Chandler Edition - June 2020

CHANDLER EDITION 2020 HEALTHCARE EDITION

ONLINE AT

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 11  JUNE 25JULY 29, 2020

Telemedicine ‘here to stay’ post COVID19

Telehealth was on the rise in the United States prior to the coronavirus pandemic, according to data from studies. But the virus, and subsequent stay-at-home orders, thrust telemedicine into the spotlight for patients and doctors.

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Any amount matters. Together, we can continue to ensure our citizens stay informed and keep our local businesses thriving. Become a #CommunityPatron

HOWTELEMEDICINE WORKS

April 2020 poll of 2,201 adults found that TELEMEDICINE USE

Telemedicine can range from phone calls with doctors to video chats.

Real-time, audio-video communication that connects physicians and patients in dierent locations

Technologies that collect

Apps and wearable devices that can remotely monitor patients’ blood pressure and weight

Verbal/audio- only and virtual check-ins via patient portals, messaging technologies

had used telehealth.

images and data to be transmitted and interpreted by physicians later

23%

SOURCE: AMERICAN WELL COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMPATRON

PHYSICIAN WILLINGNESS

Telehealth adoption was rising prior to the coronavirus, but experts say the virus caused physicians to adopt the service at an even higher rate than anticipated.

PATIENT WILLINGNESS

VOTER Guide Local 2020

Not willing

According to data from American Well, 66% of Americans are willing to see a doctor via video.

Willing

Unsure

2015

2019

Americans

57%

31%

69%

20%

66% Parents with children under 18 72% Ages 45-54 72% Over 65 53%

12%

11%

SOURCE: AMERICAN WELLCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

BY THE NUMBERS

VOTER GUIDE

The adoption of telemedicine has shifted since the coronavirus began, with virtual health care interactions expected to top 1 billion this year. March telehealth visits surged 50% amid the coronavirus pandemic. The number of general medicine visits analysts expect to see in 2020, up from 36 million initially thought. 1B 50% 200M

9

2020

HEALTH

SOURCE: AMERICAN WELL COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

EDITION CARE

SOURCE: CNBCCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

said that roughly 80% of Dignity prac- tices were utilizing telemedicine com- pared to 30% before the COVID-19 outbreak. The increase in use, experts say, is tied directly to relaxations from fed- eral and state governments on what insurance is required to cover in regard to telemedicine. “I think if you talk to most of our cli- nicians and our oce practices, they have already made signicant adapta- tions to their oces and locations and how they care for their patients, and I think that will continue,” Slyter said. “We will see where it all settles out.

Right now we have, out of necessity, a signicant use of telemedicine. Some of the doctors utilizing it would prefer to see patients face-to-face because they can make a better diagnosis, so some of that will go back to in-person visits. It will balance out; we just don’t quite know yet what the future holds. But I do think a larger portion of prac- tice will be dedicated to telehealth or telemedicine visits, the oces, space, stang will adapt to that change.” When the coronavirus gripped Arizona in March, Gov. Doug Ducey signed into law an executive order that CONTINUED ON 12

Health experts say the fast-paced implementation of telehealth across all facets of medical care that took place during the coronavirus pandemic highlights the importance of telemed- icine while also exposing areas where the model needs improvement to be sustainable and scalable. According to data from the Ari- zona Medical Association, a majority of medical practices across Arizona adopted telehealth due to the corona- virus. Mark Slyter, president and CEO of Dignity Health Chandler Regional and Mercy Gilbert medical centers,

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 6 The latest on road closures EDUCATION 7 The latest school news

MARKET TEAM EDITOR Alexa D’Angelo

FROMAMY: Each June at Community Impact Newspaper , we dedicate our pages to health care topics. This year, however, it seems especially tting that we are providing you health updates during a time when businesses and individuals are still feeling the impacts of the coronavirus and policies around the virus. I hope you enjoy the pieces of information we’ve provided in this edition. Please also check regular updates on this and other topics at communityimpact.com. Amy Ellsworth, PUBLISHER

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Damien Hernandez ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Michelle Johnson METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Amy Ellsworth, aellsworth@communityimpact.com MANAGING EDITOR Krista Wadsworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across six metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMPATRON CONTACT US 610 N. Gilbert Road, Ste. 205, Gilbert, AZ 85234 • 4804824880 PRESS RELEASES chnnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher. SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

FROMALEXA: This month, we spoke with doctors across dierent disciplines in Chandler and with experts from Dignity Health and the Arizona Medical Association about what the expansion of telemedicine in Arizona—and really across the nation—will mean heading into the future. This edition also provides information on a new hospital expected to open in Chandler this winter and the content you have come to expect from us, such as Impacts, business and dining features, and real estate data. We hope you read it cover to cover and learn something new. Alexa D’Angelo, EDITOR

CITY& COUNTY The latest local news

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2020LocalVoterGuide

VOTER GUIDE

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Local candidates on August ballot

HealthCareEdition

HEALTH CARE SNAPSHOT Listings, briefs on health industry

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CHANDLER EDITION • JUNE 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

1

E. GUADALUPE RD.

10

10

101

87

2

Big Air Trampoline Park

COURTESY BIG AIR TRAMPOLINE PARK

coronavirus pandemic. The business, located at 4050 S. Alma School Road, Ste. A3, Chandler, serves soft ice cream; Italian ice; and The Gelati, which is a combination of ice cream and Italian ice. 480-782-0211. www.jeremiahsice.com 5 Park Senior Villas opened its Chan- dler location in May. The assisted-living facility boasts seven “villas” inside a secure park complete with grass, trees and park benches. The assisted-living facility also has a location in Goodyear. The Chandler location is at 4950 S. Lindsay Road. 480-802-6888. www.parkseniorvillas.com COMING SOON 6 Backyard Taco is set to open a Chan- dler location in September. The Mexican restaurant, specializing in tacos, has loca- tions in Gilbert and Mesa. The menu has tacos, quesadillas, tostadas, burritos and more—including family packs. The new location will be at 2400 S. Gilbert Road in Chandler. www.backyardtaco.com 7 Elite Athlete Management will move into the downtown Chandler New Square development, according to developer Spike Lawrence. The business oers contract negotiations, player representa- tion, product endorsement marketing and partnerships with training facilities. The management company was previously located o of Ray Road in Chandler. www.eliteathletemanagement.com 8 La Ristra—New Mexican Kitchen , a family-owned restaurant, is set to open

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CHANDLER

W. PECOS RD.

202

202

3

W. GERMANN RD.

W. BOSTON ST.

6

1

W. CHICAGO ST.

7

11

4

9

W. FRYE RD.

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MAP NOT TO SCALE N

TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 Big Air Trampoline Park , an indoor trampoline park, opened June 13 in Chandler. The indoor trampoline park was originally scheduled to open its Chandler location in March but was unable to due to the coronavirus. Because of the virus, sta are taking precautions to ensure cleanliness of the facility. The location is at 2840 S. Alma School Road in Chandler. 480-912-5454. www.bigairusa.com

2 Bisbee Breakfast Club , a breakfast and lunch restaurant, opened a second East Valley location at 940 N. 54th St., Ste. 100, Chandler, on May 28. The break- fast and lunch joint, known for homestyle breakfast and pies, took over the building that was previously home to Paradise Bakery & Cafe. 480-590-7907. www.bisbeebreakfastclub.com 3 Cryoshift Cryotherapy opened June 11 at 3755 S. Gilbert Road, Ste. 107,

Gilbert. The boutique wellness center has whole-body and local cryotherapy, NormaTec pulse recovery systems, an infrared sauna and cryo slim tone sculpt. 480-207-1435. https://gilbert.cryoshift.com 4 Jeremiah’s Italian Ice , a Flori- da-based Italian ice business, opened its rst Chandler location June 2. Initially expected in late April or early May, the opening was pushed to June due to the

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

2

6

Bisbee Breakfast Club

Backyard Taco

Fireworks will be a little dierent in Chandler this year. (Courtesy city of Chandler)

COURTESY BISBEE BREAKFAST CLUB

COURTESY BACKYARD TACO

CLOSINGS 10 Dos Gringos Cantina , a Mexican restaurant and patio bar, closed its Chandler location May 29. The restaurant was located at 1361 N. Alma School Road. A Dos Gringos location is still open in Tempe. Prior to permanently closing, the restaurant had been closed due to the coronavirus pandemic. 11 The Sleepy Whale celebrated its one- year anniversary at 290 S. Arizona Ave., Chandler, in May. The bar oers draft beer, bottled beer and wine in an open space outtted with picnic-style tables and benches. 480-758-4929. www.thesleepywhale.com https://dosgringosaz.com ANNIVERSARIES

JULY 4TH FIREWORKS SPECTACULAR Celebrate freedom, reworks and fun at Chandler’s Independence Day celebration at Tumbleweed Park. On-site parking is assigned and free. Due to the impacts of COVID-19, and to adhere to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, the event plan for the annual July 4th Fireworks Spectacular has been amended to a drive-in reworks show. There will be no concessions or activities during this year’s event. Parking lots will open at 7:30 p.m., and spectators are encouraged to arrive

early. With a limited number of spots, parking will be assigned on a rst-come, rst-served basis and will be closed once at capacity. Tumbleweed Park, 745 E. Germann Road, Chandler. www.chandleraz.com

its Chandler location later this summer. The restaurant was initially scheduled to open in the spring but was delayed due to the coronavirus. The restaurant spe- cializes in New Mexican cuisine and will open in downtown Chandler’s Overstreet development at 140 N. Arizona Ave., Chandler. 480-545-2880. http://laristraaz.com 9 Popeyes Louisiana Chicken is open- ing a new location at the southwest corner of Gilbert and Ocotillo Roads near the Frys located in that plaza. The fast- food restaurant serves various chick- en dishes, including the restaurant’s specialty chicken sandwich. It is not yet clear when the chain restaurant will open its doors. www.popeyes.com

E. GERMANN RD.

E. QUEEN CREEK RD.

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CHANDLER EDITION • JUNE 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

ONGOING PROJECTS

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO Electric scooter pilot on hold due to concerns around coronavirus no companies have expressed any

E. QUEEN CREEK RD.

BASELINE RD.

E. APPLEBY RD.

E. OCOTILLO RD.

GUADALUPE RD.

E. BROOKS FARM RD.

101

ELLIOT RD.

E. CHANDLER HEIGHTS RD.

Chandler’s scooter pilot program is on hold due to the coronavirus. The city was preparing to start its scooter program just before COVID-19 closures began. Chandler City Council approved Dec. 12 a policy that would allow the scooters in the city for a one-year pilot that would impose rules on scooter companies and limit the number of devices. “Before things started closing down, we did have a company that we were working with that was working on an application,” said Jason Cramp- ton, a senior transportation planner with the city. “Then that kind of got put on hold because they had produc- tion issues; production was impacted because of the economic impact of the virus in China. Then things started closing down here, and the program got put on hold for real. We haven’t ocially canceled the program, but

interest, and I don’t think we would be open right now with shared devices.” Crampton said he hopes the program begins when it is safe. “Hopefully one day, but not right now,” he said. SCOOTER USE SURVEY The city sent a survey to residents last year and one of the questions asked how residents would use the scooters. Use for recreation/leisure Use instead of walking/biking Use instead of personal automobile Use instead of Uber/Lyft/taxi Use instead of the bus Use to get to/from bus stops Other N/A 25% 20% 19% 11% 1% 0% 3% 21%

WARNER RD.

E. MERLOT ST.

E. RIGGS RD.

N

N

Val Vista Drive widening The town of Gilbert is widening Val Vista Drive from Appleby Road— about where Val Vista narrows to one lane in each direction—to Riggs Road. The result will be a six-lane section from Ocotillo Road to Merlot Street with a raised landscaped median, bike lanes, sidewalks and street- lights. Status: There are plans to close Val Vista from Appleby to Brooks Farm Road from May 18-July 21 while allowing mail, trash and business access. Timeline: March 2020-July 2021 Cost: $25.96 million Funding sources: bonds, town funds and Maricopa Association of Govern- ments funds

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF 61620. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT CHNNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. Status: The northbound Loop 101 was scheduled to close between Loop 202 (Santan Freeway) and Warner Road from 10 p.m. Friday, June 26, to 5 a.m. Monday, June 29. Additional closures may occur going forward. Timeline: May 2019-summer 2020 Cost: $76 million Funding sources: half-cent sales tax, federal highway funds Loop 101 widening The Arizona Department of Trans- portation is widening Loop 101 by adding a travel lane in each direction on a stretch of the freeway through Chandler, Mesa and Tempe.

SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLER COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Chandler USD

BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

NUMBER TOKNOW Chandler USD has purchased 2,800 hand sanitizer dispensers before the beginning of the 2020-21 school year, according to district officials. The district also purchased 700 cases of sanitizer and 350 stands for the district’s classrooms prior to opening for the upcoming school year. 2,800

Chandler unveils plans for 2020-21 school year

Superintendent says district will push for equity CHANDLER USD Superintendent Camille Casteel wrote a letter to students and families June 4 regarding the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, who died while in police custody. CHANDLERUSD The district is set to return to campuses July 22 for the 2020-21 school year, and the Chandler USD governing board walked through several options for students and faculty to return, including returning to in-person full-time classes, hybrid distance and in-person learning, distance learning and keeping schools closed. The presentation to the board came a little more than a week after the Arizona Department of Education released guidance to districts on returning for the upcoming school year. The guidance offers districts flexibility and allows them to select the options that best fit the needs of their student population while maintaining student and faculty health during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Craig Gilbert, the district’s assis- tant superintendent of secondary “Living the realities of COVID-19 in our country and world has been unbelievable, almost surreal,” Casteel said. “The topic is widely

debated, and it feels like we are going in circles with a multitude of facts and opinions, and yet the finish line remains elusive. And then we have watched with horror the brutal killings of unarmed black American men, most recently George Floyd. We are witnessing the protests across the world as people cry out in pain and loss.” Casteel said in the statement as the superintendent of Chandler USD, she is “horrified by these killings.” “These recent events validate the courageous decision by our Governing Board three years ago to reaffirm our long-standing core value education, and Frank Narducci, the district’s assistant superintendent of elementary education, presented the findings of the district’s re-opening and preparedness task force at the meeting June 10 with four potential paths presented in a variety of different education scenarios. The paths included: opening schools with precautions, such as increased clean- ing; opening schools with modifica- tions, such as students not attending in-person every day; continued school closure; and schools open and then a closure is called, impacting one or more schools. Narducci and Gilbert spent the most time during the meeting on the first two options—opening schools with precautions and opening schools with modifications. Parents and guardians would be allowed to select whether a child will return to school in-person or via distance learning.

Accommodations would be made for immunocompromised staff who may not be able to work or staff that may not be able to work as they care for family members. A decision was not made during the meeting on how the district will proceed when schools open July 22. PARENT SURVEY The district surveyed parents in late May on returning to school. SELECT A LEARNING MODEL FOR YOUR CHILD NEXT SCHOOL YEAR.

HIGHLIGHTS

CHANDLER USD The governing board voted unanimously June 10 to give one-time raises to full- time and part-time staff. A $600 bonus was authorized for full-time employees, and a $300 bonus was given to part-time employees. The governing board will look at the district’s budget at a meeting at the end of June. CHANDLER USD The governing board voted unanimously June 10 to purchase a more robust filter to work with the district’s firewall as the district moves toward more take-home technology. District staff determined that LightSpeed Relay for All Operating Systems, with 55,000 licenses, is the best. This product will be purchased from Public Sector, through an Omnia Partners IT Purchasing Cooperative. The one year contract for this product is $206,308.65. CHANDLER USD The board voted June 10 to approve a $6 million expenditure for the 2020-21 school year to be spent on technology. The items are, but not limited to, laptops, carts, network hardware, cameras, computers, projectors and document cameras. The district will provide a quarterly expense report to the school board. Chandler USD board July 15, 7 p.m. 1525 W. Frye Road, Chandler 480-812-7000 • www.cusd80.com MEETINGSWE COVER

Attend school in person full time

Modified program with time at school and some remote

34%

56%

10%

Learn remotely from home

SOURCE: CHANDLER USD/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

of equity. Under their direction we have prioritized time and resources to address the inequities identified in our schools,” she wrote. “We created a roadmap with actionable steps including identifying and eradicating disproportionality among black American students and all other marginalized groups in academic achievement, discipline, access to gifted programs, and a review of current curriculum through an equity lens. An advisory board with parent and community representation was formed to provide input and hold us accountable. We are unwavering in our commitment to this effort.”

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CHANDLER EDITION • JUNE 2020

CITY& COUNTY

News from the city of Chandler

QUOTEOFNOTE “CHANDLER IS

Council votes to adopt budget, addsmillions in COVID19 relief

Chandler reduces fees for city’s liquor licenses CHANDLER City Council ratied an emergency declaration May 28 to reduce liquor license renewal fees and push back their due date by three months due to the ongoing coronavi- rus pandemic and the burden it has placed on restaurants and bars. Council Member Matt Orlando was the lone dissenting vote. He said that initiative was an “honorable attempt to help small businesses” but that he would rather look at policies that help all businesses. “This is an easy way to help a lot of businesses,” Mayor Kevin Hartke said in a news release. “It’s not a lot of money for each individual business, but it adds up and will be a welcome respite for each and every one of the businesses that are impacted.” Under the COVID-19 emergency proclamation, renewal fees for all 2020 liquor licenses will be reduced by 50%. These types of fees can range from $300 to $1,000 depending on the series of liquor license to be renewed, according to the city. Addi- tionally, the due date for all liquor license renewals has been extended to Sept. 30, and no penalty will be assessed for late payment. Normally, these fees would be due June 30, according to the city. 2020 LIQUOR LICENSE FEES 50% reduction in renewal fees for 2020 liquor licenses

STRONG. CHANDLER IS DIVERSE. CHANDLER IS UNITED.” KEVIN HARTKE, CHANDLER MAYOR SAID WHEN DISCUSSING THE DEATH OF GEORGE FLOYD. CITYHIGHLIGHTS CHANDLER Council approved May 28 an agreement with Achen Gardner Construction LLC for $733,440.95 for the rehabilitation of 30 deteriorating sewer manholes within the Chandler Municipal Airport and adjacent streets. CHANDLER Council adopted May 28 a resolution to execute an agreement with the city of Maricopa Fire Department. The estimated amount the city of Maricopa will pay Chandler for training 57 reghters is $22,800. CHANDLER Council approved a resolution June 11 for the annexation of approximately 75 acres on the northeast corner of Gilbert and Brooks Farms roads for a new Chandler USD high school. CHANDLER Council approved two resolutions June 11 to annex and rezone approximately 27 acres on the southwest corner of Chandler Heights Road and 124th Street for an 86-lot single- family residential subdivision. CHANDLER Council authorized an agreement June 11 with the city of Phoenix to provide annual and new- hire exams for Chandler reghters. Chandler City Council June 25, July 13, 16 6 p.m. 88 E. Chicago St., Chandler 480-782-2181 • www.chandleraz.gov MEETINGSWE COVER

CHANDLER The Chandler City Council voted unanimously June 11 to adopt the city’s $931 million budget and the city’s capital improvement program at a regular council meeting following several months of discussion. The budget came in at $901,353,473, which represents a 2.8% decrease from the previous budget, according to city sta. But the city was thrown a curveball earlier in the week when Gov. Doug Ducey announced the city would receive $29.98 million in funding from the AZCares Fund, a fund established to allocate coronavirus

aid and relief dollars to local cities and towns based on population size. Council moved to add the $29.98 million to the budget contingency to allow for spending bringing the budget total to $931,336,929.

BUDGET FOR FY 202021

AZCares Fund

City budget

$29.98M

$901.35M

Total: $931.33M

SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLER COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Dozens gather in Chandler to protest after George Floyd’s deathwhile in police custody

CHANDLER Dozens of protesters gathered in downtown Chandler on June 5 to peacefully protest the death of George Floyd. A series of peaceful protests had occurred throughout the weeks of June 1 and June 8 in Chandler in response to Floyd’s death. On May 25, Floyd died in Minne- apolis while in police custody. In response, protests erupted across the country and the Chandler mayor and Chandler Police chief released statements rearming the city’s commitment to all its resi- dents and engaged in conversation with local leaders and protesters.

Protesters gathered in Chandler June 5.

Liquor license renewals have been extended to

SEPT. 30

The Chandler protests remained peaceful.

SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLER COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CANDIDATE Q&A

2020 Local Voter Guide

Get to know the candidates running in local May elections August elections

WHERE TO VOTE Maricopa County voters can choose any voting location and time that works for them. Voters can visit www.locations.maricopa.vote to nd a nearby location. County voters can request a one-time ballot to be sent by mail for the Aug. 4 primary election and Nov. 3 general election at www.request.maricopa.vote.

JULY 6 Voter registration deadline JULY 8 Ballots mailed; in-person voting begins

Incumbent

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

JULY 29 Last day to mail back ballot AUG. 4 Primary, city council election

Chandler City Council (pick three candidates for three open seats)

Occupation: business owner/recruiter—Recruiting Connection LLC Relevant experience: small- business owner, Kyrene Governing Board member 2010- 2014, co-chair for YSOS-PAC supporting the Tempe Union High School District bond/override elections in 2015 and 2017 Website: www.beth4ccc.com BETH BRIZEL

OD HARRIS

CHRISTINE ELLIS

Occupation: serving as a Proctor for CNA, Managers, D&S Diversied Technology Regional Manager and Broadcaster at the Holy Spirit Network Relevant experience: wife, Mother, Grand Mother, Pastor,

Occupation: accountant/ entrepreneur Relevant experience: Scaled 35 accounting rms in 7 states, selling to a major competitor. Founded a Presidentially awarded nonprot, Ready Set

CEO 19 ALH, BSN, RN 30 years community Health, Adjunct Instructor MCC, Bridge Foundation FCS,

Go, impacting 1000s of entrepreneurs. Phoenix Business Journal 40 under 40. I sit on several local & national boards giving millions to nonprots. US Army Veteran. Master's degree in accounting. Website: www.odharrisforaz.com

Haitian Disaster Relief, For Our City. Website: www.christine2020.com

WHAT MAKES YOU QUALIFIED FOR THE ROLE OF CHANDLER CITY COUNCIL MEMBER?

I have lived in West Chandler for 25 years and have always been involved in my Community. I was elected to the Kyrene Governing Board in 2010 and served for four years. I was a co-chair for the TUHSD PAC that supported their bond and override elections in 2015 and 2017. I have owned my own company since 2002 and understand the stress small-business owners are under at this time. My 18 years as a small-business owner and 25 years of community involvement makes me uniquely qualied for a seat on the Chandler City Council.

My heart is in this city where my family has lived for 33 years, worked and where we raised our son and daughter. I have been active in the community as a volunteer and participant in service projects and with charitable organizations such as For Our City, helping people of Chandler. I lead by example, listen carefully and research topics and issues prior to decision making. I organize my time so that I am available to people who need my help and those who will have an impact on our city.

I have a wealth of experience as a successful business owner and entrepreneur. As an accountant, I am scally conservative by the nature of my trade. This translates to me saving the city money during the budget process and having a deeper understanding of budget issues. I have also had a presidentially awarded nonprot award by George Bush Sr., Ready Set Go, whose sole purpose is to educate and facilitate underserved communities, women and veterans on how start a business. Furthermore, my depth of experiences, which include an Army veteran, pastor and the numerous boards that I sit on, prove my ability to work with others.

RICK HEUMANN

Occupation: Chandler City Councilmember, City of Chandler, 2018-Present and Owner/Financial Advisor, FORM Prosperity Wealth Advisors, LLC 2011-Present Relevant experience: JEREMY MCCLYMONDS

MARK STEWART

Occupation: VP of sales CMA- Manufacturers Representative Group Relevant experience: Chandler City Council 2009-2016— termed out, Chandler Planning and Zoning Commission 2000-

Occupation: owner of Concept2Completion, Modern Marketing of the Digital Age Relevant experience: husband, father, small-business owner, and current Chandler City Council member Website: www.stewart4chandler.com

07, 2017-current—current chair, co-chair Chandler bond election—$450 million without raising taxes, extensive board experience with Chandler nonprots Website: www.rick4chandlercouncil.com

Husband, Father, Financial Advisor, Chandler City Councilmember, Compadre, Kiwanian, Past Chairman of the Chandler Chamber and Vote Yes on Prop 493 for our General Plan. Website: www.keepjeremy.com

WHAT MAKES YOU QUALIFIED FOR THE ROLE OF CHANDLER CITY COUNCIL MEMBER?

My qualications of being involved in Chandler for over 25 years include serving on Planning and Zoning, City Council, and many other community involvements. This makes me the candidate with what counts most right now, experience. My decision-making ability, involving large scale budgets and policy making, was a major part of what I spent my time on when previously on the council. My work in dealing with the Great Recession, water issues, and education, give me the experience necessary as we work our way through these challenging times.

I have committed over a decade of service to our community. In addition to currently serving on Chandler City Council, I have served on the Boards for my HOA, Chandler Compadres, Kiwanis CYP, Chandler Chamber of Commerce (past Board Chair), City of Chandler Parks and Recreation and Chairman of Vote YES on Prop 493 for our General Plan. I built experience with each endeavor, but more importantly a deeper understanding of the needs and wants of all those that call Chandler home.

America desperately needs regular people serving everywhere in government. I believe in servant leadership and government that serves the people. Since my election in 2016, I have committed to leaning on our community when making my decisions. Chandler is facing new opportunities. We have an incredible opportunity to create new lines of communication and embrace our diverse culture and people. Chandler is poised to nancially recover quickly because we have good infrastructure, excellent public safety, incredible schools and sound nancial policy. I am dedicated to the shared vision for Chandler’s bright future! I am grateful for the opportunity to serve.

Some answers have been edited for length. Read full Q&As and get more primary election information at communityimpact.com .

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CHANDLER EDITION • JUNE 2020

HOSPITALS

Information on local hospitals in Chandler

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3050 S. Dobson Road, Chandler 480-284-5867 www.phoenixerhospital.com Urgent Care 5 Banner Urgent Care 2950 S. Alma School Road, Ste. 1, Chandler 480-827-5690 https://urgentcare.bannerhealth.com 6 Chandler Valley Urgent Care Clinic 936 W. Chandler Blvd., Ste. 1, Chandler 480-792-1025 www.chandlerurgentcare.com 7 FastMed Urgent Care 2875 W. Ray Road, Ste. 8, Chandler 480-899-3070 www.fastmed.com 8 FastMed Urgent Care 3075 S. Arizona Ave., Ste. 1, Chandler 480-214-7828 www.fastmed.com 9 NextCare Urgent Care 600 S. Dobson Road, Ste. C-26, Chandler 480-814-1560 www.nextcare.com 10 NextCare Urgent Care, Ocotillo 1155 W. Ocotillo Road, Ste. 4, Chandler 480-374-7400 www.nextcare.com

ADALUPE RD.

Hospitals 1 Chandler Regional Medical Center 1955 W. Frye Road, Chandler 480-728-3000 www.dignityhealth.org The hospital opened in 1961 and now has 338 acute care beds, 2,639 employees and 1,043 physicians. The hospital has a Level I trauma center and 24-hour emergency room. A new five-story medical tower is under construction at the hospital. The expansion will add 96 inpatient beds and about 200 jobs. 2 Dignity Health Arizona Specialty Hospital 2905 W. Warner Road, Ste. 1, Chandler 480-603-9000 www.dignityhealth.org The hospital is a surgical center specializing in bariatric, orthopedic, podiatry and other general services. Free-standing ER 3 Dignity Health Arizona General ER 2977 E. Germann Road, Chandler 480-732-7540 www.dignityhealth.org

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10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Health Care Edition 2020

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO Banner OcotilloMedical Center to open in Chandler inNovember said—midwifery.

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Banner Ocotillo Medical Center, Chandler’s newest hospital, is scheduled to open Nov. 2, said the hospital’s Chief Operating Officer Nate Shinagawa. Shinagawa said the hospital will open with 120 beds, and officials expect to hire 250 staff to start. “We hope that it is going to be a great place to practice medicine, a great place to work and for patients to receive the best care,” Shinagawa said. The hospital will have an emer- gency room with 14 bays with the ability to expand to 28 if needed, Shinagawa said. Banner Ocotillo Medical Center will offer cardiac and stroke care, a labor and delivery wing, a surgical unit and gastrointes- tinal services. The labor and delivery unit will also offer something not many other Valley hospitals do, Shinagawa

“Our labor and delivery program is really going to be about supporting not only traditional delivery meth- ods, but also a midwifery focus, too,” he said. The hospital is also outfitted with the latest technology in medicine, including the top-of-the-line surgical robot that allows surgeons to conduct surgery and leaves patients with a shorter recovery time. The technology does not stop there, though. Shinagawa said the operating rooms are set to turn on ultraviolet lights on when no one is in the room to disinfect the room and reduce the risk of infections. “We’ll have hand hygiene-mon- itoring systems in every room that will make sure when doctors and nurses go in the room—it tracks if they use disinfectant,” he said. “This has been known to drastically reduce infection rates.”

Banner Ocotillo Medical Center will open with 120 beds. (Alexa D’Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

have 450 employees on staff. “It’s really exciting with 250 employees; we have tremendous interest in the facility; we’ve had thousands reach out and well over 1,000 applications,” Shinagawa said. “So we hope to be able to hire not only experienced staff but staff that are exceptional at patient care. We want our culture from the beginning to be as soon as people walk into the hospital they feel connection, warmth and follow through with the employees and medical team. Once they experience it, they are going to choose us over anybody else.”

Shinagawa said the hospital also invested in phones for the medical staff. The phones will allow doctors and nurses to check patient identi- fication, prescription identification and communicate with each other and social workers on a secure platform. “The beauty of when you have something you are starting out from the beginning is you are able to implement technology and initia- tives from day one,” Shinagawa said. Shinagawa said additionally the hospital is preparing for future expansion and hopes to eventually

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11

CHANDLER EDITION • JUNE 2020

CONTINUED FROM 1

EXPANSION OF TELEMEDICINE

COMPILED BY ALEXA D'ANGELO AND TOM BLODGETT DESIGNED BY DAMIEN HERNANDEZ

In a survey of 4,000 adults by American Well, a majority of were interested in video visits.

FUTUREOF VIDEO VISITS

The coverage of telemedicine was expanded under an executive order from Gov. Doug Ducey and in similar orders from the federal government due to COVID-19, but the use of telemedicine across the medical eld was already becoming more popular prior to the pandemic.

CONSUMER INTEREST IN SEEING PRIMARY CARE DOCTOR OVER VIDEO

Goldberg said. “It’s got to be worth- while to maintain for a practice and make sure a practice stays successful from a nancial standpoint and keeps the convenience for patients.” Dr. Philemon Spencer, owner of Piñon Family Medicine in Chandler, said the executive order related to insurance coverage was the change the industry needed to adopt telemedicine more broadly across practices. “More often, telemedicine had been oered as a service of your insurance,” Spencer said. “They have a program with access to telemedicine. But if you wanted to have a telemedicine visit before now, you weren’t talking to your regular doctor. Most of the pri- mary doctor oces weren’t oering that service.” Pros and cons of telehealth Throughout the pandemic, tele- health has been used in practices ranging from family medicine and emergency care to dermatology and counseling services. Goldberg said that all kinds of prac- tices can nd an innovative way to use telemedicine. He said the practice can be used even in surgery to operate OF THOSE WILLING TO HAVE VIDEO VISITS, THEY WANT THEM FOR: Prescription rells 78% 50% 60% 52% Birth control Chronic care management Hospital follow-up care

Somewhat interested Very interested Not very interested Not at all interested

EXECUTIVE ORDER

17%

The Governor's Executive Order is aimed at protecting Arizonans and high-risk populations. The order provides the following: Requires insurance companies and health plans to cover out of network providers, including out of plan laboratories and telemedicine providers. Waives all copays, coinsurance, and deductibles for consumers related to COVID-19 diagnostic testing and decrease co-pays for telemedicine visits. Implements consumer protections, including prohibiting price-gouging on COVID-19 diagnosis and treatment-related services. Requires symptom checks of healthcare workers and visitors at skilled nursing facilities, nursing homes, and assisted living facilities.

44%

18%

21%

as using Zoom or Facetime to talk to patients—that doctors need to try and use the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, or HIPAA, -compliant platforms. Privacy for patients and patients’ rights must also be adhered to in a telemedicine appointment, Goldberg said. He said with the expansion of tele- medicine, medical practices, urgent cares and even hospitals may look dif- ferent moving forward. “All a patient sees is the visit; they don’t see the technology and infra- structure on the practitioner’s end,” Goldberg said. “There is a lot more behind the scenes that occurs before the appointment. We need to show people that make decisions about tele- medicine—like insurance carriers and state and federal governments—the behind-the-scenes so we are compen- sated a fair value for the time, money and infrastructure.” Goldberg said he thinks telemed- icine is “vitally important” and that it is here to stay, but questions still remain about how physicians will be reimbursed. “We need to change the model for how physicians get reimbursed,” SOURCE: AMERICAN WELLCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: GOVERNOR DOUG DUCEY’S OFFICECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

expanded the insurance coverage of telemedicine visits. “The executive order kicked in and made insurance treat every visit the same, whether it’s virtual or face-to- face, and because of that, it helped push doctors to use it,” AMA President Dr. Ross Goldberg said. “We are in talks with insurers to see what we can do when the executive order and the emergency declaration end to gure out what telemedicine looks like mov- ing forward.” According to data from a National Tracking Poll that surveyed 2,201 peo- ple in April, 23% of respondents said they utilized telemedicine—either a phone call or video chat—since the beginning of the coronavirus-related closures and stay-at-home orders. “I don’t think patients would allow [telemedicine] to go away, honestly,” Goldberg said. “I think it’s a conve- nient factor. In our society we like con- venience places like Amazon, and it’s why those businesses are so success- ful. If people can have a primary care

appointment over video chat, why wouldn’t they want to pursue that?” Adapting telehealth for the future Goldberg, a surgeon at a county-run hospital, said that telemedicine is here to stay but acknowledged that there are facets of the model that still need to be worked out. “Those conversations are happen- ing,” Goldberg said. “Patients really like telemedicine visits. I work at a public hospital. For our patients it is a big deal for them to take a day o, but with telemedicine they can take a lunch break and call and have an appointment without missing work. It’s a convenience to companies, too. Not everything can be done over the phone or video, but I think it is here to stay because people like it and they don’t have to travel and can call from home. What we don’t know is what it is going to look like in the future and what is going to be reimbursed for sig- nicant infrastructure changes.” Goldberg said it is not as simple

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