Chandler Edition - October 2020

CHANDLER EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 3  OCT. 20NOV. 16, 2020

ONLINE AT

Changes to Chandler USD high school boundaries

IMPACTS

EDUCATION

REWIND

RITA’S BURRITOS

4

7

10

11

Teachers, parents adjust to newyear as district braces for enrollment woes

“WE NEVERWOULD HAVE PREDICTED THATWEWOULDHAVE LOST THE NUMBEROF STUDENTS THATWE HAVE RIGHT NOW.” LANA BERRY, CHANDLER USD CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Chandler USD seeing decreased enrollment As students head back to in-person education, the district is facing decreased enrollment, which could cause a nancial setback in the coming year.

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

just phenomenal; she’s made it a fan- tastic online learning experience,” he said. “For me, based on everything I have seen in our school district, I have faith in our school district and the peo- ple who run it. I know that they would make the right decisions for kids and teachers and the community.” The Peiers are one of thousands of families that sent their students back to classes in September in a staggered start—with the youngest students starting rst and the older kids com- ing in the next week—after starting CONTINUED ON 12

Scott Peier said his youngest son, a fourth-grader at Basha Elementary School, was a little nervous about going back to his brick-and-mortar school when campuses rst opened to elementary school students in September. He had been an average student before going virtual last spring due to the coronavirus, Peier said, but he had been getting A’s and B’s in school while learning from home during the pandemic. “I am blessed because his teacher is

2018-19

2019-20

Current

ELEMENTARY

JUNIOR HIGH

HIGH SCHOOL

23K

8K

17K

20K

7K

16K

17K

6K

15K

0

0

0

SOURCE: CHANDLER USDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

City tonish long-awaited veteransmemorial in 2021

$2.52M Total cost of veterans memorial

4.8% of Chandler’s population are veterans (12,662 total)

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO After more than a decade since the rst planning discussions occurred, the city of Chandler approved a contract for the nal design phase of the Field of Honor Veterans Memorial. The rst phase of the memorial, located at Veter- ans Oasis Park, was completed and dedicated in 2016, according to city ocials. The rst phase included a raised sitting area that will look onto the second phase, which looks like an American ag. The rst phase was completed for $716,865. Planning for the

second phase stalled for years until Chandler City Council approved a contract for the design Sept. 17 for $240,821. “The concept was to put together a memorial that veterans would like and one that, I know, resonates with a lot of folks,” Council Member Matt Orlando said. “The exciting thing about it is that the city’s vet- erans designed it. The whole design was designed by veterans. Veterans are humble; they are not going to brag or any of that type of activity. But something like

Phase 1 was completed in 2016.

E. CHANDLER HEIGHTS RD.

N

CONTINUED ON 15

ALEXA D’ANGELOCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Contribute today! Use your phone camera to scan the QR code or visit

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Any amount matters. Together, we can continue to ensure our citizens stay informed and keep our local businesses thriving. Make an impact. Become a #CommunityPatron .

SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON

480-581-8298

Philemon Spencer, MD & Robin Spencer, FNP- NOW OFFERING AFFORDABLE DIRECT HEALTH CARE PLANS

CALL TO SCHEDULE 480.248.2440

$21/mo Child 0-18 $75/mo Adults 19-64 Family plans starting from $150/mo

Family Medical Clinic | Chandler, AZ

INSURANCE OR NOT, WE ARE HERE FOR ALL YOUR MEDICAL NEEDS!

• Unlimited visits with flexible scheduling • Routine in-office procedures and labs* • Great for high deductible plan holders and those with no insurance *Select procedures and labs available at a minimal extra cost GET YOUR MEMBERSHIP NOW AND WE’LL WAIVE THE ENROLLMENT FEE (up to $79 savings)

Primary Care Urgent Care Health Management Telemedicine & Walk-in Visits Available Philemon Spencer MD Robin Spencer FNP-C

Megan Hunt MD

CALL 480.248.2440

facebook.com/chandlerdoc 610 N Alma School Rd, Ste 48 • pinonfamily.com

2

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS IMPACTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

4

Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATION

6 The latest transportation project updates

MARKET TEAM EDITOR Alexa D’Angelo GRAPHIC DESIGNER Isabella Short ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Michelle Johnson

FROMAMY: I want to thank all of the veterans who stood with courage to be willing to make the ultimate sacrice—and some, sadly, have—in defense of our freedoms. Veterans Day is Nov. 11, and in our front-page story, you will learn more about the nalization of the Field of Honor Veterans Memorial in Chandler. This initiative has taken a number of years and dedicated individuals to complete. Amy Ellsworth, PUBLISHER

METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Amy Ellsworth,

aellsworth@communityimpact.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

FROMALEXA: For months we have written stories about students returning to schools. In this month’s front-page story, we talked to teachers, parents and administrators about what returning to in-person learning has looked like. We know education is an important part of any community, and we hope this story shines a light on what going back to school during COVID-19 looks like in Chandler. Alexa D’Angelo, EDITOR

EDUCATION

7

New high school boundaries

EDUCATION

8

The latest Chandler USD updates CITY& COUNTY Updates from the city of Chandler

John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across ve metropolitan areas providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON

9

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Local sources 13

3

6

Road projects 5

New businesses

Community events

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact

SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

Our local teams tailor campaigns for all business sizes and industries wanting to reach their customer base and accomplish their nancial goals. Our products ADVERTISEWITHUS

Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

Newspaper’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens

BUSINESS FEATURE

10

Rewind

stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON CONTACT US 610 N. Gilbert Road, Ste. 205, Gilbert, AZ 85234 • 4804824880 PRESS RELEASES chnnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

DINING FEATURE

11

Rita’s Burritos REAL ESTATE

include newspaper ads; mailbox-targeted sticky notes, inserts and direct mail; and digital options. We also partner with Community Impact Printing for nationwide specialty orders. Our advertising clients self- report 97% satisfaction with their overall experience, and a recent third-party Readex survey proved 78% of paper recipients read three of the last four editions, and from what they read, 83% “took action” of some kind. Contact us today for more info! communityimpact.com/advertising

16

Residential market data IMPACT DEALS

17

YOUR INBOX

Local coupons

Sign up for our regular newsletters to receive the latest headlines direct to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter

CORRECTION: Volume 2, Issue 2 In a story in volume 2, issue 2 on page 11 in an article titled "Grubstak," the phone number should have read 480-454-3299.

Proudly printed by

@impactnews_chn

facebook.com/impactnewschn

communityimpact.com

Eye exams available in-office by appointment only. ALREADY HAVE A PRESCRIPTION? Schedule a PRIVATE APPOINTMENT at our office or an IN-HOME VISIT.

1 Go to “Our Offerings” tab at sosyeycare.com 2 Click on Virtual Try-On and Frame Gallery 3 Pick your style 4 Try on virtually 5 Create a wish list & submit 6 Weʼll contact you to schedule an in home or in office visit

Get Your Look Online from 100’s of Styles

soseyecare.com • 950 E. Pecos Rd., Suite 5 • Chandler 85225 • 480-331-6360 SUPPORT LOCAL SMALL BUSINESS

3

CHANDLER EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

COMPILED BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

E. GUADALUPE RD.

2

4

8

CHANDLER

101

W. RAY RD.

W. RAY RD.

87

7

9

The Stillery

Salt & Smoke Mesquite Seafood Grill

W. PECOS RD.

COURTESY THE STILLERY

ALEXA D’ANGELOCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

W. CHANDLER BLVD.

COMING SOON 4 Salt & Smoke Mesquite Seafood Grill is coming to Chandler. It was not clear as of press time when the restaurant is scheduled to open. It will occupy the space formerly occupied by Humble Pie in downtown Ocotillo at 2547 W. Queen Creek Road, Chandler. A phone number and website were not available at press time. ANNIVERSARIES 5 Arizona Flower Co. celebrated its one-year anniversary Sept. 19 in Chandler. Located at 975 E. Riggs Road, Ste. 11, the business, owned by Gary and Peggy Lipps, specializes in oral arrange- ments, designs, gift baskets and delivery. 480-504-3301. www.arizonaowercompany.com 6 Over Easy celebrates its one-year anniversary Nov. 12 in Chandler. Located in the downtown Overstreet develop- ment at 140 N. Arizona Ave., Ste. 104, the restaurant oers a breakfast and brunch menu. 480-257-3449. www.eatatovereasy.com 7 Sumo Snow is celebrating the one- year anniversary of its Chandler location Oct. 5. The business, which is located at 5055 W. Ray Road, Ste. 7, specializes in handcrafted boba teas, shaved snow and

Asian desserts. 480-590-6624. www.sumosnow.com CLOSINGS 8 Desert Cider House , Arizona’s oldest operating craft cidery, permanently closed Sept. 17. Business owners cited economic reasons related to COVID-19 as the reason for closure in a Facebook post. The cider house was located at 284 E. Chilton Drive, Ste. 8, in Chandler. 480- 292-3020. http://desertciderhouse.com 9 Mezquite’s Cafe , a Mexican restau- rant, closed in Chandler this year. The restaurant had been open less than a year at the time it closed. The restaurant was located at 444 E. Chandler Blvd., Ste. 1, in Chandler. 10 Purge, Love and Peace Rage Rooms closed its location in downtown Chandler. The business was a place where people could smash and destroy things to release tension and stress. The business was located at 106 S. Oregon St. in Chandler. 480-857-0022. https://purgelove- peaceragerooms.com 11 The Ivy , a Mediterranean restaurant and wine bar, announced that it will permanently close. The owners cited ongoing nancial issues related to COVID-19 as the reason for closure. The restaurant had been in business ve years. The restaurant was located at 1890 W. Germann Road in Chandler. 480-699-6189. www.theivyaz.com

202

6

11

E. GERMANN RD.

1

W. BOSTON ST.

10

2

4

3

5

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 Backyard Taco opened in late Sep- tember in Chandler. The restaurant marks the fourth location for the business, which serves a variety of tacos. Backyard Taco is located at 2400 S. Gilbert Road in

location marking the rst outside of Tennessee. The country-themed business is located at h. 480-590-1409. www.stillerychandler.com 3 Village Medical opened a medical practice location earlier this year in Chandler. Village Medical is a comprehen- sive primary care practice. The practice is located at 250 W. Chandler Heights Road in Chandler. 888-698-6727. www.villagemedical.com

Chandler. 480-809-6482. https://backyardtaco.com

2 The Stillery opened Oct. 3 in down- town Chandler. The restaurant and bar hails from Nashville, with the Chandler

Rates Dip Towards 3 Year Lows Don’t Miss Your Opportunity to Refinance and Lower your Payment

Local Chandler Lender - #1 Retail Lender in Arizona Cash Out, Rate and Term, and Purchase Available 100% Financing/$0 Money Down Loans Available Low Rates Speed Service 20 Years of Industry Experience Trust

JODALEE TEVAULT Sr. Mortgage Consultant

Call Now

480-495-6293 NMLS# 260038 55 N Arizona Place, Suite 103 Chandler, AZ 85225 jodalee@fairwaymc.com homeloansbyjodalee.com

Copyright 2020 Fairway Independent Mortgage Corporation. NMLS #2289. 4750 S Biltmore Lane. Madison, WI 53718. 1-866-912-4800. All rights reserved. This is not an offer to enter into an agreement. Not all customers will qualify. Information, rates and programs are subject to change without notice. All products are subject to credit and property approval. Other restriction and limitations may apply. Equal Housing Lender. AZ License #BK-0904162

4

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TODO LIST

October events

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

29 AND 30

HALLOWEENDRIVETHRU

SPOOKTACULAR From the comfort of a vehicle, take a trip through a Halloween-themed cul-de-sac featuring a special soundtrack, festive decor and hundreds of lights. Admission to drive through the event area is free. 6-9 p.m. Free. 178 E. Commonwealth Ave., Chandler. 480-782-2669. www.chandleraz.gov 31 PUMPKINDUNK Carve out some time for Halloween fun with Chandler Aquatics. Families are invited to dunk for pumpkins as Mesquite Groves Aquatic Center is transformed into a oating pumpkin patch. The pool is heated and open for public swimming. Registration is required. Noon-2 p.m. $1 (children), $1.25 (seniors), $2.25 (adults). Mesquite Groves Aquatic Center, 5901 S. Hillcrest Drive, Chandler. 480-782-2750. www.chandleraz.gov 31 SPOOKY SCIENCE SATURDAY Science Saturday is held with the Environmental Education Center’s at-home experiments. The Halloween edition teaches kids to make fake blood and a candy catapult. Videos will be broadcast on Facebook and available in the Chandler Rec At-Home Hub virtual recreation center. www.chandleraz.gov

OCT. 29

PAUL GREEN + MIDNIGHT BLUE

OCTOBER 24 PLAY FOR LIFEZOMBIE APOCALYPSE TENNIS SOCIAL Doubles teams disguised as zombies can head out to the Chandler tennis court at night and compete against other zombie duos during this Halloween-themed event. Registration is required to play. 6-9 p.m. Chandler Tennis Center, 2250 S. McQueen Road, Chandler. 480-782-8261. www.chandleraz.gov The Chandler Center for the Arts began putting on a series of events called CCA Anywhere as COVID-19 has limited the venue to digital performances. Paul Green + Midnight Blue will be live on Facebook at 7 p.m. Free. www.chandlercenter.org

The Downtown Chandler Farmers Market is back and running fromOctober through May.

FEATURED EVENT Downtown Chandler FarmersMarket The Downtown Chandler Farmers Market is back with local vendors and yoga classes in the park every Saturday beginning at 9 a.m. from October through May.

E. CHANDLER BLVD.

N

W. BOSTON ST.

3 S. Arizona Ave. https://downtownchandler.org

Find more or submit Chandler events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

Committed to making Chandler the best place to CALL HOME

FOR SALE ($235,000)

FOR SALE ($365,000)

879 S. Henry Ln., Gilbert 4 BD, 2.5 BA | 2,584 SQ FT

11107 W. Greer Ave., Youngtown 2 BD, 1 BA | 1,070 SQ FT

COPPERSUMMITREALESTATE.COM

FOR SALE ($330,000)

coppersummitrealestate.com to receive my home search app that will put the MLS in the palm of your hand. Visit

sharynyoungerrealtor@gmail.com 480-589-2347 Sharyn Younger

3755 E. Broadway Rd. Unit 32, Mesa 4 BD, 3 BA | 2,173 SQ FT

5

CHANDLER EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

60

W. BASELINE RD.

bike lane system at the Tempe city limits. Status: Crews began work on the project July 13 and started with tree removal and utility potholing on the road, according to the city. The work is on both the north and south lanes on the roads. Timeline: July-March Cost: $4.04 million Funding sources: federal grant, local match 2 Val Vista Drive reconstruction The town is reconstructing deteriorated asphalt pavement on Val Vista Drive from Baseline Road to Guadalupe Road, adding bike lanes, updating landscaping in the median and replacing three signs to bring them to current standards with flashing left turns. Status: Medians are being constructed with conduit work almost complete. Left turns will be restricted everywhere ex- cept at East Raleigh Bay Drive. Traffic will remain on the asphalt base course until the final pavement is put down. Timeline: March-November Cost: $6.32 million Funding source: town of Gilbert bonds and funds 3 Alma School Road improvements Construction is underway on a yearslong project to expand Alma School Road to

four lanes from Chandler Boulevard to Queen Creek Road. Status: The project began Aug. 20, and crews were working in both the north and southbound directions on Alma School from Loop 202 to Kingbird Drive. Timeline: Aug. 20-Nov. 20 Funding source: city of Chandler UPCOMING PROJECTS 4 Gilbert Road widening Chandler City Council on Sept. 17 approved a $4.77 million contract with Sunland Asphalt and Road Construction Inc. for the second phase of improve- ments on Gilbert Road from Ocotillo Road to Chandler Heights Road. The project will widen Gilbert Road to three through lanes northbound and southbound from Ocotillo to Powell Place.

W. GUADALUPE RD.

87

W. ELLIOT RD.

W. WARNER RD.

101

W. RAY RD.

1A

1B

W. CHANDLER BLVD.

W. PECOS RD.

202

3

W. GERMANN RD.

E. APPLEBY RD.

W. KINGBIRD DR.

10

2

4

Status: The contract was approved Sept. 17 by Chandler City Council. Timeline: November-June Cost: $4.77 million Funding sources: city of Chandler, Chandler USD

W. WOOD DR.

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

ONGOING PROJECTS 1 McClintock Drive, Kyrene Road bike lane additions The city of Chandler is planning to con- struct two new segments of bike lanes along A McClintock Drive and B Kyrene Road that will connect to the existing

1

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF OCT. 14. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT CHNNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

ALEXA D'ANGELO/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION Chandler USDboard reviews proposed high school boundary changes

NEWBOUNDARIES At a board meeting Sept. 23, the Chandler USD governing board received a presentation on proposed new high school boundaries. The new boundaries will take eect when the new school opens in 2021-22.

Basha High School current Moved to Basha High School Moved to new high school

Perry High School current/new high school Arizona College Prep Erie/ Chandler High School Casteel High School

2

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

E. PECOS RD.

With the opening of the district’s seventh high school in the 2021-22 school year, Chandler USD ocials are proposing changes to the high school attendance boundaries. The Chandler USD board heard the administration’s proposal at a meeting Sept. 23 and is expected to vote on the changes Oct. 14. Craig Gilbert, the assistant superintendent of secondary education for the district, walked the board through the proposed changes. The boundary changes are the product of a year of planning and public meetings to get parent and resident feedback and work with the aected schools, Gilbert said. The Sept. 23 meeting did not mark the rst time the board has seen boundary recommendations, rather it represented the rst meeting where the recom- mendation they will vote on was unveiled. The recommendation would move Arizona College Prep Erie to the new, unnamed school— moving current students and sta with it—and would assign a section of students currently in the Perry High School attendance boundary to the new school beginning with the 2021-22 school year. The administration is also recommending moving a section of students from Perry High School to Basha High School and a portion of students from Hamilton High School to Chandler High School. These changes would not aect students currently enrolled in any of the high schools, but it would aect incoming eighth graders, Gilbert said. The new high school, located at Gilbert and Brooks Farm roads, will open with grades nine through 12 in the 2021-22 school year, Gilbert said, and all current freshmen through junior students at ACP Erie would attend the new high school in the 2021-22 school year, Gilbert said. According to Gilbert, “the proposed boundary changes help the district to establish long-term

202

Hamilton High School current Moved to Chandler High School

4

7

1 5

87

3

6

N

1 Arizona College Prep Erie 2 Chandler High School 3 Casteel High School HIGH SCHOOLS

5

4 Perry High School 5 New high school 6 Basha High School 7 Hamilton High School

SOURCE: CHANDLER USDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

boundary adjustments for all high schools, max- imize existing resources, relieve the increased projected enrollment at Hamilton and Perry high schools, develop new 9-12 grade high school bound- aries to keep enrollment between 1,500 and 2,000 students, ensure the least amount of disruption for students and families and broaden ACP Erie’s model of success to more students.” All current Hamilton and Perry high school students residing in the new boundaries will not change schools, according to the district. Bussing will continue for these students until the end of the 2023-2024 school year, according to the district.

A LOOKAT CHANDLER USD HIGH SCHOOL NO. 7

• Comprehensive high school • Academic emphasis • Advanced Placement • Dual-enrollment credit

• Electives • Enrollment based on approved boundaries and open enrollment

DON’T HAVE HEALTH INSURANCE AND NEED A DOCTOR? CALL TODAY TO GET BETTER CARE WITH LESS HASSLE!

F R E E REGISTRATION!!!

($150 value) with this coupon

WHAT DO YOU GET WITH PRIME? Direct access to your doctor • Same or next day appointments • No insurance hassles Procedures and routine labs • Medications at wholesale prices At PRIME DIRECT HEALTH , patients are billed directly, which means they pay a monthly membership fee, and receive a variety of benefits unheard of at traditional care practices . Patients receive unlimited doctor access, extended and relaxed visits, and several labs and procedures at no extra cost. We offer high-quality care - no insurance, no copays, no long wait times, and no worries.

CALL TODAY! (480) 571-5934 690 EAST WARNER ROAD SUITE 131 GILBERT, AZ 85296 www.PrimeDirectHealth.com

Dr. Ashley Froese BOARD�CERTIFIED IN FAMILY MEDICINE

7

CHANDLER EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Chandler USD and the University of Arizona

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

QUOTE OF NOTE

NewMBAprogrambeginswith class of 21 students CHANDLER The University of Arizona Eller College of Manage- ment’s professional MBA program based in Chandler began its rst year this fall with 21 students, according to university employees. The professional MBA program blends online learning with biweekly practicums in Chandler. director of Phoenix programs for Eller College of Management. Forristall said she was grateful that the college was able to recruit a class of this size in a short time with a good mix of people from dierent backgrounds. “We are utilizing the classes in the online MBA program and building o a strong practicum in Chandler PROGRAMDETAILS Here are some facts about the MBA program’s rst class: Average age: 32 52% Female 27% Underrepresented 6.75 Years of work experience

Chandler USD board Oct. 28, 6 p.m. 1525 W. Frye Road, Chandler 480-812-7000 • www.cusd80.com on display for the 60-day public review period for comment at the Melinda Romero Instructional Resource Center starting July 16. CHANDLER USD On Sept. 23, the Chandler USD board approved using site funds to purchase the SkillsUSA Career Essential Suite, which is a resource for the career and technical education programs. MEETINGSWE COVER CHANDLER USD At a governing board meeting Sept. 23, the district approved a memorandum of understanding with Homeward Bound. Homeward Bound supports students who nd themselves in vulnerable situations due to variability in their living circumstances and helps them to stay in school and graduate, according to the district agenda. The memorandum of understanding is eective from July 1, 2020, to June 30, 2021. CHANDLER USD The Chandler USD governing board approved the purchase of textbooks for grades 7-12 for English language learner curriculum Sept. 23. The textbooks were purchased for $67,200. The curriculum was placed MEETING HIGHLIGHTS “I JUSTWANT TO THANK THE FAMILIESWHOHAVE ENTRUSTED THEIR CHILDREN INOUR CARE. WEWILL NOT LET YOUDOWN.” CAMILLE CASTEEL, CHANDLER USD SUPERINTENDENT

28% Employer referral

Average salary: $83,732

“The east Valley is an amazing environment,” said Julie Trujillo, director of external relations with UA. “The community and the demo- graphics are just a perfect combina- tion for this program. If you look at the average age and work experience, this is exactly the kind of community we are trying to engage with.” The program got the green light in May, said Megan Forristall, the senior

once every two weeks,” Forristall said. “That’s what we think was missing from the full-time online programming, was that in-the-market hands-on learning and the opportu- nity to go and learn pragmatic skills.” The rst class started in August for the 21-month program, and applica- tions for next fall are open. “We are excited to learn with this group of students this year and

Receive employee

sponsorship 52%

SOURCE: UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

welcome another class next year,” Forristall said. For more information, visit http://eller.arizona.edu/programs/ mba/professional-mba.

District allocates $4million for purchase of new technology CHANDLER USD At a meeting Sept. 23, the Chan- dler USD governing board authorized the purchase of thousands of Chromebooks and desktop computers for use across the district. The total expenditure was expected to be about $4.17 million, according to district sta. The funds for the technology came from “various funds” and bonds, according to the agenda item. The expenditure includes 11,000 Chromebooks and licenses for use across the district, and 500 desktop computers and monitors for the new high school scheduled to open in 2021-22 as well as replacements across the district. According to district sta, the Chromebooks are in high demand and are being ordered currently so the district has a spot in the shipping queue.

Chandler USDapproves expansion of Gilbert Road for newhigh school

CHANDLER USD The Chandler USD governing board approved spending about $2.03 million for road improvements and installa- tion of the trac signals relating

N

E. BROOKS FARM RD.

E. CHANDLER HEIGHTS RD.

to the district’s newest high school under construction. The high school will be the seventh in the district and is located near Gilbert and Brooks Farm roads. In April, the board approved an agreement with the city of Chandler for the road improvements and instal- lation of the trac signals. The total cost of the project is around $4.8 million with the city and school district splitting the cost. The expenditure for the road expansion was approved unanimously by the board.

Sticky Notes 13¢ OR LESS

Inserts 13¢ OR LESS

Postcards 21¢ OR LESS

Design, Print andDirectMail for lesswith

TARGETINGAVAILABLE

Schedule a consultation today!

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM/ CONTACT

(866) 989- 6808

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY&COUNTY

News from Chandler & Maricopa County

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

NUMBER TOKNOW

Maricopa County elections look dierent this year because of the coronavirus pandemic, ocials say

9

square miles make up the Chandler Airpark Area. The

city is in the process of updating its airpark area plan and is asking that residents provide feedback on the area and how they would like to see land used. Visit www.chandleraz.gov to take the survey.

MARICOPACOUNTY Due to mask mandates and social distancing eorts to halt the spread of the coronavirus, Maricopa County Elections ocials said the Nov. 3 general election will look dierent this year; namely, there will be fewer voting centers across the county. “Because of COVID-19, elections look dierent,” said Megan Gilbertson, a spokesperson with Maricopa County Elections. “When considering an in-person voting option, we have to nd a location that is large enough to accommodate for physical distancing. After March, we were re-evaluating what we could do to make sure voters are safe. Once we went through traditional polling locations, we found very few would be large enough. They are often small conference rooms

or meeting rooms in senior centers or public buildings. The elections department felt like they needed to be much larger.” The city of Chandler has 10 voting centers that open Oct. 22, according to the election plan approved by the Maricopa County board of supervisors Sept. 16. Any registered voter can go to any of the voting centers to cast their ballot, according to Maricopa County Elections. The voting centers include churches, malls and large meeting spaces. Gilbertson said all centers are at least 1,500 square feet. “We were able to move locations into malls and larger convention centers and larger locations so voters could physically distance,” Gilbertson said. “We were also able to add more

DATES TOKNOW OCT. 23 Last day to request that an early ballot be mailed for the general election OCT. 30 Last day to vote early in person NOV. 3 General election day SOURCE: MARICOPA COUNTY ELECTIONS COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

CITY HIGHLIGHTS

Chandler City Council Nov. 2, 5, 6 p.m. 88 E. Chicago St., Chandler 480-782-2181 • www.chandleraz.gov MEETINGSWE COVER Chandler City Council approved an agreement with Waste Management of Arizona for solid waste collection and transfer service in an amount not to exceed $8.8 million for a 10- year period from Oct. 1, 2020-Sept. 30, 2030. CHANDLER Chandler City Council on Sept. 17 approved an agreement with Kimley-Horn and Associates Inc. for the design and project management of Lindsay Road in an amount not to exceed $1,755,061. CHANDLER Chandler City Council discussed during a work session Sept. 29 the possibility of a multigenerational recreation center in the city. The process is ongoing, but city sta recommend an expansion to Tumbleweed Recreation Center and a new facility in either southeast or west Chandler. CHANDLER On Sept. 17, Chandler City Council approved an agreement with Northern Arizona Technology and Business Incubator, Moonshot at NACET, for Innovations Incubator management services for a one-year term from Oct. 1, 2020-Sept. 30, 2021, with the option of up to four additional one-year extensions, in an amount not to exceed $250,000. CHANDLER On Sept. 17,

check-in stations to get voters through the process more quickly.” Poll workers will wear masks, gloves and face shields and high-touch areas will be continuously wiped down. “The larger location really allows us to make sure we can get voters in and out as quickly as possible,” Gilbertson said. “We will be able to have up to 40 voters voting at once in some locations.”

City libraries reopen after COVID19 closures CHANDLER Chandler Public Libraries reopened public areas to customers after months of being closed due to COVID-19 as of Sept. 29, according to a news release from the city. Masks are required to enter; capacity is reduced; and a registration process is in place for 45-minute sessions for some services, such as computer access. Additionally, some reductions in hours of operation remain in place, with these facilities closed on Saturdays and Sundays until further notice, according to the city.

Chandler seeks feedback on annual budget in survey for residents

CHANDLER The city of Chandler is starting its budget process and is encouraging residents to provide their thoughts about the community and its future through the annual budget survey. The survey will be available

To complete the budget needs survey, visit www.chandler.gov.

from Oct. 5-Nov. 15, according to city ocials. Ocials ask that residents answer at least the rst six general questions of the survey, which should take about two minutes. The remaining questions allow the chance to provide feedback on any or all of the city’s targeted topics. The survey topics include transportation, employment, recreation and more.

INDIVIDUALIZED CARE | FUN ACTIVITIES | MEALS

Certified Caregivers National Alzheimer’s Association EssentiALZ Certification Activities Designed to encourage socialization & stimulate cognitive function Cameras allowing families to check on their loved one

A Progressive & Exciting Day Care Option for the Cognitively Impaired

FIRST MONTH 50% OFF

208 W Chandler Heights Rd, Suite 102, Chandler, AZ 85248 NW Corner of Chandler Heights & Arizona Ave (behind Chase)

CALL FOR A FREE TOUR TODAY!

480-827-2600 BUSYDAYSENIORCLUB.COM

9

CHANDLER EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

BUSINESS FEATURE

BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

The ice cream at Rewind is infused with cereal for a nostalgic feel.

Anita Zhou owns Rewind with several business partners.

WHAT IS BOBA? Boba, referring to the small spheres at the bottom of the sweet drinks, is made from

Rewind Dessert and drink shop pivots to keep customers coming during pandemic A nita Zhou said in coming up with a name for the dessert and drink shop, she and her

Rewind 3245 W. Ray Road, Ste. 3, Chandler 480-466-0079 https://rewindtreats.com Hours: Mon.-Thu. 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 11:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Sun. noon-9 p.m. partially cooked tapioca our. The drinks are comprised of tea and milk. Depending on the avor of drink, it is most often a green tea.

only tasty, but also that the business was aesthetically pleasing. One wall in the back is lled with greenery and a light-up sign and is perfect for those social media snapshots that appeal to people, Zhou said. “People will come in here and hang out and take photos in front of the wall with their friends or with their drinks,” Zhou said. “Social media has been a huge part of bringing in customers for us.” But, Zhou said, the business was forced to pivot quickly when the coronavirus pandemic hit. Rewind quickly oered delivery, pickup and curbside orders, Zhou said. Rewind saw a 50% decline in revenue in spring and summer—typically the busiest time for the business.

“It was really pushing us,” Zhou said. “We had to adapt, like every other business, during this time. We slowed down a lot. People don’t really think of ice cream as a to-go item, so we’ve really been marketing and pushing our drink menu. We added immunity-boosting drinks to the menu, too, specically after COVID-19.” Zhou said as the seasons change, fall and winter are typically the slower months, and the business is hoping people will continue to come in for boba and tea. “We have vegan and dairy-free items; we really have a good variety,” Zhou said. “I would recommend that anyone give us a try, and they won’t regret it.”

business partners wanted to really nd a name that t with their vision for how people would feel in the shop. “We have cereal-infused ice cream,” Zhou said. “And when you eat it, it just reminds you of the cereal you used to eat while you were growing up and watching cartoons. We wanted to kind of rewind back to the basics and back to childhood. Rewind just felt like the name that t the best.” Rewind oers customers an array of ice cream avors, cereal-infused ice cream, build-your-own ice cream options, and boba and tea options. The drink and dessert shop wanted to make sure the menu items were not

101

N

ARIZONA

5222 E Baseline Rd, Suite 108, Gilbert, AZ 85234

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE

BURRITOS TO TRY

$4.65

$4.35

$4.60

CARNEASADA Marinated beef steak with pico de gallo

PICADILLO Lean ground beef, diced potatoes in a tomato-and-jalapeno salsa

BACON&HASH Eggs, bacon, hash browns

PHOTOS BY ALEXA D'ANGELOCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Rita’s Burritos Restaurant blends homemade ingredients to make burritos A t Rita’s Burritos, customers are more than just a number or an order. Owner Gilbert Meraz said when customers come in, they are asked for their name so the sta can remem- ber—and get to know—the regulars. BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

Dan e Life’s Better When You “We’ve been working hard; we pride ourselves in our food, but really we pride ourselves in our sta,” Meraz said. “Without them we wouldn’t be what we are.” recipes—to settle on a tortilla. He wanted it to be perfect. “I knew the tortilla had to be the best,” Meraz said. “We wanted to do burritos, and we wanted it to be a menu of burritos you could only get here. The specialties section on the menu has things special to Rita’s.” The store’s employees resemble more of a family than a sta, Meraz said. Some mornings, before the restaurant opens, they go across the parking lot to another eatery and have breakfast together, Meraz said. “We are a family,” he said. “We are closed on Sundays; we close earlier than most restaurants every night. I want to spend time with my family; I want them to be able to go home and eat dinner and be with their kids before bedtime.” The burrito shop will be open ves years this December, Meraz said. Now Mario runs a Rita’s Burritos in El Paso, Texas.

Rita's Burritos sta poses in the restaurant's kitchen.

COURTESY RITA'S BURRITOS

Meraz started the business with his wife, Darcie, and brother Mario in 2015 after leaving the corpo- rate world to become his own boss. Since the very rst day, Rita’s Burritos has been a favorite among customers. “On the rst day, it was just me, my wife, my brother and one other person,” Meraz said. “After one lady came in, she posted in the Facebook group Ocotillo Friends, and after that a ton of people started coming in. We sold out of everything the rst day and had to close early and stay closed the next day to prepare all the food again. Then when we reopened, we had to close early again after we ran out of everything.” Everything at Rita’s Burritos is made by hand, Meraz said. On a wall in the restaurant is a photo of the tortilla recipe Meraz nally settled on. He said it took weeks—and multiple notebooks full of

Rita’s Burritos 4040 S. Arizona Ave., Ste. 17, Chandler 480-404-9128 https://ritasburritos.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.-4 p.m., closed Sun.

E. OCOTILLO RD.

E. CHANDLER HEIGHTS RD.

N

Two 40 minute private lessons 39 $ (per person or per couple)

No Partner Necessary! Ballroom | Latin | Social Dancing

Chandler

480.917.9133 | fredastaire.com/chandler 2390 N Alma School Rd, 85224

11

CHANDLER EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

Back to school Students began the school year in Chandler USD online. In mid-September, the governing board voted to begin bringing elementary students back to campuses. The rest of the student population is expected to return after fall break on Oct. 13.

LIMITING LEARNING LOSS

A nationwide study conducted by Successful Practices Network and the Center for College and Career Readiness shows how students have been aected by school closures caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

In a normal school year, students in grades 3-6 typically lose 20% of gains in reading , while students in grades 7-12 lose 36% .

STUDENTS RETURNING OCT. 13

Potential learning loss could total as much as 49% from the start of school closures to the start of the school year.

Some students who were online via Chandler Online Academy for the rst quarter will return to brick-and- mortar campuses. Number of students transitioning from Chandler Online Academy to in person Oct. 13: 4,049 (K-6) 5,071 (7-12)

The achievement gap between low-income and high-income students could increase by as much as 18% if schools do not ensure equal access to learning opportunities.

BACK IN THE CLASSROOM Teachers and school sta have been back at their buildings for quite some time. But reopening the schools to all elementary school children meant teachers needed to get creative with how to space kids out. (Courtesy Heidi Gass)

SOURCES: ACHIEVE 3000, SUCCESSFUL PRACTICES NETWORK, THE CENTER FOR COLLEGE & CAREER READINESSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: CHANDLER USDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

eighth grade. “Our high schools are still grow- ing; that’s where we know we have growth,” Berry said. “To be honest, there’s not a lot of competition in that area. We have a few charter schools that serve ninth through 12th grade and private schools, but our compre- hensive high schools are denitely what parents seek for their kids. And they come back, even if they are at a dierent type of entity for K-8. So we see a huge jump between eighth and ninth grades of about 500 students.” Berry said she believes the tim- ing of reopening the brick-and-mor- tar schools may be the culprit for the decline in enrollment. As charter schools, private schools and nearby districts began opening, students began leaving. Christine Newburn considered pulling her kids from the district after struggles with online learning. The Chandler mom has three students in CUSD schools—two seniors and one incoming freshman. “I am completely in favor of the kids

students,” Chandler USD Chief Finan- cial Ocer Lana Berry said. “We had 46,960 students approximately last year, and we’re at about 44,710 kids now. So we are denitely seeing that decrease. I’m hoping that once every- body’s back in school that things will change. We did not predict, prior to [COVID-19], that we would decrease. We thought we would grow about 300 kids per year. Then when COVID hap- pened, we thought, ‘OK, we’ll proba- bly grow,’ but it will be a little bit less. But we never would have predicted that we would have lost the number of students that we have right now.” Enrollment concerns For a school district, enrollment is the key to securing funding from the state. Annual funding is based on average daily membership—known as ADM—and for the last several years CUSD has seen an increase in enroll- ment each year. Berry said the majority of students leaving the district are in the elemen- tary school grades—from preschool to

CONTINUED FROM 1

being back in school,” Newburn said. “I think that we have lost six months of learning for the kids, period. Online is not working at all. My biggest concern for my children, and I think other par- ents feel the same, is that [months of virtual learning] is not going to be an accurate representation of what our kids have grasped primarily because they can cheat.” Newburn said because her senior child in sports would lose eligibility and her other senior child requires special education services, it would be too dicult for them to transfer to a charter or private school. “My freshman said that he didn’t want to move schools,” Newburn said. “I tried to talk my kids into going to charter schools because a lot of peo- ple have left the district, but they ulti- mately didn’t want to.” Berry said she is grateful for the state’s enrollment stability grant, which allows districts to be funded at their previous years’ enrollment. Even still, Berry said the district is

the school year online as the number of coronavirus cases remained too high to open schools. Families, teachers, students and district leaders have adjusted to this unprecedented school year. Teach- ers are learning new ways to connect with their students and adapt to the constraints of social distancing. Par- ents are grappling with the decision to send their children back or keep them online or areworrying about what gaps in their educationmight have occurred in the last fewmonths. Meanwhile, district ocials are bracing for decreased student enroll- ment as more parents opted this year to remove their students from the dis- trict and send them to charter schools, private schools or decided to homes- chool their kids. The district has seen annual increases in enrollment for several years, so much so that it built a new elementary school and is in the process of building a new high school. “We are down about 2,200 enrolled

You Can Give Your Loved One The Best Life Possible

Complete in-home care for every stage of life.

CALL FOR YOUR FREE CONSULTATION

• Companionship • Dementia Care • Personal Care • Shower Assistance • Family Respite

• Medication Reminders • Light Housekeeping • Recovery Support from Illness/Hospital Stay

RATED IN TOP 5% IN THE COUNTRY

602-438-1300 | WWW.COMFORCARE.COM

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TEACHERBREAKDOWN According to CUSD data, there have not been any more teacher resignations in the district than the previous year.

STUDENTSWHOOPTED FOR CHARTER SCHOOLS The district monitors the number of students each year who leave CUSD for charter schools.

PERCENT OF STUDENTS WHOWENT TOCHARTERS CUSD measures student retention via this mobility metric. More students have left for charter schools this year already than in the entire year last year.

TEACHER RESIGNATIONS After 2018-19 After 2019-20 TEACHER RETIREMENTS Through 2019 Through 2020 54 50

800

2.0%

191

745

702

1.55% 1.57%

151

574

1.31%

553

1.5%

600

1.16%

1.0%

400

0.5%

200

CERTIFIEDWORKFORCE ACCOMMODATIONS 2019-20 2020-21 69 113

0

0

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21*

2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21*

2017-18

*Year to date

*Year to date

SOURCE: CHANDLER USDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: CHANDLER USDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: CHANDLER USDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

teachers across the district have been working for months to make the best of a dicult situation. “All of these educators are incred- ible,” Nash said. “The amazing inge- nuity and creativity they have and the hours they spent outside of contract time getting rooms ready, cleaning, spreading out classrooms—it’s a lot. Ninety-nine point nine percent of educators are putting in 12- to 14-hour days, six or seven days a week and have been doing so since before school even opened to online instruction. It’s not all fun and happy times at home doing this. People are learning this technology on the y and building the plane while we’re ying it. It’s truly what is happening.” Nash said a majority of teachers were not in favor of opening schools prior to Oct. 13—when secondary stu- dents went back. But when the CUSD board voted for a staggered start for elementary schools, teachers rolled up their sleeves and got to work. She said the reopening of elementary schools has largely gone o without a hitch.

bracing for an $8 million loss it cannot regain for the next scal year due to enrollment. “We know when our budget decreases, we can handle that,” Berry said. “We can utilize funds that we had and prepared for to get us through this hard time. But next year is a big- ger problem for us. You’re down over 2,000 kids; your [maintenance and operations] budget alone is going to go down over $11 million. And that’s a big impact because now, we’re talking about positions.” Berry said, while there are no cer- tainties at this point, the district is anticipating a decrease in the number of jobs for the future. “That’s hard because we’ve been growing,” Berry said. “We haven’t had that. We haven’t been declining as a school district. But that’s denitely something we’re going to be preparing

Heidi Gass, the technology teacher at Frye Elementary School and the grandparent of a CUSD student, said she was glad to be back with her students. “I was always happy to have the kids back,” Gass said. “I’m not afraid of the virus. I want to be safe, and I feel like I could be safe and take care of myself and the kids and be safe at school. I work at a Title I school; our kids need to be at school.” Gass said kids have been coopera- tive with social distancing and wear- ing their masks from day one back on campus. “It’s been a dream,” she said. “The kids have stepped up; they are wear- ing their mask; they do what they are supposed to do. It has really been awesome.” Nash said that across the board there are concerns about rst quarter grades after students faced a steep learning curve getting used to distance learn- ing. She noted that prior to last spring, an online option at CUSD for elemen- tary school students did not even exist.

“There just has to be a level of understanding and grace,” Nash said. “At the secondary level, we are accom- modating for the fact that there will be kiddos who are struggling. Teachers aren’t going to set them up for fail- ure and recoup that grade for the rst quarter.” Peier, who has a junior high school student, said he was still a little appre- hensive about sending him back to in-person school with more students and more mobility between classes. “At the end of the day, I think too many people are focused on them- selves and everything going on,” Peier said. “I put my faith in the Chandler school district because I knew they would make the right deci- sions under all the tremendous pres- sure, and I have been pretty satised. If something were to happen and things change, they are the rst to err on the side of student and sta safety.”

for for next year.” Newschool year

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

Katie Nash, president of the Chan- dler Education Association, said

EXPERIENCING LEG OR FOOT PAIN? Do you or a loved one have any 3-4 of these risk factors and symptoms? (Peripheral Arterial Disease)

Kirk D. Minkus, MD. Dr. Minkus has over 16 years of collective interventional radiology practice and training, and has performed over 40,000 procedures. Call Today! (480) 945-4343

PAD RISK FACTORS

PAD LEGS

Diabetics 50+ years of age - require Arterial Duplex Ultrasound Screenings

• Tingling? • Weak Foot Pulses (PT/DP)? • Leg Pain while walking? • Lack of hair on leg/ foot?

• Sores on legs or feet? • Leg Fatigue/ heaviness/cramping • Discoloration/Pale or Blue toes/feet/legs? • Cold legs/feet?

• High Cholesterol • Chronic Kidney Disease • Previous Stroke • Previous Heart Attack • Coronary Stents

Indications: • 50 years old or older • Previous/Current Smoker • Diabetic • High Blood Pressure

TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS GILBERT (Next to Mercy Gilbert Hospital) 3420 S Mercy Rd., Ste# 300 MESA (Just North of Banner Baywood Hospital) 140 S Power Rd., Ste# 102

13

CHANDLER EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24

communityimpact.com

Powered by