North San Antonio Edition - May 2022

NORTH SANANTONIO EDITION

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 8  MAY 13JUNE 19, 2022

ONLINE AT

NewClassen-SteubingRanchPark to oer ‘something for everyone’

INSIDE

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IMPACTS

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TODO LIST

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Voters pass three bond packages

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HUEBNER RD.

A pavilion with restrooms is one of many features planned at Classen-Steubing Ranch Park. (Rendering courtesy Rialto Studio)

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SAWS plans to further secure SanAntonio’swater future

CITY & COUNTY

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BY EDMOND ORTIZ

providers and local leaders on manag- ing local water resources and planning supplies to keep pace with a growing population. SAWS serves 2 million-plus

customers in a 929-square-mile ser- vice area, according to the utility. SAWS projects the San Antonio-area popu- lation rising from 1.43 million in the

The San Antonio Water System— the 30-year-old, city-owned utility—is working to update its long-term water management plan, which guides utility

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The San Antonio Water System has developed a range of water conservation measures that have helped cut total water consumption over a 40-year period and aims to further reduce total water use through 2070. WATER CONSERVATION ON THE RISE Projections

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Curious what is selling in your neighborhood? Scan me *All prices shown are list price

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7111 Marina Del Ray, Converse, TX 78109 McKenzie Peek | 512-787-0407

315 Clover Crk, San Antonio, TX 78245 Claudia Miranda | 210-863-8113

235 Malone Dr, Devine, TX 78016 Jose Urrabazo | 210-508-0387

955 Vista Serena, San Antonio, TX 78260 Bertha Wicker | 210-727-8538

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3 bds

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2.5 ba 2,643 sq ft

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4 bds

2.5 ba 2,340 sq ft

307 Lower Beacon Rd, Lakehills, TX 78063 Jean Reich | 210-241-0268

26707 Redstone Hill, San Antonio, TX 78261 Lia Horton | 214-469-4177

4823 Ranchers Ridge, San Antonio, TX 78251 Chaz Jackson | 210-288-4779

2735 Pebble Breeze, San Antonio, TX 78232 Adam Biechlin | 210-718-7518

PENDING

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$830,000

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4 bds

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4,303 sq ft

3 bds

3.5 ba 2,830 sq ft

3 bds

2 ba

2,271 sq ft

5 bds

3.5 ba 3,933 sq ft

9328 Blazing Star Trl, Garden Ridge, TX 78266 Adam Schwab | 210-837-0113

3118 Ivory Crk, San Antonio, TX 78258 Ryan Volpe | 210-993-3130

162 Arnold Dr, Canyon Lake, TX 78133 Leo Salazar | 210-391-4312

1477 Frontier, Spring Branch, TX 78070 Rebecca Trussell | 210-859-5576

As a homeowner in San Antonio, you don’t want rising home values to impact how much you pay in property taxes. Protest Your Property Taxes

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NORTH SAN ANTONIO EDITION • MAY 2022

YOURCHILDRENARE 100%CURIOUS

Please visit TheDoSeum.org/mfa for more information

AFFORDABLE & VALUABLE $3.00 general admission for Guests who present a SNAP or WIC Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT or PEBT) card and a valid form of photo ID. VISIT ANY DAY

Special admission rate available during normal operating hours (excludes building closures and special events). HAVE A GREAT TIME! The DoSeum is a safe and fun place for families to bond, learn, and explore!

Museums for All is an initiative of the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Administered by the Association of Children’s Museums.

Rate is offered for up to four guests per EBT card. © THE DOSEUM 2022, IS A 501(C)(3) NON-PROFIT

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROM JASELLE: You can usually nd me—and my family— hiking one of the many city trails early Saturday mornings. In this edition, learn more about the soon-to-be-complete Classen-Steubing Ranch Park and its inclusive playground, Mitchell’s Landing, which will serve the needs of families and children of all abilities. I can’t wait to take my family there! Jaselle Luna, PUBLISHER

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FROMTRICIA: As we get closer to summer, temperatures are on the rise, and rain has been in short supply. On the front page of this edition, Reporter Edmond Ortiz examines San Antonio Water System’s Stage 2 water restrictions, which were triggered in mid-April with the hot, dry weather of La Nina, and what they mean for homeowners and businesses. Tricia Schwennesen, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

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NORTH SAN ANTONIO EDITION • MAY 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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Fusion Academy

COURTESY FUSION ACADEMY

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6 Total Men’s Primary Care opened a Stone Oak location April 12 at 427 N. Loop 1604, Ste. 206, San Antonio. Fo- cused on men’s primary health care, TMPC offers check-ins via phone or computer, and services include treatment for erectile dysfunction and low testosterone; medical weight loss consultations; flu shots; an- nual physical exams; and testing for sex- ually transmitted diseases and COVID-19. 210-985-1228. www.totalmens.com 7 Body Concepts Health Spa hosted an April 21 grand opening for its new Rogers Ranch location at 2711 N. Loop 1604 W., Ste. 104, San Antonio. Body Concepts offers Botox treatment, derma fillers, Kybella injections, body contouring, skin tightening, hydrafacials and other services. 210-999-5757. www.bodyconceptshealthspa.com 8 Boardroom Salon for Men opened a new location Feb. 15 at The Rim Crossing retail center, 5515 N. Loop 1604 W., Ste. 104, San Antonio. Boardroom offers haircuts, shaves and styling tips as well as special services, discounts and promotions available for customers who pay for membership. 830-360-8668. www.boardroomsalon.com 9 Signature Beauty Bar opened in March at 5123 N. Loop 1604 W., Ste. 110, San Antonio. The beauty salon also offers threading and facials. 210-257-9525 10 Parry’s Pizza opened April 4 at The Shops at South Rim retail center, 5311 N. Loop 1604, Ste. 114, San Antonio. This is the first San Antonio restaurant and the third Texas location for the Colorado-based chain that specializes in New York-style pizza, wings, calzones, sandwiches, wraps, salads, pasta and

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MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2022 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 Abundant Hospice Home , located at 13431 Blanco Road, San Antonio, began ac- cepting general inpatient and respite care services on Feb. 28. Abundant Hospice cares for patients with certain conditions, including Parkinson’s disease, Lewey Body Dementia and multiple sclerosis. Abun- dant provides 24-hour nursing availability; physical, occupational and speech therapy; social services; and family counseling. Abundant Hospice also has an outpatient location at 12500 San Pedro Ave., Ste. 150, San Antonio. 210-608-0081. www.abundanthospicecare.com 2 The North San Antonio Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon-cutting

ceremony April 6 at Fusion Academy , 227 N. Loop 1604 E., Ste. 100, San Antonio. Fusion Academy is an accredit- ed private middle and high school that offers a customized approach for each student. Fusion Academy has campuses in seven other Texas cities. 210-510-0203. www.fusionacademy.com 3 IHOP opened a new 24-hour restau- rant at 17242 Autry Pond Road, San An- tonio, near the Bulverde Road/Loop 1604 intersection, with a full menu of food items. IHOP officials said the Autry Pond Road location only offers dine-in service for now. 210-507-2253. www.ihopsa.net 4 Tampa, Florida-based US Bioskills launched Burkhart Bioskills Lab inside the The San Antonio Orthopaedic Group

(TSAOG) Orthopaedics and Spine’s Ridgewood Orthopaedic Center, located at 19138 N. US 281, San Antonio. The 2,600-square-foot training facility opened in April, providing surgical skills training to various health care profession- als. 210-804-5400. www.tsaog.com 5 Evolve Human Optimization Labs opened in April at 502 Embassy Oaks, Ste. 103, San Antonio, near Hill Country Village. Evolve offers various physical and mental wellness services, including cold water immersion, contrast therapy, an infrared sauna, cognitive and neuro training, interactive stretching, met- abolic analysis and maximum oxygen consumption testing. 210-562-3310. www.evolvehumanlabs.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY EDMOND ORTIZ

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Tealicious Cafe

Burkhart Bioskills Lab

RENDERING COURTESY TSAOG ORTHOPAEDICS AND SPINE

COURTESY TEALICIOUS CAFE

craft beer on tap. 210-455-1455. www.parryspizza.com

441 W. Nakoma Drive, San Antonio, in April. Chicago Philly Eats was created by local Jeff Moore, owner of a North- west Side Las Palapas restaurant, who has a love for Chicago street foods and Philadelphia cheesesteaks, according to the Chicago Philly Eats website. The new restaurant offers a variety of tra- ditional cheesesteaks, pizzas, burgers, sandwiches and pastas. 210-248-9609. www.chicagophillyeats.com 15 Taco Palenque opened a new loca- tion at 25018 N. US 281, San Antonio, in early May. Taco Palenque offers break- fast, tacos, quesadillas, plates, enchi- ladas, burritos, parrilladas, antojitos, bowls, salads, soups and desserts. The new Stone Oak-area restaurant is open 24/7 and has dine-in and drive-thru ser- vice. www.tacopalenque.com/locations 16 Sofia’s Pizzeria expanded from its Potranco Road-area home to open a second location at 903 E. Bitters Road, San Antonio, in early April. Sofia’s fills the former home of Miss Ellie’s Pizza, which permanently closed earlier this year. Sofia’s specializes in New York-style pizzas. Sofia’s is opening a third location in the Evans Road/TPC Parkway area this

P. Terry’s Burger Stand opened its third San Antonio location on the North Side in lateMarch.

11 Tealicious Cafe on Feb. 10 opened a Stone Oak-area location at 1160 N. Loop 1604 W., Ste. 108, San Antonio. Tealicious offers a variety of teas and coffees along- side smoothies and tapioca. Tealicious has five other local cafes, including one at 11255 Huebner Road, Ste. 108, and one at 5238 DeZavala Road, Ste. 122. A sev- enth Tealicious Cafe is expected to open late this spring or in early summer at 3112 TPC Parkway, Ste. 120, San Antonio. 210-999-7989. www.tealiciouscafe.com 12 The San Antonio Chamber of Com- merce held a ribbon-cutting ceremony April 7 for Venture X San Antonio-The Enclave at 11103 West Ave., Ste. 2101, San Antonio. Venture X provides coworking and shared office space; virtual private office services; and amenities to support on-site collaboration and networking. Members have 24/7 access. Venture X has other San Antonio locations at 18911 Hardy Oak Blvd. and at 7550 I-10 W. 210-940-5230. www.venturex.com/ locations/san-antonio-west-ave 13 Mexican restaurant Panfila Cantina opened April 11 at 22250 Bulverde Road, Ste. 114, San Antonio. Co-owned by Charlie Gonzalez and Gaby Hinojosa, Pan- fila Cantina offers dishes influenced by Mexican street food and snack vendors, including chilaquiles and garlic mojo shrimp. The new eatery at The Shops at Fossil Creek retail center features brunch, dinner and happy hour menus as well as a full bar and a patio. 210-455-0702. www.facebook.com/PanfilaCantina 14 Chicago Philly Eats replaced WiseGuys-A Chicago Eatery at

COURTESY P. TERRY’S BURGER STAND

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN P. Terry’s Burger Stand opened a third local restaurant in late March in the Ventura Plaza retail center, 530 N. Loop 1604 W., San Antonio. The rst local P. Terry’s opened in 2021 at 8443 Wurzbach Road, and the second restaurant opened in February at 22607 N. US 281. A fourth San Antonio location is being developed at Loop 1604 and Potranco Road, company ocials said. 726-444-0085. www.pterrys.com/ locations/ventura-plaza quesadillas, nachos and chile relleno. 210-655-4420. www.nichas.com 18 Fish City Grill is set to open a third San Antonio location late this spring or in early summer at The Shops at South Rim retail center, 5311 N. Loop 1604. Plans call for a 3,200-square-foot restaurant to ac- commodate more than 200 diners indoors and outdoors. www.fishcitygrill.com ANNIVERSARIES 19 Montessori Kids Universe-Shavano marked its first anniversary with a March 23 ribbon-cutting ceremony with the North San Antonio Chamber of Commerce at 13807 Red Maple Wood Drive, Ste. 101, San Antonio. MKU Shavano offers Montes-

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sori preschool and kindergarten education as well as day care and child care services for parents/guardians of children age 12 weeks-6 years old. 210-395-4353. www.montessorikidsuniverse.com IN THE NEWS 20 Bexar County Commissioners Court on March 8 approved a subdivision plat for Brookstone Creek Unit 1B , which homebuilder D.R. Horton is developing along Evans Road east of TPC Parkway. According to plans, the project will contain 83 single-family lots across a 29.2-acre tract within San Antonio’s extraterritorial jurisdiction. Cost and a timeline for construction were not available. www.drhorton.com/ texas/san-antonio

summer. 210-960-5700. www.sofiaspizzeriatx.com COMING SOON

17 Nicha’s Comida Mexicana will open in a third San Antonio location at 12403 West Ave., replacing Tilo Mexican Restau- rant, which closed in March. Nicha’s has not yet furnished an opening date. For 40 year’s the family-owned Nicha’s has served up Mexican classics such as tacos and enchiladas, and also carne guisada,

Re j uvena t e , Hea l , Immune Boos t , Bu r n Fa t o r F i gh t Wr i nk l es . New I V The r ap i es !

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NORTH SAN ANTONIO EDITION • MAY 2022

TODO LIST

May & June events

COMPILED BY EDMOND ORTIZ

Nina Diaz will play an album release show at 9 p.m. May 28 at 502 Bar. LIVEMUSIC 502 BAR 502 Embassy Oaks, Ste. 138 San Antonio 210-257-8125 www.502bar.com MAY 21 The Heroine CD release show, Propaganda Poets, Westcreek, 9 p.m. 24 Mega Ran, Richie Branson, Rustage, Gross Angel, 8 p.m. 28 Nina Diaz album release show, 9 p.m. THIRSTYHORSEDANCEHALL 2335 NWMilitary Hwy. San Antonio (Doors open at 7 p.m.) 210-348-1513 www.thirstyhorse.net MAY 25 Nate DeLeon 26 Mario Flores PICKS BAR 4553 N. Loop 1604 W., Ste. 1101 San Antonio 210-253-9220 www.picksbar.com MAY 21 Chandler and the Bings, 9:30 p.m. 18 Jordan Gauna 19 Mario Flores 21 Small Town Habit 26 Van Full of Nuns, 5:30 p.m. 27 Passing Strangers, 9:30 p.m. 28 The Motts, 9:30 p.m. COURTESY NINA DIAZ

VISIT A BOOK FESTIVAL CENTRAL LIBRARY AND SOUTHWEST SCHOOL OF ART

MAY 21

MAY 21

ENJOY BREWS AND SKEWED FOODS SUNKEN GARDEN THEATER

The Dark Side of the Brew and Skew is a culinary and music festival that will feature more than 20 renowned local chefs and restaurants competing in a skewer cookout. Headliner bands will include Texas Pink Floyd, which includes alumni from Pink Floyd. Proceeds will benet the nonprot organization Music for Life. 2-11 p.m. Free (admission age 10 and under), starting at $35 (age 11 and over). Sunken Garden Theater, 3875 N. St. Mary’s St., San Antonio. 210-722-1993. www.thedarksideofthebrewandskew.com

The 10th annual San Antonio Book Festival returns as an in-person event, featuring appearances by more than 70 local and national authors such as Jericho Brown, Julia Glass, Margo Jeerson, Natalie Diaz and Emma Straub. The free event includes book signings, panel discussions, author presentations, children’s theater performances and food trucks. ( 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Central Library and Southwest School

of Art, 600 Soledad St., San Antonio. 210-701-8370. www.sabookfestival.org

COURTESY DARK SIDE OF THE BREW AND SKEW MUSIC FESTIVAL

COURTESY SAN ANTONIO BOOK FESTIVAL

MAY ONGOING SHOPLOCALVENDORS

(Fri.-Sat.), 1 p.m. Sun., 7 p.m. (June 2 and 9). $15-$45. 800 W. Ashby Place, San Antonio. 210-733-7258. www.thepublicsa.org/currentseason 21 LEARNABOUT BONSAI TREES San Antonio Bonsai Society members will present their bonsai collections and demonstrate the ancient art of bonsai at the San Antonio Botanical Garden. Bonsai trees will be available for purchase. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. May 21, 9 a.m.- 4 p.m. May 22. Admission by regular SABG admission or membership. 555 Funston Place, San Antonio. 210-536-1400. www.sabot.org 27 THROUGH 29 SHOP FOR UNIQUE THINGS The Women’s Guild from St. Mark the Evangelist Catholic Church presents the Trash and Treasure Sale, featuring various used jewelry, collectibles, chia, kitchenware, glassware, home decor, scarves, holiday items, small appliances and shoes. Free entry. Prices vary on items. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. 1602 Thousand Oaks Drive, San Antonio. 210-494-1606. www.stmarkevangelist.com

senior theater students at the campus auditorium. Patrons are asked to wear a mask and practice social distancing where possible. Attendees must reserve seating in advance. 7 p.m. $10-$15. 23203 Bulverde Road, San Antonio. 210-356-0400. www.johnsontheatre.com 19 CELEBRATE NICHE’S ANNIVERSARY Local boutique Niche is hosting a series of 25th anniversary events, including a fashion show that will feature special discounts, wine and gift bags for guests. Space is limited. 6-8 p.m. Free (RSVP required). Pearl, 302 Pearl Parkway, Ste. 112, San Antonio. 210-437-0239. www.facebook.com/nicheatpearl 20 THROUGH JUNE 12 CATCHA PLAY The Public Theater of San Antonio performs “She Loves Me,” a musical comedy set in the 1930s about two sparring sales clerks who do not realize that their respective beloved pen pal is really one another. American Sign Language interpretation will be provided at the June 9, 10 and 12 shows. 7:30 p.m.

On multiple weekends each month, Arbor Park Pop-Up Market features local artisans and vendors selling homemade apparel, accessories, decor, food and more in an outdoor market at the Arbor Park shopping center. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. every other Saturday and Sunday. Free admission. 17700 N. U.S. 281, San Antonio. www.facebook.com/ arborparkpopupmarket 14 PROTECT YOUR PETS Hollywood Park Humane Society and Vanguard Vet Clinic will oer a low-cost vaccination and microchip clinic for Hollywood Park pet owners outside City Hall. Pets must be leashed or in a carrier. Only cash or a credit card will be accepted. 9-11 a.m. 2 Mecca Drive, Hollywood Park. 210-495-4856. 19 AND 20 WATCH THEATER STUDENTS PERFORM Johnson High School theater students will present one-act plays directed by

Find more or submit North San Antonio events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

THREE CONVENIENT CAMPUSES SERVING SAN ANTONIO

Love what you wear.

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NORTH CENTRAL: 12222 Huebner Rd. STONE OAK: 20615 Huebner Rd. DOMINION: 6185 Camp Bullis Rd.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from North East & Northside ISDs

COMPILED BY EDMOND ORTIZ

QUOTEOFNOTE

North East ISDplans to redevelop tech programs

North East ISD will meet May 16 and 23, and June 6 and 13 at 5:30 p.m. 8961 Tesoro Drive, San Antonio 210-407-0000 • www.neisd.net Northside ISD will meet May 24 at 6 p.m. 5900 Evers Road, San Antonio 210-397-8500 • www.nisd.net MEETINGSWE COVER High School lm and photography students earned three awards at the sixth annual BexarFest Multimedia Festival held April 12 at the Tobin Center for the Performing Arts. Participating Johnson students included Ella Franklin, lm director/ videographer; Brandon Staten, chief editor; Emmanuel Castillo, actor/videographer; David Edgell, original music score/actor; Logan Stubbleeld, coordinator/ videographer; JoseMaria Alanis, graphic design/storyboard artist; Brooke Campbell, communications manager; and Julia Mazzocco and Amelia Pretli, still photographers. “WE DON’TWANT TO HAVE KIDS PREPARED FOR PROGRAMS NOT OFFERED IN POSTSECONDARY SETTINGS.” ESMERALDA MUÑOZ, NORTH EAST ISD LEARNING SUPPORT SERVICES EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, ON MERGING TWO EXISTING TECH BASED MAGNET PROGRAMS DISTRICT HIGHLIGHTS NORTHEAST ISD The NEISD Council of PTAs on April 26 awarded a $5,000 Virgil T. Blossom Scholarship to seven seniors who plan to pursue a degree in education. Each of NEISD’s seven high schools was represented, including Reagan High School’s Camila Hernandez, Johnson High School’s Clara Rosita, Churchill High School’s Ashley Being and Gisselle Barmore of Legacy of Educational Excellence High School, NEISD ocials said. NORTHSIDE ISD The NISD board on April 26 approved the purchase of 65 full-size buses and 25 mini-buses from Longhorn Bus Sales with 2018 bond funds. District ocials said state law requires that buses with a model year of 2017 or newer must have seat belts unless the school board holds a public meeting and votes to indicate the addition of seat belts would create a nancial hardship. All new buses also have air conditioning, cameras and GPS systems. NORTHEAST ISD Johnson

NORTH EAST ISD The district plans to merge two existing tech- nology-based magnet programs into one program designed to lure more students interested in space and aerospace engineering careers. NEISD trustees unanimously voted April 11 to realign the Krueger School of Applied Technologies and the Engineering and Technologies Academy to create the Space and Engineering Technologies Academy magnet program. School district ocials said the new SETA magnet program could begin classes for sixth through 12th graders in the 2023-24 academic year. The SETA program, district ocials added, would blend much of the curricula featured in the KSAT and ETA programs. School board members said they accepted the program realignment recommendation from district sta, who cited low enrollment trends in both the ETA and KSAT programs as one reason to develop a new program to accommodate students’ evolving interests in space- and aerospace-re- lated professions. Esmeralda Muñoz, learning support services executive director, said the ETA program enrolled 305 students in the 2020-21 school year, a decrease from 325 students in 2018-19 and 323 in 2019-20. The KSAT pro- gram enrolled 365 students in 2020- 21, an increase from 345 students in

2018-19 and 362 in 2019-20. The new program, Muñoz said, could encourage higher enrollment and improve students’ career and technology education pathways. As a result, participating students will be better prepared to pursue current and future jobs in such elds as mechanical, aerospace and computer engineering as well as naval and wind sciences, she added. “We don’t want to have kids prepared for programs not oered in post-secondary settings,” Muñoz said. NEISD surveyed current KSAT and ETA students and parents, and talked with faculty members as part of the creation of the SETA program, Muñoz said. Muñoz said the SETA program could also accommodate collaboration with NASA, including having instructional coaches teach students on campus and extending aerospace education training opportunities to teachers. NEISD Superintendent Sean Maika said Texas’ growing space and aero- space industries as well as recent sci- entic investments made by billionaire business leaders, such as Elon Musk and Je Bezos, are raising awareness of related jobs among students. “We can oer lots of things that kids enjoy, but if that leads them to nowhere, is that what we want to put our support behind?” Maika said. “These are high-demand, high-pay- ing jobs.”

PROGRAMMERGER North East ISD’s Krueger School of Applied Technologies will merge with the Engineering and Technologies Academy to become the Space and Engineering Technologies Academy. Krueger School of Applied Technologies • Founded in 1998 • Based at Krueger Middle School • Rocketry program • Engineering and technology-based career and technical education courses • Real world/leadership skills

Number of students

345

2018-19

362

2019-20

365

2020-21

Engineering and Technologies Academy • Founded in 2003

• Based at Roosevelt High School • College-level engineering and related technologies curriculum and preparation • Science-Technology-Engineering- Math-focus

Number of students

325

2018-19

323

2019-20

305

2020-21

SOURCE: NORTH EAST ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Four NEISD studentswin business group’s scholarships NORTH EAST ISD Four NEISD students in April received all four scholarships oered in the National Association of Women Business Owners San Antonio (NAWBOSA) business plan writing contest. NAWBOSA is a national professional organization for women business owners and supporters. Shayna Klein from Legacy of Educational Excellence High School won rst place and was awarded a $10,000 scholarship. Fatima Madero from Johnson High School placed second and received a $7,500 scholarship. Elizabeth Scott from Johnson High School won third place and was awarded a $5,000 scholarship. Jane Kamata from LEE High School placed fourth and received a $2,500 scholarship. NEISD ocials said all four students have worked

From left, North East ISD students Elizabeth Scott, Fatima Madero, Shayna Klein and Jane Kamata receive scholarships from the National Association of Women Business Owners-San Antonio.

COURTESY NORTH EAST ISD

toward this goal since September, including attending several conferences and being mentored by NAWBOSA members. The students were required to write a complete busi- ness plan and submit it by February, competing against students from across the city.

9

NORTH SAN ANTONIO EDITION • MAY 2022

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES TxDOT declares 2021 second-deadliest year for Texas roadways; trac deaths up 15%over 2020

ONGOING PROJECTS

BY MIKAH BOYD

TRAFFIC TRAGEDIES While most trac crashes did not result in injuries, thousands of Texans died

TREE HILL ST.

Roadways are becoming increas- ingly deadly, according to a news release from the Texas Department of Transportation that detailed ndings that are part of a large issue nationwide. TxDOT reported more than 4,480 deaths on Texas roads in 2021, only a little behind 1981, the deadliest year to date with over 4,701 deaths. Roadway deaths are also on the rise nationwide. Ocials reported an estimated 20,160 people died from vehicular crashes in the rst half of 2021, 18.4% higher than in 2020. Texas saw an increase of almost 15% from 2020-21. TxDOT elaborated on the shared responsibility among Texas drivers, roadway engineers and law enforce- ment to reduce the number of deaths on Texas roads. “Driver behavior is one of the causes but also one of the most important solutions,” Transportation Commis- sioner Laura Ryan said in a news release. “This is not blame. These are facts. We all have a role. TxDOT can do more, and we accept that responsi- bility. The driving public can do more. For instance, in 2021, a total of 1,522 people were killed because of speed, and a total of 1,219 were killed because they were not wearing a seat belt. These were decisions made by people that could have potentially saved 2,741 lives.” Art Markman, a psychology professor at The University of Texas, informed TxDOT leaders and

N

or faced serious injuries on the roads in 2021. Reported vehicle crashes in Texas in 2021

Vance Jackson Road upgrades Contractors on the Vance Jackson Road low-water crossing improve- ment project were recently working on water and sewer lines at Tree Hill Street. Plans for the overall project include street, curb and sidewalk reconstruction and improvements to utilities. Cost: $8.1 million Timeline: May 2021-September 2022 Source: city of San Antonio

Noninjuries

1.07M

137.4K Possible injuries 100.4K Unknown injuries

“WEMUST DOBETTERFOR OURSELVES, OUR LOVED ONES ANDOUR LARGER COMMUNITYOF TEXANS.” LAURA RYAN, TRANSPORTATION COMMISSIONER

82.5K Suspected minor injuries 19.4K Suspected serious injuries

HUEBNER RD.

4.5K Fatalities

1604

281

SOURCE: TEXAS PEACE OFFICER’S CRASH REPORTSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

W. BLANCO RD.

COUNTRY CLUB LN.

TRADESMANRD.

as well as proven life-saving roadway designs. TxDOT is also reviewing crash data to identify areas where drivers are more likely to crash and will use its ndings to focus improvement initiatives on those areas and share the data with the driving population. Ocials within the agency believe the implementation of the above initiatives and focusing on engineering and enforcement will greatly reduce the number of deaths on Texas roads. “But make no mistake: This is an urgent call to action for all of us behind the wheel,” Ryan said. “We can do bet- ter. We should do better. We must do better—for ourselves, our loved ones and our larger community of Texans. Not a single death on our roadways is acceptable. Let’s end this streak.”

transportation stakeholders at the annual Texas Transportation Forum in February about coronavirus-related pressures that have had a negative impact on Texas roadways. “We have to remind people that they are part of a community,” Markman said. “We have to start considering everyone as part of our community. If we don’t do that, there are going to be all sorts of negative consequences, and those are going to include negative consequences on the road.” The release provided information on initiatives TxDOT is researching and studying before implementing to aid in roadway safety. Some of the initia- tives include trac safety campaigns and law enforcement funding grants

N

Loop 1604 North expansion Loop 1604 between US 281 and Tradesman Road has had alternating lane closures in both directions on weeknights. Construction contractors have also been working on Blanco Road between Country Club Lane/ West Blanco Road and Huebner Road. Timeline: May 2021-TBD Cost: $1.3 billion Funding source: Texas Department of Transportation

1604

N

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MAY 9. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT NSANEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. 1604. City ocials said motorists using Huebner near 1604 should be aware of a closure of the existing right lane where through trac must merge left. Timeline: April-August Cost: TBD Funding source: city of San Antonio Huebner Road/Loop 1604 work San Antonio Public Works began work April 18 to add a 300-linear-foot right-turn lane on northbound and southbound Huebner Road at Loop

One-third of NWMilitaryHighway project nowcomplete in ShavanoPark

BY EDMOND ORTIZ

2. Phase 1 includes utility line relocation, installa- tion of new water and gas mains and stormwater drainage. However, City Manager Bill Hill said the city red original trac signal sub- contractor L&H because they failed to keep up with project requirements and timelines.

The new subcontractor SAECO was expected to erect new signals at Northwest Military’s intersections at DeZavala Road and at Pond Hill Drive by June. Timeline: June 2021- spring 2024 Cost: $15.5 million total Funding source: Texas Department of Transportation

Shavano Park ocials said eorts to expand and improve Northwest Military Highway were on schedule and still projected for completion in spring 2024. Currently, project con- tractors are working on various elements sched- uled across phases 1 and

1604

POND HILL DR.

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10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

INSIDE INFORMATION PROTESTING APPRAISALS

COMPILED BY ERIC WEILBACHER & EDMOND ORTIZ DESIGNED BY RACHAL RUSSELL

The market value of homes rose by more than 30% this year in Bexar County, according to the local appraisal district. Property valuation determines how much a property owner pays in taxes. Homeowners may seek to protest the market value of their properties with their county’s appraisal district. For more information, visit www.bcad.org.

R I S E

VALUE ON THE

UNDERSTANDING

Appraisal notices are sent to residents each April and contain information about a property’s assessed value and estimated taxes. Below is a breakdown of terms residents would see on an appraisal.

A P P R A I S A L

YOUR

Bexar Appraisal District said average appraised market values for Bexar County residential homesteads rose more than 32% in the past year, from $250,741 to $331,130. Average taxable values rose from $243,742 to $265,602 in the past year.

MARKET VALUE

TAX RATES

Effective tax rate: The rate that would generate the same amount of tax dollars as the previous year Rollback tax rate: The maximum rate a taxing entity can set without taxpayers being able to petition for an election Adopted tax rate: The rate adopted by a taxing entity

What the property would sell for

AVERAGE TAXABLE PROPERTY VALUE

$300K

ASSESSED VALUE

The limited value based on current market value or last year’s assessed value plus 10%, whichever is lower

+6.4%

$250K

+8.9%

TAXABLE VALUE

EXEMPTION

+5.3%

The assessed value minus any exemptions

$200K 0

Removes part of a home’s value from taxation and lowers taxable value

2019 2020 2021

2022*

TAX BILL = (TAXABLE VALUE X TAX RATE) / 100

*PRELIMINARY AS OF MAY 4

A PROTEST H OW TO F I L E 1 2 3 4

REASONS TO P R O T E S T property is too high. The property is valued unequally compared with other property in the appraisal district. The chief appraiser denied an exemption.

HISTORICAL BEXAR COUNTY PROTESTS

Residents who wish to protest the market value of their property must follow these steps.

Property owners have the right to protest the appraised values of their properties to the appraisal review board if they disagree with the appraisals.

Protests settled by appraisal staff Number of protests

Protests settled by appraisal review board

150K

File the protest no later than May 16 or 30 days after the appraisal district mailed the appraisal notice. Fill out an online or hard copy protest form that identifies the owner, the property in question and the owner’s dissatisfaction with the appraised value. Gather evidence to show why the value should be lowered, such as recent sales of comparable homes. Hearings will be scheduled, and the appraisal review board may make recommendations for cases not settled with the taxing entity.

THE FOLLOWING ISSUES CAN BE REVIEWED BY THE BOARD: The proposed value of a

120K

The chief appraiser denied agricultural appraisal for a farm or ranch. The appraisal records show an incorrect owner or the wrong taxing units.

90K

60K

30K

0

2019

2020

2021

SOURCES: BEXAR APPRAISAL DISTRICT AND THE TEXAS COMPTROLLER’S OFFICE/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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11

NORTH SAN ANTONIO EDITION • MAY 2022

CITY& COUNTY

News from Hollywood Park, San Antonio and Shavano Park

City seeks federal funds to fixDeZavala Road

DEZAVALA ROAD REPAIRS Shavano Park is working to secure federal funds toward envisioned improvements to the city’s portion of DeZavala Road between Northwest Military Highway and Lockhill Selma Road.

SHAVANO PARK City Council on March 28 authorized city staff to submit paperwork to secure federal monies to support proposed improvements on DeZavala Road. City Manager Bill Hill said the city will ask U.S. Rep. Tony Gonzales, R-San Antonio, to include a request for up to $5 million in Community Project Funding, which is available in fiscal year 2022-23 federal budget appropriations. Shavano Park’s pitch, Hill said, involves lever- aging the $10 million road improvement bond that the city proposed and voters passed with 81% of the vote May 7 to fix the city’s portion of DeZavala Road. The bond is designed to fund repairs to 14 roads and cul-de-sacs, and be used to leverage federal funds to fix part of DeZavala Road. The city proposes repaving DeZavala and adding

a bicycle lane, sidewalks and drainage upgrades between Northwest Military Highway and Lockh- ill-Selma Road. If approved as part of the federal government’s FY 2022-23 budget appropriations process, the $5 million would support the construction work on DeZavala, local officials said. The council also authorized the city applying with the Rebuilding American Infrastructure with Sustainability and Equity grant program. Curtis Leeth, assistant to the city manager, said the new $7.5 billion grant program is part of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, which Congress passed in November. In a memo, Leeth said the RAISE program provides funding for “road, rail, transit and other surface transportation of local and/or regional significance.”

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The city is submitting the DeZavala improve- ment project for up to $5 million in RAISE grant funding, local officials said. “This is going to be a very competitive grant piece. It’s very complicated. We’ll have to provide a cost-benefit analysis,” Hill said.

HollywoodPark adopts ethics code

Citymulls how to fill council vacancy HOLLYWOOD PARK City Council has taken up discussion about how to fill the Place 1 seat after Council Member Sean Moore became the lone mayoral applicant in the May 7 municipal election. He replaces Oscar Villarreal, who did not file for a full term as mayor. The council April 19 voted 3-2 to urge residents to file for the vacancy after they had a lack of participation from residents who could apply for the position by May 10. Under the leadership of Moore, the council will have to decide whether to extend the application period of appoint someone. The term for the Place 1 seat expires in May 2023.

ETHICS VIOLATIONS Possible penalties for a city official found violating Hollywood Park’s ethics code could include: Censure and formal

HOLLYWOOD PARK City Council on April 19 unanimously approved an ethics code to guide elected city officials and appointed members of city boards, commis- sions and committees. Among other things, the 16-page document says city officials and employees may own a business or have clients unrelated to the city position in which they serve. However, a potential conflict may arise if a city official or employee is compensated for work performed for an “outside” client—a business or some other venture—within the last 12 months, according to the new code. The ethics code requires an elected official or appointee to be

recused from deliberating or voting on something with which they may have a conflict of interest. The code also requires city offi- cials to report having accepted gifts of food, lodging, transportation or entertainment to the city secretary within 90 days of receiving a gift valued at $100 or more. In the event of an ethics complaint filed against a city official, the mayor may do an initial investigation to determine whether further investigation is needed. However, the mayor may not dismiss the complaint without first getting council approval or obtaining an agreement that spells out a proposed penalty or correc- tive action.

public reprimand Ouster if allowed by state law

Creating a corrective action plan to prevent future violations Reassignment and/ or revising duties/ responsibilities Requiring the official to undergo specific training, education or counseling Any combination of the above

SOURCE: CITY OF HOLLYWOOD PARK/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Mayor gives State of the City address SANANTONIO Mayor Ron Nirenberg delivered his annual State of the City address April 26 at the Tech Port Center and Arena, commending local residents and businesses in their efforts to overcome obstacles such as the COVID-19 pandemic’s effects, inflation and rising home appraisals. Nirenberg pledged the city will explore property tax relief and continue to pur- sue workforce, economic development and affordable housing initiatives to help residents whose lives were affected by COVID and other socioeconomic challenges. “City staff is already poring over the numbers, and City Council will consider proposals for moving forward with tax relief this fall,” Nirenberg said. He also commended the 170-plus area employers who opted to participate in SA Ready toWork, which he said has seen more than 1,500 trainees get jobs.

“CITY STAFF IS ALREADY PORING OVER THE NUMBERS, AND CITY COUNCIL WILL CONSIDER PROPOSALS FOR MOVING FORWARD WITH TAX RELIEF THIS FALL." RON NIRENBERG, SAN ANTONIO MAYOR

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY EDMOND ORTIZ

Bexar County Commissioners Court Will meet May 17 and 19 and June 7 at 9 a.m. MEETINGSWE COVER Bexar County Courthouse, 100 Dolorosa St., Ste. 2.01 210-335-2011 • www.bexar.org Hill Country Village City Council Will meet May 19 at 5 p.m. 116 Aspen Lane • 210-494-3671 www.hcv.org Hollywood Park City Council Will meet May 17 at 6 p.m. 2 Mecca Drive • 210-494-2023 www.hollywoodpark-tx.gov San Antonio City Council Will meet May 19 and June 2 and 9 at 9 a.m. 114 W. Commerce St. • 210-207-7040 www.sanantonio.gov Shavano Park City Council Will meet May 23 at 6:30 p.m. 900 Saddletree Court 210-493-3478 www.shavanopark.org authorized the Hollywood Park Economic Development Corp. to extend $125,000 toward the project. HOLLYWOOD PARK Todd Kounse won the City Council Place 2 election on May 7, receiving 67.8% of the vote against Michael Hall. A political newcomer, Kounse, who is a local businessman and insurance adjuster, succeeds Place 2 Council Member Debbie Trueman, who declined a re-election bid. CITY HIGHLIGHTS SANANTONIO Residents have been invited to give input on the city’s redistricting draft plan. A news release said a proposed map in the plan better balances the city’s population of 1.4 million across 10 City Council districts by moving council boundaries. According to the city’s release, most of the redistricting lies between the boundaries of districts 1, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9. A final draft of the plan will be shared with City Council in the summer 2022. A date has not yet been set. The draft plan can be found at www.saspeakup.com/M6152. Visit www.sabexarcountmein.org for more information. HOLLYWOOD PARK City Council on April 19 awarded a $299,000 contract to All Pro Construction, which will work to extend the rear end of the fire station bay more than 20 feet by November. City officials said extending the fire station bay will help to accommodate a custom- designed 44-foot-long ladder truck that Wisconsin company Pierce Manufacturing is building for the Hollywood Park Fire Department. The new $1.6 million fire truck will replace the fire department’s 20-year-old ladder truck, according to local officials. The council also

Bonds OK’d in SanAntonio, NISD; 2NEISD trustees lose SAN ANTONIO Voters approved bonds floated by the city of San Antonio and Northside ISD in the May elections. Two of six propositions contained in San Antonio’s record $1.2 billion bond each passed with more than 71% of the vote. The other four propositions each received at least 59% or more. City officials said San Antonio’s bond will support projects citywide affecting roads, drainage, parks, libraries, public safety facilities and affordable housing development. Also on May 7, NISD voters approved a $992 million bond that will fund a new elementary school on the far West Side and upgrades to all existing campuses and facilities. Officials in San Antonio and NISD each said bond approval would not raise their respective property tax rates. Some critics complained about the sizes of the bonds and claimed neither entity was forthcoming about the long-range effects that new bond debts will have on property taxes. Elsewhere, North East ISD held winner-takes-all elections for three school board seats. Two trustees were upset by political newcomers. Castle Hills resident Diane Sciba Villarreal won the District 3 post with 57.8%, defeating Omar Leos, who was appointed to the board in 2019. Marsha Landry collected 41.5% in her narrow victory in District 7, unseating incumbent Sandy Winkley, who fin- ished with 40.5%. Former trustee Joseph Trevino finished last with 17.9%. With 40.5%, District 2 Trustee Terri Williams won a second term, fending off a challenge from Jacqueline Klein and Rhonda Rowland. The next Election Day on May 24 will see some area voters casting ballots to settle GOP and Democratic party runoffs from the Primaries in March. Races include the Bexar County judge Democratic election between Peter Sakai and Ina Minjarez, as well as Republicans Elisa Chan and Mark Dorazio for Texas House

ELECTION RESULTS In the May 7 election, 91,656—or 7.6%—of registered Bexar County voters, including those in San Antonio, cast a ballot.

City of San Antonio bond

For 46,192 (71.35%) Proposition A (roads, sidewalks) Against 18,544 (28.65%)

For 46,574 (71.94%) Proposition B (drainage)

Against 18,166 (28.06%)

Proposition C (parks)

For 41,783 (64.69%)

Against 22,806 (35.31%)

For 41,802 (64.65%) Proposition D (libraries, cultural facilities) Against 22,854 (35.35%) For 41,831 (65.09%) Proposition E (public safety facilities) Against 22,434 (34.91%)

For 38,566 (59.79%) Proposition F (affordable housing) Against 25,934 (40.21%)

SOURCE: BEXAR COUNTY/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

District 122, and Democrats Claudia Zapata and Ricardo Villarreal for U.S. House District 21. Winners will advance to the Nov. 8 general elections. Early voting for the primary runoff elections will be held from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. May 16-20. Visit www.bexar.org/1568/ Elections-Department for polling details.

Officials seek tax relief amid high home appraisals

HOWTO PROTEST HOME APPRAISALS

$12,500 homestead exemption for disabled residents BEXAR COUNTY $5,000 homestead exemption

SANANTONIO City leaders are requesting property tax relief to help residents affected by skyrocketing home values, which have risen more than 20% in the past year, according to the Bexar Appraisal District. Mayor Ron Nirenberg and City Council members Manny Pelaez, John Courage and Clayton Perry issued Property tax exemptions available to local eligible homeowners: CITY OF SANANTONIO $5,000 homestead exemption Maximum $65,000 exemption for property owners ages 65 and over

working families that are just now recovering from the economic trauma of the pandemic,” Courage said. Perry said he would also like to see the city cut its tax rate of $0.558 per $100 valuation. Bexar County homeowners had until May 16 to file a protest by mail or online of their appraisal, which affects the taxes due in 2023. Protest request details can be found on the homeowner’s appraisal notice and at www.bcad.org. SOURCES: BEXAR APPRAISAL DISTRICT, CITY OF SAN ANTONIO, BEXAR COUNTY/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

statements pledging to back some form of tax relief when the city devel- ops its fiscal year 2023-24 budget. Local officials voiced support for expanding existing city property tax exemptions. Applications for home- stead exemptions had to be submitted by May 1. “This relief is meant to target

13

NORTH SAN ANTONIO EDITION • MAY 2022

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