Keller - Roanoke - Northeast Fort Worth - September 2022

KELLER ROANOKE NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION

VOLUME 4, ISSUE 5  SEPT. 22OCT. 19, 2022

ONLINE AT

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HIGHER EDUCATION FOCUS

FACELIFT FOR OLD TOWN The latest phase of construction in Old Town Keller is split into two parts.

Alliance Training Center designed to help meet region’s workforce needs

$685,000 • Bates Street Park

development (includes pavilion, landscaping, seating areas)

BY CODY THORN

A growing need for specialized workers and a grow- ing area in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex became a catalyst for North Central Texas College to expand. The Gainesville-based junior college opened North Central Texas College Alliance Training Center on Aug. 22. The latest campus for NCTC came together quickly thanks to more than $2.4 million from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board’s Texas Reskilling and Upskilling for Education grants, according to Darrell Smith, NCTC division chair for industrial and energy technology.Theschoolreceivedthreedierentgrants,

$4.28 million • Bates Street reconstruction

• Utility replacements • Median on Main Street • Pedestrian hybrid beacon for crosswalk

SOURCE: CITY OF KELLER COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Bates Street, shown here at the intersection with Elm Street, is being redone so the city can hold festivals there. (Valerie Wigglesworth/Community Impact Newspaper)

Keller creating new destination in Old Town The latest eorts to improve Old Town Keller involve upgrad- ing Bates Street with a park to hold festivals and adding con- nectivity to the west side. connect to the west side of Old Town Keller, which saw work completed there in 2017. BY VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

CONTINUED ON 20

North Texas Central College opened a training center Aug. 22 to help ll job needs in the market. PATHWAY TO THE WORKFORCE

Work includes reconstruct- ing the road, replacing the util- ities, improving drainage and adding an adjoining park with an elevated pavilion and pub- lic art benches. The city also plans to build a median with a pedestrian hybrid beacon and crosswalk along Main Street/US 377 just south of Bates Street to

Mayor Armin Mizani said all of the elements are part of a larger eort to make Keller one of the most fami- ly-friendly cities in the state. “At the end of the day, CONTINUED ON 14

31 students enrolled at NCTC Alliance

4 programs oered at NCTC Alliance

7 total NCTC campuses

The goal with the nearly $4.97 million project is to create a des- tination for residents and visi- tors alike, ocials said.

SOURCE: NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

HIGHER EDUCATION FOCUS 2022 SNAPSHOT DATA

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IMPACTS

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KELLER - ROANOKE - NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. Now in 2022, CI is still locally owned. We have expanded to include hundreds of employees, our own software platform and printing facility, and over 30 hyperlocal editions across the state with a circulation to more than 2.4 million residential mailboxes.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS MONTH

FROM ANA: School is back in session, and we are ready for fall. As you readjust to your normal routine, I encourage you to look through our pages and support the advertisers you see inside. Go visit these businesses. Share their coupons with a friend, and thank them for making it possible for you to receive your Community Impact Newspaper for free. Happy fall, y’all! Ana Erwin, GENERAL MANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROM VALERIE: In this edition we take a look at the new training center in the Alliance area for the North Central Texas College (Pages 20-21). We also explore some of the changes planned along Bates Street in Old Town Keller (Pages 14-15). Send us your feedback at krnnews@communityimpact.com. Valerie Wigglesworth, SENIOR EDITOR

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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BYRON NELSON BLVD.

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Eat The Frog Fitness

Torchy’s Tacos

ROANOKE

COURTESY EAT THE FROG FITNESS

COURTESY TORCHY’S TACOS

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COMING SOON 4 Torchy’s Tacos is slated to open a third Fort Worth location at 9700 Hill- wood Parkway, Fort Worth, according to a ling with the Texas Department of Li- censing and Regulation. The ling states an interior nish-out of the restaurant chain’s new location will wrap up around February 2023. Torchy’s Tacos oers spe- cialty tacos, queso, burritos, margaritas and more. www.torchystacos.com 5 Bualo Wild Wings Go will open this winter in the Keller Marketplace at 1411 Keller Parkway in Keller. The Go concept focuses on online ordering, takeout and deliveries. The curated menu includes wings, burgers, tenders, chicken sand- wiches, sides, sauces and seasonings. www.bualowildwings.com/en/bww-go 6 Journeys , a national shoe store chain, will open at the Tanger Outlets in Fort Worth. The new location will be at 15853 North Freeway, Ste. 1078, Fort Worth. According to a listing with the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation, a $331,200 renovation is estimated to nish at the end of October. The company stocks shoes and accessories for teens and adults, and carries brands, such as Converse, Vans, Ugg, Hey Dudes, Crocs and Birkenstock. www.journeys.com 7 The Wichita Falls-based American National Bank & Trust is expanding its footprint into Roanoke. A sign located next to Roanoke City Hall shows a render- ing of the new site that will be construct- ed on a 0.9-acre lot but an address is not yet available. The 13,000-square-foot building will oer retail and commercial

oces on the rst oor and oce space on the second oor. Prior to the bank’s construction, American National will open a loan production oce at 409 N. Oak St., Ste., 200, Roanoke, with an expected opening date in October. www.amnat.com 8 The town of Westlake approved a site plan for a 7-Eleven that will be located at the intersection of SH 170 and US 377. ADL Development LP’s nal plat for Westlake Corners South was approved at the Town Council’s Aug. 29 meeting. Ron Ruthven, the town’s planning and development director, stated the Irving-based company will build on a 2.38-acre lot and will have a fueling station. No timeline for the project was available. 7-Eleven oers coee, snacks, fast food and the iconic Slurpee drink. www.7-eleven.com 9 Roanoke City Council approved a spe- cic use permit Aug. 9 to allow a distill- ery and tasting room to open at 101 Travis St., Roanoke. The area was previously occupied by A Biker’s Garage. BlackEyed Distilling Company does business as Southern Springs Distillery , according to the application led by Je Johnson of Portland, Maine. Council approved a zoning change to allow the company to produce, package and sell its alcohol as well as include a tasting room. Informa- tion on timing of the business opening was not available. 10 A new Prosperity Bank building will be constructed at 615 E. Byron Nelson Blvd. in Roanoke after City Council voted unanimously at its Aug. 23 meeting to approve a site plan. According to city documents, a bank was originally built at that location in 1982. The building, which

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TIMBERLAND BLVD.

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GOLDEN TRIANGLE BLVD.

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WESTERN CENTER BLVD.

NOW OPEN 1 Sports City Taverna opened in early July at 5711 Golden Triangle Blvd., Fort Worth. The sports bar oers burgers, salads, wings and pizza as well as en- trees, such as grilled salmon and street tacos. It also has a breakfast menu. 682-328-0261. www.sportsbarfortworth.com 2 Eat The Frog Fitness opened its group training studio on Aug. 31 at 861 N. Tarrant Parkway in Keller. The stu- 820

dio is open 24/7 and oers sessions for all tness levels. 817-886-3764. www.eatthefrogtness.com 3 Great Hearts Prairie View , a tu- ition-free, classic liberal arts charter school, opened Aug. 11 for kindergarten through third grade. The school is tem- porarily located at 1750 Rufe Snow Drive, Keller, for the 2022-23 school year. The permanent location will be on 17 acres near US 287 and I-35W in Fort Worth. 817-259-0738. https://prairieview. greatheartsamerica.org

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Kimchi ramen noodles are one of the items that will be served at Hoshi Ramen in Keller.

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was a little more than 8,000 square feet, was damaged during freezing weather last year and determined to be a total loss, city documents state. The building was demol- ished in February. SLI Group Inc., which is working with Prosperity Bank, plans to re- place the building with a smaller footprint on the 3.79-acre site at the northwest cor- ner of East Byron Nelson Boulevard and Dorman Street, documents state. The site plan calls for a 4,000-square-foot build- ing with three drive-thru lanes. A timeline for construction was not announced. www.prosperitybankusa.com 11 A 41,550-square-foot building on vacant land is planned to be constructed for Penguin Patch at 721 Chisholm Trail in Keller that would include oce space, warehouse space and an assembly area. The company assembles kits containing holiday gifts and sells them to schools to be used as fundraisers or service projects, according to information presented at the Aug. 2 Keller City Council meeting. Penguin Patch would be moving its oper- ations from 3553 Loddick Lane in north- east Fort Worth once the new building is completed. A timeframe for the move has not been determined. 1-888-577-2824. https://penguinpatch.com FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON A Wichita Falls ramen noodle restaurant is expanding to Keller with construction scheduled to wrap up by December. Owner Injun Shim said he expects to open Hoshi Ramen shortly after construction nishes at 1301 Keller Parkway, Ste. 200, Keller. The Fort Worth resident opened Taki Ramen in Wichita Falls in 2021 and is bringing a second restaurant to the Dallas-Fort Worth area. The business will oer appetizers, such as edamame, gyoza and spring rolls. Entrees include rice bowls, salads and tonkotsu, shoyu, aka, miso and specialty ramen noodles with brisket,

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pork, shrimp, kimchi or tofu. There is also a children’s menu. Japanese beer, Korean liquor and sake are on the menu in Wichita Falls, and Shim said he will apply for a liquor license at the Keller location. www.takiramen.com (Wichita Falls location)

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RELOCATIONS 12 Hope Harbor Counseling & Family Therapy opened Aug. 1 at 4917 Golden Triangle Blvd., Ste. 441, Fort Worth. The oce recently expanded after relocating from 1211 S. Main St., Ste. 300, Keller. Counselors and therapists on sta spe- cialize in trauma and addiction, and also oer life coaching. 817-201-2444. www.hopefulharbor.com

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

TODO LIST

September & October events

SEPTEMBER 27 SEE SCHOOL BANDS PERFORM Keller ISD Fine Arts holds its annual Marching Expo with band performances from the district’s four high schools and seven middle schools. Proceeds benet KISD’s band programs. 7-9 p.m. $5 (tickets available through any high school or middle school band program). Keller ISD Athletic Complex, 500 Pate-Orr Road N., Keller. https://bit.ly/3KMjlRr 28 APPLY FOR A JOB The 2022 AllianceTexas Job Fair will connect job seekers with area employers. The event is hosted by Workforce Solutions for Tarrant County, Hillwood Properties and Workforce Solutions for North Central Texas. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free (admission). Texas Motor Speedway, 3545 Lone Star Circle, Fort Worth. https://bit.ly/3es19jF OCTOBER 01 CELEBRATE PETS The 13th annual Pet Fest includes pet-related merchandise and information, dog-owner services, a DJ, a photo station, balloon art, kids games and more. Leashed, vaccinated pets are

welcome. A dog drill performance by K-9 Directions will be at 10 a.m. 9-11 a.m. Free (admission). Freedom Dog Park, 2675 Trophy Park Drive, Trophy Club. www.trophyclub.org/298/Pet-Fest 01 ENJOY BREWS & BLUES The fourth annual Brews & Blues for Boobs beneting Cancer StrongHER will include beer, live music, a silent auction, bra pong, an honor wall, games, food and vendor booths. Attendees are invited to bring chairs. Awards will be given to the most “pinked out” person, child and dog. 2-6 p.m. Free (admission). Shannon Brewing Company, 818 N. Main St., Keller. https://bit.ly/3CZO4Za 04 VISIT WITH MAYOR Join Westlake Mayor Sean Kilbride for some Coee & Conversation. 8-9:30 a.m. Free (admission). Sip Stir Coee, 1300 Solana Blvd., Westlake. https://bit.ly/3TDhfXU 04 STAND AGAINST CRIME Neighborhoods in Fort Worth and Trophy Club are invited to join in the annual National Night Out Against Crime. Residents are invited to turn on their outdoor lights from 6-10 p.m. Those hosting a block party may register with their city’s police department for a possible visit from ocers. Free.

OCT. 08

HONOR FOUNDING FAMILIES DOWNTOWN ROANOKE

The 25th anniversary of Celebrate Roanoke features a street festival to honor founding families. The event includes live music, community performances, vendors, wagon rides, a petting zoo, reworks, kids activities and more. Noon-9 p.m. Free (admission). Tickets ($5-$10) are required for the Coleman’s Canine Corral dog tricks and agility show, Kelsey’s Cow Patty Bingo, Peterson’s Pig Penning and Smith’s Armadillo Races. Oak Street, Roanoke. https://bit.ly/3CYDEZS

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pickups. Proceeds benet the Westlake Historical Preservation Society. Food and beverages will be for sale. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Free (admission). Westlake Town Hall, 1600 Solana Blvd., Westlake. www.westlakeclassiccarshow.com 15 THROUGH 16 CAMP OUT IN KELLER The Keller Parks & Recreation Department hosts a Haunted Camp Out at Bear Creek Park. Families are invited to bring their tents for a sleepover. The event includes a costume contest, a tent decorating contest, s’mores, a spooky trail and a haunted movie. Families are on their own for dinner. Breakfast will be served in the morning. Check-in begins at 3 p.m. Oct. 15. $5 (T-shirts available for $10). Registration required. Bear Creek Park, 400 Bear Creek Park, Keller. https://bit.ly/3KR4OUp 18 GET IN SOME SHOPPING Sip ‘n’ Shop attendees may enjoy food and drinks while shopping among 50 local artisans and vendors. Proceeds benet the Greater Keller Women’s Club. 5:30-9 p.m. (VIP access at 4:30 p.m. for $35). Tickets are $15 in advance, $20 at the door. The Bowden Events & Weddings, 1775 Keller Parkway, Keller. www.gkwc.org

https://bit.ly/3TDhfXU (Fort Worth), www.trophyclub.org/nno (Trophy Club) 08 CELEBRATE FALL This Fall Fun Festival will include vendors, food, kids activities, a costume contest for kids and dogs, and more. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Free (admission). Outside Keller Town Hall, 1100 Bear Creek Parkway, Keller. 817-770-6971. https://bit.ly/3qbmIrB 15 HELP CLEAN UP THE CITY All ages are invited to sign up for the community-wide Fall Trash Bash hosted by the Keller Parks & Recreation Department. 9-11 a.m. Free. Attendees should meet at Bear Creek Park, Pavilion 1, 400 Bear Creek Park, Keller, to pick up supplies. https://tinyurl.com/yzehb2n6 15 JOIN A GROUP GARAGE SALE Residents can participate in the Trophy Club Women’s Club Community- wide Garage Sale. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Free (admission); $20 (garage sale permits). Various locations in Trophy Club. A map of participating locations will be online Oct. 14. https://bit.ly/3RlkZvK 15 CHECK OUT CLASSIC CARS The 11th annual Westlake Classic Car Show includes original or restored- to-near-original classic cars, trucks and

OCT. 22

TAKE IN AN ANNUAL AIR SHOW FORT WORTH ALLIANCE AIRPORT

The 2022 AllianceTexas Aviation Expo presented by Bell is one day only this year. The event will include Flight Line aircraft displays from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. as well as Landing Zone exhibits, simulators and kids activities from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. There will also be a beer garden, food concessions, a gift shop and kids inatables. Aerial acts will perform from 4-5:30 p.m. Acts include the F-22 Raptor Demonstration Team and U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds. 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Tickets are available online only; $79 parking pass per vehicle required to attend. Tickets for a sunset photo tour on Oct. 21 ($80) and sunrise photo tour on Oct. 22 ($125) are also available. Fort Worth Alliance Airport, 2221 Alliance Blvd., Fort Worth. www.atxaviationexpo.com

Find more or submit Keller, Roanoke, Northeast Fort Worth, Trophy Club and Westlake events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

EVENTS

WINTER WONDERLAND ICE! will run from Nov. 11, 2022-Jan. 1, 2023, at the Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Center in Grapevine. This year’s theme is “The Polar Express.” The attraction involves:

of ice; 2Mlbs.

to create sculptures; and 40 artisans

room temperature to preserve the exhibit. 9 degrees Fahrenheit

SOURCE: GAYLORD TEXAN RESORT & CONVENTION CENTERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

ICE!, other holiday events return to Gaylord Texan in Grapevine “The Polar Express” will be recreated out of ice at the Gaylord Texan this winter. COURTESY GAYLORD TEXAN RESORT

BY HANNAH JOHNSON

Inside the attraction, guests can ride down two-story-tall ice slides, explore ice tunnels and arches, and visit the Carver’s Showcase to see live ice sculpting demonstrations. Guests can also see a Nativity scene carved out of ice. The resort will

More than 2 million pounds of ice will ll the Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Center in Grapevine during the holiday season. Gaylord Texan’s ICE! attraction is back for its 15th season after a two-year hiatus, according to a

also have several attractions as part of the Gaylord Texan’s Lone Star Christmas Celebration. More than 2 million lights will be sprawled across the 125-acre resort as well as

“WE CAN’T WAIT FOR OUR GUESTS TO ONCE AGAIN EXPERIENCE THE MAGIC AND WONDER OF ICE! DURING THIS YEAR’S LONE STAR CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION.” CHUCK PACIONI, GENERAL MANAGER

news release. ICE! will run from Nov.

11, 2022-Jan.1, 2023, and will

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bring the holiday movie “The Polar Express’’ to life through a team of 40 ice artisans who will craft

the nearly 17,000-square-foot frozen world. With the attraction kept at 9 degrees Fahrenheit, guests will be given parkas to keep warm as they tour the exhibit. “We can’t wait for our guests to once again experience the magic and wonder of ICE! during this year’s Lone Star Christmas celebration,” said Chuck Pacioni, general manager of Gaylord Texan Resort, in the release. “Since debuting here in 2005, ICE! has always been a one-of-a-kind attraction for our guests, and we’re excited to welcome this Gaylord Hotels tradition back this year with ‘The Polar Express’ and all the beloved characters from the classic holiday movie.”

numerous Christmas trees, 15,000 ornaments and miles of garland, the release stated. The Gaylord Texan will also host several live events, including the “Cirque: Winter Won- derland,” which is a fusion of theatre and cirque with stunts, acrobatics and juggling contortion. The #Lit Light Show will feature thousands of lights synchronized to a soundtrack. Interactive attractions include indoor snow tubing, holiday-themed escape rooms, a Christmas car- ousel, snowball throwing and a 6,000-square-foot ice skating rink. Online reservations are required for all ticketed events. For tickets and information, visit https://christmasat- gaylordtexan.marriott.com.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION New school resource officers assigned to Keller ISD campuses

SCHOOL ASSIGNMENTS Keller ISD will have 12 school resource officers provided by three cities this school year. In the chart below, each dot represents one resource officer. Key: Fort Worth Keller Colleyville

BY CODY THORN

funding the city’s portion of the SRO cost, which is a 50-50 split between the city and KISD. In the wake of the Robb Elemen- tary School shooting in Uvalde in May, Trustee Ruthie Keyes ques- tioned whether the high school SROs would respond to other schools in the district. Kevin Kinley, KISD director of safety and security, noted these SROs will respond to calls at elementary and middle schools in Fort Worth. “Police officers are going to do what they have to do; they will respond if we need them,” Kinley said. “That is their job, and that is what they are going to have to do. They will help us out as much as they possibly can.” In addition to SROs inside the campuses, Fort Worth patrol officers will check on schools within their assigned districts, officials said.

Timber Creek High School Fossil Ridge High School

Keller Center for Advanced Learning and Indian Springs Middle School will share one officer. One mobile officer will support the remaining 25 campuses in the city.

More school resource officers, or SROs, will be at Keller ISD locations within the city limits of Fort Worth this school year. The district’s board of trustees approved an agreement Aug. 22 between the city and the school district to provide two additional officers—for a total of seven—for the 2022-23 school year. The city of Fort Worth will again cover the full cost of a mobile officer, while the school district and city will split the costs for six other officers who will be located at the Fort Worth high schools. The contract starts Oct. 1 and runs until Sept. 30, 2023. The contract this school year is for nearly $1.62 million with Keller paying $809,946. Last year the amount for four officers was $526,586. The Fort Worth Crime Control and Prevention District will assist with

Keller High School Keller Middle School Central High School

Bear Creek Intermediate School Liberty Elementary

SOURCE: KELLER ISD, COLLEYVILLE POLICE DEPARTMENT/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

When asked about the cost to have a dedicated officer at each KISD campus, Kinley said that number would depend on a lot of factors. “It’s not just the cost, but it is the availability and what cities can provide for us,” he said. The command staff involved in the Fort Worth SRO program includes one detective, five sergeants, two relief officers and one lieutenant, who is in charge of the unit, in addition to the officers within the schools.

A total of 12 SROs will be working within KISD this school year across three cities. KISD’s anticipated cost for Keller police officers is $391,364, which includes three full-time officers and one less-than-full-time officer. KISD’s Liberty Elementary School in Colleyville will have a school resource officer provided by the Col- leyville Police Department. The cost for one officer at Liberty is $90,529, according to Colleyville Police.

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SERVICES AND AMENITIES INCLUDE: • 38 private patient rooms and 10 spacious family suites • 6 intensive care unit suites • 24/7 emergency department with average wait times of 15 minutes or less • Advanced operating suites with robotic surgery capabilities • Cardiac catheterization lab • Imaging services including MRI, CT, ultrasound, and X-ray

Methodist Southlake Medical Center is a 141,000-square-foot hospital right in your own backyard. Designed with your comfort and the highest level of care in mind, here you’ll find skilled physicians and surgeons on the medical staff, advanced technology, and personalized service. Providing the level of care and caring that our friends and neighbors deserve. That’s community, and why so many people Trust Methodist.

Texas law prohibits hospitals from practicing medicine. The physicians on the Methodist Health System medical sta are independent practitioners who are not employees or agents of Methodist Southlake Medical Center, Methodist Health System, or any of its a liated hospitals. Methodist Health System complies with applicable federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex.

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KELLER - ROANOKE - NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION UPDATES

COMPILED BY CODY THORN

COMPLETED PROJECT

170

ROANOKE

ROANOKE RD.

377

OAK TRAIL

114

377

35W

N

ROANOKE

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF SEPT. 9. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT KRNNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. “We’re asking all Texans to be safe and smart, and that starts with obey- ing trac laws,” TxDOT Executive Director Marc Williams said in a Sept. 6 news release. About one in ve trac deaths in Texas in 2021 involved a pedestrian or a bicyclist, according to the Texas Department of Transportation. The agency’s “Be Safe, Drive Smart” cam- paign encourages people to follow the rules of the road and help end the streak of daily trac deaths. 20% of 4,490 fatalities on Texas roadways in 2021 involved a bicyclist or a pedestrian. Roanoke Road pavement improve- ments New asphalt was laid on Roanoke Road from SH 170 to just north of Oak Trail. The project began July 22, and roadwork was completed in mid-Au- gust. The guardrail work on the bridge was completed during the last week of August. The pavement project was done near the Charles Schwab corpo- rate oce, located at 2050 Roanoke Road, Westlake. Timeline: July 22-Aug. 23 Cost: proposed budget $1.16 million* Funding: town of Westlake community improvement fund; Tarrant County *THE FINAL COST WILL NOT BE KNOWN UNTIL PEARSON ROAD WORK, WHICH COSTS IS CONNECTED TO THIS PROJECT, IS COMPLETED. NUMBER TO KNOW

Roadwork is already underway on Hwy. 114 near Roanoke, and under a 10-year, $85 billion state-wide project, more work will happen in upcoming years. CODY THORNCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

N

Hwy. 114 in Roanoke to expand lanes to I35W

The Texas Department of Transpor- tation unveiled a 10-year, $85 billion statewide roadway construction plan that will include projects in Roanoke. The unied transportation program is aimed at addressing congestion, involves what are deemed to be the state’s highest priority transportation projects, according to a news release. Two projects in the plan include Hwy. 114 Business expansion and connecting it to US 377. According to Tony Hartzel, the TxDOT Dallas district public informa- tion ocer, the rst project for a new location of a freeway is tentatively rural connectivity and general upkeep of highways. The plan

range of work being done sometime between 2027 and 2032. US 377 is already under construc- tion with widening and addition of lanes that starts at Henrietta Creek Road in Roanoke and continues through Flower Mound and ends in Argyle. Another TxDOT project involves intersection improvements at Hwy. 114/US 377, which is expanding US 377 from two lanes to three lanes and adding left-turn lanes at Crockett, Main and Denton streets. Hartzel said that the $32 million Hwy. 144/US 377 project started a year ago and was 54% complete as of Sept. 2.

scheduled for 2025—though work on that project could begin sooner or later. The more than $26 million project has an estimated timeline of 2023-26. Middle lanes will be added from Hwy. 114 Business, west of US 377, which will create actual frontage roads instead of the frontage roads being used for highway driving. The second part, widening the free- way from east of I-35W to Hwy. 114 Business, will cost nearly $65 million. There will be six lanes constructed in the middle of the frontage roads with three lanes in each direction. This project is tentatively scheduled to start in 2028, with an estimated

Road work planned in the Alliance area of Fort Worth

Multiple areas are set for work in Fort Worth at an estimated cost of $33 million as part of the Texas Depart- ment of Transportation’s statewide roadway construction plan. These projects are expected to get started from 2023 to 2026. All of the work involves Harmon Road with dierent highways

connecting to it or near it, according to Bethany Kurtz, TxDOT Fort Worth district information ocer. A bridge over Hwy. 287 will be built on North Tarrant Parkway, with a turnaround on the east side. The bridge has an estimated cost of $14.4 million, documents show. It will grant access to Harmon Road as well.

35W

377

N. TARRANT PKWY.

287

FORT WORTH

N

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

Beefing up Bates Street

The reconstruction of Bates Street will include features that set it apart as a festival street. There will be bollards to close off both ends to traffic, stained and stamped concrete to enhance the look, no curbs to trip pedestrians, and electrical outlets for food trucks and generators.

construction in July on Bates Street and the park, which is about a third of an acre. There will be on-street parking on Bates Street as well as on the new Elm Street. “Parking is the No. 1 con- cern now in Old Town,” Hens- ley said. Bates Street will also get removable bollards so it can be closed for festivals. “It’s a little fancier” than the orange and white barri- cades the city would typi- cally use to close off a street, Hensley said. Other features include gateway entries on Bates Street; enhanced lighting; built-in food truck hook- ups for water and electric- ity; improved landscaping; and more. Bates Street itself will have pavement that is stamped and stained to give it a more decorative look, according to city plans. Earlier this year the city’s Public Art Board selected nearly a dozen designs for benches that will also serve as public art. “The goal here is really to enhance the festival street atmosphere and to really just set Bates Street apart from other spaces,” Lupe Orozco, the city’s manager for admin- istrative services, told coun- cil in May. A look at funding Part of Hensley’s job is keeping residents and busi- nesses abreast of what is hap- pening, she said. “It’s really easy to get wrapped up in the stamped and stained concrete and the

DESIGNED BY NICOLAS DELGADILLO

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

KELLER

ELM ST.

MAIN ST.

Elevated pavilion

Bates Street Park will include these amenities. • Elevated pavilion • Open lawn • New landscaping • Enhanced lighting

Open lawn

Seating areas

CONTINUED FROM 1

Designated crosswalk

ultimately for us, it’s just trying to make Old Town Keller a unique destination for residents and create some vibrancy by attracting new businesses,” he said. Construction on Bates Street began in July and is expected to wrap up in fall 2023, according to the city’s timeline. The next phase will involve the reconstruction of Elm Street, which is still under design and tentatively scheduled for construction beginning in 2024. Project details The ongoing construction is part of what city officials have dubbed Old Town Keller Phase 2. The area extends from Keller Parkway to Bear Creek Parkway and is between Main Street/US 377 and Elm Street. The first phase involved nearly $4.5 million worth of improvements to the west

BATES ST.

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

WHAT IS NEXT: The city is working on designs to reconstruct South Elm Street from Keller Parkway to the new roundabout at Bear Creek Parkway. Construction is expected to start in 2024.

IMPROVING PEDESTRIAN SAFETY A landscaped median will be added to Main Street (US 377) between Vine and Olive streets along with a pedestrian hybrid beacon and a designated crosswalk so people can more safely move between the east and west sides of Old Town Keller.

SOURCE: CITY OF KELLER/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

side of Main Street/US 377 just south of Keller Parkway. Keller Public Works Direc- tor Alonzo Linan said the city started with the basics: replacing the water and sewer lines, improving drainage, and redoing streets. Crews then added parking, more fencing, enhanced lighting, landscaping, outdoor seating and multiple gateway struc- tures, according to city doc- uments. The city also added a landscaped path to encour- age pedestrians to walk behind the buildings rather than along the heavily traf- ficked highway, Linan said.

“What started out as a util- ity infrastructure project has now become an economic development project,” Linan said. “And I think that as we do Bates and Elm [streets], we hope that it spurs enough redevelopment and reinvest- ment that it starts to snow- ball into more than what we started with.” Sarah Hensley, assis- tant director of community development in Keller, said after the first phase was completed, the city did a lot of work to figure out what would come next. There were public meetings, feedback

from the community and the businesses, and work with consultants and City Council. “There was a lot of thought and data collection and con- versation that went into iden- tifying which projects should come first on the east side,” she said. Phase 2 started with the roundabout being con- structed at Elm Street and Bear Creek Parkway to improve traffic flow. With that completed over the summer, the city started

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Functional art

nice little benches and lights and everything else,” she said. “Everything that we’re doing right now and planned to do in the future, first and foremost, they’re infrastruc- ture projects.” The improvements are being funded through a vari- ety of city funds as well as grant money. To help fund future projects, the city cre- ated a tax increment rein- vestment zone last year along the US 377 corridor that includes Old Town Keller. As the area redevelops and increases in property value, the zone will allow the city to capture that additional tax revenue and funnel it into other improvements. “[The reinvestment zone shows] how dedicated we are to making sure that Old Town Keller is a success,” Mizani said. “From the city’s per- spective, we’re very into our parks. We’re very into our trails. We like having unique mom-and-pop retailers and restaurants. … The more that we can improve on the

see,” she said. Sue Harbert owns The Pol- kadot Giraffe gift shop, which she opened five years ago in a house built in 1920 on Olive Street. Opening in Old Town versus a strip mall gives her business “an old quaint feel- ing,” she said. Harbert also serves as vice president of the Old Town Keller Merchants Associa- tion. She said it is important to let people know businesses are still open, despite the construction. “People just need to get out and explore Old Town and see what’s really down here,” she said. “There’s really some unique shops.” Harbert said she is excited about all the improvements coming to Old Town Keller. “When it’s done, it’s going to be phenomenal,” she said. “I just wish they could wave a magic wand and have every- thing done already.”

infrastructure and bring it up to date, in that sense, I think it’s just going to further put Keller on the map.” What is next Once the Bates Street improvements are done, the city plans to tackle rede- velopment of Elm Street. Plans include utility work, improved drainage, added sidewalks, on-street parking and a reconstructed roadway. Between $5 million-$5.5 mil- lion of the Elm Street work will be funded through the Tarrant County transporta- tion bond program voters approved in 2021, according to Linan. Linan said construction is scheduled to be done between 2024 and 2026. Hensley said the city also hopes some of the business owners might band together and add extra touches, whether that means holiday decorations, signage or extra security cameras. “The sky’s the limit as far as what they might like to

The city of Keller has commissioned artists to construct public art benches for the Bates Street project. The city is paying $8,000 for each bench. The artists are:

1 B.C. Gilbert 2 Claudia Maysen 3 Julia Ousley 4 Scott Shubin 5 Pascale Pryor

6 Robert Heintzelman 7 Robertus van der Wege 8 Sherry and Jimmy Don Snowden of Sleepy Rooster Studios 9 Thomas Diel

1

6

8

6

PHOTOS COURTESY CITY OF KELLER/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

For more information, visit communityimpact.com.

SOURCE: CITY OF KELLER/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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15

KELLER - ROANOKE - NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

CITY & SCHOOLS

News from Keller ISD, Northwest ISD, Keller, Westlake & Tarrant County

COMPILED BY CODY THORN

Fort Worth City Council 200 Texas St., Fort Worth www.fortworthtexas.gov Keller City Council 1100 Bear Creek Parkway, Keller www.cityoeller.com Roanoke City Council 500 S. Oak St., Roanoke www.roanoketexas.com Trophy Club Town Council 1 Trophy Wood Drive, Trophy Club www.trophyclub.org Westlake Town Council 1500 Solana Blvd., Bldg. 7, Ste. 7200, Westlake | www.westlake-tx.org Denton County Commissioners Court 231 Courthouse Drive, Denton www.dentoncounty.gov Tarrant County Commissioners Court 23100 E. Weatherford St., Fort Worth www.tarrantcounty.com Keller ISD 350 Keller Parkway, Keller www.kellerisd.net Northwest ISD 2001 Texan Drive, Fort Worth www.nisdtx.org For the latest news coverage from these government meetings, visit communityimpact.com MEETINGS WE COVER

District chooses Michael Grin to be interim superintendent

Prisoner move costing Tarrant Co. $18M

Property tax rate stays same in Westlake WESTLAKE The city’s tax levy is going up in scal year 2022-23 even though its property tax rate will remain the same. STAYING THE SAME The tax levy for scal year 2022-23 will generate more than last year.

KELLER ISD The board of trust- ees approved a policy change at its Aug. 22 meeting that will help staff determine whether library books are appropriate across four different education levels. The latest change adopts content guidelines for reviewing library books in KISD. The guidelines list 14 different categories that will judge whether books adhere to the new policies. Keller ISD approves policy change for library book review

TARRANT COUNTY Prisoners will be sent to a jail in West Texas to ease overcrowding after the commissioners court approved an $18 million contract with a private Delaware-based company called Management & Training Corp. The motion passed by a 3-2 margin on Aug. 30. Commissioners Gary Fickes and J.D. Johnson along with County Judge Glen Whitley voted in favor of the contract. Commissioners Roy Charles Brooks and Devan Allen were opposed. The Tarrant County Jail can safely handle 3,600-3,700 prison- ers, but its capacity typically is

between 4,400-4,500, according to sheri’s ocials. A number of state inmates are being held there due to issues that came about as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and the inability to make jail transfers, ocials said. The new contract allows Tarrant County to send 432 state inmates to the Giles W. Dalby Correctional Facility in Post, Texas, which is about 40 miles south of Lubbock and 274 miles from Fort Worth. Garza County contracts with Management & Training Corp. to operate the facility, according to Tarrant County documents.

NORTHWEST ISD The board of trustees announced Michael Grin will serve as the interim superin- tendent for the remainder of the 2022-23 school year. Grin, who was the district’s assistant superintendent of curricu- lum and instruction, has worked in NISD for nearly 20 years. She was selected during a special meeting Sept. 15 at the Legacy Learning Center in Haslet. The board made the decision unanimously. Grin will be the acting super- intendent until a permanent one is selected. She will ll the role of former Superintendent David Hicks, who died unexpectedly following a medical emergency Sept. 9. “Northwest ISD means the world to me, and I’m honored to tem- porarily lead the district forward with stability as we search for a new leader,” Grin said in a press

release. “Our culture of excellence and commitment to academic and extracurricular achievement are unchanged, and our team

SOURCE: TOWN OF WESTLAKE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER Tax rate FY 2021-22: Tax rate FY 2022-23: $0.16788 per $100 valuation

During a meeting Aug. 29, the council approved a tax rate of $0.16788 per $100 valuation. The rate is essentially a tax hike due to the increase in assessed property values in the town. By keeping the same tax rate, Westlake residents will see a bump of about 14.92% in their property tax bills. No residents spoke during the hearing. The approved tax rate was passed 5-0 in a roll-call vote.

Michael Grin

The no-new-revenue property tax rate is $0.14609 per $100 valuation, which is the rate at which the town would generate the same amount of revenue as last scal year.

is doing great work to continue a strong start to our school year. Dr. Hicks left a tremendous mark on our district in his time with us with his caring and compassionate nature.” Hicks was in his rst year working for the school district, as he started on May 17. A press release said the district will use search rm Leasor Crass. The rm was also used to hire Hicks, who was in his 33rd year in education. He worked for Carroll- ton-Farmers Branch, Grapevine-Col- leyville, Denton and Sherman ISDs.

Keller residents to see 8% rise in trash rates

Cost to transfer: $18 million Tarrant County expected capacity: 3,600-3,700

Prisoners being transferred to Garza County: 432 Average capacity as of September: 4,400-4,500

PRISON OVERCROWDING Tarrant County will free up prison overcrowding with transfers.

TRASH RATE INCREASE Residential customers will see a $2 or less increase on their bills.

KELLER The city of Keller and Community Waste Disposal came to an agreement on a rate increase and extension of the existing contract during a council meeting Sept. 6. CWD was seeking an 11.4% increase

but agreed on an 8% raise for the period of Sept. 1, 2022-Aug. 31, 2023. Average residential cus- tomers will see no more than a $2 increase on their next bill, accord- ing to data provided to council.

Senior citizen: $1.28

Residential: $1.38 Backdoor pickup: $1.85 SOURCE: CITY OF KELLER COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: TARRANT COUNTY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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