The city of Franklin will hold an election for ve alderperson seats Oct. 26. BRENTWOOD City ocials announced April 15 the Brentwood Police Department has collected more than 3,700 pounds of prescription drugs in the past three years. The city’s dropbox, located inside City Hall, is open to residents all year to help prevent drugs from ending up in the water supply or landll. Drop-o is free and no forms are required according to the city. FRANKLIN City ocials announced Franklin Mayor Ken Moore’s annual State of the City address has been postponed to May 19 and will be held at the ampitheater in Franklin Park at 6100 Tower Circle, Franklin. A limited number of tickets will be available for in-person attendance; however, the event will be live-streamed via the city’s social media pages.

WCS approves two online-only schools for 202122

Incumbents re-elected to sit on city commission Superintendent Jason Golden said approximately 900 students so far have opted to continue online learn- ing for the next school year, down from the roughly 5,000 students who enrolled in WCS Online for the spring WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS As the coronavirus pan- demic continues into its second year, local school districts are working to plan for how the next school year will look. Following a unanimous approval from the school board April 19, Williamson County Schools will begin work to launch two online schools for the 2021-22 school year for students who wish to continue online learn- ing: one for grades K-8 and one for grades 9-12. BRENTWOOD Following the May 4 city election, all three incumbent commissioners will be sworn into the Brentwood City Commission. The top three candidates who received the most votes‚—Rhea Little, Mark Gorman and Regina Smithson— will serve in at-large positions. Just over 4,300, or 12.48% of registered voters cast a ballot in the election, according to the Williamson County Election Commission. City commissioners serve four-year terms and elections are held every two years. The positions of mayor and vice mayor are appointed by the commission every two years.

2020-21 semester. “It’s a lot less—I’m actually

district will still allow hybrid options, where students can combine in-per- son and online classes. The district will submit the pro- posal to the state board of education for approval, ocials said. Golden said the district intends to evaluate in the future if there is enough demand to continue the online schools beyond the 2021-22 school year. “For this, I anticipate that we may very well have a viable online school at these grade levels into the future, but it’s going to be driven by student choice and the academic instruc- tional need of our students,” Golden said. “I want it to be an option, if we can have enough students for it to make [sense].”

encouraged by that,” Golden said. “I think families are focusing on what’s going to be best for their students instructionally.” “I WANT IT TOBE AN OPTION, IFWE CANHAVE ENOUGH STUDENTS FOR IT TOMAKE SENSE.” JASON GOLDEN, WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS SUPERINTENDENT The move will establish two separate schools for online learning, meaning students will not be enrolled in the campuses to which they are geographically zoned. However, the

The Pilgrimage Music & Cultural Festival will return Sept. 2526. (Courtesy Pilgrimage Music & Cultural Festival)

Franklin approves event permits for PilgrimageMusic &Cultural Festival

MEETINGSWE COVER

FRANKLIN As the region gears up for a return to in-person events and activities, the city of Franklin has approved the rst of several major events for later this year. The Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen unanimously approved event permits April 13 for the

annual Pilgrimage Music & Cultural Festival, to be held Sept. 25-26 at The Farm at Harlinsdale Park. Additionally, the city approved a long-term contract with festival organizers which will allow the event to be held at the park through 2025.

Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen

Meets May 11 and 25 at 7 p.m. at 109 3rd Ave. S., Franklin. Workshop meetings are always held two hours prior. In-person seating may be limited. 615-791-3217. www.franklintn.gov Brentwood City Commission Meets May 24 and June 14 at 7 p.m. at 5211 Maryland Way, Brentwood. In-person seating may be limited. 615-371-0060. www.brentwoodtn.gov Williamson County Schools board of education Meets May 17 at 6:30 p.m. 615-472-4000. www.wcs.edu Franklin Special School District board of education Meets June 14 at 6:30 p.m. at Poplar Grove Elementary School at 2959 Del Rio Pike, Franklin. 615-794-6624. www.fssd.org

City seeking feedback for inclusive playground

BRENTWOOD Renovations are planned for Granny White Park, and the city is asking the public to help with recommendations. The city announced April 13 it has launched a survey to ask residents about how it should build a new inclusive playground for the park to meet the needs of children with

disabilities. Residents will be asked what kinds of activities their children enjoy and what kinds of structures should be added to the park. Residents can take the inclusive playground survey at www.surveymonkey.com/r/ brentwood_inclusive_playground.

An inclusive playground is planned for Granny White Park. (Wendy Sturges/ Community Impact Newspaper)

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MAY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GUIDE

Places to get breakfast in Franklin, Brentwood

4 doughnut places to try 15 Duck Donuts This newly opened Brentwood shop features an open kitchenwhere diners can watch doughnuts get cooked and topped with specialty icings, drizzles and sprinkles. 101 Creedside Crossing, Ste. 1000, Brentwood www.duckdonuts.com 16 Five Daughters Bakery Located in The Factory at Franklin, this bakery oers its signature 100-layer doughnuts topped with avors such as Oat Milk Matcha Latte and Cream Cheese Sticky Bun. 230 Franklin Road, Ste. 11J, Franklin 6159339332 www.vedaughtersbakery.com 17 Peace Love and Little Donuts This Brentwood bakery features miniature doughnuts in gourmet avors such as Bos- ton CreamPie, Lemon Bar, Salted Caramel Macchiato and Strawberry French Toast. 213 Franklin Road, Ste. 120, Brentwood www.peaceloveandlittledonuts.com 18 tiny little donuts Two Airstream trailer locations in Franklin oer miniature doughnuts served warmwith toppings such as chocolate drizzle, powdered sugar and classic cinnamon sugar. A 328 5th Ave. N., Franklin 6156799422 B 1203 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin 6152243179 www.tinylittledonuts.com

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Sugar Drop

COURTESY SUGAR DROP

12 Sugar Drop Assorted scones: These pastries come in an assortment of avors such as bacon and pimento cheese. 574 Franklin Road, Franklin 6292026949 www.sugardrop.com Brentwood 13 The Perch Florentine crepe: Crepes are stued with eggs, portobello mushrooms, spinach and goat cheese. 117 Franklin Road, Brentwood 6156619008 www.theperchtn.com O 14 Puy Mun Crabcakes Benedict: Two over-easy eggs with Hollandaise sauce are served on top of Maryland-style crab cakes, asparagus, tomato

With warmer weather on the way, spring is a great time to explore local options for a weekend breakfast or brunch. This list is not comprehensive.

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

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Dish to try

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MAY 2021 Avocado toast: Sourdough bread is topped with goat cheese, lemon, avocado, sprout, red pepper akes and sea salt. Smoked Salmon Bagel: A freshly baked bagel is topped with capers, onion, salmon and house-made scallion cream cheese. 100 E. Main St., Franklin 6156288493 www.franklinbakehouse.com O A 4 The Good Cup PBWrap: Peanut butter, bananas, apples, honey and house-made granola ll a whole wheat wrap. 2181 Hillsboro Road, Franklin 6155912326 www.thegoodcup.com 5 Herban Market Breakfast tacos: Three house-made corn tortillas are lled with beans, eggs, bacon, avocado, mozzarella, cilantro and salsa. 3078 Maddux Way, Ste. 300, Franklin 6155676240 www.herban-market.com O A K 6 High Brow Coee & Tea Franklin 1 Biscuit Love Southern Benny: An open-faced biscuit topped with shaved ham, over-easy eggs and sausage gravy. 132 3rd Ave. S., Franklin 6159050386 www.biscuitlove.com O A K 2 The Coee House at Second and Bridge Quattro Formaggio crepes: French-style crepes are lled with asiago, feta, mascarpone and provolone cheeses. 144 2nd Ave. N., Franklin 6154656362 www.thecoeehousefranklin.com O K 3 Franklin Bakehouse

188 Front St., Ste. 102, Franklin 6154721938 www.highbrow.coee O K 7 Just Love Coee

Bacon Tater: A hashbrown wae is topped with cheddar cheese and bacon with ketchup or sour cream on the side. 4301 Aspen Grove Drive, Ste. 138, Franklin 6154656661 www.justlovecoeecafe/mcewen K 8 McCreary’s Irish Pub & Eatery Ulster Fry: A traditional Irish breakfast including bacon, Irish bangers, corned beef, eggs, potatoes and a slice of black and tan bread. 414 Main St., Franklin 6155913197 Mccrearyspub.com O A K 9 Merridee’s Breadbasket Stued French toast: Cinnamon streusel bread is lled with cream cheese and topped with syrup. 110 4th Ave. S., Franklin 6157903755 www.merridees.com O 10 Puckett’s Gro. & Restaurant Fried Chicken and Apple Jacks: Two pan- cakes are topped with whiskey-fried apples, fried chicken tenders and whiskey syrup. 120 4th Ave. S., Franklin 6157945527 www.puckettsgro.com A K 11 Ruby Sunshine BBQ shrimp and grits: Gulf shrimp are sau- teed with pepper, pork, onions and butter and served over grits with a biscuit on the side. 231 Public Square, Franklin 6157163711 www.rubysunshine.com O A K

slices and an English mun. 229 Franklin Road, Brentwood 6153732741 www.puymun.com

CREEKSIDE CROSSING

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MARYLAND WAY

BRENTWOOD

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MACK C. HATCHER PKWY.

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COOL SPRINGS BLVD.

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ASPEN GROVE DR.

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FRANKLIN

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DINING FEATURE Big Shake’s Hot Chicken&Fish Franklin eatery oers a hot take on fried chicken and sh F rom working as a cook at age 12 in New York to becoming a nationally known chef in Tennessee, Big Shake’s Hot Chicken & Fish owner Shawn Davis said he has spent the last 40 years thinking outside the box with his cooking. When Davis and his wife and business partner, Robin, moved to Tennessee, starting a chicken restaurant seemed like a natural next step, but Davis’ unique take on hot chicken is what set Big Shake’s apart from other popular Nashville institutions. “First of all, I’m a fried chicken fanatic—I’m addicted to fried chicken,” Davis said. “I didn’t want to compete, per se, or try to emulate or try to copy somebody else’s recipe; ours tastes a little dierent. So, I kind of created my own style of hot chicken.” The couple opened the rst location of Big Shake’s in downtown Franklin in 2013 before mov- ing to their location on Murfreesboro Road in 2014. Davis said the eatery’s jumbo tenders are the most popular menu item, and as with all the chicken dishes, diners can customize their heat levels. While heat levels range from the original, no-heat option to Death Row, Davis said he recom- mends rst-time diners start with a lower heat level and work their way up. “I try to tell people, you know, do it in modera- tion,” he said. “You don’t want to ruin your whole meal the rst time out the gate just because you want to show o.” Th eatery also oers sh and signature sides, such as macaroni and cheese, white beans, turnip greens and cole slaw. Additionally, Big Shake’s Shrimp Burgers, which were created as a beef alternative for the Davis’ daughter, have also helped the restaurant gain popularity. In 2011, Davis appeared on the ABC television show “Shark Tank” and has since been featured on multiple other media outlets. “I’ve always been an entrepreneur; I’d always try to look for ideas and ways to get my ideas to come to fruition,” Davis said. During the early weeks of the pandemic, Davis said the eatery was able to quickly pivot to online ordering to stay open, a concept many of Big Shake’s regulars were already familiar with. The restaurant also operates www.shopbigshakes.com, which allows customers to order food and products to be shipped nationwide. However, Davis said he has been glad to see regu- lars return to dine at the restaurant after months of ordering in. “It’s been awesome. We’ve seen customers we haven’t seen in over a year; it’s fantastic,” he said. BY WENDY STURGES

Hot chicken options ($7.49-$12.49) can be customized with six heat levels.

HOW HOT IS IT? Big Shake’s Hot Chicken & Fish features six dierent heat levels for diners to choose from.

Original

Cry Baby

Stop, Drop and Roll

Rambo

Executioner

Death Row

Big Shake’s also oers sh sandwiches and platters ($7.99-$10.99).

The eatery’s signature shrimp burgers ($9.99-$10.49) earned the Davises an appearance on ABC’s “Shark Tank.”

Owners Robin (left) and Shawn Davis opened the location on Murfreesboro Road in 2014.

PHOTOS COURTESY BIG SHAKE’S HOT CHICKEN & FISH

Big Shake’s Hot Chicken&Fish 1203 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin 615-988-9335 www.bigshakeshotchicken.com Hours: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HISTORY

Local historians, members of the African American Heritage Society of Williamson County and community leaders gathered April 14 to sign contracts signaling their intent to purchase and restore the Merrill-Williams home in Franklin. (Photos by Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

Merrill-Williams Home Local groups work to save 140-year-old house T o help save one of Williamson County’s historic properties from future development, the Previously, the AAHS has pur- chased and restored the McLemore House, which is now the nonprot’s headquarters. In a ceremony held at the home BY WENDY STURGES

The home is located at 264 Natchez St. near downtown Franklin.

The home was built in 1881 by Moses Merrill, a former slave.

African American Heritage Society of Williamson County has announced it is working to purchase a 140-year-old home near downtown Franklin. The Merrill-Williams Home, located at 264 Natchez St., Franklin, was built in 1881 by Moses Merrill, an emancipated slave previously owned by a Franklin slaveholder, according to the AAHS and local historians. Following the Civil War, Merrill built the home and lived there for 40 years until the house was passed along to the Williams family, which owned it for the next 100 years. During that time, the home and the area was a gathering place for artists, educators, musicians and the Black community in what is known as the historic Hard Bargain neighborhood. The home is one of the oldest structures still standing in the Natchez Street District, which is included in the National Register of Historic Places. “This is going to be saved by the community in Williamson County,” AAHS President Alma McLemore said. “It’s not just Franklin; it’s not just one group of people—it’s the community.”

REMEMBERING HISTORY

April 14, Cassandra Taylor—a descen- dant of the Williams family and the property seller—and Tennessee state historian Carroll Van West spoke about the importance of saving and restoring a part of Black history in Franklin. “This is a bright light shining on this place today because it is the light of truth, and truth is what this house can help us understand,” West said. “When I talk about the light of truth, what I’m getting at is that a place like this on this street in this neighbor- hood elevates the entire history of Franklin. The Black history of Franklin has been neglected for too long.” On April 14, the AAHS signed an option-to-purchase contract, which will give the nonprot one year to raise the funds needed to buy the home for preservation. The organi- zation is working to raise $610,000 to purchase the property as well as additional funding to restore it and open it to the public as a community and education space, according to McLemore. Those interested in donating can nd more information at www.mclemorehouse.com.

Downtown Franklin’s Hard Bargain neighborhood is home to a number of signicant places that are part of the area’s Black history. 1 Natchez Street Historic District Following the Civil War, the area around Natchez Street south of downtown became a predominantly Black community that was home to a number Harvey McLemore and his descendants for nearly 120 years until the home was bought for preservation. 3 Franklin’s Green Book Entry

This site recognizes the former home of Ruth Gaylor, whose guest house was listed in The Green Book, a travel guide for hotels, restaurants and businesses that welcomed Black visitors. The book was published from 1936-66 to help visitors avoid “sundown towns,” where Black people were barred from spending the night.

of Black businesses. 2 McLemore House Located in the Hard Bargain

neighborhood, the McLemore House was built in 1880, making it the oldest Black- owned home in Franklin. The house was occupied by emancipated slave

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SOURCES: NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES, AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE SOCIETY OF WILLIAMSON COUNTY, WILLIAMSON COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MAY 2021

sta oces, however; the two-story building includes an emergency call center, multiple training areas, crime laboratories, a public records room and a municipal courtroom. “It’s the biggest project in the his- tory of Brentwood from a nancial perspective,” Brentwood Police Chief Je Hughes said. “It is going to put us on the map in regard to having a facility that is state of the art that will allow us to serve the citizens of Brent- wood more eciently and hopefully more eectively.” Growing needs From the department’s founding in 1971, the number of ocers on stahas grown exponentially, according to the city. Fifty years ago, the department had three ocers and a chief of police, Howard Buttrey, who retired in 2000. Later the department was served by former Chief Ricky Watson. “Chief Buttrey started this depart- ment in 1971 with a budget of $40,000,” Watson said. “We’ve come a long way from there.” Since that time, ocials said the city’s needs have changed. The city’s population has grown from just over 3,700 in 1970 to over 42,000 in 2019, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The city itself has also grown, adding new roadways and services to help support the increasing population. Today, the Brentwood Police Department has more than 60 ocers and nearly 20 civilian sta members, according to the city. “It took a lot of hardwork and vision NEED FOR SPACE From its founding in 1971, the Brentwood Police Department had grown alongside the city’s population, which has increased exponentially in the last 50 years. SOURCES: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU, CITY OF BRENTWOODCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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HEADQUARTERS HISTORY In its 50 years, the Brentwood Police Department has grown from a small team to a full department in its own facility. To help house the department, the city completed a $29 million capital project this year to create a stand-alone facility.

2017 City commissioners approve $29 million in capital improvement funding for a new headquarters. SEPTEMBER 2019 The city breaks ground on the facility on Heritage Way.

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1969 The city of Brentwood is incorporated.

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WENDY STURGES COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

NOVEMBER 2020 The department announces the addition of a statue and memorial wall to honor retired

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and fallen ocers. APRIL 2021

COURTESY CITY OF BRENTWOOD

The Brentwood Police Department celebrates 50 years and completes its new headquarters. JUNE 2021 Over 80 ocers and sta will move into the new building.

APRIL 1971 The Brentwood Police Department is formed with a sta of four. 1974 The department moves to its rst building on Franklin Road near what is now Town Center. 1976 The department moves to a facility near Harpeth Drive. 1979 The department moves again to Wilson Pike Circle 1987 The department moves into Brentwood City Hall.

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SOURCE: CITY OF BRENTWOODCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

“IT IS GOING TO PUT US ON THE MAP IN REGARD TO HAVING A FACILITY THAT IS STATE OF THE ART THAT WILL ALLOW US TO SERVE THE CITIZENS OF BRENTWOOD MORE EFFICIENTLY AND HOPEFULLY MORE EFFECTIVELY.”

CONTINUED FROM 1

the new facility April 29. “Brentwood loves their police,” Mayor Rhea Little said. “This head- quarters will provide many ameni- ties that will lead to a better-trained police force, and it will be a vital tool in continuing to provide safety and security to those who live and work in Brentwood.” The $29 million project, which is funded through the city’s capi- tal improvement program, features more than 56,000 square feet of space, a far cry from the department’s existing oces at Brentwood City Hall. The department is expected to move employees to the new space by June 1, according to the city. The new space features more than

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WENDY STURGES COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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1999 Brentwood acquires land for future headquarters.

JEFF HUGHES, BRENTWOOD POLICE CHIEF

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

A LOOK INSIDE The new Brentwood Police Department headquarters includes a number of features the department has not had in the past. 1 INDOOR FIRING RANGE An indoor ring range will allow ocers to complete required training in house, regardless of weather conditions or appointment times. 2 COMMUNITY ROOM The community room, which is also a municipal courtroom, will oer residents the chance to interact with police ocers during events. 3 SIMULATION TRAINING ROOM The simulation training room features VirTra, a program that uses a variety of scenarios to help ocers practice judgment and de-escalation techniques. 4 MEMORIAL WALL The memorial wall features the names of retired and fallen ocers.

1971 City population: 3,700 Police sta: 3 ocers 1 police chief

2021 City population:

42,000+ Police sta: 67 ocers 18 civilian personnel

to get us to where we are today,” City Manager Kirk Bednar said. When ocers and sta move into the building this summer, it will be the fth time the department has moved in its history, according to the city. Prior to moving to its existing space in Brentwood City Hall in 1987, the department had oces on Frank- lin Road before moving to Harpeth Drive and, later, Wilson Pike. Hughes said the new building will not only house the department, but also include space for future growth. “We built this to service the city for decades moving forward,” Hughes said. “There is future development space that is not currently going to be occupied, and that was intended.” The new facility features a new gym and training rooms for ocers to complete ongoing training, including an in-house ring range. Previously, training would be conducted at county facilities, whichmeant the department would compete with other municipali- ties for appointment times. “We have always put a high empha- sis on training in Brentwood, and I know that’s not the case everywhere, but it’s important to us,” he said. Another training room will feature VirTra, a virtual use-of-force program that runs simulations to help ocers work on judgment skills in real time. “With the simulation room, it gives you that ability to train ocers on de-escalation techniques and to train them on their communication skills,” hesaid. “That is so important because it allows you to train on decision-making

SOURCE: CITY OF BRENTWOODCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COURTESY CITY OF BRENTWOOD

COURTESY CITY OF BRENTWOOD

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COURTESY CITY OF BRENTWOOD

to where we are now on the furthest northern part of the city,” Hughes said. The new building will also pay hom- age to the department’s past, Hughes said. One late addition to the project was the creation of the Police Memo- rial Plaza, which features a bronze lion statue commissioned by local artist Cindy Billingsly as well as walls with the names of retired and fallen ocers, including former ocerDestinLegieza, who was killed in a drunk driving acci- dent while on duty last June. “This memorial wall only has one name on it, and we pray it never has any more names,” Little said. Additionally, the headquarters’ municipal courtroom will double as a community room, where the department can meet with residents

and host events and meetings, which Hughes said he hopes helps facilitate more interaction between the depart- ment and the public. The department intends to expand its citizens police academy and neighborhood watch programs, he said. “We have historically had a very good working relationship with the citizens in our community, and we value that,” Hughes said. “We wanted to expand that because we never really had the facilities to invite the public to engage with us. I know this will give us the ability to do that much more eectively.”

and the emphasis is on de-escalating those scenarios, which might other- wise result in a use of force.” Community focus Hughes said he hopes the new facil- ity will be a better resource for not just the department, but for the commu- nity. In addition to police amenities, the new headquarters also features an ambulance bay to be staed by Williamson County by the end of the year, giving emergency medical services more access to the area, an advantage the police department will also have, Hughes said. “It puts us in the geographical cen- ter of the city, which will give us an opportunity to respond more quickly to every area of the city as opposed

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

13

FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MAY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

A NEW STATION The city of Brentwood has begun the process to design and build Fire Station No. 5, which will serve the southeast side of the city. A design for the station was debuted April 8.

Goal time Brentwood city ocials said the new station will help responders meet their target response time by removing the delays of distance and trac. IMPROVING RESPONSE TIMES GROWING DEMAND Call volume in the city has risen in the last decade as the population has grown, prompting the need for more services. Current time 12 MINUTES, 9 SECONDS 6 MINUTES, 50 SECONDS

RAGSDALE RD.

R

PLEASANT HILL RD.

N

Population

Emergency responses 2008 2,441

2008

35,262

2018

2018

43,889

3,633

SOURCE: CITY OF BRENTWOODCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

RENDERING COURTESY TMPARTNERS, CITY OF BRENTWOOD

Brentwood to break ground on newFire StationNo. 5 this fall

make sure the design of the station t in with its surroundings. The new, two-story station will include large bay doors and a small tower, reminiscent of hose towers used in older stations, according to Je Earwood, government and civic prac- tice leader for TMPartners, the design and project management rm for the station. The station will also include a public restroom and area to ll water bottles for residents using the nearby walking trail. Goss said the neighborhood aspect of the station was important to the department as well. “A new concept, or rather a return to tradition, is the concept of a neigh- borhood re station in an area where reghters can actually be part of the surrounding neighborhood,” Goss said. “That was our goal in designing the building and also our ability to interact with the public.”

“When we rst started looking at designing the station, it was based on the fact that our response numbers in this part of the city were climbing dra- matically, and our response times were delayed due to trac and distance and just the nature of the roadways,” Fire Chief Brian Goss said. “This year alone, our number of responses that originate in this district have climbed 21%.” Construction is set to wrap up in fall 2022. “We are very excited to get this started and we wide as far as our response time and our eectiveness, this stationwill have a dramatic impact,” Goss said. A neighborhood station Because of the station’s prox- imity to nearby neighborhoods, Bednar said the city worked with Brentwood-based TMPartners to know that when we average our aggre- gate number city-

BY WENDY STURGES

City ocials said one of the largest advantages to the new station’s loca- tion on Split Log Road will be the abil- ity to improve response times to calls on the east side of the city. From 2008-18,

To help meet demand in a growing part of the county, Brentwood city ocials are moving forward with Fire Station No. 5 on the southeast side of the city. The new station, slated to cost approximately $5 million, is set to begin construction this fall on Split Log Road near Ragsdale Road. Plans for the station have been in the works for the past several years; the city pur- chased land for the station in 2018. “[The department] identied this southeast area of town as one of our fastest-growingareasbut alsooneof the areas that kind of fell in a hole between two stations where we were having response time issues, and we had iden- tied an ideal fth station in this area,” City Manager Kirk Bednar said during a community meeting April 8.

“THIS YEAR ALONE, OUR NUMBER OF RESPONSES THAT ORIGINATE IN THIS DISTRICT HAVE CLIMBED 21%.” BRIAN GOSS, BRENTWOOD FIRE CHIEF

the city popula- tion has grown by 24%, and emer- gency response has increased by 48% to meet a rising

demand in call volume, according to the city. In District 5 in particular, call volume increased by more than 70% between 2016-18. According to the city, a target response time for rst responders is six minutes and 50 seconds; however District 5’s response time is just over 12 minutes.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MAY 2021

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