Chandler Edition - October 2020

TEACHERBREAKDOWN According to CUSD data, there have not been any more teacher resignations in the district than the previous year.

STUDENTSWHOOPTED FOR CHARTER SCHOOLS The district monitors the number of students each year who leave CUSD for charter schools.

PERCENT OF STUDENTS WHOWENT TOCHARTERS CUSD measures student retention via this mobility metric. More students have left for charter schools this year already than in the entire year last year.

TEACHER RESIGNATIONS After 2018-19 After 2019-20 TEACHER RETIREMENTS Through 2019 Through 2020 54 50

800

2.0%

191

745

702

1.55% 1.57%

151

574

1.31%

553

1.5%

600

1.16%

1.0%

400

0.5%

200

CERTIFIEDWORKFORCE ACCOMMODATIONS 2019-20 2020-21 69 113

0

0

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21*

2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21*

2017-18

*Year to date

*Year to date

SOURCE: CHANDLER USDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: CHANDLER USDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: CHANDLER USDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

teachers across the district have been working for months to make the best of a dicult situation. “All of these educators are incred- ible,” Nash said. “The amazing inge- nuity and creativity they have and the hours they spent outside of contract time getting rooms ready, cleaning, spreading out classrooms—it’s a lot. Ninety-nine point nine percent of educators are putting in 12- to 14-hour days, six or seven days a week and have been doing so since before school even opened to online instruction. It’s not all fun and happy times at home doing this. People are learning this technology on the y and building the plane while we’re ying it. It’s truly what is happening.” Nash said a majority of teachers were not in favor of opening schools prior to Oct. 13—when secondary stu- dents went back. But when the CUSD board voted for a staggered start for elementary schools, teachers rolled up their sleeves and got to work. She said the reopening of elementary schools has largely gone o without a hitch.

bracing for an $8 million loss it cannot regain for the next scal year due to enrollment. “We know when our budget decreases, we can handle that,” Berry said. “We can utilize funds that we had and prepared for to get us through this hard time. But next year is a big- ger problem for us. You’re down over 2,000 kids; your [maintenance and operations] budget alone is going to go down over $11 million. And that’s a big impact because now, we’re talking about positions.” Berry said, while there are no cer- tainties at this point, the district is anticipating a decrease in the number of jobs for the future. “That’s hard because we’ve been growing,” Berry said. “We haven’t had that. We haven’t been declining as a school district. But that’s denitely something we’re going to be preparing

Heidi Gass, the technology teacher at Frye Elementary School and the grandparent of a CUSD student, said she was glad to be back with her students. “I was always happy to have the kids back,” Gass said. “I’m not afraid of the virus. I want to be safe, and I feel like I could be safe and take care of myself and the kids and be safe at school. I work at a Title I school; our kids need to be at school.” Gass said kids have been coopera- tive with social distancing and wear- ing their masks from day one back on campus. “It’s been a dream,” she said. “The kids have stepped up; they are wear- ing their mask; they do what they are supposed to do. It has really been awesome.” Nash said that across the board there are concerns about rst quarter grades after students faced a steep learning curve getting used to distance learn- ing. She noted that prior to last spring, an online option at CUSD for elemen- tary school students did not even exist.

“There just has to be a level of understanding and grace,” Nash said. “At the secondary level, we are accom- modating for the fact that there will be kiddos who are struggling. Teachers aren’t going to set them up for fail- ure and recoup that grade for the rst quarter.” Peier, who has a junior high school student, said he was still a little appre- hensive about sending him back to in-person school with more students and more mobility between classes. “At the end of the day, I think too many people are focused on them- selves and everything going on,” Peier said. “I put my faith in the Chandler school district because I knew they would make the right deci- sions under all the tremendous pres- sure, and I have been pretty satised. If something were to happen and things change, they are the rst to err on the side of student and sta safety.”

for for next year.” Newschool year

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

Katie Nash, president of the Chan- dler Education Association, said

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CHANDLER EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

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