Franklin - Brentwood Edition - July 2021

FRANKLIN BRENTWOOD EDITION

2021 R E A L E S T A T E E D I T I O N

ONLINE AT

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 5  JULY 13AUG. 16, 2021

In the past ve months, the median home value in Williamson County has risen by 16%. That number is even higher in communities like Franklin and Brentwood.

Williamson County

Franklin

Brentwood

SOURCE: WILLIAMSON COUNTY ASSOCIATION OF REALTORSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

$1.5M

$1,269,891

$1,266,250

$1,144,250

$1,100,000

$1.25M

$1,055,000

$1M

IMPACTS

4

$741,000

$731,869

$700,500

$640,000

$750K

$582,000

$685,000

$674,774

$500K

$627,000

$600,000

$582,000

0

January

February

March

April

May

Home competition tightens inWilliamson County Out-of-state buyers, low inventory push home prices up by as much as 25%

County proposes property tax increase TRANSPORTATION

6

BY WENDY STURGES

County Schools district. But even with a budget of more than $600,000, they were consistently being outbid by buyers ready to spend thousands over asking prices, often with all-cash oers. “We looked and looked and looked

and couldn’t nd anything,” Sanslow said. “We’d pick houses that we liked and, of course, they’d go o the mar- ket in just a day or two.” With inventory in the county down by 67% from May 2020 to May 2021, CONTINUED ON 14

WhenBrandonSanslowandhiswife, Kristin, learned they were expecting a baby, he said they began looking to move from Nashville to William- son County to be closer to Brandon’s job and for the coveted Williamson

Local restaurants, hotels scramble to nd employees

CITY & COUNTY

7

WE’RE COMINGUPWITH ALL KINDS OF CREATIVE

REAL ESTATE EDITION MARKET DATA 2021 HABITAT FOR HUMANITY RESTORE HOME IMPROVEMENT

ANDNEW INCENTIVES TO GET PEOPLE TO COME APPLYAND TALK TOUS.”

BY WENDY STURGES

Even with the lowest unemployment rate in the state— 2.7% as of May—Williamson County remains one of many counties across Tennessee looking to ll open positions as the area economy continues to recover from the coronavi- rus pandemic. The hospitality industry was the hardest hit during the pandemic, accounting for more than 70% of net jobs lost CONTINUED ON 16

9 11

TOM RYBAK, GENERAL MANAGER OF HILTON SUITES BRENTWOOD

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Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMLACY: Summer is ocially here, and it’s time for our annual Real Estate Edition. Take a look at our special issue (see Page 9) for data on local home sales, our Home Improvement Guide with tips on maintenance and special projects, and insight from local experts on the competitive housing market in Williamson County. Lacy Klasel, PUBLISHER

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FROMWENDY: With coronavirus restrictions largely lifted, many hospitality businesses have fully reopened. However, several restaurants and hotels are having trouble nding enough sta to stay open full-time. One of our cover stories looks at why there is so much competition for employees and what local businesses are doing to attract talent. Wendy Sturges, EDITOR

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JULY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

1

3

6

MARYLAND WAY

BRENTWOOD

Shake Shack

Penn Station East Coast Subs

COURTESY SHAKE SHACK, CHEYENNE COHEN

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

431

NOWOPEN 1 Shake Shack opened June 28 at 5027 Aspen Grove Drive, Franklin, in McEwen Northside. The restaurant oers its signature ShackBurger as well as chicken sandwiches, crinkle fries and milkshakes. A summer menu with new items also debuted July 1, according to a release from the company. The Franklin location also features a walk-up window where customers can pick up online orders. www.shakeshack.com 2 Black Tulip Press opened in spring inside CR-71 in The Factory at Franklin, located at 230 Franklin Road, Franklin. The book shop oers a selection of rare and hard-to-nd books with an empha- sis on 20th century poetry, small press and pamphlets as well as contemporary works. www.blacktulippress.org 3 Penn Station East Coast Subs opened a new location at 102 Lumber Drive, Franklin, in early June in the former location of Lenny’s Grill & Subs. The eatery oers wraps, salads and its signature sub sandwiches, available with hot and cold options, such as cheesesteak, Italian, BLT and club sandwiches. 629-899-7366. www.penn-station.com 4 Owner Claire Dean opened Caliente Contouring in Cool Springs inside Salon Boutique at 4107 Mallory Lane, Ste. 149, Franklin, in early June. The studio oers fat reduction and body-contouring ser- vices with noninvasive techniques using heating and acupuncture. Appointments can be booked online and do not require downtime, according to the company. 615-246-7108.

www.calientecontouring.com/ cool-springs-tn 5 Rewind Medical Solutions held a grand opening July 8 at 1025 Westhaven Blvd., Ste. 210, Franklin. The medical spa oers laser treatments, injectables, IV nu- trition and skin rejuvenation. 615-721-5121. www.rewindmedicalsolutions.com 6 Oxana Salon opened a new location at 710 Old Hickory Blvd., Ste. 301, Brent- wood, in May. The salon, which also oper- ates a location in Nashville, oers haircuts and styling for men and women as well as hair coloring and treatments, such as deep conditioning and Brazilian blowouts. 615-739-5614. www.oxanasalon.com 7 Co-working space Westhaven HUB opened in mid-May at 1001 Westhaven Blvd., Ste. A100, Franklin. The oce oers open and private workspaces, a communal kitchen and meeting rooms. The building is open 24 hours a day, and memberships range from one-day options to full-time memberships. 615-862-2760. www.westhavenhub.com 8 The Find opened inside The Factory at Franklin at 230 Franklin Road, Franklin, on June 25. The store oers a selection of vintage clothing and accessories. www.facebook.com/thendresale 9 Tamale Joe’s , located at 2000 Mallory Lane, Ste. 310, Franklin, held a soft open- ing July 6 with plans for a grand opening celebration on July 31. The fast-casual eatery oers Mexican fare, including its signature 100-year-old tamale recipe and house salsa. www.tamalejoes.com 10 Williamson Inc., in partnership with the Heritage Foundation of Williamson County, held a grand opening June 21 for

SEABOARD LN. 11

96

MALLORY LN.

BRADLEY CT.

14

7

MACK C. HATCHER PKWY.

9

5

WESTHAVEN BLVD.

2 8

COOL SPRINGS BLVD.

ASPEN GROVE DR.

1

4

FRANKLIN

96

10

S. MARGIN ST.

3

LUMBER DR.

65

31

HARPETH RIVER

RURAL PLAINS CIR.

13 BERRY FARMS CROSSING

12

15

840

PUBLIC SQ.

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TODO LIST

July & August events

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

12

JULY 1718

MAIN STREET FESTIVAL DOWNTOWN FRANKLIN

Onyx & Alabaster

Franklin Tomorrow

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

The Heritage Foundation will host the annual Main Street Festival in downtown Franklin with artisans, vendors, activities, games and food from eateries such as Kona Ice, Loveless Cafe and Cousins Maine Lobster as well as a beer garden. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. (Sat.), 10 a.m.-6 p.m. (Sun.). Free (admission). Main Street, Franklin. www.williamsonheritage.org.

ANNIVERSARIES 14 Westhaven shop Sweethaven celebrated its rst anniversary July 3 at its location at 1015 Westhaven Blvd., Ste. 130, Franklin. The business oers spe- cialty frozen yogurt, ice cream, popsicles and other sweet treats, such as cookies, chocolate and cupcakes. 615-398-8743. www.sweethaventn.com Tristar Bin Cleaning celebrated its rst anniversary in early July. The business, which serves the Williamson County area, oers trash can cleaning using eco-friendly products to sanitize and deodorize. 615-991-2467. www.tristarbincleaning.com IN THE NEWS Ocials with Franklin Tomorrow and the city of Franklin stood alongside family members of former alderperson Pearl Bransford on June 8 to present the inaugural endowment to Columbia State Community College as part of a new scholarship program. The Pearl Bransford Memorial Scholarship Fund was created in honor of Bransford, who died last No- vember at age 67. The organization raised $50,000 for the fund through community donations. www.franklintomorrow.com CLOSING 15 Owner Autumn Grant announced in June that The Kind Poppy , located at 117 3rd Ave., Franklin, has closed its physical storefront. The shop, which oers hand- made bath and shower bombs, soaps, and candles, will continue to operate online. www.thekindpoppy.com

the Franklin Innovation Center , an entre- preneurial oce located inside the LeHew Mansion on the grounds of the Franklin Grove Estate and Gardens at 423 S. Margin St., Franklin. The center will provide oce space for up to seven start-up companies. www.williamsonchamber.com/

COURTESY THE HERITAGE FOUNDATION

JULY 23 THROUGH 24 LISTEN TOMUSICIANS This annual event beneting the Williamson County Cultural Arts

AUGUST 06 THROUGH 14 VISIT THE COUNTY FAIR The Williamson County Fair returns to the Ag Expo Park with games, rides, exhibits, contests and food. Hours vary by day. $9 (adults, $5 (children). 4215 Long Lane Franklin. 615-794-4386. www.williamsoncountyfair.org LIVEMUSIC The FirstBank Amphitheater kicks o its inaugural season with a music line-up. 4525 Graystone Quarry Lane, Franklin • 615-763-3367 www.rstbankampitheater.com Aug. 03 Together Feeding Nashville benet Aug. 0506 Greta Van Fleet Aug. 12 Counting Crows Aug. 27 Lady A

franklininnovationcenter COMING SOON

11 HEI Schools will open in September at 627 Bradley Court, Franklin. The school oers a play-based, holistic approach in- spired by Finnish education models while incorporating Spanish language skills. The school will be open to students ages 2 and a half through 6 years.

Commission will be held in Franklin’s Public Square and feature live music performances as well as contests. 7- 10 p.m. (Fri.), 10 a.m.-10 p.m. (Sat.). Free (admission). 3rd Avenue, Franklin. www.bluegrassalongtheharpeth.com 31 CELEBRATE FRANKLINPRIDE In partnership with PFLAG- Franklin, Franklin Pride will host its inaugural event at The Park at Harlinsdale Farm. The event will feature a craft fair, vendor booths, food trucks, beer and wine, and live music. 12:30-6 p.m. Free (admission). 239 Franklin Road, Franklin. www.franklinpridetn.com 31 SEE CARS AT AVETERAN FUNDRAISER The Vietnam Veterans of America will host its inaugural Benet Show at The Elks Lodge. Participants can register to showcase their vehicles for $20. Admission for spectators is free; however, donations will be accepted. 8 a.m.-noon. 485 Meadow Oak Drive, Franklin. 615-870-2294. www.vva.org

www.heifranklin.com RELOCATION

12 Design studio and home goods shop Onyx & Alabaster completed its relocation from 134 Second Ave. N., Franklin, to 234 Public Square, Franklin, in late May. The business operates a home market with decor items and furniture, and also oers interior design services. Onyx & Alabaster has also opened a coee shop connected to the market featuring hot and cold coee drinks, pastries and teas. 615-628-8253. www.onyxandalabaster.com 13 Reliant Realty relocated its oces from 7065 Moores Lane, Ste. 100, Brent- wood, to 4068 Rural Plains Circle, Ste. 150, Franklin, in June. The company oers real estate services for homes in Middle Tennessee and Florida. 615-724-5129. www.reliantrealty.com

Aug. 29 Harry Connick Jr. Sept. 1617 Jonas Bothers Sept. 21 TLC Sept. 29 Santana Oct. 01 Nathaniel Rateli & The Night Sweats

Find more or submit Franklin and Brentwood events at communityimpact.com/event- calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JULY 2021

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Brentwood renames portion of Franklin Road in honor of fallen police ocer

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

One year after his death, the city of Brentwood paid tribute to police ocer Destin Legieza by renaming a portion of Franklin Road in his honor. City and state ocials held a cere- mony June 18 to rename the portion of Franklin Road fromWest Concord Road to Murray Lane to be the Ocer Destin Legieza Memorial Highway. Legieza was killed in June 2020 after his vehicle was struck head-on by an impaired driver while he was on duty. The portion renamed is near where the accident occurred. “In the early morning hours of June 18 one year ago exactly today, while serving and protecting all of us, Destin, doing his duty with honor, his life was taken,” Brentwood Mayor

Rhea Little said during the event. “I hope as we go through this memorial that you’ll think of Destin, but I hope you’ll [also] think of all those who every day put their life on the line— that ne, thin blue line that protects us from chaos and keeps order in our society.” Signs will be placed along Franklin Road in the coming weeks as crews continue utility work along the roadway. The change was made in accordance with a recently-passed state law, Senate Bill 137, that allows for local municipalities to rename certain roads and bridges in honor of specied persons, which included Legieza. “Destin would be so proud, and

A ceremony was held June 18 to rename a portion of Franklin Road for Destin Legieza, who was killed in a trac incident in 2020. (Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

I’m sure he’s smiling down on us today as we pay tribute to him and his memory,” Brentwood Police Chief Je Hughes said. “I think it’s appropriate that today of all days we come together to unveil these signs that will forever mark a section of Franklin Road in memory and in honor of Destin Legieza.”

65

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ONGOING PROJECTS

FUTURE PROJECT

HOOPER LN.

31

65

HARPETH RIVER

HOLLY TREE GAP RD.

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McEwen Drive improvements The city of Franklin is working toward a project to widen McEwen Drive from a two-lane roadway to a four-lane divided road. The project, which spans from Cool Springs Boulevard to Wilson Pike, will convert the existing road- way into a multi-use trail, add new street lighting and add modications to the Wilson Pike bridge. Timeline: spring 2022-summer 2025 Cost: $34 million Funding source: city of Franklin, federal funding

Franklin Road improvements Work on improvements to Franklin Road from the Har- peth River Bridge to Hooper Lane is ongoing as the city works to create a three-lane roadway with sidewalks on both sides of the roadway. The project will also relocate existing utilities underground. The city has included an incentive to complete construction early. Timeline: summer 2020-winter 2021 Cost: $12.7 million Funding Source: city of Franklin

Murray Lane roundabout construction The city of Brentwood is early in the process of convert- ing the three-way stop at Murray Lane and Holly Tree Gap to a roundabout after approving design work in mid- June. The roundabout is intended to help calm trac in the area and reduce the number of rolling stops at the

intersection, according to the city. Timeline: June 2020-summer 2022 Cost: $125,900 (design only) Funding source: city of Brentwood

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JULY 7. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT FRBNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News fromWilliamson County, Brentwood & Franklin

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

CITY SNAPSHOT

County to adopt new tax rate following 2021 home appraisals

HOWDO EFFECTIVE TAX RATESWORK? The eective tax rate will generate the same amount of revenue as the previous year after home values rise. Before reappraisal If a $400,000 home was taxed at $2.22 per $100 assessed value, the annual property tax bill would equal $2,220. After reappraisal If that home value rose to $528,000, the tax rate would need to decrease to about $1.68 to collect the same amount. Increase over eective rate When a tax rate is higher than the eective rate, property owners will pay more in taxes. If that same home was taxed at the new rate of $1.88, the property tax bill would increase by about $261.

WILLIAMSON COUNTY As part of its scal year 2021-22 budget, William- son County ocials have proposed a $0.13 increase over the eective tax rate to help bridge gaps caused by the pandemic. The budget follows the county’s most recent home appraisals, which found home values, on aver- age, increased 32% since 2016. Due to this increase, the county now has an eective tax rate of $1.7526 per $100 assessed home value, which would allow the county to collect the same amount of revenue as the previous year. However, the county’s FY 2021-22 budget proposes a $0.13 increase over that eective rate for a proposed Brentwood lowers property tax rate in FY 202122 budget year 2021-22, the city of Brentwood adopted a tax rate of $0.29 per $100 valuation, which is $0.07 lower than the previous rate of $0.36. According to the city, it is the 32nd year without an increase in the eective tax rate. The rate was lowered due to BRENTWOOD Following the approval of its budget for scal Williamson County’s recent home assessment, which found home values in the city rose by 23%.

new tax rate of $1.88. While this is technically lower than the scal year 2020-21 rate of $2.22, the new rate will allow the county to collect more income to fund the budget. The additional revenue will help oset revenue declines in hotel and motel taxes due to the coronavirus pandemic. According to the county, hotel tax revenues were down 48%, park fee collections were down 24% and business tax was down 8%. The budget was expected to be approved during the Williamson County Commission’s July 12 meeting. As of press time July 7, the budget had not yet passed. Visit www.communityimpact.com for updates.

COURTESY CITY OF FRANKLIN

On June 22, state ocials presented a proclamation to the family of former Franklin Mayor Tom Miller, who died in December. Miller served as mayor from 2003-2007. COUNTY HIGHLIGHT WILLIAMSONCOUNTY The county health department is no longer providing COVID-19 vaccines at the Ag Expo Park on Long Lane in Franklin as of July 1. Residents interested in the vaccine can nd Franklin and Brentwood providers at www.vaccinender.org.

SOURCE: WILLIAMSON COUNTY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

MEETINGSWE COVER

Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen meets Aug. 10 and 24 at

Williamson County Schools extends superintendent contract by 1 year

7 p.m. at 109 3rd Ave. S., Franklin. Workshop meetings are always held two hours prior. In-person seating may be limited. 615-791-3217. www.franklintn.gov Brentwood City Commission meets July 26 and Aug. 9 at 7 p.m. at 5211 Maryland Way, Brentwood. 615-371-0060. www.brentwoodtn.gov Williamson County Schools board of education will not meet in July. The next meeting will be held Aug. 16. 615-472-4000. www.wcs.edu Franklin Special School District board of education meets July 19 at 6:30 p.m. at Freedom Middle School at 750 Hwy. 96 W., Franklin. 615-794-6624. www.fssd.org

WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS Superintendent Jason Golden is expected to stay with Williamson County Schools through at least 2025, following a contract extension approval from the board of education June 21. Eight board members voted to approve the extension, with Board Member Candy Emerson abstaining and Board Member Brad Fiscus absent. Two board mem- bers, Dan Cash and Jay Galbreath, voted against the extension, citing

the district’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic in schools and recent debate over reading curriculum.

Jason Golden

Previously, Golden’s contract was set to expire in June 2024; the contract will now run through June 2025. The extension does not include a change in compensation, according to the district.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JULY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2021 R E A L E S T A T E E D I T I O N

MARKET AT AGLANCE Homes within ZIP codes 37064, 37067, 37069 and 37027 in the Franklin and Brentwood areas saw more homes sold at a higher average sales price in 2021 compared to the same time frame in 2020. Days on market includes time from a home’s listing to its contract closing.

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

BRENTWOOD

37069

37027

431

37064

65

FRANKLIN

37067

31

840

SOURCES: MCARTHUR SANDERS REAL ESTATE, FREDDIE MACCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

N

NUMBER OF HOMES SOLD June 2019-May 2020 June 2020-May 2021

Although 30-year and 15-year xed mortgage rates declined during the heart of the pandemic in 2020, they have since risen in the early months of 2021. NATIONALMORTGAGE RATE DATA 30-year xed-rate mortgage 15-year xed-rate mortgage 5%

3.95%

4.51%

+20%

+11.22%

+15.5%

+6.13%

4%

3.72%

990

1,188

1,542

1,715

413

477

359

381

37027

37064

37067

37069

AVERAGE HOME SALES PRICE June 2019-May 2020 June 2020-May 2021

2.65%

3.38% 3.99%

3%

$819,710

37027 SOLD

+23.49%

$1,012,286

3.16%

$626,659

37064 SOLD

+19.84%

$750,869

$612,906

37067 SOLD

+11.09%

$680,888

2%

2.16%

$575,000

37069 SOLD

0 January 2018

+20.52%

$693,000

January 2019

January 2020

January 2021

June 2019-May 2020 June 2020-May 2021 AVERAGE DAYS ON THEMARKET

FEATURED DEVELOPMENT

THE ARLINGTONON WESTMAIN, 37064

37027 +11.6%

37064 +2.08%

This multi-unit residential development features 10 for-sale units with 27 parking spaces below ground level. Construction on the development, located on West Main Street near Eighth Avenue in Franklin, is slated to be complete later this fall. Home sizes range from 2,400-4,200 square feet. Two- and three-bedroom options are available, and units feature outdoor living spaces.

77

86

96

98

37067 -1.28%

37069 -16.6%

N

78

77

78

65

Amenities: high ceilings, high-speed elevators, fenced dog-walking area, high- end kitchen xtures, security systems

NEIGHBORHOOD DATA PROVIDED BY TOM MCARTHUR JR., MCARTHUR SANDERS REAL ESTATE 203 N. ROYAL OAKS BLVD., FRANKLIN, TN 37067 6153704663 • WWW.MCARTHURSANDERS.COM

9

FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JULY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

NONPROFIT

2 0 2 1 R E A L E S T A T E E D I T I O N

The store carries new and gently used furniture as well as lighting and home decor.

Habitat for Humanity ReStore has been in the Franklin area since 2005 and supports the creation of aordable housing, said ReStore Director Ansel Rogers (second from left). (Photos by Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

Habitat for Humanity ReStore Franklin nonprot supports aordable housing F or those looking to update their home’s sustainably, Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore oers a 12,000-square-foot warehouse of home goods while supporting the creation of aordable housing in the community. The ReStore location in Franklin is aliated BY WENDY STURGES

ReStore also carries building materials, xtures, tools, paint and appliances.

DECONSTRUCT&RECYCLE The Habitat for Humanity ReStore oers deconstruction services for homeowners renovating kitchen cabinets. 1. Call ReStore or email

Homeowners who move into Habitat homes also work at the store as part of their “sweat equity,” in which they volunteer with the nonprot as part of their partnership. Those looking to donate items can either bring items to the store’s location on Columbia Avenue or take advantage of the nonprot’s free pick-up or DeConstruct options, in which the nonprot’s team will salvage kitchen cabinets from a remodel to be reused or sold. Residents are advised to call or email

photos of cabinets to tnrestore@hwm.org 2. Meet to set a project date. 3. The DeConstruct team will carefully remove cabinets. 4. Cabinets will be sold in the ReStore to benet aordable housing.

with Habitat for Humanity Williamson-Maury and features furniture, decor, cabinets, lighting, appli- ances and other home goods. Items are both gently used and new, as the nonprot works with nearby retailers

the store prior to donating items. Because inventory is constantly changing, Rogers said the store often provides updates on the locations Facebook page to show- case new items. Additionally, ReStore holds a sale at the end of every month with items up to 30% o regular prices. Rogers said buying and donating through ReStore not only helps support the nonprot, but also diverts what would

“WE TAKE DONATIONS, BRING THEMBACK HERE ANDALL OF OUR REVENUE BASICALLY GOES BACK INTO AFFORDABLEHOUSING.”

such as Lowe’s and Costco that donate new items. The store also oers building materials, paint, xtures and tools. Proceeds from the ReStore, which has been in the Franklin area since 2005, go to fund Habi- tat projects that create workforce housing in Williamson and Maury counties. According to Habitat, the store raises enough to fund

Habitat for HumanityReStore 1725 Columbia Ave., Franklin 615-690-8090 www.hwm.org/restore Hours: Tue.-Fri. 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., closed Sundays

ANSEL ROGERS, DIRECTOR OF HABITAT FOR HUMANITY WILLIAMSONMAURY’S RESTORE

the creation of three to four new homes annually. “We’re basically a fundraiser for Habitat,” ReStore Director Ansel Rogers said. “We take donations, bring them back here and all of our revenue basi- cally goes back into aordable housing.” According to Habitat, the nonprot will begin work on a project to build in Columbia this fall and is currently in need of sponsors and volunteers.

otherwise become waste from going to landlls. According to Habitat, the ReStore can salvage as much as 989,000 pounds—or nearly 500 tons—of household goods that would otherwise be thrown away in one year. “We’re keeping stu out of landlls and giving people something to do with their used materials, so we’re kind of unique in that,” Rogers said.

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11

FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JULY 2021

GUIDE HOME IMPROVEMENT COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

Local businesses oer home improvement tips

ASKAN INTERIOR DESIGNER Interior designer Amie Igou with Decorating Den Interiors talks about things to consider when decorating a home as well as what designs are coming into style.

ASKAHOME PAINTER

Bill Nishanian of Nash Painting answers questions about exterior home painting, color trends and maintenance.

WHAT IS IMPORTANT TO CONSIDER BEFORE HAVING EXTERIOR PAINTING DONE ON A HOME? My rule of thumb on exterior paint is the prep is 100% where your focus should be, and the paint is almost inconsequential as long as it’s a decent paint. If they didn’t do the prep work, it’s probably only going to last three to four years before it needs to be repainted. But if someone was to use an inexpensive paint, and do the prep work correctly, it still is going to last 10 to 20 years. WHAT EXTERIOR HOME COLORS ARE IN STYLE RIGHT NOW? The most popular thing to do right now is an all-white house, or an all-white house with black trim accents. That was very traditional years and years ago, but now it’s come back with a vengeance. WHAT SHOULD HOMEOWNERS CONSIDER BEFORE HIRING A PAINTER OR OTHER CONTRACTOR? [One way] to protect yourself is to avoid large deposits. If you give a contractor 50% or whatever they ask you for upfront, they have no skin in the game and can jump to the next job. In Tennessee, it’s actually illegal to take more than a 25% deposit. Also ask for a timeline from your contractor to make them guarantee that they’re not going to jump in and out of your project and that they’re going to stay on your project until it’s done.

Another thing that is highly overlooked is asking for references in your neighborhood. So, if you were to ask [a company] out there for reference, they’re going to look through their list and they’re going to nd the best people they can nd. But if you ask for a neighborhood reference, that’s harder to fake. WHAT SHOULD HOMEOWNERS WATCH OUT FOR THAT CAN AFFECT PAINT OR EXTERIOR APPEARANCES? In Tennessee, obviously there’s a huge carpenter bee problem. If a surface is painted or coated, it’s less attractive to carpenter bees, but if there is someone who has a big problem with them, there is a product we use called Bug Juice, that we can mix in with the primer or paint [before applying], and it will actually repel those carpenter bees. CHECK YOUR DECK Nishanian said one way to test whether a home’s deck needs to be painted or sealed is to pour a glass of water on a deck.

PHOTOS COURTESY IGOU DESIGN GROUP

HOW DO HOMEOWNERS WORK WITH A DESIGNER TO DETERMINE STYLE? I provide my clients with about a 10-page questionnaire, and it really lets them get honed in on colors that they like, colors that they don’t want, furniture pieces that they need, window treatments that they need, [etc.]. I also listen to what they want to accomplish in their home. WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO CHOOSE AN INTERIOR PAINT COLOR? Traditionally, we have all chosen paint color rst, and that’s really backwards of the way you should do it. What I let my clients know is nd a piece of artwork you really love. Maybe its fabric for window treatments or custom pillows, and then you can pull colors out of that item and that becomes your paint scheme. WHAT CAN BE OVERLOOKED WHEN CONSIDERING THE LOOK OF A SPACE? Lighting can make a huge dierence, and there’s some really cool trends that

are kind of coming down the pike. Paint colors and everything change in lighting, and so that’s denitely one thing that clients have to think about. Things will change depending on the way that their rooms are oriented, the amount of lighting, natural light and then what we can do with bringing other light sources into the space. WHAT TRENDS ARE HAPPENING AT THE MOMENT? One trend that I really like is having hanging pendant [lamps] over nightstands in the master bedroom. I think that’s a very chic, sophisticated look. It frees up the space of the top of the nightstands, where traditionally we’ve put lamps. Another is we’re seeing a lot more gold. We’ve been in these oil-rubbed bronze and satin nickel tones for about 10 to 12 years, so now [we’re] really seeing a lot of gold coming into style, especially in kitchens and for kitchen hardware.

If the water beads and stays on the surface, the deck is in good condition. If the water absorbs into the deck, it needs to be sealed.

Bill Nishanian, Owner Nash Painting 615-829-6858 www.nashpainting.com Serves: Franklin, Brentwood, Nashville, Green Hills, Forest Hills, Belle Meade

Amie Igou, Owner Igou Design Group, Decorating Den Interiors 615-969-9195 www.amie.decoratingden.com Serves: Franklin, Brentwood, Nolensville, Arrington, Thompsons Station

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12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2 0 2 1 R E A L E S T A T E E D I T I O N

TIPS FROMAHVAC EXPERT

With summer now in full swing, heating and cooling expert Chris Koehner, owner at Halo Heating & Cooling, shares tips on how to keep heating and cooling units running at peak performance. 1 Get a tune-up twice a year

BEFORE &AFTER

Koehner said while some heating and cooling maintenance can be done by homeowners, a bi-annual tune-up is still recommended for certain repairs, such as interior coil cleaning on HVAC units. He said after just a couple of seasons, units can gather large amounts of dust and debris. BEFORE

3 Change lters Homeowners should change air lters regularly to help keep dust and other debris out of HVAC units or ducts. “A lter change is one of the easiest things that homeowners can do to make sure the unit is working at 100% capacity and eciency,” Koehner said. 4 Check carbon monoxide detectors Koehner said while many homeowners likely already have a carbon monoxide detector, they may not know where to place them or when to check them. Detectors, which measure levels of harmful carbon monoxide that can be deadly, should be placed near a vent, if possible. Homeowners should also check expiration dates on their units. “One thing that people don’t realize is carbon monoxide detectors have a little sensor in there, and after a certain period of time, it goes bad,” he said. “For the sensors in these carbon monoxide detectors, you’ll look on the back of a carbon monoxide detector and you’ll see an expiration date on there. Most people don’t know that; they’ll think it’s only a

few years old and they nd out it’s like eight years old.” 5 Keep air conditioning on when out of town Koehner said because air conditioning units also regulate the amount of humidity in a home, homeowners should leave air conditioning on when leaving on a vacation to avoid letting too much moisture in the house. Units can be set a few degrees above normal to help keep costs down.

“There are a lot of moving parts on these units. Before the summertime, we will do a cooling tune-up, but also in the fall we do a heating tune-up, and that heating tune-up is not just for eciency,” Koehner said. “There are components in these furnaces that need to be checked to make sure they’re clean, to make sure they’re operating properly and to make sure everything’s safe too. So, the cooling tune-up is primarily for eciency, but the heating is for eciency and safety.” 2 Find a comfort number To help keep HVAC units working eciently, especially in winter and summer, while preventing energy waste, Koehner recommends picking a “comfort number” and staying as close to that temperature as possible, rather than setting a dramatically dierent level to change the temperature quicker. “As a general rule, nd your comfort number and stay within two degrees, one way or the other,” he said. “You don’t want the unit to strain in these super-hot days because it’s designed to maintain.”

AFTER

Chris Koehner, Owner Halo Heating & Cooling 615-551-9894 www.haloheatingandcooling.com Serves: Franklin, Brentwood, Nashville

PHOTOS COURTESY HALO HEATING & COOLING

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13

FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JULY 2021

CONTINUED FROM 1

Active inventory

according to the Williamson County Association of Realtors, local real estate agents said competition for homes in the county is booming, with buyers from California and other states often pushing oers signi- cantly over a home’s appraised value. From January to May, the median price for homes sold in the county rose by 15% to more than $670,000. Prices in Franklin and Brentwood rose 25.7% and 20%, respectively. Dave Webber, owner of Limestone Title and Escrow in Franklin and a Realtor with Regal Realty, repre- sented the Sanslows in their search for a home. Webber said Williamson County in particular has been a tough market to get into. “We know for a fact that a lot of the people that we were competing against were from California and out of state and they were coming in and writing cash oers, and a lot of them were sight unseen,” Webber said. “The rst day on the market, there were ve homes on the market that t [their budget]. They liked one, we wrote an oer for $50,000 over asking and it wasn’t even close.” After six unsuccessful oers, the Sanslows ultimately widened their search and found a home in Hender- sonville. While they still paid above asking price, Sanslow said the pro- cess was much easier than in Wil- liamson County. “We still went $30,000 over ask- ing up here, so it’s still pretty bad, but I think it’s worse in Williamson County,” he said. Betting onWilliamson County Local real estate agents said there are a number of factors bringing out-

Home inventory has decrease by an average of

1,500

With low inventory levels, there has been increased competition for buyers looking for single-family homes in Williamson County in recent months, shown by the decrease in average days on market for homes. Creating competition

2020

66% in 2021.

1,200

900

2021

600

300

0

Days on Market

coming from areas where they shut down the schools, and they’ve lost condence in that if something pops up again, they’re going to shut all the schools down again. They have more condence that it will be handled dif- ferently [here].” Anger said because of the lower tax rates in Tennessee compared to states with income taxes and higher median prices, out-of-state buyers also often have a higher budget after selling their previous homes. Accord- ing to data from the National Associ- ation of Realtors, the median home price for a home in San Fransisco is about $1.1 million. Because of this, he said buyers are willing to pay over asking prices, even if that is higher than the appraised value, which is closer to the home’s actual worth. “You run the biggest risk because you’re betting on your home appreci-

May 2020 29 days May 2021 8 days

SOURCE: WILLIAMSON COUNTY ASSOCIATION OF REALTORSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

can sometimes be subjective, and in current market conditions, they may not mean much to buyers. “It’s really up to the appraiser, but right now there can be a big dierence between the appraised value and what the market is willing to bear,” he said. In addition to high oers, Webber saidmany buyers are alsowaiving con- tingencies, such as home inspection negotiations. However, he said local buyers should still be cautious about going overboard with oers, even in a market like Williamson County. “I literally had to call [buyers] and say, ‘hey listen, it is really hard for me to put this down on paper and push you in this direction because this is a terrible deal if anything in this market changes,” he said. “[If it changes] this price is going to tumble and you’re going to be stuck in this house not able to sell. I’ve never done that before. I’ve written quite a few contracts over the years, and it was pretty crazy to sit and say ‘don’t do this,’ and then they would say, ‘no, I still want it.’” Sanslow said prospective home- buyers should be prepared to research

how much a home is really worth, rather than risk spending more than the home is worth. “Denitely do as much of your homework as you can because there’s a very good chance you’re going to have to waive the appraisal,” he said. “You really need to understand how to appraise it yourself. That way you’re not getting in a bad nancial situation.” Unintended eects With home prices continuing to rise, local ocials have expressed concern over how increased compe- tition will aect the area’s existing aordability issue. When considering teacher pay raises during its June 21 meeting, members of the Williamson County Schools Board of Education said although the district plans to raise pay by 4% this year, it has not been able to keep up with the cost of hous- ing in a way that would allow teach- ers to aord a home in the district. “Zillow today says the average cost of a home in Williamson County

of-state buyers to Middle Tennessee, such as large com- panies like Ama- zon, Mitsubishi and Alliance Bernstein setting up in the Greater Nashville area, as well as schools that oered in-person options during the corona- virus pandemic. “Schools are a huge deal, espe-

ating when you say, ‘hey, I’m willing to pay what I think it’s going to be worth a couple of years from now,’” Anger said. “You’re bet- ting on this market still appreciating at a pretty good pace when you go really high on your oer.” Anger said the appraised value of a home includes a

“WE KNOWFORA FACT THAT A LOT OF PEOPLE THATWEWERE COMPETINGWITHWERE FROMCALIFORNIAAND OUT OF STATE ... AND WRITING CASHOFFERS, ANDA LOT OF THEM WERE SIGHT UNSEEN.” DAVE WEBBER, OWNER OF LIMESTONE TITLE AND ESCROW

cially in Williamson County,” said Tedd Anger, co-owner of the Anger Group and Realtor with Keller Wil- liams Realty. “A lot of people are

number of considerations, including what homes in that area have recently sold for, market conditions and school ratings. However, appraisals

14

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