Spring - Klein Edition | June 2020

2020 SPRING KLEIN EDITION

HEALTHCARE EDITION

ONLINE AT

VOLUME 7, ISSUE 3  JUNE 5JULY 10, 2020

A N T I C I P A T I N G T H E S U R G E

Texas leads the nation in having the highest percentage of residents without health insurance. Although most Spring and Klein ZIP codes have lower uninsured rates than the state, experts anticipate the uninsured rate will climb amid a rise in unemployment claims.

PERCENTAGE UNINSURED

UNEMPLOYMENT CLAIMS

Percent of workforce iling for unemployment, April 15-May 16, 2020

Percent of uninsured residents, 2018

IMPACTS

6

Texas

Harris County 20.2%

Texas

Harris County 5.67%

17.4%

4.98%

45

45

77389

77389

249

249

4.43%

6.4%

99 TOLL

2920

99 TOLL

77373

2920

77373

7.09%

14.2%

5.55%

MEAT INDUSTRY

10

9.8%

77379

77379

5.06%

8.8%

77090 77388

77090 77388

HEALTH CARE EDI T ION 2020

77070

77070

5.82%

13.6%

8.85%

20.8%

77068

77068

7.13%

18.1%

SPONSOREDBY • Houston Methodist • Lone Star College

77069

77069

5.84%

10%

77066

77066

6.45%

21.7%

1960

1960

13.02% of Spring and Klein residents did not have health insurance in 2018.

6.12% of the local workforce led unemployment claims in one month.

HEALTH CARE SNAPSHOT 12

N

N

SOURCES: TEXAS WORKFORCE COMMISSION, 2018 AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY 5YEAR ESTIMATES, WORKFORCE SOLUTIONSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Spring, Klein uninsured rate to grow following layos State sees calls for expanding health care coverage amid rising COVID19 needs

3 STITCHES

23

BY ANNA LOTZ, ADRIANA REZAL & HANNAH ZEDAKER

That number is expected to surge as more residents nd themselves unem- ployed as a consequence of the host of layos and business closures caused by the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Since March 11, unemployment claims peaked for the period spanning March 18-April 18, totaling 18,638 claims in the nine Spring and Klein-area ZIP codes, according to the Texas Work- force Commission.

TOMAGWA provides care to those ineligible for or unable to access health insurance throughout portions of Har- ris, Montgomery and Waller counties, including six ZIP codes in the Spring and Klein area, Simmons said. More than 49,700 residents within the nine Spring- and Klein-area ZIP codes were uninsured in 2018, accord- ing to 2018 ve-year estimates from

There are about 100,000 residents without health insurance within TOMAGWA HealthCare Ministries’ 600-square-mile service area, which includes portions of Spring and Klein, CEO Timika Simmons said. “That was before the layos, so now the phones are ringing o the hook,” she said.

CONTINUED ON 20

Getting your annual mammogram is still important. Houston Methodist can see you safely. Getting your annual mammogram is one of the most important steps you can take to stay healthy. That’s why our Breast Care Centers are taking every necessary precaution during the coronavirus pandemic to keep you and our staff members safe.

During the coronavirus pandemic, we are:

Screening all patients when scheduling appointments and upon arrival.

Wearing masks and other personal protective equipment while providing patient care.

Implementing additional sanitation processes to disinfect all equipment and surfaces.

I E

N

HOUSTON METHODIST BREAST CARE CENTER ATWILLOWBROOK

249

1960

WILLOWBROOK MALL

Redesigning waiting rooms and check-in procedures to ensure social distancing.

Visit houstonmethodist.org/breast-care-wb or call 281.737.PINK (7465) to schedule your mammogram today.

2

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

3

SPRING - KLEIN EDITION • JUNE 2020

WHO SAID YOUR BACK HAS TO GET IN THE WAY OF YOUR BACKSWING?

Is back pain getting in the way of doing the things you love? St. Luke’s Health can help. Because “pain” is just another way of saying “restrictions.” And the last thing you need are restrictions. The back specialists at St. Luke’s Health can help. We have the technology, the proven experience and a track record of getting people back to the game of golf. And the game of life. Now’s the time to break free, be brave.

StLukesHealth.org/SpineCare

4

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

FROMKIM: In addition to our mission of letting residents know what is going on in their own backyards and helping local businesses grow, our family-owned company’s purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other. We hope you enjoy our annual Health Care Edition, which contains information about the eect COVID-19 has had on the local Spring and Klein community, in addition to other valuable health information for you and your families. While many of us are continuing to social distance and this summer may look a little dierent than in years past, we will make the best of it. Remember to be the light for someone today, and as always, thank you for being a valued reader. Kim Giannetti, GENERALMANAGER

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Kim Giannetti, kgiannetti@communityimpact.com

BECOMEA #COMMUNITYPATRON Please join your friends and

SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMPATRON CONTACT US 8400 N. Sam Houston Parkway W., Ste. 220 Houston, TX 77064 • 2814696181 PRESS RELEASES sklnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

EDITOR Hannah Zedaker REPORTER Adriana Rezal

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Ronald Winters ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Kim Laurence METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Tessa Hoee CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Lanane CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company's mission is to build informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across six metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve.

Our local teams tailor campaigns for all business sizes and industries wanting to reach their customer base and accomplish their nancial goals. Our products ADVERTISEWITHUS

Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

Proudly printed by

include newspaper ads; mailbox-targeted sticky notes, inserts and direct mail; and digital options. We also partner with Community Impact Printing for nationwide specialty orders. Our advertising clients self- report 97% satisfaction with their overall experience, and a recent third-party Readex survey proved 78% of paper recipients read three of the last four editions, and from what they read 83% "took action" of some kind. Contact us today for more info! communityimpact.com/advertising

DAILY INBOX

communityimpact.com

Sign up for our daily newsletter to receive the latest headlines direct to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter

facebook.com/impactnewsSKL

WE’VE TEAMEDUP TOBRING YOUMORE OF THE STORIES YOU CARE ABOUT

@impactnews_SKL

BUSINESS AS USUAL. JUST 6 FEET AWAY.

OPENING OUR DOORS AGAIN, COME ON IN!

713.744.7400

- complimentary bag and bow gift wrap - order online for delivery & pick up

We encourage you to order online or download our mobile ap� for quick and easy delivery or in-store pick up.

twinliquors.com

You must be 21+ to shop and order online, receive delivery, or pick up in store. All deliveries require in-person verification of a legal photo ID at point of delivery. Orders will NOT be left unattended. Limited delivery area and pick up only available at select locations. All in-store promotions and pricing do not apply to online orders. Exclusions apply. Please drink responsibly.

5

SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • JUNE 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

2

SPRINGWOODS VILLAGE

6

CITY PLAZA DR.

3

4

99 TOLL

OLD TOWN SPRING

9

10

11

2920

Behavioral Innovations

12

7

COURTESY BEHAVIORAL INNOVATIONS

ent origins around the world, as well as multiple brewing methods, breakfast and lunch. The cafe is open at limited capacity and oers drive-thru service and delivery through UberEats and Grubhub. 832-559-7684. www.barbarossacoee.com 5 Carly Risacher along with her mom and stepdad, Loretta and Raborn Reader, opened a new Painting with a Twist studio at 16740 Champion Forest Drive, Spring, on May 19. The studio oers paint-and-sip classes for artists of all skill levels and ages and is currently oering Twist at Home Kits available for curbside pickup 6 Focus Optical opened May 4 at 1700 City Plaza Drive, Spring. The Woodlands- based business oers frames and lenses in addition to personalized optometry services such as eye exams, contact lens ttings and eye disease monitoring. The business is open at limited capacity, has increased sanitization eorts and is man- dating sta to wear masks. 832-648-4335. www.focusopticaltx.com 7 The Teahouse Tapioca and Tea opened at 2129 FM 2920, Ste. 260, Spring, on March 7. The bubble tea shop oers tapioca with smoothies as well as slushies, coee and tea. The Teahouse is currently oering curbside pickup and delivery through UberEats. 832-663-5325. www.teahousebeverage.com and delivery. 346-808-7106. www.paintingwithatwist.com Owner Mike Ferguson launched Driveway Dumpster Rental and Junk Removal on May 1. The Magnolia-based business, which also serves the Spring and Klein area, oers dumpster rentals for home clean outs, hoarders and small construc-

45

2

13

249

5

20

17

1960

99 TOLL

CUTTEN RD.

VINTAGE PARK BLVD.

1 16

18

15

VINTAGE PRESERVE PKWY.

8

14

GRANT RD.

19

WILLOWBROOK MALL

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 Center Court Pizza & Brew opened at 138 Vintage Park Blvd., Bldg. F, Ste. L, Houston, in early March. The eatery’s menu features hand-tossed pizzas, pizza rolls, calzones, atbread pizzas, sliders, pasta, wings and salads. The pizzeria is open at limited capacity and oers curb- side pickup and delivery. 832-761-7806. www.centercourtpizza.com

2 Behavioral Innovations opened at 8620 Spring Cypress Road, Ste. D, Spring, on March 16. The center is staed with board-certied behavior analysts who use applied behavior analysis to work with children on the autism spectrum, maintains a 1-1 therapist-to-child ratio and oers parent training. 855-782-7822. www.behavioral-innovations.com 3 Walk-On’s Sports Bistreaux began oering curbside pickup and delivery ser-

vice at 21930 Kuykendahl Road, Spring, in March. The Louisiana-based restaurant opened its dining room at limited capac- ity May 6 and oers Cajun cuisine and seafood, as well as burgers, salads and wraps. 225-330-4533. www.walk-ons.com 4 Spring-based Barbarossa Coee opened a second location May 8 at 9166 FM 2920, Ste. 100, Tomball. The cafe oers coee beans from 20 dier- GEARS RD.

6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY ADRIANA REZAL & HANNAH ZEDAKER

4

17

45

RANKIN RD.

N

Stats Sports Bar and Grill

Barbarossa Coee

COURTESY BARBAROSSA COFFEE

COURTESY STATS SPORTS BAR AND GRILL

tion jobs as well as junk removal services where the team hauls away items. 713-570-6095. www.drivewaydumpsterrental.com Treat Lady Training launched its website March 1 in Spring and surrounding areas. The business oers reward-based mobile dog training services and is a member of the American Kennel Club, The Pet Professional Guild and Therapy Pet Pals of Texas. 832-299-4941. www.treatladytraining.com COMING SOON 8 Stacked Pickle , an Indiana-based sports bar, is planning to open this summer at 6944 FM 1960 W., Houston. Known for its burgers, wings and beer, the restaurant will also oer wraps and salads, as well as a full bar. 832-775-8353. www.stackedpickle.com 9 McAlister’s Deli plans to open a new location this summer at 21460 Kuykend- ahl Road, Ste. 240, Spring. Known for its signature sweet iced tea, the eatery oers salads, soups, sandwiches and spuds. 866-438-3900. www.mcalistersdeli.com 10 Gossip & Co. Nail Spa will open this summer at the intersection of FM 2920 and Gosling Road in Spring. The spa will oer manicures and pedicures for men, women and children and feature a full bar. 832-639-8337. www.facebook.com/louettacypress 11 Hotworx plans to open at 2015 Spring Stuebner Road, Ste. 500, Spring, this summer. The facility oers virtually instructed exercise programs with added infrared heat absorption methods, includ- ing 30-minute isometric workouts or 15-minute high-intensity interval training sessions. Presales began in late May.

713-955-6252. www.facebook.com/hotworxspring 12 Geronimo Adventure Park is slated to open this summer at 6753 FM 2920, Spring, according to a news release from J. Beard Real Estate Co. The family adventure park will feature 16 zip lines across three zip line courses. www.geronimoadventurepark.com 13 Imagine Early Education and Child- care is planning to open in July at 8901 Spring Cypress Road, Spring. The facility formerly housed Children’s Learning Adventure, which led for bankruptcy and closed March 13. Ocials with Lasco Development Corp. said the new operator will oer similar services, including child care from 6 weeks to 12 years of age. 833-742-4453. www.imaginechild.com RELOCATIONS 14 The Door Store relocated from 14919 Stuebner Airline Road, Houston, to 10706 Grant Road, Houston, in March. Owned by Ron and Debra Hathaway, The Door Store oers a showroom with a vari- ety of doors including exterior, mahoga- ny, wrought iron, steel, berglass, patio, storm, French, interior and decorative 15 Maozinha Brazilian Jiu Jitsu relo- cated in March from 22820 I-45, Ste. 5P, Spring, to a larger space at 27359 W. Har- dy Road, Ste. 210, Spring. The Brazilian jiujitsu gym oers classes for all ages, as well as beginner and competition classes in No Gi, or grappling. 713-265-7111. www.teammaozinha.com 16 French Violet Boutique relocated April 4 from 8312 Louetta Road, Ste. D, glass. 281-444-4224. www.thedoorstore.info

Construction is underway on the Rankin 45 Distribution Center. (Rendering courtesy Trammel Crow Co.)

FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON Construction is underway for a 352,303-square-foot distribution center by commercial real estate developer Trammel Crow Co. in partnership with investment management company Clarion Partners, according to a March 2 press release. Known as the Rankin 45 Distribution Center , the development is located on the corner of Rankin Road and I-45, at 13800 I-45, Spring, and made its debut at 130 Vintage Park Blvd., Ste. C, Houston, on April 28. Owned by Earlene White, the shop carries women’s clothing, bold accessories and artisan jewelry that White crafts herself. The boutique is currently open at 25% capacity and is implementing extra saniti-

Houston. Developers broke ground in late February, and the building is expected to be substantially completed in August. The class A, cross-dock industrial building will span 22.5 acres and accommodate medium- to large- scale distribution, e-commerce and light industrial uses, according to the press release. Amenities of the center include 259 parking spaces, 23 trailer parking spaces and four drive-up ramps. www.trammellcrow.com 18 The Ezer Law Group , an immigration law rm, celebrated its 10-year anniver- sary in March. Located at 14511 Falling Creek Drive, Ste. 202, Houston, the rm handles family-based and employment- based immigration, as well as services related to citizenship and global work authorization. 281-404-7781. www.ezerlawgroup.com CLOSINGS 19 Sears closed its anchor store at Willowbrook Mall, located at 7925 FM 1960 W., Houston, in April, according to Willowbrook Mall General Manager Sandy LaClave. www.sears.com 20 Fratellini Ristorante Italiano announced April 30 that the restaurant located at 8905 Louetta Road, Ste. A, Spring, had permanently closed.

zation protocols. 832-953-2467. www.frenchvioletboutique.com ANNIVERSARIES

17 Stats Sports Bar and Grill , located at 10850 Louetta Road, Ste. 1700, Houston, celebrated its 10-year anniversary March 7. Owned by Tate Powers and Michael and Jessica Statlander, the bar and grill oers a variety of American fare ranging from Bualo wings and burgers to crawsh and atbreads. 281-257-8287. www.statssportsbarandgrill.com

Get excellent care from the comfort of your own home, office or wherever with Next Level Virtual Visits. Fill out a Virtual Visit request form at nextlevelurgentcare.com and you will be notified within 30 minutes to schedule your virtual appointment. Best of all, Virtual Visits can be billed to insurance or paid for directly.

Actual care. Virtually anywhere.

Available 9-9, 7 days a week nextlevelurgentcare.com | 832.779.8597

7

SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • JUNE 2020

WE’LL GET YOU WHERE YOU NEED TO GO

MON-FRI: 6AM - 11PM & SAT/ SUN: 7AM - 7PM SALES: MON-SAT: 9AM - 9PM

Stop In or Shop Online | Get Online Credit Approval | Apply For Financing | Value Your Trade

0% APR FINANCING FOR 36 MONTHS *

*Offer available on select newHondamodels, see dealer for full details. 0.0%APR is a dealer buydown rate. Dealer contribution 1.9%. Thismay affect the final negotiated price of the vehicle. Examplewith $0 down payment andmonthly payments of $27.78 per $1,000 financed. May not be combinedwith any other advertised offers or USAA/TrueCar/Costco price quotes. Offers valid through 6/30/20.

Every surface and vehicle at our facility is being continuously cleaned and sanitized for your safety.

1) Take pictures of your car & submit your VIN, make, & model via our website. 2) Bring it in for a quick 15 minute appraisal! WE BUY CARS! RECEIVE AN OFFER IN MINUTES

We will even come and pick up your vehicle if you decide to sell.

Honda of Tomball is a member of the Pohanka Automotive Group celebrating 100 years in business!

3) Or, we’ll come to your work or home to appraise it there.

Can’t Come To Us? We’ll Come To You!

COMPLIMENTARY VEHICLE PICKUP & DELIVERY AVAILABLE

Vehicle pickup & delivery available between 9am and 7pm, see dealer for complete details.

Valid only at Honda of Tomball

Valid only at Honda of Tomball

Valid only at Honda of Tomball

Valid only at Honda of Tomball

EXPIRES 6/30/2020

EXPIRES7/15/2020

EXPIRES 7/15/2020

EXPIRES 7/15/2020

Valid only at Honda of Tomball. Any or all coupons must be presented at time of write up in the service drive. Any or all coupons not to be utilized with other coupons nor are coupons redeemable for cash. No discount will exceed $100.00 unless specifically stated in the individual coupon advertisement. Synthetic oil usage will incur additional charges. Up to 5 quarts. Some models higher based on filter and diesel engines. See service advisor for full details. $ 29 88 OIL CHANGE SPECIAL All Makes & Models (Up to 5 quarts)

Valid only at Honda of Tomball. Any or all coupons must be presented at time of write up in the service drive. Any or all coupons not to be utilized with other coupons nor are coupons redeemable for cash. No discount will exceed $100.00 unless specifically stated in the individual coupon advertisement. See service advisor for full details. (B3G1IM) Plus $30 Off 4 Wheel Alignment with purchase. BUY 3 TIRES GET ONE FREE! WE WON’T BE UNDERSOLD

TIMING BELT SPECIAL

Valid only at Honda of Tomball. Any or all coupons must be presented at time of write up in the service drive. Offer is for 20% off your entire service bill. Maximum savings of $150. Current advertised specials & tires are excluded. Offer expires 6/30/20. OFF YOUR TOTAL BILL TOTAL SERVICE DISCOUNT 20 %

Valid only at Honda of Tomball. Any or all coupons must be presented at time of write up in the service drive. Any or all coupons not to be utilized with other coupons nor are coupons redeemable for cash. No discount will exceed $100.00 unless specifically stated in the individual coupon advertisement. See service advisor for full details. (TBSI) ANY VEHICLE $ 250 OFF! Don’t get stranded! Timing belt fatigue cannot be detected. Includes drive belts, water pump, tensioner and coolant. Recommended every 7 years or every 105k miles.

Car Buying Made Simple. Shop Here... or From Home!

DRIVE A LITTLE, SAVE A LOT! • 3 Minutes south of Grand Parkway 99 • 8 Minutes north of Beltway 8 • 15 Minutes from I-45 • 15 Minutes from Hwy. 290 Conveniently located on Hwy. 249 in Tomball. Take a right at the car stacker !

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES TxDOT begins reversal of northboundHwy. 249 ramps between Spring Cypress, Jones roads

BY ADRIANA REZAL & HANNAH ZEDAKER

TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY REOPENS IN PHASES Texas residents can now receive limited services from the Department of Public Safety as driver’s license oces across the state have begun to reopen. The opening plan includes the launch of an online appointment system for customers to book appointments up to six months in advance. Limited services will be provided by appointment only to those currently without a Texas driver’s license, commercial driver’s license, learner permit or ID card as well as those in need of a drive test. • Phase 1 allowed northwest and West Texas regional DPS oces to begin scheduling for limited services May 22; oces opened May 26. • Phase 2 allowed South and Central Texas regional DPS oces to begin scheduling for limited services May 26; oces opened May 29. • Phase 3 allowed North and southeast Texas regional DPS oces to begin scheduling for limited services May 29; oces opened June 3. This phase includes Spring-Klein. • Phase 4 will allow customers statewide to schedule appointments for all DPS oce transactions. Service are expected to begin midsummer. Extended license expiration dates will remain in eect until Phase 4.

The project will reverse the existing entrance/exit ramp conguration to an exit/entrance conguration. HWY. 249 RAMP REVERSAL

CURRENT DESIGN

The Texas Department of Trans- portation began a three-month project April 20 to reverse the Hwy. 249 northbound entrance and exit ramps between Jones and Spring Cypress roads. According to TxDOT Public Information Ocer Danny Perez, the $2.6 million project will reverse the existing entrance/exit ramp cong- uration to an exit/entrance congu- ration by shifting the new exit ramp south of the current entrance ramp. Perez said the project aims to ease trac congestion the interchange’s current design facilitates. “Hwy. 249 northbound trac exiting to Spring Cypress Road during the afternoon commute was queuing up back on the main lanes due to the close proximity of the exit ramp to the Hwy. 249/Spring Cypress Road signalized intersection,” Perez said in an email. “This queuing created a bottleneck between motorists

entering the freeway from Jones Road and merging into high-speed trac on the main lanes.” Perez said the project is expected to add capacity on the Hwy. 249 frontage road for drivers exiting to Spring Cypress Road, thus elimi- nating the queue of vehicles back onto the main lanes. The project will also include the restriping of the Hwy. 249 northbound frontage road approach to Chasewood Park Drive. The project will require three months of daily ramp closures, Perez said. In the interim, northbound motorists wanting to exit Hwy. 249 at Spring Cypress Road will need to take the exit ramp just south of Louetta Road, and northbound motorists wanting to enter Hwy. 249 will need to take the entrance ramp either south of Louetta Road or north of Spring Cypress Road. Road and ramp closures are updated daily on www.houstontranstar.org.

EXIT

ENTER

249

N

NEW DESIGN

ENTER EXIT

249

N

Timeline: April 20-July 20 Cost: $2.6 million (80% federal, 20% state) Funding source: Texas Department of Transportation

SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Are we more accessible than ever? Bank on it. With the myTrustmark ® app — plus an extensive network of drive-thrus and ATMs — it’s easy to connect with us. So you can bank your way, anytime, anywhere.

Visit trustmark.com to learn more.

MEMBER FDIC

9

SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • JUNE 2020

BUSINESS Meat shortages put strain onNorth Houstonmeat shops, restaurants

While some North Houston-area meat suppliers and eateries have experienced an increase in consumer demand for meat products during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, business owners said product shortages and frequent price changes frommeat processing plants across the country remain a challenge. Raymond Skelton, the owner of Ainsworth Meats on FM 2978 in Magnolia, said his store saw a large increase in customer demand after grocery stores were hit with meat shortages at the pandemic’s onset in mid-March. “[There’s] panic on the brain, so [customers] buy in excess,” Skelton said. “Eventually, it will settle down, but it will be more than what I was running before.” Similarly, Mike Majkszak, the owner of Majkszak’s Meat Market BY ADRIANA REZAL & DYLAN SHERMAN

in Conroe, said his business has received approximately 800 new cus- tomers since the pandemic started. However, Majkszak said the price he pays for red meat has doubled in recent weeks, causing his business to raise the price of certain products. “Our ground beef ... traditionally, I sell it for $4.99 a pound. [Now], I have it on the shelf at $8.99,” he said. “An invoice that I paid $10,560 for last Friday—if I would have gotten that truck in on March 1, ... it would have cost me roughly $6,800.” Following an outbreak of 700 pos- itive coronavirus cases in Amarillo in early May, Gov. Greg Abbott released a statement May 16 identifying meat processing plants as an at-risk area for increased coronavirus cases. According to the statement, pro- cessing plants with outbreaks, such as those in Amarillo, experienced temporary shutdowns to allow for

For Spring-area barbecue joint CorkScrew BBQ, owner and pitmaster WIll Buckman said steep price hikes in meat products have added to the challenge of operating a restaurant amid the coronavirus pandemic. (Adriana Rezal/Community Impact Newspaper)

proper disinfection protocols. Down the supply chain, local barbecue joints, such as Tejas Chocolate & Barbecue in Tomball and CorkScrew BBQ in Spring, are having diculty turning a prot on certain items, such as brisket. “We’re losing 50%-60% ... of that brisket before it hits the customer’s plate,” CorkScrew BBQ owner and pitmaster Will Buckman said. “So

already, at $8 a pound, we’re $16 into it just in loss and cost. Then, you add in the wood, [and] you add in the employees [and] everything else [that goes into] the restaurant’s cost. ... It’s hard to break even on that product sometimes.” As the price for meat has increased, local restaurant owners said they are worried about transferring that cost to their customers.

SENIORS ARE LOVED & PROTECTED AT THE BELLAIRE THE BELLAIRE SENIOR LODGES LEASING SPECIAL

ASKYOURSELF: Do you want your mom and dad to move into a large facility where the chance of catching the virus is very high or a 1st class 30 suite facility with 24/7 Certified nurse assistants, with a very low chance of getting this terrible virus.

STANDARD DELUXE SUITE = $ 2,900.00 per MONTH VIP SUITEW/PRIVATE, COVERED PORCH = $3,900.00 DOUBLE DELUXE SUITE = $3,900.00 per Month

• All utilities included + Great FREEWiFi • FREE - washers/dryers + no security deposit • 55” SamsungTV in each suite with 120 channels + Netflix movies • Full service beauty salon with a massage room • Individual air and heat in each suite (very quiet) • Coffee bar in each suite with refrigerator/micro wave oven • 10 foot ceilings with sprinkler fire system and ceiling fan • We move you FREE with professional movers

• 3 Meals a day served at your table by our professional chef • Dining tables only steps away from your suite • Maid service once a week • State approved certified nurse assistants on site 24/7

IN ORDER TO HELP - FIRST MONTH’S RENT IS FREE!

6420 CYPRESSWOOD DRIVE | SPRING,TEXAS 77379 | www.bellairelodge.com | patrickboyd8@gmail.com | 832-404-2000

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CORONAVIRUS Houston-area foster care advocatesworry of unreported abuse, trauma toll amid COVID19

In Texas, medical personnel and schools contribute more than 33% of reports of abuse and neglect, according to the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services. W FE ROS O AS O NLT? In scal year 2019, the top ve reporters of abuse and neglect were: Medical personnel (18.6%) 1 Schools (15.3%) 2 Lawenforcement (12.8%) 3 Relatives (9.1%) 4 Community agencies (7.5%) 5

BY ANNA LOTZ

Media Specialist Tiani Butler said. She said as of mid-May the DFPS had not had problems nding placements for children during the pandemic, and the number of children removed from homes was not unlike any other year. “I feel like more families are reaching out for the licensing process. Honestly, I think it’s because they’re home more and they have time to stop, do the research, attend the meetings and all of that,” Riebel said. However, to help meet the anticipated future increase in demand for foster families, Riebel said Arms Wide Adoption Services—which serves Region 6—has adjusted its operations to avoid delaying the licensing process for prospective families. While nger printing and re inspections have been dicult to complete due to social distancing measures, Riebel said Arms Wide has allowed fam- ilies to attend training sessions with everything but these few items completed in the licensing process so as not to delay the process further. Home studies were also paused in April but resumed in May with personal protective equip- ment and social distancing, she said.

With schools closed for much of the semester and families encouraged to stay home, Houston-area nonprot leaders worry there will be a spike in reports of abuse as coronavirus measures are lifted, allowing groups to gather again. “Once we start to get out again, people are going to start saying things, and kids will start talking,” said Arianne Riebel, director of adoption and foster care services for Arms Wide Adoption Services in Houston, an agency placing children into foster and adoptive homes. “I think that’s when the reports are going to start coming in more. That’s the major reason why here we can’t slow down. They’re going to need these homes for these kiddos in the future.” Texas Department of Family and Protective Services data shows schools contributed 15% of abuse and neglect reports throughout the state in scal year 2019, second to medical personnel for the source of most reports in the state. In DFPS Region 6—which spans 13 counties, including Harris—approximately 2,400 children were in foster care in the month of April, and the region included 2,000 foster homes, Region 6

SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY AND PROTECTIVE SERVICESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Reports of suspected abuse, neglect or exploitation can be made online or by phone. Texas Department of Family and Protective Services Call the Texas Abuse Hotline: 800-252-5400 H T RO

www.txabusehotline.org (for nonurgent situations)

ActonAcademy Champions

VISIT OUR WEBSITE TO

LAUNCH YOUR HERO’S JOURNEY FIND A CALLING; CHANGE THE WORLD. 4820 Strack Rd. Houston, TX ENROLLING YEAR ROUND

Online Video Evaluations are Now also available. Payment Plans as low as $125 per month

HELP US SUPPORT LOCAL RESTAURANTS SCHEDULE YOUR FREE ESTIMATE TODAY

A global network of the most innovative K-12 schools on the planet.

AND RECEIVE A $25 GIFT CARD *Gift Card provided within 30 days of completing the evaluation

• Blue Water Seafood • Capt. Brad Coastal Kitchen • Freddy’s Frozen Custard • Hasta La Pasta Italian Grill

• Iza Robata - BBQ - Poke - Ramen • Mia Bella Trattoria - Vintage Park • Tropical Smoothie Cafe - Spring

CYPRESSWOOD DR.

STRACK RD.

ADMIN@ACTONCHAMPIONS.ORG Get in touch by sending an email to

5902 W. 34th Street, Houston 77092 olshanfoundation.com 713-223-1900 Schedule a Free Estimate Today.

WWW.ACTONACADEMYCHAMPIONS.ORG

11

SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • JUNE 2020

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER IS PROUD TO SAY THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS

GOLD SPONSOR

Serving Northwest Houston providing high-quality, comprehensive health care in a spiritual, patient-focused, compassionate environment.

GOLD SPONSOR

Lone Star College oers associate and bachelor’s health care degrees and certicate programs that provide an essential workforce to keep our community safe and healthy. Students are trained on state-of-the-art simulation equipment designed for real-world experiences which include hands on laboratory exercises, classroom learning and clinical facility rotations. Many students can qualify for nancial assistance which covers educational expenses including tuition, fees, books and supplies. Visit LoneStar.edu/HealthCare to start your rewarding career today!

Data and information on health care trends in Harris County

HEALTH CARE SNAPSHOT

COMPILED BY MATT DULIN & HANNAH ZEDAKER

CORONAVIRUS CASE ANALYSIS After experiencing a surge in mid-April, new case counts have leveled o even as testing has ramped up in Harris County. But an uptick began in mid-May as more businesses and activities were released from shutdown orders.

Harris County’s health indicators show the county ranking low among counties in the state for socioeconomic factors, which include measures of poverty and education, and it is ranked last in Texas for physical environment, which includes air quality and the prevalence of commuting.

HOWHEALTHY IS YOUR COUNTY?

CASE BREAKDOWN

NEW CORONAVIRUS CASES PER WEEK

Harris County

These rankings are updated annually but in- clude data from previous years. There are other factors included that are not listed below.

Harris County

March 16- March 22 March 23- March 29 March 30-

17

Active cases 58.5%

45

418

69

Total cases: 11,770

1.9% Deaths

HEALTH OUTCOMES INCLUDE:

99 TOLL

April 5 839

• LENGTHOFLIFE • QUALITYOFLIFE , such as the number of poor mental and physical health days reported

10

39.6% Recoveries

April 6- April 12 2,277 April 13- April 19 1,092 April 20- April 26 975 April 27- May 3 1,080 May 4- May 10 1,095 May 11- May 17 1,323 May 18- May 24 1,456

N

Recoveries per 100,000 residents Deaths per 100,000 residents 101.27 4.86

HEALTH FACTORS INCLUDE:

• HEALTHBEHAVIORS , such as smoking, obesity, physical activity, excessive drinking, alcohol-impaired driving deaths, sexually transmitted infections and teen births • CLINICALCARE , including health insurance coverage; number of physicians, dentists and mental health providers; preventable hospital stays; and u vaccinations • SOCIOECONOMICFACTORS , such as educational attainment levels, children in poverty, income inequality and violent crimes • PHYSICALENVIRONMENTFACTORS , such as air pollution, drinking water violations, housing problems and long commutes

2020 STATEWIDE HEALTH CARE RANKINGS (out of 244 counties)

23 68 151 72 64 32

Health outcomes

CASES BY AGE

0-9 10-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70-79 80-89

Length of life

363

619

Quality of life Health factors Health behaviors

2,000

2,400

2,200

1,900

Clinical care

1,300

598

190 244

Socioeconomic

500

Physical environment

All coronavirus data is up to date as of press time May 29. For updated coronavirus data and information, go to communityimpact.com.

SOURCES: ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION, UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN POPULATION HEALTH INSTITUTE, COUNTYHEALTHRANKINGS.ORG, TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES, HARRIS COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HOSPITALS

Information on local hospitals in Spring and Klein

TRAUMA LEVEL TEXAS

E. MOSSY OAKS RD.

99 TOLL

1

LEVEL I

• Highest level of care • Full range of specialists, equipment in-house 24/7 • Oer teaching, research components

2920

6

45

LEVEL I I

7

REAL . LOCAL . SAVINGS .

249

• Oer specialists on call 24/7 • Can transfer to Level I facilities • No research component required

5

3

1960

LEVEL I I I

CHASEWOOD PARK DR.

2

• Oer resources for emergency surgery, intensive care • May have to transfer to Level I and II centers

4

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

LEVEL IV

See how much you could save on car insurance today.

• Provide initial evaluation, stabilization, diagnostic capabilities • Will likely have to transfer to higher-level trauma center

COMPILED BY ADRIANA REZAL

2

1 CHI St. Luke’s Health- Springwoods Village 2255 E. Mossy Oaks Road, Spring 3463055000 www.chistlukeshealth.org • Trauma level: N/A • NICU level: N/A • Total number of employees: 70 • Number of beds: 4 • Number of beds dedicated to coronavirus patients: N/A • New programs, expansions: N/A 2 CHI St. Luke’s Health-The Vintage 20171 Chasewood Park Drive, Houston 8325345000 www.chistlukeshealth.org • Trauma level: N/A • NICU level: II • Total number of employees: 420 • Number of beds: 65 • Number of beds dedicated to coronavirus patients: N/A • New programs, expansions: N/A 3 First Texas Hospital 9922 Louetta Road, Houston 3462062300 www.rsttexashospitalcyfair.com • Trauma level: N/A • NICU level: N/A • Total number of employees: 116 • Number of beds: 50 • Number of beds dedicated to coronavirus patients: 6 • New programs, expansions: hospice general inpatient care 4 Houston Methodist Willowbrook 18220 Hwy. 249, Houston 2817372500 www.houstonmethodist.org/willowbrook • Trauma level: N/A • NICU level: III • Total number of employees: 3,147 • Number of beds: 312 • Number of beds dedicated to coronavirus patients: 94 • New programs, expansions: ongoing

NICU LEVEL TEXAS

CHI St. Luke’s Health-The Vintage

LEVEL I

ADRIANA REZALCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

• Well nursery • Can care for mothers, infants at 35-plus weeks gestation with rou- tine perinatal problems • Anesthesiology, lab, radiology, ul- trasonography, blood bank services and pharmacist available

713-224-3426 1403 Spring Cypress Rd Spring

$18 million women’s services expansion, new 36-bed medical/surgical unit 5 HCA Houston Northwest Medical Center 710 Cypress Creek Parkway, Houston 2814401000 www.hcahoustonhealthcare.com • Trauma level: III (in active pursuit of Level II Trauma designation) • NICU level: III • Total number of employees: 1,260 • Number of beds: 423 • Number of beds dedicated to coronavirus patients: N/A • New programs, expansions: stroke program, Bryant Rehab Center 6 UMMC Spring Hospital 20635 Kuykendahl Road, Spring 8328443746 www.springhospital.com • Trauma level: II • NICU level: N/A • Total number of employees: 39 • Number of beds: 9 • Number of beds dedicated to coronavirus patients: N/A • New programs, expansions: drive-thru COVID-19 testing and antibody testing daily 7 TOPS Surgical Specialty Hospital 7080 Red Oak Drive, Houston 2815392900 www.tops-hospital.com Hospital did not respond to requests for information.

LEVEL I I

• Specialty care nursery • Can care for mothers, infants at 32-plus weeks gestation with problems to be resolved rapidly • In addition to Level I requirements, dietitian, and physical and respiratory therapists available

LEVEL I I I *

• Neonatal intensive care unit • Can care for mothers, infants of all ages with mild to critical illnesses • Can provide consultation for pediatric medical and surgical subspecialists; can perform major pediatric surgery on-site

Saving people money on more than just car insurance. ®

LEVEL IV*

• Advanced NICU • Can care for mothers, infants of all gestational ages as well as the most complex, critically ill infants • Comprehensive pediatric medical and surgical subspecialists on-site; can perform major surgeries, includ- ing repair of complex conditions SOURCES: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES, TEXAS SECRETARY OF STATE'S OFFICE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER *MEET LEVEL I AND LEVEL II REQUIREMENTS AS WELL

Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not availableinallstates, inallGEICOcompanies,orinallsituations.Boat and PWC coverages are underwritten by GEICO Marine Insurance Company. Homeowners, renters and condo coverages are written through non-affiliated insurance companies and are secured through the GEICO Insurance Agency, Inc. Motorcycle and ATV coverages are underwritten by GEICO Indemnity Company. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image © 1999-2019. © 2019 GEICO

13

SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • JUNE 2020

HEALTH CARE BRIEFS

Health Care Edition 2020

News from local health care providers

Spring, Klein health care providers adapt as state gradually reopens

BY ADRIANA REZAL

in that regard,” Krenz said. Similarly, Mohamad Syed, head optician at Louetta Family Vision Care, said the optometry oce was prompted to reopen in early May as a result of reduced income following a monthlong closure. “To be honest, it was a matter

of only having so much nancial stability at the time to provide for the employees and the business,” he said. Syed said the center now requires face coverings and is accepting clients by appointment only. Likewise, the Pediatric & Adoles- cent Clinic located on Louetta Road has also implemented safety mea- sures to reduce the risk of exposure to COVID-19. According to Medical Assistant Mireya Trejo, face masks are encouraged, and patients are asked to stay in their cars until their appointment. The clinic also oers telemedicine services.

and face shields to the sta dress code, the clinic also asks patients to wear masks and wait in their vehicles until the time of their appointment. “We’ve always been on top of hand-washing and sanitation, of course, but [COVID-19 has] put an uptick on everything that we’re doing

As Phase 2 of Gov. Greg Abbott’s plan to gradually reopen the state continues to unfold, Spring- and Klein-area health care providers are adapting as they get back to business. According to dentist Daniel Krenz of Spring Smiles Dental Group and Orthodontics, in late March the clinic was required to scale back sta to accommodate only emergency cases. In early May, however, Krenz said the clinic, located on FM 2920, has been able to resume normal services at 25% capacity. Beyond adding disposable gowns

“WE’RE JUST TRYING TO FIGURE OUT HOW TOOPERATE DIFFERENTLY BECAUSE IT’S JUST AWHOLE DIFFERENT REALMNOW.” DANIEL KRENZ, SPRING SMILES DENTAL GROUP AND ORTHODONTICS DENTIST

Experts explain COVID19 vs. antibody testing

Cypress CreekHospital launches telehealth service, newcontact tool amid pandemic

BY ADRIANA REZAL

pandemic and health crisis. Serology testing uses a small blood sample taken by nger prick to test for the presence of antibodies created in response to COVID-19 infection. Both the CDC and U.S. Food and Drug Administration advise against serology testing being used as a method of diagnosing an active COVID-19 infection, as antibodies can appear anywhere from one to three weeks after contracting the virus. However, serology testing can be eective in detecting a previous COVID-19 infection in someone who may not have otherwise known due to a lack of displayed symptoms or asymptomatic infection. Beginning June 1, the nearest Harris County-operated coronavirus testing site is at Cy-Fair ISD’s Prid- geon Stadium, located at 11355 Falcon Road, Houston.

Whether by nasal swab or nger prick, testing for the novel corona- virus has become available to the public in a few dierent ways since the outbreak began. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, samples must be taken from the upper respiratory system, such as through a nasal or throat swab, and sent to laboratories to be analyzed to properly diagnose a person with COVID-19. This form of testing is also known as molecular testing. The other type of coronavirus testing, known as serology or antibody testing, does not diagnose for COVID-19. However, ocials said it can detect a previous coronavirus infection and contribute to research to give health care providers a better understanding of the ongoing global

Cypress Creek Hospital 17750 Cali Drive, Houston 281-751-6139 www.cypresscreekhospital.com

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

Cypress Creek Hospital launched a new telehealth service to better serve patients during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, hospital ocials announced April 13. The fully accredited, 128-bed acute care psychiatric facility treats adolescents ages 12-17, adults and rst responders who require acute or outpatient psychiatric care or substance abuse treatment. According to the release, the telehealth service enables patients to participate remotely in the Intensive Outpatient Program and the Partial Hospitalization Program, receive assessments and schedule virtual visits from home. Additionally, hospital ocials announced the launch of a new

45

1960

N

online contact tool for its Honor Strong Program on April 21. The hospital’s Honor Strong Program is an acute inpatient pro- gram geared to address the unique symptoms experienced by rst responders, military personnel and veterans. The new online contact tool will allow these patients to ask for help condentially by submit- ting an online inquiry.

Reward yourself with up to $100 Cash!

3 1 2

UFirst Savings

Your FCCU Grad Pack 1 Includes:

FCCU Free Checking Account

Grad Pack

FCCU Rewards Credit Card 2

FCCU.org/GradPack

May 15 - August 31, 2020

1 APY=Annual Percentage Yield. Rates and terms subject to change without notice. Must open savings, checking and credit card to receive $100 cash deposited to your savings account within 7 to 10 business days. Open savings and checking only, $50 cash will be deposited to your savings account within 7 to 10 business days. If already a member, see credit union representative for complete details. 2 APR= Annual Percentage Rate. Certain credit criteria apply. Credit Card requires a credit qualified co-signer unless financial responsibility can be shown by applicant. Rates and terms subject to change without notice. 0% APR intro rate for twelve months valid for purchases and balance transfers for new cardholders only. After intro rate expires, standard rate will be between 9.99% and 17.99% APR based on creditworthiness. Minimum payment of $18 or 3%, whichever is greater, required monthly. Rewards points have no cash value. Points can be redeemed for cash back, travel, gift cards, merchandise and more. Points are non-transferable. 3 Cash back statement credit reward(s) will appear as a credit, in the form of a payment, in cardholder’s rewards card payment history. Cardholder is responsible for any outstanding balance owed on the account after the credit is applied. If there is a zero balance owed on the card, the statement credit will post to the cardholder’s savings account when received. Offer valid through August 31, 2020. This offer is available to 2020 high school graduates only. Cannot be combined with any other offers. FCCU invites all high school graduates in Harris, Fort Bend or Montgomery County to get your Grad Pack today! Federally insured by the NCUA

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

INSIDE INFORMATION

A guide to ambulance and emergency medical services

COMPILED BY BEN THOMPSON

AMBULANCE AWARENESS Navigating ambulance services for the rst time in the heat of an emergency can be a stressful experience. While no two people or medical situations are the same, there are several general guidelines Texans can follow to prepare themselves for an unexpected medical emergency.

Texas employs thousands of emergency medical services workers. STATEWIDE STAFF Ambulances are called once every 7 seconds on average in Texas. DID YOU KNOW?

HOWMUCHWILL IT COST?

HAVE AN EMERGENCY?

Follow the eps

Ambulance rides can range from $200-$300 to thousands of dollars depending on the services performed and distance traveled.

If someone experiences something that requires immediate medical attention, call 911.

1

Confirm cos

First responder organizations 598

EMS providers 748

• Many ambulance riders’ trips are covered by their insurance. Check insurance policies or call insurance companies to conrm coverage. • Call the local ambulance service or hospital district to conrm their costs, and start a personal relationship with the organization. • If the bill is unaordable, contact the ambulance service and work out a payment plan.

2

Answer the dispatcher’s questions, and follow his or her instructions.

67,904 EMS personnel in the state

3

Do not hang up until they do.

Emergency medical technicians 34,664

If possible, prepare the home for medical workers.

EMT-paramedics

19,876

WHENWILL THEY ARRIVE?

7,725 Licensed paramedics

Move furniture and pets away from access points. Turn on outside lights, and make sure the home address is visible. Open the front door, and have someone ready to meet emergency responders. Administer treatment such as CPR until EMS arrives.

Ambulance crews are expected to respond to calls within certain time frames based on the severity of an incident and its location. EMS teams must follow time guidance at least 90% of the time.

3,406 Advanced EMTs

2,233 Emergency care attendants

RESPONSE TIMES IN MINUTES

Priority 1 most severe

Priority 2 moderately severe

Priority 3 least severe

DID YOU KNOW?

Ambulances may not display lights and sirens when responding to calls. It does not mean the call is any more or less important.

In the ambulance

URBAN

9:59

11:59

15:59

SUBURBAN 11:59

13:59

17:59

If possible, discuss symptoms with the EMS workers. Be honest and provide all relevant information. Inform them of any relationships with local hospitals or personal treatment preferences.

RURAL

14:59

15:59

19:59

SOURCES: JOSEPH W. SCHMIDER, DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES STATE EMS DIRECTOR; JAMES CAMPBELL, MONTGOMERY COUNTY HOSPITAL DISTRICT CHIEF OF EMSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FRONTIER 16:59

18:59

22:59

Dog & Cat Boarding • Dog Training & Agi l i ty • Dog & Cat Grooming • Doggie Daycare

We Are The Right Place To Be Right Now As a company that’s served the best interests of seniors for nearly 30 years, we are no stranger to emergency management. Our commitment to the health and safety of our residents has long been paramount, and although COVID-19 is a new threat, it is by no means the first one we’ve faced head on.

Cage Free Dog Boarding

Accepting New Residents Call 832.764.7478 Today!

New Cus t ome r s On l y . No t Va l i d on Ho l i days

BOARDING or GROOMING

ConservatorySeniorLiving.com 8215 Cypresswood Drive Spring, TX 77379 Active Independent Living

O P E N 7 D A Y S A WE E K , 3 6 5 D A Y S A Y E A R Mon - Sun 7am- 7pm COME ME E T OUR DOG T RA I NE R !

11105 Mahaf fey | Tombal l , TX 77375 | 832-884-6122 | Wi l l owCreekPets.com

Prices, plans and programs are subject to change without notice. Owned and operated by Discovery Senior Living. Void where prohibited by law. ©2020, Discovery Senior Living, CCF-0110 5/20

15

SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • JUNE 2020

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32

communityimpact.com

Powered by