Gilbert Edition - January 2021

GILBERT EDITION

2021

ONLII NE AT

A N N U A L C O M M U N I T Y G U I D E

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 5  JAN. 26FEB. 22, 2021

ANNUAL COMMUNITYGUIDE 2021

TOP STORY TO WATCH IN 2021

Hospitals on the rise The two hospitals in Gilbert are each undergoing large expansions that will increase the care available on their campuses.

DIGNITY HEALTHAND PHOENIX CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL WOMENAND CHILDREN’S PAVILION Investment: $250M Opening: 2021

BANNER HEALTH BANNER GATEWAY HOSPITAL EXPANSION Investment: $243M Opening: spring 2023

5-story patient tower

109 additional beds

5 stories

2story diagnostics and treatment center expansion

351,000 square feet

378,000 square feet

IMPACTS

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168 beds

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TRANSPORTATION

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HUSD, CUSD soon to have new superintendents

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SOURCES: DIGNITY HEALTH, BANNER HEALTH, TOWN OF GILBERTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Expansion of hospitalswill aect town, region in 2021 and beyond

BY TOM BLODGETT Health care may continue to hold sig- nicance in 2021, but in Gilbert, it will not just be about the coronavirus. The town will see a medical indus- try expansion of nearly half a billion dollars this year. Most notably, the $250 million Women and Children’s Pavilion is anticipated to open this spring on the campus of Mercy Gilbert Medical Center. The pavilion is the product of a partnership between Phoe- nix Children’s Hospital and Dignity

Health, which operates Mercy Gilbert. That comes on top of the Gilbert Planning Commission’s December approval of a $243 million expansion of the Banner Gateway Medical Center, which will bring an additional patient tower, an expanded diagnostics and treatment area, and more parking to the campus. Banner, Dignity and PCH are nonprots. Construction for Banner’s project is anticipated to begin in mid-2021, with

completion projected for the rst quar- ter of 2023, town and Banner ocials said. Gilbert Economic Development Director Dan Henderson said that given the pandemic, the expansions, includ- ing additional capacity and inventory of beds, could not come at a better time. The importance of the projects will be clear not just in Gilbert but also in the East Valley and the whole of the

EDUCATION

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GOVERNMENT

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS IMPACTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TODO LIST Local events and things to do

FROMAMY: I think we can all agree that we were thrilled to say goodbye to 2020, and hello to 2021. In this month’s paper, you will nd articles that outline some of the biggest issues on the horizon for our area, from transportation projects to education and government. We appreciate all of you taking time to read the paper each month and support our local businesses. Happy new year! Amy Ellsworth, PUBLISHER

MARKET TEAM EDITOR Tom Blodgett GRAPHIC DESIGNER Isabella Short ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Michelle Gavagan

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ANNUAL COMMUNITY GUIDE TRANSPORTATION 7 Lindsay interchange o Loop 202 EDUCATION 8 New superintendents for HUSD, CUSD GOVERNMENT 9 Possible town street bonds issue

METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Amy Ellsworth,

aellsworth@communityimpact.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

FROMTOM: We previously wrote in June 2019 about how health care providers nd Gilbert to be an attractive market. That point will be driven home hard in 2021 as Dignity Health and Phoenix Children’s Hospital’s partnership on the Women and Children’s Pavilion opens and Banner Health begins work on a major expansion of its hospital campus. Our cover story will examine the impact that those will have on the town and region.

Tom Blodgett, EDITOR

John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across ve metropolitan areas providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

New businesses 12

Road projects 3

4

Local sources 16

BUSINESS FEATURE 3D Imagine Mini Golf

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Events

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TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS GILBERT (Next to Mercy Gilbert Hospital) : 3420 S Mercy Rd., Ste# 300 MESA (1 mile East of Banner Baywood Hospital) : 7529 E Broadway Rd., Ste# 101

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GILBERT EDITION • JANUARY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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GILBERT

The Porch: A Neighborhood Joint

Sonoran Desert Olive Oil Company

PHOTOS BY TOM BLODGETTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

W. WARNER RD.

5 Flavors of India restaurant opened Jan. 11 at 857 E. Warner Road, Ste. 101, Gilbert. It serves Indian cuisine including vegetarian, chicken, lamb, seafood and shrimp dishes and has a lunch buet. 602-277-5546. www.avorsondiaphoenix.com 6 A Gilbert franchise of My Gym opened Sept. 21 at 690 N. Cooper Road, Ste. 105, Gilbert. It oers mommy and me classes for children ages 6 weeks to 4 1/2 years and active play classes for children up to age 10. It also has parents’ night out programs, preschool prep and camps. 480-758-5879. www.mygym.com/gilbert 7 The Porch: A Neighborhood Joint opened Jan. 4 in the Heritage District at 312 N. Gilbert Road, Gilbert. The restaurant and bar also has locations in Arcadia and Tempe and serves appetizers, tacos, bowls, burgers, salads, sweets and drinks. 480-572-1298. www.porchrestaurants.com 8 A second location of the Sonoran Desert Olive Oil Company opened Nov. 18 in SanTan Village at 2206 E. Williams Field Road, Ste. 104, Gilbert. The store oers a selection of balsamic vinegars and olive oils sourced from all over the world. It also has olive leaf teas. The rst location is in Phoenix. 480-656- 9076. www.sonorandesertoliveoil.com 9 Thai Chili 2 Go opened a location in City Gate on Dec. 30 at 1495 N. Higley Road, Ste. 108, Gilbert. It is a Thai fast- food restaurant with traditional decor. 480-219-8330. https://tc2go.com 10 Top Cup Coee opened Dec. 9 at 7115 S. Val Vista Drive, Gilbert. It oers gourmet coee in a relaxed setting. 480-729-1375. http://topcup.coee

11 Twisted Sugar opened a second Gilbert location Nov. 6 at 1440 S. Higley Road, Ste. 104, Gilbert. The cookie bakery oers 20 avors fresh daily and as well as more than 100 specialty soda options and ice cream smoothies. 480-758-4515. www.twistedsugar.com 12 Woodland TearDrops opened Nov. 1 at 700 N. Neely St., Ste. 18, Gilbert. It is a recreational vehicle and custom-built trailer dealership. 480-868-6813. www.woodlandteardrops.com COMING SOON 13 Beauty Forever Med Spa anticipates opening Feb. 1 at 1760 E. Pecos Road, Ste. 207, Gilbert. The boutique medical spa oers injectables, skin care, laser treatment and body contouring. 480-590-5696. www.beautyforevermedspa.com 14 Square One Concepts anticipates opening a second location of Bourbon & Bones Chophouse and Bar in the SanTan Village shopping center at 2150 E. Williams Field Road, Ste. 123, Gilbert, in perhaps the rst week of February. Bourbon & Bones’ menu includes wet- and dry-aged cuts of beef as well as fresh seafood. It also oers 300 varieties of bourbon and whiskey, a large wine list and a cocktail menu. www.bourbonandbonesaz.com 15 Cracker Barrel Old Country Store anticipates opening Feb. 8 at 1799 N. Hig- ley Road, Gilbert. Each site of the chain features a gift store and a restaurant with a Southern, country theme. The decor in the Gilbert store will pay homage to the town’s former status as the “Hay Shipping Capital of the World.” www.crackerbarrel.com

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MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

E. HUNT HWY. NOWOPEN 1 Arizona Back Road Rentals opened Oct. 10 at 700 N. Neely St., Ste. B, Gilbert. The company rents Polaris Slingshots, Can Am Rykers and Corvettes. 480-572-1254. www.azbackroadrentals.com 2 An AT&T Store opened Dec. 21 at 1505 E. Warner Road, Ste. 101A, Gilbert. It sells technology devices, including phones, tablets and wearables, as well as accessories and TV packages. It also oers in-store activation of devices.

HUNT HWY. 602-654-1750. www.att.com/stores/ arizona/gilbert/176995 3 A location of Culver’s opened Dec. 7 at 3610 S. Val Vista Drive, Gilbert. The fast-food chain specializes in frozen custard and signature burgers. 480-825- 7400. www.culvers.com/restaurants/ gilbert-az-val-vista 4 Five Below opened a store Oct. 9 at 1093 E. Baseline Road, Gilbert. It is part of a chain of specialty discount stores that mostly sells items that cost up to $5. 480-690-8931. www.vebelow.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TODO LIST

Late January-February events

COMPILED BY TOM BLODGETT

JANUARY 28 THROUGH FEB. 13 ‘INTO THEWOODS’

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Actors Youth Theatre will put on this story of the Baker, his wife, Cinderella and Jack, all of whom have their wishes. When everyone’s wish is granted, the consequences of their actions return to haunt them with disastrous results. 7 p.m. (Thu.-Sat.), 2 p.m. (Sat.). $20 (advance), $22 (door). Tuscany Theatre, 861 N. Higley Road, Ste. 105, Gilbert. 480-907-7050. www.aytaz.org FEBRUARY 09 GHOSTS ANDMORE Investigators from the Phoenix Arizona Paranormal Society will give attendees the chance to learn about the investigative equipment the team uses, discuss certain cases and participate in a Q&A session. 6:30-8 p.m. Free (registration required). HD South, 10 S. Gilbert Road, Gilbert. 480-926-1577. https://hdsouth.org 20 CREATIVE CONVERSATION Gilbert business owner Elaine Kessler will facilitate a dialogue on how to cultivate a culture of justice and

Copper 48

Kung Pow Restaurant

FEB. 11 MARCH 27

‘CHARLEY’S AUNT’

NAME CHANGES 19 Nico’s Heirloom Kitchen reopened as Copper 48 restaurant Jan. 1 at 366 N. Gilbert Road, Gilbert. The new concept is for a gastropub with broader appeal and a more eclectic wine list with the same craft cocktails and niche craft beers. 480-584-4760. www.copper48az.com 20 The former Panda Libre restaurant at 748 N. Gilbert Road, Gilbert, changed its name and concept Dec. 18 to Kung Pow Restaurant . The restaurant had a trademark infringement suit brought against it by a national Chinese restaurant chain, which prompted the change. The restaurant now serves burgers and Chi- nese food with the majority of its menu revamped, but the owner said some Mex- ican-Chinese infusion items from the pre- vious menu will return. 480-507-0713. www.kungpowrestaurant.com

16 Nascent Health anticipates opening a wellness clinic at 115 E. Williams Field Road, Ste. 101, Gilbert, in February. Its services include injectables, IV therapies, microneedling, platelet-rich plasma and regenerative therapies. 480-270-8318. http://nascenthealthclinics.com 17 TC’s Pub & Grub has purchased JC’s Steakhouse and anticipates opening perhaps the rst week of February at 25 E. Ray Road, Gilbert. The sports pub will oer pop culture bingo, trivia, live music and karaoke. It also has a location in Queen Creek across Power Road from Gilbert. www.tcspubandgrub.com 18 Vero Chicago Pizza , a new franchise restaurant chain from the owners of Buddyz A Chicago Pizzeria, anticipates opening Feb. 1 at 1431 E. Williams Field Road, Gilbert. Buddyz closed its Gilbert location in December. www.verochicagopizza.com

In this farce, Charley and Jack hope their buddy, Lord Fancourt Babberley, can pull o a dress so they can meet the Victorian etiquette standards of having a chaperone when they are with their true loves. 7:30 p.m. (Thu.-Sat.), 3 p.m. (Fri.-Sat.). $22 (over the phone for ages 5-17), $40 (general admission). 480-497-1181. www.haletheatrearizona.com equity in the town of Gilbert. Attendees will hear and participate in a discussion on justice, race and equality. 10:30 a.m.- noon. Free (registration required). HD South, 10 S. Gilbert Road, Gilbert. 480-926-1577. https://hdsouth.org

Find more or submit Gilbert events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION

Updates on key transportation stories

2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

OTHER PROJECTS TO FOLLOW IN 2021

TOP TRANSPORTATION STORIES OF 2021

Work starting on Loop 202Santan Freeway’s Lindsay Road interchange

E. PECOS RD.

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BY TOM BLODGETT Work was anticipated to begin Jan. 25 on construction of an inter- change at Lindsay Road on the Loop 202-Santan Freeway after a decade of moving from an idea to the start of construction. Ocials from the Arizona Depart- ment of Transportation, Gilbert and other involved parties held a socially distanced groundbreaking Jan. 4 at Gilbert’s Zanjero Park, adjacent to the construction site, with Gilbert Town Engineer David Fabiano serving as the master of ceremonies. He called Loop 202 a “vital artery that helps the town to be successful.” The $18.15 million project will give Gilbert’s largest north-south street

without a freeway interchange access to the Loop 202-Santan Freeway and provide another outlet to Gilbert’s growing Central Business District. “Many times we don’t fully consider the true impact infrastruc- ture has on economic development for communities,” Town Manager Patrick Banger said. “These roads, these interchanges, the bridges, they unlock the full potential ... to bring economic benets to a community. And this single project is probably one of the most impactful projects I’ve been involved with in that area in my 10 years at Gilbert.” Scott Anderson, mayor at the time of the groundbreaking, noted the progress the area has made.

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Germann and Lindsay roads upgrades Germann Road will be improved from Gilbert Road to Val Vista Drive to major arterial roadway standards and Lindsay Road widened between Loop 202-Santan Freeway and south of Germann. Status: Crews are maintaining one lane in each direction while maintain- ing left turns at signalized intersec- tions whenever possible. Timeline: October 2020-January 2022 Cost: $27.43 million Funding sources: town bonds and funds, regional funds, developer contributions

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“I can remember more than 20 years ago as the planning director, I never really thought the 202 would be a reality, much less an interchange here at Lindsay Road,” he said. The project is funded through the town’s bonds and funds, Mar- icopa Association of Governments funds and developer contributions. Construction is expected to last 14 months, according to the town.

E. QUEEN CREEK RD. E. APPLEBY RD.

As of Jan. 1, drivers inArizona can get pulled over for cellphone use Beginning in the new year, Arizona drivers will be subject to a new law prohibiting the use of cellphones while driving. Gov. Doug Ducey signed into law House Bill 2318 on April 22, 2019. The law took eect Jan. 1, 2021.

E. CHANDLER HEIGHTS RD.

BREAKDOWNOF THE NEWLAW

wireless communication device or stand-alone electronic device, to direct the writing, sending, reading or other communicating of any text-based communication • the use of a portable wireless communication device or stand-alone device when used in a hands-free manner for navigation of the motor vehicle, use of a GPS or obtaining motor vehicle information or information related to driving a motor vehicle.

portable wireless communication device with an earpiece, headphone device or device worn on a wrist to conduct voice- based communication • a stand-alone electronic device 2 Writes, sends or reads any text-based communication, including a text mes- sage, instant message, email or internet data, on a portable wireless communi- cation device or stand-alone electronic device. This paragraph does not apply to any of the following: • the use of voice-based communications, including through the use of a portable

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Val Vista Drive widening The town is widening Val Vista Drive from Appleby Road to Riggs Road. Status: Trac is still one lane in each direction, shifted away from work. Timeline: March 2020-August 2021 Cost: $25.96 million Funding sources: town bonds and funds, regional funds

The law states unless a motor vehicle is parked or stopped, a person may not operate a motor vehicle on a street or highway if the person does either of the following: 1 Physically holds or supports with any part of the person’s body either of the following: • a portable wireless communication device, except that a person may use a

SOURCE: ARIZONA REVISED STATUTE 28914 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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GILBERT EDITION • JANUARY 2021

EDUCATION

Updates on education stories to follow

OTHER STORIES TO FOLLOW IN 2021

TOP EDUCATION STORIES OF 2021

Higley, Chandler districts to get new leadership for the 202122 school year BY TOM BLODGETT Higley USD and Chandler USD will both be led by new superintendents beginning with the 2021-22 school year. CUSD Superintendent Camille Casteel and HUSD Super- intendent Mike Thomason are retiring as the current school year winds down. Casteel has been with CUSD for 50 years, including 25 as superintendent. The district named a high school in Queen Creek after her in 2015. Casteel announced her intention to retire at the end of the school year in a letter to district families. “I look forward to beginning the recovery [from the pan- demic] and then handing the reins to CUSD’s next leader,” Casteel said. “I am condent the governing board will nd just the right person to succeed me.” The governing board met Jan. 13 in executive session

202021 AVERAGE TEACHER SALARIES Gilbert Public Schools $54,303 Higley USD $59,212 Chandler USD $62,315

Camille Casteel

Dawn Foley

Mike Thomason

about the replacement search, but it did not report anything from that session. Its next meeting will be in February. For Higley USD, the answer is already in place: The governing board immediately chose Associate Superin- tendent Dawn Foley as Thomason’s replacement when he announced his retirement last July. In fact, as Thomason uses his leave, Foley already has taken up much of the day-to-day leadership of the district. Thomason’s retirement will be eective in May, at which point Foley will assume the position. Foley called the transition seamless and thanked Thoma- son for his leadership and support. “While there have been many unexpected challenges over this last year, I am so proud of our amazing HUSD leadership team and our exemplary employees for their ongoing work during a global pandemic,” Foley said.

Teacher salaries remain a concern Gov. Doug Ducey’s “20 by ‘20” plan, a three-year rollout of a 20% increase in teacher salaries, ended in 2020, which means districts will not see additional money to prop up Arizona’s teacher salaries. On top of that expiration came the coronavirus pandemic, which has left all budget issues a concern, ocials said. Addressing stang and salaries will be a big part of budget discussions this spring. Arizona voters did pass Proposition 208, a 3.5% surcharge on residents whose income surpasses $250,000 annually, or $500,000 if married and ling jointly. The surcharge will apply to income past that threshold starting in 2021. The money would support education, including salaries, according to the proposition’s language. However, Prop. 208 is under legal scrutiny with some lawsuits contending it is unconstitutional. Chandler USD considers override The Chandler USD governing board will consider a potential override election in 2021, according to the board’s roadmap attached to the Jan. 4 meeting agenda. Overrides are used to provide additional money to support maintenance and operations budgets. CUSD Chief Financial Ocer Lana Berry is expected to give a report to the governing board later this year. SOURCES: GILBERT PUBLIC SCHOOLS, HIGLEY USD, CHANDLER USDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Districts prepare for budget woes BY TOM BLODGETT The three districts that serve Gil- bert students face the same question for 2021 that districts across Arizona are asking: What will state funding look like? The COVID-19 pandemic rst hit as schools were working through their budgets for scal year 2020- 21; as such, little changed during

those sessions. But as schools head toward budget preparation for FY 2021-22 this spring, things are more uncertain. Average daily membership—a dis- trict’s total enrollment of fractional students and full-time students, minus withdrawals, for each school day through 100 days in session— stands to be down slightly in Higley USD and down signicantly in Gilbert Public Schools and Chandler USD, according to district ocials. ADM is a key gure in the state’s education funding formula. Additionally, Gov. Doug Ducey

promised in June that schools would be funded at a minimum of 98% of their current budgets if they met certain conditions. But as districts received the promised enrollment stabilization grants, they found the money was about half of what they needed to get to 98%, ocials said. That has left ocials looking to the state legislative session this spring to see what their funding pictures will look like. Chandler USD is already planning for a potential loss of $25 million. GPS and HUSD have yet to detail what their losses could be.

AVAILABLE TO GILBERT RESIDENTS Rental & Water Bill Assistance Please contact one of the organizations below for more information: • AZCEND - (480) 892-5331 | azcend.org • Chandler Salvation Army - (480) 963-2041 | chandler.salvationarmy.org • Save the Family - (480) 898 - 0228 | savethefamily.org For additional social service resources check out the Gilbert Community Resource Guide at gilbertaz.gov/communityresources or call (480) 503-6956.

Gilbert families that want to help can do so through Gilbert’s Neighbor 2 Neighbor program. gilbertaz.gov/n2n Neighbor Neighbor 2 Working together to help those in need.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GOVERNMENT

Updates on key issues facing the town

2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

OTHER STORIES TO FOLLOW IN 2021

TOP GOVERNMENT STORY OF 2021

Council could put bond package before voters in fall

BY TOM BLODGETT Gilbert voters could be asked in November to approve a $465 million transportation and infrastructure bond package that would pay for 40 projects in the coming years. The bonds were headed toward voters for consideration last Novem- ber. However, Gilbert Town Council accepted the recommendation of sta and the Gilbert Citizens Trans- portation Task Force to delay putting it on a ballot for at least a year. That recommendation, presented to council at a nancial retreat in April 2020, was made in light of eco- nomic uncertainty as the pandemic took hold in the country.

Gilbert Vice Mayor Yung Koprowski, a civil engineer who specializes in trac engineering, was vice chair of the task force when council accepted the recommenda- tion to delay the bond question. Five days later, she was appointed to ll a vacancy on council. Koprowski said the bonds are critical to meet the long-term needs of the community, though she supported the delay last year. “But we are in a time crunch in terms of—the bond really needs to be passed this year so that projects can continue to move forward in a timely fashion,” she said. Koprowski said the list of projects that will be funded through the bonds has not been nalized but will be brought to council at its February retreat. She also noted that since the delay, additional studies have been completed or are underway that will help further dene the long-term needs of the community, including on the transportation master plan and parking in the Heritage District. Koprowski said she does not expect the project list or budget to change much but rather to be better dened as a result of the additional studies. When the task force was consider- ing its recommendation to council in April, Town Manager Patrick Banger said the town would be in “a world of hurt” if the bond did not pass in 2021. Without the bond, he said, the town would have to look for grants or put in a dedicated transportation sales tax.

BONDS IN SUMMARY If Gilbert Town Council refers a transportation and infrastructure bond package to voters for consideration, here is what voters will need to know. $465M cost 40 projects Nov. 2 Election Day

(Tom Blodgett/Community Impact Newspaper)

Public Safety Training Facility The Gilbert Public Safety Training Facility, which was paid for by voter- approved bonds from 2018, is largely complete, town ocials said. Crews are nishing a punch list of items ahead of an imminent opening, which is anticipated for this spring, though no date has been set. The facility will allow the Gilbert Police Department and the Gilbert Fire and Rescue Department to conduct training for ocers and reghters instead of sending them to other cities, which was becomingly increasingly dicult. More police projects GPD has also proposed a $16.3 million victims advocacy center and a $7.9 million dispatch center expansion, ocials said. The victims advocacy center would help to streamline the handling of cases for victims so they are not directed into as many dierent interviews. The dispatch center, which would use existing space in the public safety building, would enable the town to keep pace with growth in call volume as the town itself grows. Council could consider these projects this spring. Park phases The Gilbert Parks and Recreation Department is gathering feedback from residents on what they would like to see in future development phases for Gilbert Regional Park and Desert Sky Park, park ocials said. The department will present ndings to council in the spring, at which point council could decide how to proceed.

PROJECT CATEGORIES:

Safety/congestion

$221M

Reconstruction/maintenance

$91M

Transportation technology

$61M

Redevelopment

$49M

Multimodal investment

“WE’RE INA TIME CRUNCH. ... THE BONDREALLY NEEDS TOBE PASSED THIS YEAR. ...” YUNG KOPROWSKI, VICE MAYOR

$43M

SOURCE: TOWN OF GILBERT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Public Works Director Jessica Marlow told the task force that other cities have such a sales tax but noted it would take a decade to collect the funds needed to move forward with the projects, which would put a halt to the projects in the meantime. The result, Banger said, would be Gilbert’s transportation issues would continue to worsen and the level of service would decline. “We do need everyone’s support for the transportation and infrastruc- ture bond so that we can really make all of the projects a reality for the next 10 years,” Koprowski said.

That delay would have minimal eects, staers noted, because any bonds passed in 2020 would not have been issued until 2022. But at the same time, staers said they had no “Plan B” in case of further delay. Council will be discussing moving the bond forward for consideration in the November general election at February’s council retreat, town spokesperson Jennifer Harrison said.

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GILBERT EDITION • JANUARY 2021

Jay Harris

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BUSINESS FEATURE Imagine 3DMini Golf

BY TOM BLODGETT

Owners’ plans for new family entertainment in Valley came together quickly after initial idea F or Che and Ruby Jereys, the opening of Imagine 3D Mini Golf in Gilbert was serendipitous. element and a dierent twist to the glow golf. It messes with your depth perception, but that’s not a bad thing. It’s a dierent, unique, fun thing that hopefully customers haven’t experi- enced before.”

The couple took their 4-year-old son, Dane, to a glow-in-the-dark miniature golf course in Scottsdale in July 2018, and though they had good jobs and no entrepreneurial aspira- tions, something just clicked. “I didn’t say one word [on the ride home], but the wheels were spinning in my head,” Che said. “Ruby didn’t say one word, but the wheels were spinning in her head. We got home, and we’re like, ‘I can’t

Then there was the location. Ruby set out to look for a place, and she found it just a couple minutes from their Gilbert home. “The windows were already blacked out for us, and that’s something that the artists were saying, ‘Make sure there’s no outside light because that’ll mess up your artwork,” he said. It was another

Che Jereys said he had a good job that he liked before opening Imagine 3DMini Golf, but “something overtook us.” (Photos by Tom Blodgett/Community Impact Newspaper)

INSPIRATION Ruby Jereys had the vision for the course’s look. Her inspiration was their son’s imagination, so the customer sees pirates, aliens and an undersea world among the walls’ and walkways’ themes. The Lindberghs, the course designers, then executed that vision. “It caters to little boys and to little girls. … It’s something you can do year-round and somebody any age can do,” Che Jereys said.

sleep. I can’t sleep.’ I was like, ‘What is this? What is this itch that we have now?’” That started the

“THAT’SWHAT WE’REALLHERE FOR. SEEINGA FAMILY ENJOY THEMSELVES ...” CHE JEFFREYS, OWNER

instance of things just falling into place. There were obstacles, but they cleared each quickly. From idea to opening was just six months. Even with the pan- demic, which has hit

couple on the trajectory toward opening, which came together with astonishing quickness, Jereys said. They launched in January 2019. They started doing their research. Jereys made a fortunate connection with an indoor course in Illinois, which led him to some artists back east, the Lindberghs, who design, build and paint indoor courses. They even provided the golf equipment. The paint is not just glow-in-dark for black lights but 3-D as well, which dierentiates Imagine 3D Mini Golf. “It makes the art kind of pop o the wall,” Jereys said. “It really amplies it. It adds a whole new

the business hard, particularly with parties and corporate outings, the owners were ahead of the curve. They were sanitizing putters and 3-D glasses after each use from the beginning. Jereys said they have always wanted a safe, family environment. “That’s what we’re all here for,” he said. “Seeing a family enjoy themselves and get away from the TV or get away from the tablets or the cell phones and they go out and do something together. That’s what I grew up on.”

The walls along the course represent the imagination of son Dane Jereys, now age 6.

Imagine 3DMini Golf 785 W. Warner Road, Ste. A107, Gilbert 480-361-8005 https://imagine3dminigolf.com Hours: Sun.-Mon. noon-9 p.m., Tue.-Thu. 2-9 p.m., Fri. 2-10 p.m., Sat. noon-10 p.m.

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GILBERT EDITION • JANUARY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE

BY TOM BLODGETT

Joe’s Big Breakfast ($13) is the most popular morning item, Eaton said.

“FARMGRILL IS NOTAT THE FINAL EVOLUTIONOF WHAT ITWILL BE. I DON’T THINK IT EVERWILL BE.” JOE JOHNSTON, COOWNER

The half-pound Gouda Garlic Bacon Burger Stack ($15) has tomato, red onions, Caesar dressing, barbecue sauce and pickles on a grilled bun.

One idea Johnston has had was a doughnut shop, but warm Apple Fritters ($6) may be as close as he gets.

General Manager Bill Eaton (left) and co-owner Joe Johnston stand outside Joe’s Farm Grill. (Photos by Tom Blodgett/Community Impact Newspaper) Joe’s FarmGrill Partners bring about ‘next level’ of burger stand on old family farmland J oe Johnston long had an idea for a farm-to-table restaurant that would be built on the farmland he grew up on in Gilbert. What they did was Joe’s Farm Grill, what he calls a burger stand taken to the next level. inquisitiveness.” “He’s got a gift for food,” restau-

A CHILD’S VISION OF THE FUTURE

The restaurant was designed in a “retro future” way. That is why the restrooms are decoratedwith old children’s toys and have four TV shows on a loop, meant to evoke how children once viewed the future.

• “The Jetsons” (1962-63) • “Jonny Quest” (1964-65) • “Stingray” (1964-65) • “Thunderbirds” (1965-66)

rant General Manager Bill Eaton said. “He’s got a wide-ranging palette and comes up with these creations.” To get to that “next level” of burger stand, Johnston said, involves “scratch cooking, elevated avor proles, great ingredients.” The restaurant makes use of ingredients from the Agritopia farmwhen possible. The Peelen and Johnston partner- ship dates back 32 years to a since- sold coee shop in Tempe. ‘It works great,” Johnston said. “Just like a good marriage, each person has to have their own area of autonomy to some degree, but there’s still some areas where everybody has to agree.”

The restaurant opened in 2006 in Agritopia—Johnston’s rural-inspired development centered on 12 acres of active farm. The midcentury modern building is built upon the footprint of the Johnston family home con- structed in 1966. Using that footprint, as well as keeping two massive pines that the insurance company would like removed, goes with a Johnston preference. “I don’t like tearing down stu,” he said. “Anybody that knows me knows I hate cutting down trees.” The menu is the territory of Peelen, whom Johnston says is a great restaurateur with a “culinary

Harvest was to be a traditional restaurant with full service in the evening; quick service at lunch; and beer, wine and cocktails available. But that last part was a little uncomfortable for the original own- ers of the land, Johnston’s parents. They are teetotalers. Following the Biblical com- mandment to honor thy father and mother, Johnston went to partner Tim Peelen and said they could not launch the restaurant. “We had like $25,000 invested in plans, and we tore them all up and said, ‘Now, what are we going to do?’” Johnston said.

Joe’s FarmGrill 3000 E. Ray Road, Gilbert 480-563-4745 www.joesfarmgrill.com Hours: Sun.-Sat. 7:30 a.m.-9 p.m.

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GILBERT EDITION • JANUARY 2021

TOP STORY

WOMENAND CHILDREN’S PAVILION The new medical pavilion, made possible through a partnership between Dignity Health and Phoenix Children’s Hospital, will open in 2021 on the campus of Mercy Gilbert Medical Center.

BANNER GATEWAYMEDICAL CENTER The expansion of this campus, set to begin construction this summer, has been in Banner Health’s plans since the hospital opened in 2007.

• 2-room emergency department expansion • 4 additional operating rooms • 31 pre-op/PACU bays • 1-room endoscopy expansion • 1 MRI room • 1 Angiography room DIAGNOSTICS AND TREATMENT EXPANSION

• 9-room antepartum/ postpartum expansion • 2-room labor and delivery expansion • 1 C-section and recovery suite • 16-room NICU expansion • 84 acute adult beds 5STORY PATIENT TOWER

MATERNITYSERVICES

• High-risk labor and delivery • Midwifery/birth center • 24 labor and delivery suites with labor tubs and birthing chairs • 12 antepartum rooms with a hydrotherapy suite for oating and physical therapy

• 4 operating rooms • 48 postpartum beds

• 12 obstetrics triage beds • Antenatal testing center • Birth concierge • Certied lactation specialists

Diagnostics and treatment expansion

MATERNITYSERVICES • 60-bed Level III newborn intensive care unit with private rooms located near postpartum beds • 24-bed pediatric inpatient unit • 24-bed pediatric emergency department • 18 pre-op rooms • 6 operating rooms • 12 post-anesthesia care units • Diagnostic imaging N WBORNINFANT SERVICES

Women and Children’s Pavilion

New patient tower

E. BANNER GATEWAY DR.

SOURCES: DIGNITY HEALTH, TOWN OF GILBERTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCES: BANNER HEALTH, TOWN OF GILBERTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

not just Gilbert. … Hospital capac- ity is important to manage. More beds are urgently needed to alleviate overcrowding.” The expansions are also important to the town in terms of employment, town ocials said. Health care and social assistance is the largest employ- ment sector in Gilbert, and it grew by 18%, or by more than 2,400 jobs, from 2015-20, according to labor market analytics rm EMSI, and is anticipated to grow by another 16% through 2025. Banner, which also operates the MD Anderson Cancer Center next door to Banner Gateway, is the town’s second-largest employer, and Dig- nity is the second-largest employer

in Gilbert’s Central Business District, according to town data. Henderson said Greater Phoenix has been a destination site for health care advancement, with Banner, Dignity, Phoenix Children’s Hospital and the Mayo Clinic all in the market. Health care companies have made $7 billion in strategic investments in the market since 2009, according to data from the Greater Phoenix Economic Council. Henderson also cited data that shows nearly 4,300 clinical trials are being conducted in the Valley, includ- ing more than 300 in Gilbert, as an example of the innovation and collab- oration that has resulted. The Banner expansion alone will

add more than 600 jobs over time, Banner ocials said. Dignity ocials said the Women and Children’s Pavil- ion will support about 1,000 jobs once it is operational. “It’s a tremendous economic gen- erator for the region and the East Valley,” Henderson said. “We have a skilled and diverse work force that is being recognized globally. We have … [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] and STEM-related jobs that drive the economy because they are high-wage jobs.” Planned expansionmoves ahead When Banner Health built Ban- ner Gateway Medical Center, which

CONTINUED FROM 1

Greater Phoenix metropolitan area, Henderson said. “We know community needs roll up to regional needs,” he said. “They want to be complementary.” Serving the region Henderson pointed to several ways the medical center expansions will benet more than just Gilbert. “The number of surgery cases is growing,” he said. “Having women and infant services pairs really well with our young and rapidly growing community and with the number of births forecasted for the East Valley,

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

which was set to open this spring, but work will resume this year to nish it, Dignity Health spokesperson Abby Friedemann said. The pavilion received $250 million in investment from the partners, and its footprint, at about 378,000 square feet, is larger than the adjacent hospi- tal, which is 350,000 square feet. Mark Slyter, president and CEO at Mercy Gilbert Medical Center, told Community Impact Newspaper in May 2019 that Gilbert’s growth and central location within the East Valley made it an ideal place for the pavilion. “What we’ve put together over the last few years is a combination where we would extend and expand our women’s services on our current Mercy campus and then add in the children’s hospital adjacent to these women’s services and really be the rst true women’s and children’s pavilion or hospital in the state of Ari- zona,” Slyter said in 2019. The women’s health expansion will include 12 antepartum rooms, 12 obstetrics triage beds, 24 labor and delivery suites, and 48 postpartum beds, among other features, Dignity ocials said. Slyter said in 2019 that Dignity was investing in a more complex and com- prehensive labor and delivery unit, one that would give women the ame- nities they now look for when they are giving birth. The expansion of PCH’s services for children will include a 60-bed Level III newborn intensive care unit, a 24-bed pediatric inpatient unit, a 24-bed pedi- atric emergency department and six operating rooms.

quarter of 2023, and it will grow in the new spaces as demand requires. Yoder said the facilities have seen rapid growth in demand to deliver babies at Banner Gateway and cancer cases at Banner MD Anderson. “This demand presents the need to increase our women and infant ser- vices and oncology departments and spaces dedicated to these patient pop- ulations,” he said. The infant services expansion includes a larger nursery with a higher level of newborn care for babies that might require more complex care, Yoder said. He added that Banner Gateway is at the forefront of piloting and implementing innovative tech- nologies to improve the health care experience. “As we build this expansion, we will continue to look for and act on those opportunities,” he said. Regional growth was also a factor in the decision to expand at Banner Gate- way, Yoder said. “Many people living in the South- east Valley communities are enrolled in and receive care through our Ban- ner Health Network, so expanding the hospital will give them greater access to acute care close to home,” he said. “Our mission is to make health care easier so life can be better, and expanded access is part of that.” Pavilion nears opening Dignity Health and Phoenix Chil- dren’s Hospital have partnered before the Women and Children’s Pavilion, including PCH opening a specialty clinics building on the Mercy Gilbert Medical Center campus last January. The partners broke ground on the pavilion in November 2018. The COVID-19 pandemic has delayed construction of the pavilion,

HEALTH CARE EMPLOYMENT IN GILBERT Gilbert has 756 health care-related business locations in town and 5,170 within a 30-minute drive of the town, according to Esri, a geographic information system company. Here is how that translates to health care-related employment.

200K

In Gilbert Within 30 minutes of Gilbert

+18%

+22%

150K

153,523

129,742

100K

106,423

50K

+16%

+18%

18,514

2020 15,967

13,526

0

2015

PROJECTED FOR 2025

+1,000 Women and Children’s Pavilion

+600 Banner Gateway expansion (eventually)

NEWJOBS AFTEROPENING

SOURCE: EMSICOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

opened in 2007, it did so with room for planned further expansion. Hender- son said the town has long talked to Banner Health about future expansion and understanding its needs. Banner Gateway CEO Lamont Yoder said Banner evaluated current need and projected community growth in Gilbert for 10 years as part of its master planning process, something it does with all large construction projects. “There is a ne line between over- building and underbuilding for the stated demand, so we build infra- structure to support the next 10 years of growth, including shelled space, utilities, technology bandwidth, etc.,” Yoder said. “This allows the campus

to grow and adjust with community needs.” The project, which represents a $243 million investment from Banner, will add about 351,000 square feet to the Banner Gateway campus, which is approximately 380,000 square feet now, Yoder said. The plan includes a second ve- story patient tower, a two-story expansion of the existing diagnostics and treatment facility on the east and west sides of the building, and two new surface parking lots, according to documents presented to the Gilbert Planning Commission. Banner ocials said the expansion is slated for completion in the rst

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