Alpharetta - Milton Edition - June 2020

ALPHARETTA MILTON EDITION 2020 HEALTHCARE EDITION VOLUME XX, ISSUE XX  XXXXXXXXXX, 2020

ONLINE AT

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 4  JUNE 18JULY 22, 2020

The unseen tolls of COVID19

IMPACTS

4

Maddy Reinert, the program manager of population health for nonprot Mental Health America, said MHA oers nine free, online screenings for mental illnesses, including depression, anxiety, post traumatic stress disorder and addiction tests—and from January to May, the number of people in Georgia taking any of the nine screenings increased 426%.

Daily anxiety screenings increased by 370% from January to May nationwide.

4,000

Daily depression screenings nationwide increased by 394% from January to May.

Depression screenings Anxiety screenings

3,000

CITY & COUNTY

8

The number of Georgians taking any of the screenings increased by 426% from January to May.

2,000

2020

HEALTH

1,000

EDITION CARE

0

SOURCE: MENTAL HEALTH AMERICACOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

January February March

April

May

Local professionals seeing ‘amounting health crisis’ since pandemic hit inMarch Mental health experts see surge in demand due to COVID19

HEALTHCARE SNAPSHOT

9

SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

BY KARA MCINTYRE

2,620 in May—a 426% increase. The nine free, online screenings MHA offers include depression, anxiety, eating disorders, post traumatic stress disorder, addiction and other mental health disorder tests. “What we’re seeing really is a mounting health crisis,” said Maddy Reinert, the programmanager of pop- ulation health for MHA. As mental health issues rise, sub- stance abuse issues have also risen— and with bars closed and restaurants suspending eat-in dining, take-home alcohol sales statewide went up. According to numbers released by the Georgia Department of Revenue on May 6, the state collected $18.42

million in alcohol taxes in April, an increase of 12.95% from April 2019. Lynda Micheletti, the chief oper- ating ocer at Sunrise Detox, an Alpharetta alcohol and drug detox center, said she has seen an uptick in demand for both mental health and substance abuse resources since the pandemic hit, which she said can go hand-in-hand. “Behavioral health issues like men- tal illness and substance abuse have ties to each other,” Micheletti said. “Oftentimes people with mental illnesses like anxiety or depression will turn to substances to self-medi- cate or cope.” CONTINUED ON 14

Public health measures taken to slow the spread of COVID-19—such as business and school closures, shelter- in-place orders and social distancing protocols—have created a hidden ght for some residents of Alpharetta, Milton and nationwide: a battle with mental health and substance abuse. According to data from Mental Health America, a nonproit dedi- cated to spreading awareness about overall mental health and address- ing the needs of those living with mental illness, the number of Geor- gians taking any of the nine mental health screenings offered via MHA increased from 498 in January to

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Any amount matters. Together, we can continue to ensure our citizens stay informed and keep our local businesses thriving. Become a #CommunityPatron

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMPATRON

Dr. Aaron Larsen is proud to introduce two new Associates at the Alpharetta Smiles and Sun Valley Smiles locations!

Dr. Fadler and Dr. Bishop met during their first year of dental school and they were married shortly after graduation. Following dental school, Dr. Fadler & Dr. Bishop practiced dentistry together in LaGrange, GA. The doctors regularly attend continuing education courses to keep abreast of the latest techniques and technologies. They enjoy volunteering their time and dental services to organizations dedicated to helping the underprivileged. In their free time, they enjoy spending time with family and friends, lifting weights, traveling and visiting AZA-accredited zoos and aquariums.

DR. BISHOP Gary Tyrone Bishop, DMD was born and raised in the mountains of North East Georgia. He obtained his bachelor’s degree in biology/minor in chemistry with cum laude honors from North Georgia University. Prior to attending dental school, Dr. Bishop obtained a master’s degree in secondary education from Brenau University. Dr. Bishop strives to stay current on the latest advances in evidence-based dentistry/medicine. His special interests are in oral surgery, implantology, bone grafting, root canals, full mouth rehabilitation, and IV sedation.

DR. FADLER Kathleen R. Fadler, DMD is a native of Alpharetta, GA and a graduate of Milton High School. Dr. Fadler graduated with magna cum laude honors from Georgia College and State University in Milledgeville with a Bachelor of Science in biology/minor in French. In dental school, Dr. Fadler was involved in the American Student Dental Association and the Georgia Dental Association student chapter. While studying, she completed a 2-year fellowship and is a fellow of the American Dental Educators Association.

As the newest associate dentist at Alpharetta Smiles, Dr. Bishop looks to the future with high optimism as he meets new patients and creates beautiful smiles in Milton.

Dr. Fadler is excited to be joining Dr. Larsen as an associate and the resident dentist at Sun Valley Smiles. Dr. Fadler is happy to be coming home to her Alpharetta roots and to serve her lifelong friends and neighbors.

NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS AT ALL 3 AREA LOCATIONS

GRAND OPENING

7000 Peachtree Dunwoody Rd NE Lakeridge 400 Bldg. 2 Sandy Springs, GA 30328 (770) 828-0000 atlanta-smiles.com

555 Sun Valley Dr. Suite #C-3 Roswell, GA. 30076 (770) 643-9499 sunvalley-smiles.com

5665 Atlanta Hwy Suite #107 Alpharetta, GA. 30004 (770) 521-0026 alpharetta-smiles.com

2

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

4

Now Open, Coming Soon &more TODO LIST

FROMALLISON: As our communities begin to reopen, many of us are reecting on the changes we’ve experienced over the past few months. In this issue of Community Impact Newspaper , you will read about the toll the pandemic has taken on some residents’ mental health as part of our annual Health Care Edition coverage (see Pages 9-15). You will also nd our monthly coverage of city government, transportation, and business and dining proles. Wishing you all the best! Allison Altobelli, PUBLISHER

6

MARKET TEAM EDITOR Kara McIntyre ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Timothy Anderson METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Allison Altobelli, aaltobelli@communityimpact.com MANAGING EDITOR Krista Wadsworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Lanane CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across six metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON

Local event cancellations, postponements

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 7 Charlotte Drive extension, Kimball Bridge Road and more

HealthCareEdition

HEALTH CARE SNAPSHOT Local health care data CLINICS & ER LISTINGS Area clinics and emergency rooms

9

FROMKARA: Our annual Health Care Edition front-page story takes a look at the stigmas behind mental health and how we can address the needs of our communities. Mental illnesses do not discriminate—no matter your race, geographic location, income level or age, you can experience mental illness. If you or a loved one is in need of help, please check our list of resources (see Pages 14-15). You are not alone. Kara McIntyre, EDITOR

13

BUSINESS FEATURE

16

Painted Horse Winery & Vineyards

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

13

3

11

1

Local sources

New businesses

Community events

Peaceful protest

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact

SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

Newspaper’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens

Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

Our local teams tailor campaigns for all business sizes and industries wanting to reach their customer base and accomplish their nancial goals. Our products ADVERTISEWITHUS

DINING FEATURE

17

Chiringa

stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMPATRON CONTACT US 308 Maxwell Road, Ste. 200 Alpharetta, GA 30009 • 4044189444 communityimpact.com PRESS RELEASES alpnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

REAL ESTATE

19

Residential market data IMPACT DEALS

20

Local coupons

include newspaper ads; mailbox-targeted sticky notes, inserts and direct mail; and digital options. We also partner with Community Impact Printing for nationwide specialty orders. Our advertising clients self- report 97% satisfaction with their overall experience, and a recent third-party Readex survey proved 78% of paper recipients read three of the last four editions, and from what they read 83% "took action" of some kind. Contact us today for more info! communityimpact.com/advertising

DAILY INBOX

Sign up for our daily newsletter to receive the latest headlines direct to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter

CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE All content in this print publication, both editorial and advertisements, was up- to-date as of the press deadline. Due to the fast-changing nature of this event, editorial and advertising information may have changed. Please visit communityimpact.com and advertiser websites for more information.

Proudly printed by

communityimpact.com

@impactnews_ALP

facebook.com/impactnewsALP

SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM Become a #CommunityPatron Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Any amount matters. Together, we can continue to ensure our citizens stay informed and keep our local businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM/PATRON

3

ALPHARETTA  MILTON EDITION • JUNE 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

1

MILTON

3

9

19

140

6

2

Crumbl Cookies

COURTESY CRUMBL COOKIES

ALPHARETTA

21 for youth with disabilities can receive free meals every week from the Fulton County Schools Nutrition Program’s Summer FoodStop sites, according to a news release from FCS May 29. “The Fulton County Schools Nutrition Program recognizes the important role school meals play in combating childhood hunger,” said Alyssia Wright, executive director of the FCS Nutrition Program, in the release. “For many families, schools are the one place their children can get a nutritious meal. Our FoodStop drive-thrus allow communities to continue feeding children when school is not in session.” Beginning June 3, meals will be passed out in drive-thru fashion each Wednesday from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. at 22 distribution sites throughout the district, eight of which are in North Fulton. Each food package contains 10 meals—five breakfasts and five lunches—to feed students until the next meal package, the release said. FoodStop locations include: Abbotts Hill, Asa Hilliard, Brookview, Col- lege Park, Hamilton E. Holmes, Hembree Springs, A Ison Springs, B Esther Jack- son, C Lake Forest, Hapeville, Liberty Point, D Mimosa and E Vickery Mill elementary schools; F Haynes Bridge, G Holcomb Bridge, McNair and H San- dy Springs middle schools; and Banneker, Creekside, Langston Hughes, Tri-Cities and Westlake high schools. To maximize social distancing, drivers should not leave their vehicles, but walk-

B R O

1

120

92

5

4F

4D

ROSWELL

4E

WARSAW RD.

4B

120

140

PRIDE PL.

NESBIT FERRY RD.

M

MARTIN RD.

4G

4H

SANDY SPRINGS CIR.

4C

9

400

4A

285

ISON RD.

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 Gourmet cookie shop Crumbl Cookies opened May 28 at 4190 Old Milton Parkway, Ste. 2L, Alpharetta. Delivery and drive-thru services are offered as well as limited lobby capacity. Crumbl offers chocolate chip and sugar cookies every week of the year, in addition to four specialty flavors that change each week. 470-281-9209. www.crumblcookies.com 2 The Hemp Farmacy , located at 5250 Windward Parkway, Ste. 116, Alpharetta,

opened May 15. The CBD, or cannabidiol, shop offers a variety of CBD products, in- cluding tinctures, topicals, capsules, vape cartridges and pens, and hemp flower as well as CBD products for pets. 770-676-0853. www.hempfarmacy.us COMING SOON 3 Christian Brothers Automotive is expected to open a new location near The Village at Crooked Creek shopping center, located at the 6200 block of Hwy. 9 in Alpharetta in the fourth quarter of 2020

or the first quarter of 2021, according to a May 18 news release from Christian Brothers Automotive. Construction on the facility is anticipated to begin this summer. Christian Brothers offers auto maintenance and repair services for air conditioning, air filtration, tire alignment, oil and filter changes, inspections and emissions, brakes and other vehicle needs. www.cbac.com SCHOOL NOTES 4 While schools are closed this sum- mer, children under age 18 or under age

ups are allowed. CLOSINGS

5 The Alpharetta location of Pier 1 Imports will close permanently after it

WE PAY YOU FOR QUALITY NEW & USED GEAR! CLEAN OUT YOUR CLOSETS & VISIT US TODAY

Fitness Equipment • Golf • Water Sports Bikes • Baseball • Tennis & More!

PLAYITAGAINSPORTSROSWELL.COM 993 MANSELL RD. ROSWELL, GA | 770-642-4880

Newly Renovated, Sanitized and Enforced Social Distancing At All Times

4

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY KARA MCINTYRE

3

Christian Brothers Automotive

COURTESY CHRISTIAN BROTHERS AUTOMOTIVE

sells off its remaining inventory start- ing on an unknown date at 6551 North Point Parkway, Alpharetta. The store had closed due to the outbreak of COVID-19, but has since reopened for the liquidation process. Pier 1 confirmed May 19 that the company is preparing to go out of business “as soon as reasonably possible” after failing to secure a buyer that would have allowed it to continue operating. Pier 1 filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in February. 678-297-2998. www.pier1.com 6 Del Taco management announced in an email to customers in late March that the restaurant—located at 12996 Alpharetta Highway, Milton—had perma- nently closed after being open in Milton since March 2016. The location has been removed from the restaurant chain’s list of locations on its website. www.deltaco.com

Zagster notified the city of Alpharetta on May 27 that the company would be ending its bike share service with the city effective May 29. (Kara McIntyre/Community Impact Newspaper)

FEATURED IMPACT IN THE NEWS Alpharetta city officials were notified late in the day May 27 that Zagster would end its bikeshare service with the city effective May 29. The company began removing bikes and rental stations May 28, and all equipment will be removed by June 12, according to a news release from the city May 28. The city has partnered with Zagster since May 2016 to provide and manage the community’s bikeshare program.

The program initially began with 12 bikes and three rental stations along Alpharetta’s section of the Big Creek Greenway; it later expanded to include downtown Alpharetta and Avalon, the release said. The city of Alpharetta had also partnered with the city of Roswell, which also worked with Zagster, to connect the two cities’ bikeshare programs so users could move between each city’s program. “This is an unfortunate situation, as the bike share program has been very popular in Alpharetta, and Zagster has, until now, been an excellent partner,” Alpharetta Assistant City Administrator James Drinkard said in the release.

“The program was growing, so we are confident that another vendor will seize on this opportunity to work with us.” Drinkard also said in the release that city staff is working to find a new partner to continue to offer a bikeshare program to residents and visitors. According to the release, a statement issued by Zagster cites its withdrawal from the Alpharetta market is due to negative impacts on its business from the COVID-19 pandemic. The release also said other communities in metro Atlanta have received similar notices from Zagster.

10% OFF All regular priced items you can fit in your bucket. Free bucket included. Must present coupon. Exclusions may apply.

PUBLIX

11770 Haynes Bridge Rd. Alpharetta, GA 30009 770-299-8225 www.urbanhardware.com

N

5

ALPHARETTA - MILTON EDITION • JUNE 2020

TODO LIST

Community events

COMPILED BY KARA MCINTYRE

Over the past several weeks, many events in Alpharetta, Milton and the Greater Atlanta area have been canceled or postponed as residents were under shelter-in-place orders from local and state ocials. However, as businesses begin to reopen in the area, some events are being rescheduled toward the end of the year. While all event dates were accurate as of press time, they are subject to change as state and local leaders make decisions regarding when and how events can be held. This list is not comprehensive.

POSTPONED EVENTS The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation postponed the annual Shamrockin’ for a Cure fundraising event, which was scheduled for March 21 at the Ameris Bank Amphitheatre in Alpharetta. The event, now called Shamrocktoberfest, will take The Alpharetta Farmers Market canceled its 2020 season kicko April 4; however, despite not being open in the traditional format, organizers restructured the farmers market to create a temporary mini market held each Saturday from 9 a.m.-noon in the parking lot of Urban Hardware, located at 11770 Haynes Bridge Road, Ste. 501, Alpharetta. About 20 vendors can set up at the mini market, as opposed to the 98 vendors initially planned for the traditional farmers market setup. 404-660-4403. www.alpharettafarmersmarket.com The inaugural Alpharetta Wine Festival was scheduled for June 14 in downtown Alpharetta, but event organizers place Oct. 24. 404-733-5010. www.shamrockinforacure.com postponed it until further notice. The event will feature wine tastings with more than 75 wines from around the world provided by participating local restaurants and businesses. A new date was still to be announced as of press time June 9. 678-701-6114. www.alpharettawinefestival.com The Drake House’s second annual Tappin’ Out Homelessness fundraising event, slated for March 14 at Truck & Tap in downtown Alpharetta, was postponed due to the pandemic, event organizers announced in mid-March. The Drake House is a nonprot organization located in Roswell that provides emergency housing for single homeless women with children in north metro Atlanta. A new event date was not announced as of press time June 9. www.thedrakehouse.org

STILL PLANNED The eighth annual Crabapple Fest was still slated to take place from 10 a.m.- 5 p.m. on Oct. 3 along Crabapple Road in downtown Milton as of press time June 9. The art and antique festival, put on by the city of Milton and the Crabapple Community Association, is expected to include a variety of foods, vendors, music, family-friendly activities and football, said Anita Jupin, the special events coordinator for the city of Milton. 678-242-2603. www.cityofmiltonga.us The city of Milton’s annual Meet Me in Milton block party series has had three of its block parties canceled—the 2020 kicko April 18, the second party slated for May 16 and the third block party scheduled for June 20—but the remaining events, which take place on the third Saturday of each month, are still scheduled throughout the year. The next event is expected to take place July 18 with event activities and details still to be announced as of press time June 9, but could include a cornhole tournament. https://meetmeinmilton.com CANCELED EVENTS The 26th year of the Fulton Golden Games —a monthlong athletic event for seniors hosted and run jointly by the cities of Alpharetta, Milton, Johns Creek, Roswell and Sandy Springs as well as Fulton County—was canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic. The games were slated to run April 29-May 27, but are expected to take place again next year. 678-242-2500. www.cityofmiltonga.us Olde Blind Dog Irish Pub’s 12th annual St. Patrick’s Day party and the St. Baldrick’s Foundation’s head-shaving fundraising event—held in conjunction with the St. Patrick’s Day party—scheduled for March 14 were both canceled. Geo Kokoszka, director of operations for Olde Blind Dog

Irish Pub, said it still plans to hold the annual event next year. 678-624-1090. www.oldeblinddog.com City ocials announced March 20 that the 30th annual Taste of Alpharetta , which was scheduled for May 7, was canceled due to the pandemic. The city had about 45 vendors conrmed for the TOA and planned for almost 80 vendors in total at the citywide event as well as more than 50,000 attendees. However, event organizers said they are looking forward to the TOA next year, which is slated for May 6, 2021. 678-297-6048. www.alpharetta.ga.us REGIONAL EVENTS The AJC Peachtree Road Race , an annual event in the Greater Atlanta area since 1970 and hosted by the Atlanta Track Club, has been postponed from July 4 to Nov. 26—Thanksgiving Day—event organizers announced May 1. This is the rst time in the event’s history that it will not be held on the Fourth of July. The more than 45,000 current registrants can complete the race as usual or virtually, move their entry to 2021 at no charge, transfer to a new participant, donate their registration fee to the Atlanta Track Club’s community initiatives or receive a refund. Registration will reopen again Aug. 31- Sept. 6 for club members and Sept. 7-13 for nonmembers. 404-231-9064. www.atlantatrackclub.org Event organizers for the Atlanta Food & Wine Festival announced March 18 that the festival’s 10th season would be postponed from May 28-31 to later this summer. The event highlights food and beverage traditions from a variety of southern regions, both in the U.S. and around the globe, all across Midtown Atlanta. As of press time June 9, an ocial date had yet to be announced. 404-474-7330. www.atlfoodandwinefestival.com

The Ameris Bank Amphitheatre is located in Alpharetta. (Courtesy Alpharetta Convention & Visitors Bureau) LIVEMUSIC AMERIS BANK AMPHITHEATRE 2200 Encore Parkway, Alpharetta 404-733-5010 Several concerts have been canceled or rescheduled due to the coronavirus pandemic. All dates were accurate as of press time June 9, but for the most up-to-date status of events, visit www.livenation.com/eventstatus. CANCELED EVENTS JUNE 18 Knotfest Roadshow: Slipknot, A Day to Remember, Underoath and Code Orange 19 Brad Paisley JULY 03 Bob Dylan and Nathaniel Ratli & the Night Sweats 26 Lady Antebellum NEWEVENT DATES JUNE 21 Styx with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra OCTOBER 10 Sam Hunt APRIL 2021 30 Maren Morris JULY 2021 27 Dave Matthews Band

Find more or submit Alpharetta and Milton events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

ALPHARETTA ARTS CENTER Officially reopened to offer you a vibrant summer of creating! REGISTER NOW Summer Camps & Classes newly designed for an Art Environment with CDC Safety Guidelines. Register at: www.alpharetta.ga.us/arts VISIT OUR GALLERY Current exhibit Best in Show . Featuring artwork by Instructors & Students with all original work for sale! JOIN Local Art Leader Groups to collaborate with other creative minds: www.artsalpharetta.org

238 Canton St. Alpharetta, GA. 30009 | (678) 297-6135 Email us: arts@alpharetta.ga.us

6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY KARA MCINTYRE

ONGOING PROJECTS

NORTH POINT PKWY.

WATERS RD.

N

Kimball Bridge Road improvements This project extends the eastbound right-turn lane on Kimball Bridge Road at Waters Road back to North Point Parkway as well as extends the west- bound right-turn lane from Kimball Bridge to North Point. As part of an in- tergovernmental agreement between the city of Alpharetta and Fulton Coun- ty, the county began installing water lines for the project in mid-May. Timeline: February 2020-third quarter 2021 Cost: $15.7 million Funding source : 2016 Alpharetta parks and transportation bond

The extension of Charlotte Drive, also referred to as the Northeast Crabapple Connector or the extension of Heritage Walk, was completed May 15. The city of Milton project has been underway since February 2019. (Kara McIntyre/Community Impact Newspaper)

Milton’s downtown connector nowcompleted Construction on the extension of Charlotte Drive, also known as the Northeast Crabapple Connector, is now complete, according to a news release from the city of Milton on May 15. The $2.3 million road is now tentatively being referred to as a Birmingham Highway, and the other at the cross between Mayeld Road and Charlotte Drive, the release said. The roundabout at Mayeld and Charlotte is undergoing nishing touches. “This is a major milestone for

BIRMINGHAM HWY.

O A D W

N

RECENTLY COMPLETED completion date was pushed from May to August due to weather, utility relo- cations and the COVID-19 pandemic. Timeline : July 2019-August 2020 Cost : $3.23 million (total) Funding source : TSPLOST funds Bethany Road roundabouts Two roundabouts are under construc- tion on Bethany Road at the intersec- tions of Mayeld and Mid Broadwell roads, a project underway by the city of Alpharetta. Alpharetta Public Works Director Pete Sewczwicz said the

Milton and our growing downtown,” Milton Mayor Joe Lockwood said in the news release. “It’s a crucial con- nection in the city that should be a magnet for people who will live along it, eat at its restaurants and otherwise enjoy it for years to come.” The new road will house the Mar- ket District at Crabapple project—an eight-building, mixed-use develop- ment that will include residences, restaurants, a food hall and oce space, Community Impact Newspaper previously reported—as well as the Town Center East development. Town Center East is a nonresidential,

continuation of Heritage Walk, which is the name of the road behind Cra- bapple Market in downtown Milton and the same road on which Milton Charlotte Drive fromMayeld Road to Birmingham Highway—has been under construction since February 2019, Community Impact Newspaper previously reported. Its design was intended to give drivers a way to bypass congestion in the downtown area, beginning and ending at two new roundabouts: one at the intersection of Heritage Walk and City Hall sits, the release said. The project—which extends

N

mixed-use development project that will include retail on the rst oor as well as oces and other uses on upper oors, the release said. This three-story building will sit on May- eld Road facing the Milton Library, and the project is under construction. Timeline: February 2019-May 2020 Cost: $2.3 million Funding source: Transportation Spe- cial Purpose Local Option Sales Tax, or TSPLOST

400

D

19

N

Gov. BrianKemp claries driver’s license road tests rules amid pandemic

Old Milton Parkway ramp changes The project added a second left-turn lane to the ramp on Old Milton Park- way going eastbound to Georgia 400 northbound, therefore adding turning capacity and reducing the bottleneck eect in trying to access GA 400. Timeline : April-May Cost : $27,000 Funding source : city of Alpharetta

In Gov. Brian Kemp’s executive order for “reviving a healthy Geor- gia” issued April 23, all road tests for driver’s license applications were suspended through the public health state of emergency, which expired May 13. Nearly 20,000 Georgians received their license in the rst nine days of the executive order without taking a road test, according to the Georgia Department of Driver Services.

Kemp claried in a press confer- ence May 12—and in a subsequent executive order—that those who have received a driver’s license during the temporary suspension of road tests still have valid licenses, but they must complete a road test by Sept. 30. The executive order also claries that road tests for driver’s license applications were to resume starting May 12. According to the GDDS,

road tests have been modied to t proper public health measures.

All road tests must be scheduled by appointment only at www.dds.georga.gov . Those who received a driver’s license without taking a road test must pass one by Sept. 30

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JUNE 9. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT ALPNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

7

ALPHARETTA  MILTON EDITION • JUNE 2020

CITY& COUNTY

News from Alpharetta, Milton & Fulton County

Alpharetta City Council Meets July 6 and 20 at 6:30 p.m. at 2 Park Plaza, Alpharetta. 678-297-6000. www.alpharetta.ga.us Milton City Council Meets July 6 and 20 at 6 p.m. at 2006 Heritage Walk, Milton. 678-242-2500. MEETINGSWE COVER commissioners voted at the June 3 meeting to establish a program to reimburse municipalities within the county for up to $2.5 million in expenditures eligible for reimbursement under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act. CITY HIGHLIGHTS ALPHARETTA Council members passed the rst reading of an ordinance that would prohibit skateboarding, inline skating, rollerskating or longboarding within portions of City Center on June 1. Some council members, including Ben Burnett, voiced concerns about the limitations of the ordinance encompassing all of City Center and requested the limits be narrowed. The ordinance will be read and voted on again at the June 15 meeting. ALPHARETTA Council approved a purchase order June 1 to begin Phase 1 of the Wills Park Equestrian Center renovations for an amount of $75,620, which will be split evenly between the city and the Wills Park Equestrian Foundation. MILTON All forms of vaping are now prohibited on city of Milton property other than in designated smoking areas, per a City Council vote June 1. The new vaping law also includes city parks, unless in a designated smoking area. MILTON Council members voted June 1 to allow personal transportation vehicles, such as golf carts, to be driven on certain public streets subject to state regulations. FULTONCOUNTY Fulton County QUOTEOFNOTE “WHILE THEMAJORITY OFPOLLINGPLACES OPERATEDSMOOTHLY, ANUMBEROF SITES EXPERIENCEDCHALLENGES WITHEQUIPMENT THROUGHOUTTHEDAY.” FULTON COUNTY OFFICIALS

Alpharetta police ocers talk with protesters and shake hands during the protests June 2.

Dozens of protesters gather in Alpharetta City Center to protest the death of George Floyd.

Drivers honk as they drive past protesters at the corner of Milton Avenue and South Main Street.

KARA MCINTYRECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

KARA MCINTYRECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

ALLISON ALTOBELLICOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Protesters gather downtown over George Floyd’s death ALPHARETTA Dozens of protesters gathered in down- town Alpharetta June 2 to peacefully protest the death of George Floyd, a black man who died May 25 while in police custody. Floyd was handcued and laid face-down on the street while then-ocer Derek Chauvin—a white man and a former Minneapolis police ocer—knelt on Floyd’s neck for 8 minutes and 46 seconds. Protesters stood at the four corners of Milton Avenue and South Main Street, sporting face masks and signs protesting racism and police brutality. As cars drove by, some drivers honked at the protesters, while others shouted “All Lives Matter” and told protesters to go home. BY KARA MCINTYRE

Primary, nonpartisan election results delayed

City Council vote pavesway for breweries, food halls to open

BY KARA MCINTYRE

sources,” LaDart said. The following establish- ments can now open in the city of Milton under specic criteria, but bars and nightclubs are still prohibited: breweries, craft breweries, distilleries, microdistilleries, food halls, courtyard markets, city food markets, craft beer and/or wine markets, and growler shops. The ordinance also allows these establishments, as well as restaurants, to have an alcohol-to-food ratio of 70-30, which means up to 70% of its revenue can come from the sale of alcoholic beverages. Previously, the ratio had to be 50-50. This change allows high- er-end spirits to be served at establishments since more of the revenue can come from alcohol sales, LaDart previously told Community Impact Newspaper. Restau- rants will also be able to sell “incidental” packaged beer and wine under this new ordinance.

BY KARA MCINTYRE

MILTON Food halls, breweries, distilleries, craft beer and wine markets, and other alcohol-related establishments will now be allowed to open in the city of Milton, per a Milton City Council vote to approve changes to the city’s alco- hol ordinances at the June 1 council meeting. Milton Economic Devel- opment Manager Sarah LaDart said during the meeting that she and other sta have been working on changes to the city’s alcohol ordinances since August to allow for more business opportunities within the city, both for current and future business owners. “There were really three main objectives throughout everything: to make the ordinance easier for both the city and for businesses to read through and understand it, to create new opportunities for busi- nesses to come to Milton and to create new revenue

concerns in the 2018 governor’s election—but instead placed in provi- sional ballot envelopes at polling locations across Georgia. Not all precincts in Fulton County or in the state had reported election results as of press time, and no winners in major races had been announced as of 11:59 p.m. June 9. “[June 9] is the rst election where most poll workers in Fulton County and across Georgia operated the new election equip- ment introduced this year,” Fulton County ocials said in a news release June 9. “While the majority of poll- ing places operated smoothly, a number of sites experienced chal- lenges with equipment throughout the day.”

GEORGIA Due to voting machine malfunctions and other polling location issues, the Fulton County Department of Registra- tion & Elections extended polling hours for the presidential preference primary, general primary and nonpartisan general elections from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. on June 9 for all polling locations in the county; however, this also caused a delay in the tabulation of election results early into the morning June 10. Other counties, including DeKalb and Chatham counties, also kept polling locations open for additional hours, some as late as 10:10 p.m. Beginning at 7 p.m. June 9, ballots were no longer scanned into voting machines—which were put in place across the state after voting

www.cityofmiltonga.us Fulton County Board of Commissioners

Meets the rst and third Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 141 Pryor St., Ste. 10, Atlanta. 404-612-4000. www.fultoncountyga.gov

FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM .

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

WANT TO STAND OUT AS A SUPPORTER OF YOUR COMMUNITY? Contact us today for future sponsorship opportunities! JULY: REAL ESTATE EDITION SEPTEMBER: PUBLIC EDUCATION FOCUS 8669896808  COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMADVERTISE

HEALTH CARE E D I T I O N 2 0 2 0

Health CareDirectory 2020

Data & information on health care trends in Alpharetta & Milton

HEALTH CARE SNAPSHOT ALPHARETTA & MI LTON

The following data represents a picture of the health care community within Fulton County and includes health rankings and statistics related to COVID-19. See more below on how the county ranks in health metrics statewide as well as how the coronavirus pandemic is aecting the area week over week.

HOWHEALTHY IS YOUR COUNTY?

COMPILED BY KARA MCINTYRE

• LENGTHOFLIFE • QUALITYOFLIFE , such as the number of poor mental and physical health days reported HEALTH OUTCOMES INCLUDE:

2020 STATEWIDE HEALTH CARE RANKINGS (out of 159 counties)

15 27 27 17 13

These rankings are updated annually but include data from previous years. There are other factors included that are not listed below.

Health outcomes

19

Length of life

HEALTH FACTORS INCLUDE:

• HEALTHBEHAVIORS , such as smoking, obesity, physical activity, excessive drinking, alcohol-impaired driving deaths, sexually transmitted infections and teen births • CLINICALCARE , including health insurance coverage; number of physicians, dentists and mental health providers; preventable hospital stays; and u vaccinations • SOCIOECONOMICFACTORS , such as educational attainment levels, children in poverty, income inequality and violent crimes • PHYSICALENVIRONMENTFACTORS , such as air pollution, drinking water violations, housing problems and long commutes

Quality of life Health factors Health behaviors

75

20

5

Clinical care

47

Socioeconomic

85

Fulton County

154

N

Physical environment

CORONAVIRUS CASE ANALYSIS Fulton County has seen hundreds of new cases weekly for the past three months, according to data from the Georgia Department of Public Health. Residents age 25 and older are most aected by the virus.

CASES PER ZIP CODE Coronavirus cases in Fulton County per ZIP codes in the Alpharetta and Milton area

FULTON COUNTY CASE BREAKDOWN KEY: Deaths 5.52%

Total cases: 4,823

0-19 CASES KEY

CASES AS OF JUNE 3

94.48%

30005 47 30004 100 30009 52 30022 112

Active and recovered cases

20-39 40-59 60-79 80+

NEW CORONAVIRUS CASES PER WEEK IN FULTON COUNTY March 29- April 4 516 April 5-11 505 April 12-18 619 April 19-25 478 April 26- May 2 385 May 3-9 457 May 10-16 364 May 17-23 223 May 24-30 532 May 31- June 7 319

Cases per 100,000 residents

Deaths per 100,000 residents

448.71

24.8

CASES BY AGE STATEWIDE

30004

19

140

30005

30009

120

30022

400

SOURCES: ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION, UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN POPULATION HEALTH INSTITUTE, COUNTYHEALTHRANKINGS.ORG, GEORGIA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH, FULTON COUNTY BOARD OF HEALTHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

N

All coronavirus data is up to date as of press time June 9. For updated coronavirus data and information, go to communityimpact.com.

9

ALPHARETTA  MILTON EDITION • JUNE 2020

The Southern Porch Simple & Traditional Southern Breakfast & Lunch

TO HISTORIC DOWNTOWN ALPHARETTA

OPEN LUNCH & DINNER MONDAY - SUNDAY 11:30 AM - 9:00 PM

Outdoor Patio Seating Available Reservations not required but highly recommended

Let Us Cater Your Next Party or Event

Open Tuesday-Friday 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM; Sat/Sun Brunch 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM; Closed Monday

Let Us Cater Your Next Party or Event 52B North Main Street Alpharetta, GA 30009 470-242-5458 | www.flatlands52.com @flatlands52

62 North Main Street Alpharetta, GA 30009 470-448-1006 | www.porch62.com southernporch62

We Are Happy To Announce The Newest Member Of Our Restaurant Family RE-OPENING MID JULYWITH NEWMENU

NOW OFFERING Dinner Service Upstairs With Our Smoldering Summer Dinner Menu OPEN EVERY DAY 2:00 PM - LATE NIGHT LIVE MUSIC THURSDAY/FRIDAY/ SATURDAY 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM

SMOKING BOX COCKTAILS

LOBSTER ROLLS ARE BACK!

TUESDAYS BURGER & BEER $10

WEDNESDAYS 1/2 PRICE APPS

DAILY LUNCH & DINNER SPECIALS THE BEST STOCKED BAR & BEST MARGARITAS IN TOWN

12635 Crabapple Rd. Milton, GA 30004 770-663-0908 www.canstaqueria.com @cansmilton

RESERVATIONS NOT REQUIRED BUT HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.

20 North Main Street, Alpharetta, GA 30009 470-242-5317 • www.mercantilesocial.com

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HOSPITALS

Health Care Edition 2020

Information on local hospitals in Greater North Fulton

COMPILED BY KARA MCINTYRE

TRAUMA LEVEL GEORGIA

LEVEL I

• Highest level of care • Full range of specialists, equipment in-house 24/7 • Oer teaching, research components

19

9

PEACHTREE DUNWOODY RD.

141

LEVEL I I

285

• Oer specialists on call 24/7 • Can transfer to Level I facilities • No research component required

HEMBREE RD.

400

LEVEL I I I

N

N

N

• Oer resources for emergency surgery, intensive care • May have to transfer to Level I and II centers

Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta- Scottish Rite Hospital 1001 Johnson Ferry Road NE, Atlanta

Emory Johns Creek Hospital 6325 Hospital Parkway, Johns Creek 6784747000 www.emoryhealthcare.org • Trauma level: None • Total number of employees: 1,000 • Number of beds: 110 • New programs, expansions: Emory University School of Medicine and Georgia Tech created barrier protection devices for treating COVID-19 patients in May.

Wellstar North Fulton Hospital 3000 Hospital Blvd., Roswell 7707512500

4047855437 www.choa.org • Trauma level: II • Total number of employees: 11,500 • Number of beds: 319 • New programs, expansions: Children’s was chosen in April as one of ve National Institutes of Health-funded centers nationwide for COVID-19 testing validation.

www.wellstar.org • Trauma level: II • Total number of employees: 1,000 • Number of beds: 202 • New programs, expansions: Wellstar Health System is in early stages of renovating its Atlanta Medical Center in central Atlanta.

LEVEL IV

• Provide initial evaluation, stabilization, diagnostic capabilities • Will likely have to transfer to higher level trauma center

SOURCES: GEORGIA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

We specialize in non-surgical treatment options proven to reduce pain, minimize injury, and restore function It’s Your Life... Live it in Health! • Family friendly environment • No referrals needed • Medicare and most insurance accepted

Knee Surgery is NOT Your ONLY OPTION!

CONSULTATION Call 678-566-3030 to schedule yours today! FREE

As always, we are practicing medicine with your safety in mind! WE ARE OPEN!

windwardhealthcare.com Follow Us on Social Media: Windward Healthcare 2905 Jordan Ct. Alpharetta, GA. 30004

11

ALPHARETTA  MILTON EDITION • JUNE 2020

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CLINICS AND ERS

Health Care Edition 2020

Information on local ERs, retail and urgent care clinics

COMPARING CARE

7A

8A

9

Below are the dierences between the dierent types of facilities. Note that the breakdowns are general and may not apply to every facility listed. Contact each facility for the specic services oered.

RETAI L CL INI CS

Peachtree Immediate Care

Piedmont Urgent Care by WellStreet

Wellstar Avalon Health Park

Can treat: minor conditions, such as the u, strep throat, colds, minor cuts and skin conditions Stang: nurse practitioners and physi- cian assistants Equipment: can provide immunizations and physicals; can draw blood and swab for labs but will need to send tests out; pharmacies located in the same building Estimated cost: typically $25-$40*

KARA MCINTYRECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

KARA MCINTYRECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COURTESY WELLSTAR HEALTH SYSTEM

M

ALPHARETTA

10A

9

8A ALPHARETTA HWY.

10B

MCFARLAND PKWY.

5C

9

URGENT CARE CL INI CS

11

UPPER HEMBREE RD.

HOSPITAL PKWY. SARGENT RD.

10C

Can treat: the same conditions as retail clinics as well as broken bones, stitches and burns Stang: nurse practitioners and physician assistants, but more likely to have medical doctor on sta than retail clinics Equipment: may have X-ray, ultrasound and on-site lab test equipment Estimated cost: typically $35-$100*

141

140

1 6

9

4

120

HEMBREE RD.

12

5A

HOSPITAL BLVD.

19

ROSWELL

8B

7A

92

CROSSVILLE RD.

D .

FREE STANDING EMERGENCY ROOMS

7B

3

Can treat: life-threatening conditions, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, severe burns, head or spinal trauma, serious broken bones and sports injuries Stang: medical doctors and surgeons Equipment: X-ray, ultrasound, CT

400

A

JOHNS CREEK

5B

2

NESBIT FERRY RD.

*WITH INSURANCE SOURCES: TED CHAN, CEO OF HEALTH CARE DIRECTORY, CAREDASH COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER scanners, laboratory services Estimated cost: $500-plus*

5D

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

7 Peachtree Immediate Care A 10905 Haynes Bridge Road, Alpharetta 7703439898 www.peachtreemed.com CURRENTLY OPEN FOR COVID19 TESTING ONLY B 540 E. Crossville Road, Ste. 210, Roswell 7705101850 www.peachtreemed.com 8 Piedmont Urgent Care by WellStreet A 13081 Hwy. 9, Alpharetta 7705216690 www.wellstreet.com/oce-locations/ milton-urgent-care B 10945 State Bridge Road, Johns Creek 4049960194 www.wellstreet.com/oce-locations/ johns-creek-alpharetta 9 Wellstar Avalon Health Park 2450 Old Milton Parkway, Ste. 102, Alpharetta 4702672108 www.wellstar.org 10 Wellstar Medical Group Urgent Care A 5655 Atlanta Hwy., Ste. A, Alpharetta 7703436364 www.wellstar.org

4047855437 www.choa.org/urgentcare TEMPORARILY CLOSED DUE TO COVID19 4 Emory at Avalon 2795 Old Milton Parkway, Alpharetta 4042512820 www.emoryhealthcare.org 5 Georgia Clinic Primary Care A 11378 State Bridge Road, Alpharetta 7707724020 www.gaclinicpc.com B 3280 Old Alabama Road, Alpharetta 7706451014 www.gaclinicpc.com C 11912 Jones Bridge Road, Alpharetta 6789901831 www.gaclinicpc.com D 9570 Nesbit Ferry Road, Ste. 100, Alpharetta 7706451014 www.gaclinicpc.com 6 Northside Family Medicine & Urgent Care 11685 Alpharetta Hwy., Ste. 150, Roswell 7706193860 www.northsideurgentcare.com

B 12460 Crabapple Road, Ste. 901, Alpharetta 6787620574 www.wellstar.org C 1360 Upper Hembree Road, Ste. 100, Roswell 4709564430 www.wellstar.org Emergency rooms 11 Emory Johns Creek Hospital Emergency Room 6325 Hospital Parkway, Johns Creek 6784747000 www.emoryhealthcare.org/locations/ hospitals/emory-johns-creek-hospital 12 Wellstar North Fulton Hospital Emergency Room 3000 Hospital Blvd., Roswell 7707512500 www.wellstar.org

Noncomprehensive listings of local urgent care clinics, retail clinics and emergency rooms

COMPILED BY KARA MCINTYRE

Retail clinics 1 CVS Minute Clinic 11710 Alpharetta Highway, Roswell

7707540141 www.cvs.com 2 Piedmont QuickCare at Walgreens 3003 Old Alabama Road, Alpharetta 4049483019 www.piedmont.org Urgent care centers 3 Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Urgent Care Center 3795 Mansell Road, Alpharetta

13

ALPHARETTA  MILTON EDITION • JUNE 2020

CONTINUED FROM 1

and there was one I lived in where my neighbors brought me a list of poten- tial dentists, school tutors, doctors, but they also included mental health therapists and family counselors. I couldn’t believe they were so open,” Moore said. “But in Georgia, there’s more of a stigma here than in some other states. Things are changing in recent years, but we’ve got a long way to go.” Moore said she started seeing an uptick in new clients in mid-May due to increased feelings of anxiety as the state began reopening in late April. She said she expects her number of patients to increase as the months continue, particularly after unem- ployment benets run out. Moore also said she has seen an increase in the need for patients to use her oce’s sliding scale for pay- ment for therapy sessions, in which she and other licensed clinical psy- chologists can adjust the necessary payments for a patient if they can- not aord to pay in full immediately. She said this increase in nancial adjustments is due to patients los- ing their jobs, either temporarily or permanently. “I already have plenty of people that can barely pay for our health services,” she said. “We’re denitely going to have a big problem across the nation with people not having the money to literally survive, and that typically leads to higher rates of depression and

as well as family support groups for those who have loved ones withmen- tal health problems. Dave Saunders, a support group facilitator for NAMI Georgia, said the main reason behind mental health stigmas is a lack of understanding. “The stigma usually comes from the general population that maybe don’t have any understanding or any personal contact with someone that has mental health issues,” Saunders said. “That creates a fear of people with mental health issues, which only leads to division.” Pster said to combat this, one of the biggest solutions is to talk about mental health more in social circles, the workplace and beyond. “Mental health doesn’t discrimi- nate. It’s very common—1 in 5 Amer- icans will have some sort of mental health condition,” he said. “Get involved, support a familymember or loved one that you know might need your help. The more we talk about it, the more commonplace it will feel for people to seek help.” Substance abuse on the rise Prior to COVID-19, mental health disorders were still prevalent in substance abuse patients; however, public health recommendations encouraging less contact with other people—in addition to COVID-19’s impact on the economy—have exacerbated mental health disorders and substance abuse p r o b l e m s , M i c h e l e t t i said. “ S u b - stance abuse and men- tal health go hand in hand. People with mental illnesses often turn to substances like alcohol or drugs to help them cope with the mental illness,” she said. “We’re seeing more and more peo- ple coming in with suicidal thoughts, depression, anxiety, that [before COVID-19] they weren’t reporting those things and turning to sub- stances as a result of COVID-19.” Micheletti said loneliness, isola- tion and boredom are among the top reasons contributing to mental

In mid-April, Mental Health America added a question to its nine free screenings to chose the top three things contributing to mental health problems right now. Of those who screened positive for depression or anxiety in both the nation and in Georgia in the month of May, loneliness or isolation was the top reason contributing to mental health problems. Diving deep into mental health

DESIGNED BY ISABELLA SHORT

May nationwide responses

May Georgia responses

What is contributing to your anxiety or depression?

Depression and anxiety 2,518 responses

Depression 45,335 responses

Anxiety 25,643 responses

Loneliness or isolation

64%

62.14% 72.59%

51%

47.65% 46.17%

Past trauma

Relationship problems

42%

41.1% 44.34%

“GET INVOLVED, SUPPORT A FAMILY MEMBEROR LOVEDONE THAT YOUKNOWMIGHT NEEDYOURHELP. THEMORE WE TALKABOUT IT, THEMORE COMMONPLACE ITWILL FEEL FOR PEOPLE TO SEEKHELP.” SEAN PFISTER, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NAMI NORTHSIDE ATLANTA

anxiety in par- ticular, which leads again to an increased d e m a n d for men- tal health resources.” One stigma of mental health is the perception

29%

36.37% 30.23%

Coronavirus

SOURCE: MENTAL HEALTH AMERICACOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Mental health stigmas The coronavirus pandemic—and the subsequent economic down- turn—have resulted in increased feelings of anxiety, depression and isolation for people already suering frommental illness, but also for those who have never experienced mental illness before, local mental health professionals say. Georgia ranks 47th out of 50 states in terms of access to mental health care, resources and insurance, according to MHA. This lower ranking has resulted in a misunderstanding of mental health overall, said Dr. Kirsten

Moore, clinical director of Balance & Potential Inc. and licensed clinical psychologist. Balance & Potential Inc. is a therapy and counseling center located in Alpharetta. Moore said even in casual settings, she does not often tell people she is a psychologist because of the stigma behind mental health in the area and through the state. She purposefully excluded any mention of therapy, counseling or psychology in her busi- ness name because some patients worry about someone seeing them walking in to be treated. “I’ve lived in many dierent states,

that people with mental health disorders are bro- ken or dierent, or that because the disorder does not always mani- fest physically, it does not exist, said Sean Pster, executive director for National Alliance on Mental Illness Northside Atlanta, which encom- passes the North Fulton County area. NAMI Northside and NAMI Georgia oer free virtual support groups for those with mental health disorders

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24

communityimpact.com

Powered by