Sugar Land - Missouri City Edition | March 2021

SUGAR LAND MISSOURI CITY EDITION

VOLUME 8, ISSUE 7  MARCH 10APRIL 6, 2021

ONLINE AT

Winter stormsparks debate about future of Texas electric grid

IMPACTS

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60% of Fort Bend County residents werewithout power following thewinter storm SOURCE: FORT BEND COUNTY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

TRANSPORTATION

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Record-settingWinter StormUri left Sugar Land andMissouri City residents without power for days. (Claire Shoop/Community Impact Newspaper)

Texas Disaster Declaration brings federal aid

Sugar Land, Missouri City ocials, residents repair damage left in storm’s wake

BY CLAIRE SHOOP

Among the residents who were aected by the long-lasting freezing temperatures and subsequent home damage was Monique Chatman, who moved to Missouri City three months ago after retiring from the U.S. Navy. Chatman lost power at 5 a.m. on

Feb. 15 and went several subsequent days without power or heat, during which the temperatures inside her home continued to drop. Relying on her military training, Chatman stocked up on water, nonperishable food and CONTINUED ON 16

Health ocials focus on access, education in vaccine rollout When Winter Storm Uri brought record-low temperatures to Texas in mid-February, millions of resi- dents had prolonged power outages, and tens of thousands of homes had plumbing damage from frozen pipes.

CAMP GUIDE 2021 CITY & SCHOOLS

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BY LAURA AEBI & SHAWN ARRAJJ

ALLOCATED Vaccine doses are allocated to Fort Bend County providers, such as hospitals. SOURCE:TEXAS HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER First dose

60K

Public health ocials in Fort Bend County are looking to kick distribution eorts of the coronavirus vaccine into high gear in the comingweeks as elected ocials cite teamwork, additional vaccine sites and increased allocations as driving forces for increasing distribution. “My team has been coordinating very well with both county and the state,” Missouri City City Manager Odis Jones said. “I thinkwhat’s been the issue over the last [few] months has been our ability, collectively, …to be able to get vaccinations on a fre- quent basis.” Jones also said with the increased number of vaccinations CONTINUED ON 18

CAMP GUIDE

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40K

Second dose

20K

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BUSINESS FEATURE

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and trust use.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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SUGAR LAND - MISSOURI CITY EDITION • MARCH 2021

Kindness is a gift that each of us is born with. And when we share it, the goodness that’s released is amazing. Our human connection is important to our well-being, but it’s essential when we’re sick and hurting. For decades, we’ve been proud to bring world-class medical and academic excellence to our communities. But we also know that treating every patient with kindness, empathy, and respect is key to healing. Humankindness is what we call this strength. It has stood the trials of life and the test of time, and it leads us forward every day. Learn more at stlukeshealth.org . thepower of human connection. Never underestimate

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMAMY: Attention parents and caregivers: We have a great resource for you to nd safe and fun summer activities for your kiddos in this month’s edition. Our annual Camp Guide (see Page 12) oers choices in several categories, so whether your children like art, music, sports or computer classes, you’ll nd something to keep them busy. Amy Martinez, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMLAURA: This month, we took a look into how local vaccine distribution is going. Additionally, we explore the local eects of our area’s extreme February weather and subsequent energy grid failures. Laura Aebi, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

WHATWE COVER

Sign up for our daily newsletter to receive the latest headlines direct to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter DAILY INBOX Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Amy Martinez EDITOR Laura Aebi REPORTER Claire Shoop GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chase Brooks ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Amanda Feldott METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kristina Shackelford MANAGING EDITOR Marie Leonard ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Kaitlin Schmidt CORPORATE LEADERSHIP GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES &MARKETING DIRECTOR Tess Coverman CONTACT US

BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION &DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • MARCH 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

erage options including auto, homeowners, renters and ood policies. 346-375-6140. www.geico.com 5 StretchLab , a wellness concept that oers customized assisted stretch sessions in a group setting, held its grand opening in February. Located at 18802 University Blvd., Ste. 103, Sugar Land, StretchLab’s highly trained Flexologists work to improve sports performance, increase mobility, increase motion, reduce muscle soreness, reduce joint pain, improve posture and reduce stress. 281-213-5340. www.stretchlab.com 6 Hogan Spine & Rehabilitation Center opened Jan. 18 at 16035 Lexington Blvd., Ste. 100, Sugar Land. The oce is the result of a merge of two oces: Dr. Jerey Hogan’s chiropractic practice and a Hous- ton Spine and Rehab facility. Hogan Spine & Rehabilitation Center provides chiropractic services as well as physical therapy, sports and injury rehabilitation, and spinal decom- 7 Wishbone Pet Care will open another location March 22 at 17034 University Blvd., Ste. 200, Sugar Land. This will be Wishbone Pet Care’s second location, with the rst being located in Missouri City. Wishbone Pet Care oers a variety of pet supplies, as well as dog day care, over- night boarding, pet grooming, vaccina- tions and dental services. The store oers in-store and curbside pickup as well as local, no-contact and same-day delivery options. www.wishbonepetcare.com 8 Torchy’s Tacos will open its rst Staf- ford location in late spring or early summer. Located at 11327 Current Lane, Staord, Torchy’s Tacos is known for its variety of unique tacos and its queso. It has daily happy hour oerings from 3-6 p.m. during the week and all day on weekends. Torchy’s Tacos, founded in Austin in 2006, also has a kids menu and gluten-free options. www.torchystacos.com 9 Sozo Japanese Steakhouse , located at 222 Hwy. 6, Ste. 100, Sugar Land, is set to open May 1. The traditional Japanese steakhouse aims to serve quality food at an aordable price. Sozo will oer chicken, steak, sh and fried rice served with pression therapy. 281-720-3209. https://hoganchiropractic.com COMING SOON

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NOWOPEN 1 Bar Kada , a new Missouri City sports bar, celebrated its grand opening Feb. 13. Located at 9009 Sienna Crossing Drive, Missouri City, the restaurant serves Asian-inspired bar food including egg rolls, wings, oysters, salads, burgers and fried rice. While dining, patrons can also enjoy sports and TV shows on more than 30 screens. 713-227-5232. www.facebook. com/Bar-Kada-112853440547146 2 Umami Japanese Restaurant opened at 18921 University Blvd., Sugar Land, on

Jan. 25. The restaurant serves a variety of soups and salads as well as crudo, carpac- cio, maki and temaki. The restaurant also has robata—a method of cooking over hot charcoal—creations, which include plates such as charcoaled eel or fresh sh over sushi rice. 281-903-7067. www.facebook.com/umami.sugarland 3 Alkaline Market , a bottled water and health store, held its soft opening at the beginning of January. Located at 4713 Hwy. 6, Missouri City, Alkaline Market oers bottled water, healthy snacks, herbal teas, supplements and juice cleanses. When

many Sugar Land and Missouri City resi- dents were without running water during the winter storm, Alkaline Market owners Hermeka and Michael Morgan helped distribute the store’s desperately needed bottled water. They will host a ribbon-cut- ting at the end of March. 346-304-2186. 4 Chadwick Sapenter, a Geico insurance agent, opened an oce at 400 Promenade Way, Ste. 1000, Sugar Land, on Feb. 23. On his website, Sapenter said he enjoys getting to know people and serving the commu- nity. The insurance oce aims to assistant customers with a variety of insurance cov-

    

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY LAURA AEBI & CLAIRE SHOOP

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Umami Japanese Restaurant

Torchy’s Tacos

COURTESY UMAMI JAPANESE RESTAURANT

AMANDA FELDOTTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

vegetables such as zucchini, mushrooms and onions. The restaurant will also have a double drive-thru. 10 Silom Station , a Thai Cottage Group restaurant, is planning to open at 222 Hwy. 6, Ste. 500, Sugar Land in May. The restaurant will serve Thai food and coee. The Thai Cottage Group operates several restaurants including multiple Thai Cottage locations, Time for Thai and Rim Tanon. www.thai-cottage.com 11 Hampton Inn & Suites will open a ho- tel at the intersection of Hwy. 6 and Hwy. 90A in April. Located at 218 Promenade Way, Sugar Land, the hotel will include amenities such as free breakfast and Wi-Fi, a tness center, an outdoor pool and 3,000 square feet of meeting space. The hotel is not yet taking reservations. www.hilton.com/en/hampton 12 Kinghaven Counseling Group is planning to open a location at 3425 Hwy. 6, Ste. 103, Sugar Land, in late March or early April. The business is staed with licensed therapists and oers a variety of programs, including ones focused on families, behav- ioral health, veterans, seniors, substance use and autism. Kinghaven has several other outpatient locations throughout the Houston and Dallas metros. 713-457-4372. https://kinghavencounseling.com RELOCATIONS 13 Healthy Teeth Pediatric Dentistry will be relocating to a new location at 167 Cita- del Way, Sugar Land later this year. Healthy Teeth Pediatric Dentistry oers a variety of dental services, including cleanings, X-rays, tooth extractions, sleep dentistry, uoride treatment and space maintainers. The prac-

tice is currently located at 4907 Sandhill Drive, Ste. E, Sugar Land. 713-955-2100 www.healthyteethpediatricdentistry.com EXPANSIONS 14 The Fort BendWomen’s Center , located at 1500 Pultar Road, Richmond, will build an additional 22 units at its lon- ger-stay housing facility, which currently has 27 units and provides shelter to domes- tic violence and sexual assault survivors and their children while they work toward self-suciency. The $3.8 million expansion is funded in part through an aordable housing program subsidy from Community- Bank of Texas and the Federal Home Loan Bank of Dallas. “When survivors and their children are ready to exit the emergency shelter and transition to independence, one of the chief factors that could cause them to return to their abuser is the inability to nd an aordable place to live,” FBWC Executive Director Vita Goodell said in a press release. “The funds from Communi- tyBank of Texas and FHLB Dallas will help us build much-needed housing.” Fort Bend Women’s Center operates the only crisis hotline and emergency shelter for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault in Fort Bend County. 281-344-5750. https://wc.org CLOSINGS 15 GameStop at 2575 Town Center Blvd. closed in February. Headquartered in Grapevine, GameStop sells video games, gaming consoles and other gaming mer- chandise. GameStop in First Colony Mall remains open. www.gamestop.com

On Feb. 1, ocials held a groundbreaking ceremony for the state-of-the-art building.

COURTESY CRAIN GROUP

FEATURED IMPACT IN THE NEWS Fort Bend County will soon have a new emergency operations center. County ocials broke ground on the new facility during a short ceremony Feb. 1. County Judge KP George during the Feb. 2 Commissioners Court meeting thanked the county’s emergency management sta for working diligently to make the project a reality. “This is an exciting time,” George said. “We should have a brand-new, state-of- the-art building at the end of this year for the residents of Fort Bend County.” The two-story building will be about 24,000 square feet and will consolidate oces and communications spaces to best accommodate the county’s response to weather, re and other emergencies, according to county documents. 16 Sugar Land’s Red Lobster location permanently closed its doors in early 2021. The restaurant was located at 2323 Hwy. 6, Sugar Land. Known for its Cheddar Bay biscuits, Red Lobster serves shrimp, crab, salmon, steak and pasta. There are several other Houston-area Red Lobster locations outside of the Sugar Land and Missouri City area. www.redlobster.com

The facility will include an additional detached apparatus bay for emergency vehicles, according to the county documents. It will also include large training rooms, a media room, sta oces and support areas. The new center will be located at 307 Fort St., Richmond, according to county documents. https://coem.org

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17 Fry’s Electronics permanently closed all of its 31 stores across nine states in late February, including its Sugar Land-Missouri City-area location at 11565 Southwest Free- way, Ste. 59, Houston. Fry’s attributed the decision to changes in the retail industry, as well as challenges resulting from the pandemic. The closing comes a few months before the company’s 36th anniversary. www.frys.com

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • MARCH 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Newroad, trail to connectMemorial Park, Brazos River Park in Sugar Land

COMPILED BY CLAIRE SHOOP

ONGOING PROJECTS

BROOKS ST.

The city of Sugar Land is construct- ing a milelong road and trail connect- ing Brazos River Park and Sugar Land Memorial Park. Work on the $2.2 million project is 75% complete and expected to be nished in early spring. Once open, the road will provide accessibility to 420 acres of park land along the Brazos River, according to Sugar Land Communications Director Doug Adolph. The property on which the new road and trail are located was formerly part of the Central Unit Prison Farm and was deeded to the city from the state of Texas in the 1990s, Adolph said. “The completion of the road and trail connection has been a long-term goal identied in the Brazos River Park Corridor Master Plan for providing full access to the whole 420-acre park site,” Adolph said in an email. Funding for the two-lane concrete road and accompanying 8-foot concrete trail as well as landscaping, lighting, irrigation and drainage

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Hwy. 6 road widening Construction on the expansion of Hwy. 6 from six to eight lanes from Lexington Boulevard to Brooks Street in Sugar Land is nearing its anticipated completion in March, according to Deidrea George, a public information ocer with the Texas Department of Transportation. Remaining road work is taking place west of Hwy. 59. Timeline: February 2020-March 2021 Cost: $12.1 million Funding sources: TxDOT, city of Sugar Land, Fort Bend County

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services were included in the city’s 2013 bond election. Additionally, the new trail will connect existing trails at Brazos River Park and Crown Festival Park to those at Memorial Park, giving residents and visitors access to 9.5 miles of continu- ous trails in the area, Adolph said.

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CLAIRE SHOOPCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER Brazos River Park Road at Memorial Park

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF FEB. 23. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SLMNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. connection point at Independence Boulevard to the south end of the street near Long Rock Drive. Timeline: summer 2020-summer 2021 Cost: $1.4 million Funding source: city of Missouri City Waterfall Drive reconstruction The project to completely rebuild Waterfall Drive in Missouri City’s Meadow Creek neighborhood is ap- proximately 50% complete, according to the city of Missouri City. The scope of the project extends from the road’s

Sugar Land approves sidewalk, trail repairs Sugar Land City Council approved a $625,000 contract for sidewalk and trail repair services starting inMarch. Contractor J Rivas Construction will address approximately 300 requests months due to the pandemic. Additionally, in scal year 2019-20, sta identiedmore than 10,800 side- walk hazards with a total estimated repair cost of $5.9 million. Of these

TRIP TREACHERY There are more than 10,800 trip hazards on Sugar Land sidewalks. Trip hazard more than 2 inches

Locations: 1,305 Cost: $1.46 million Trip hazard 1-2 inches Locations: 3,643 Cost: $4.08 million

from residents for sidewalk repairs with the money allocated in the contract, according to Assistant Public Works Director Eric Oscarson. Oscarson said the city has 969 pend- ing service requests, and the backlog to complete requests has grown to 18-24

hazards, 1,305 are classied as category one, meaning there is a trip hazard of more than 2 inches. Maintenance of streets, sidewalks and other infrastructure was a priority according to a recent Sugar Land resident satisfaction survey.

Trip hazard less than 1 inch

Locations: 5,888 Cost: $491,000

Total locations: 10,836 Total cost: $5.9 million SOURCE: CITY OF SUGAR LAND COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

I N- STORE & ONL I NE MAR 4-17

*Irish Whiskey Sale runs 3/4/21-3/17/21. Valid on featured products. Sale items can be shopped in-store and online at www.twinliquors.com. Selection varies by store. Items and prices subject to change without notice. No further discount on Sale Items, Final Few, or Closeouts. Some exclusions apply. Please drink responsibly.

ON SELECT BOTTLES OF I R I SH WH I SKEY *

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • MARCH 2021

COUNTY&SCHOOL

News from Fort Bend County & Fort Bend ISD

New large-scalemultipurpose complex coming to Fort Bend County

Fort Bend ISDapproves 2021-22 school calendar

BY CLAIRE SHOOP

DATES TOKNOW School calender:  Aug. 11-May 26 Thanksgiving break:  One week Winter break:  Two weeks Spring break:  One week “I want us to go forward with the innovation,” James said. “I want us to seize this opportunity for change and step forward.” Charles Dupre said while there is more innovation FBISD can bring into the calendar, the organization is not ready for that change this year. “Tome, we are maxed out on innovation today,” Dupre said. While James joined five other trustees in voting in favor of the calendar, she urged FBISD to use the calendar as a tool of innovation. Trustee DenettaWilliams did not participate in the vote.

FORT BEND ISD The Fort Bend ISD board of trustees approved the school calendar for the 2021- 22 school year during its Feb. 22 meeting. The start date for students is Aug. 11, and the last of school is May 26. Additionally, the calendar retains a traditional holiday sched- ule with a week-long Thanksgiving and spring break, and two weeks for winter break, according to district documents. Trustee Grayle James, who will not seek re-election to the board of trustees inMay, asked why this calendar, which was presented as Option C, was selected over other proposed options that may have had more innovative uses of time. Trustee Angie Hanan, who served on the calendar committee, said feedback from teachers, parents and students pointed overwhelmingly to this calendar option. Furthermore, Superintendent

BY MORGAN THEOPHIL

demand for the facility,” he said. The recommendations call for pri- vatized public development, Prestage said, whichmeans the county will lease the property to a development entity, which will then construct the project and lease the building to the county. The county will then retain ownership of the land, he said, and will own the building when the debt on the development is paid. The total development cost is approximately $120million, Prestage said. The project is slated for comple- tion in the fourth quarter of 2022.

FORT BEND COUNTY A new 230,000-square-foot multipurpose facility dubbed the Fort Bend EpiCen- ter project will soon be built in Fort Bend County near the fairgrounds. At a Feb. 23 meeting, Fort Bend County commissioners unanimously approved funding for the purchase of approximately 51 acres for the project. “This will be something that will be a big benefit for Fort Bend County and its residents,” Precinct 1 Commissioner Vincent Morales said. Several years ago, the county hired Convention Sports and Leisure, an advisory and planning firm, to deter- mine the feasibility of adding a facility to the area, Precinct 2 Commissioner Grady Prestage said. In 2020, a committee reviewed the results to determine the need for the facility, Prestage said. The study results “showed great

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SOURCE: FORT BEND ISD/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Texas Disaster Declaration opens door for federal aid for losses sustained during storms

BY VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH FORT BEND COUNTY Individuals and businesses who sustained losses during theWinter StormUri are eligible for federal assistance, according to a Texas Disaster Declaration approved by President Joe Biden. The declaration, signed Feb. 19 and updated days later, encom- passes 126 counties and is meant to supplement state and local recovery efforts, according to a statement from president’s office. “Assistance can include grants for temporary housing and home repairs, low-cost loans to cover uninsured property losses, and other programs to help individuals and business owners recover from the effects of the disaster,” according to the statement. Disaster assistance through the Federal Emergency Management Agency is also available to eligible state and local governments as well as certain nonprofits “on a cost-shar- ing basis for emergency protective measures and hazard mitigation measures statewide.” The storm that brought snow and extreme cold left millions without power, some for several days, and triggered water supply issues as fro- zen pipes burst in homes, businesses and schools. People and businesses that sus- tained losses may apply for federal assistance at www.DisasterAssistance. gov or by calling 800-621-3362. FEMA officials advised people to take photos of any damage from the storms and if water pipes have burst to work with a plumber and their insurance company on repairs. Those who apply for FEMA disaster assis- tance will need to provide insurance claim information, according to a release from FEMA. A Disaster Distress Helpline has also been activated for people coping with stress from the winter storm. This toll-free, multilingual and confidential crisis support line is available 24/7. People may call or text 800-985-5990 to connect with a trained crisis counselor. The Texas Division of Emergency Management is also conducting a sur- vey to assess damages from the storm. State officials announced Feb. 25 that

QUALIFYING COUNTIES The declaration affects 126 Texas counties, most of which are located in the southeast portion of the state.

DRIVE THRU TODDLER FAIR Spring Fling Saturday, March 13, 2021 11:00 A.M. – 3:00 P.M.

Eligible

SOURCE: WHITEHOUSE. GOV/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FORT BEND COUNTY

Heritage Park 8719 Azalea Crossing Ct Missouri City, TX 77459

Sugar Land City Council 2700 Town Center Blvd. N., Sugar Land. Meetings are livestreamed. March 16 and 23 and April 6 at 5:30 p.m. Missouri City City Council 1522 Texas Parkway, Missouri City. Meetings are livestreamed. March 15 and April 5 at 7 p.m. Fort Bend County Commissioners Court • 401 Jackson St., Richmond. March 9 and 23 and April 6 at 1 p.m. Fort Bend ISD board of trustees Locations may vary. Meetings are livestreamed. March 22 and 29 at 6 p.m. MEETINGSWE COVER a new call center has been set up to help Texans with limited or no internet service fill out the damage survey. Calls to 844-844-3089 will be accepted from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. daily. Gov. Greg Abbott called the infor- mation collected through the damage survey as crucial. “The information gleaned from the iSTAT will help us advocate for the sup- port and assistance our communities need to recover from the winter storm,” he said in a news release. In addition, the U.S. Small Business Administration has set up centers to assist business owners as well as homeowners and renters in applying for help through the disaster loan pro- gram. Assistance is available between 7 a.m.-7 p.m. by calling 800-659-2955 or emailing focwassistance@sba.gov.

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SUGAR LAND - MISSOURI CITY EDITION • MARCH 2021

C A M P G U I D E GUIDE

A noncomprehensive list of camps in the Sugar Land & Missouri City area

COMPILED BY CLAIRE SHOOP Parents looking for camps for their children have a number of options to choose from in Sugar Land and Missouri City, including virtual options for families looking to socially distance during the pandemic. This list is not comprehensive.

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Dates: weekly June 7-Aug. 13 Cost: $200 and up 18318 University Blvd., Ste. 100, Sugar Land 17101 Grand Parkway, Ste. 65, Sugar Land 281-456-3010 www.codeninjas.com 3 iCode’s daylong summer camps are designed to prepare students ages 5-18 for school, higher education and the work- force. Camps explore science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics through game design, robotics, drones, virtual reality, app design and 3D printing. Virtual camps are also available. Dates: day and week camps available June 7-Aug. 13 Cost: $89-$399 4899 Hwy. 6, Ste. 113C, Missouri City 281-584-6618 https://icodeschool.com

ACADEMICS

1 Located at Faith Lutheran Church, Club SciKidz camps immerse children pre-K through eighth grade in a variety of science-related topics, including mete- orology, robotics, video games, surgery, coding and stop motion animation. Dates: June 14-July 30 Cost: $295-$350 800 Brooks St., Sugar Land 713-589-8958 http://houston.clubscikidz.com 2 At two locations in Sugar Land, Code Ninjas oers campers ages 5-14 and of all skill levels hands-on coding experience. From designing a website to building a Minecraft world to becoming a Roblox developer, Code Ninja camps aim to en- gage children in the worlds of science and technology. Virtual camps are available.

iCode

Inspiration Stage

COURTESY ICODE

COURTESY INSPIRATION STAGE

4 The Houston Museum of Natural Sci- ence at Sugar Land’s in-person summer camps are packed full of engaging hands- on science and social studies activities. With camps titled Booms and Blast Os, Movie Monster Maker, and Build It Big— just to name a few—adventure awaits for campers age 6-12. The museum has updated its procedures in alignment with CDC recommendations and virtual camps are also available via Zoom. Dates: weekly May 31-Aug. 6 Cost: varies by camp and member status 13016 University Blvd., Sugar Land 281-313-2277 www.hmns.org/hmns-at-sugar-land

5 Language Kids World oers week- long summer camps where campers ages 4-12 can learn the Spanish language through a variety of camp themes, including Animal Planet, Camp Picasso, Adventures in Spain and Camp Safari. Camps incorporate hands-on activities, art, games, music and play to help chil- dren gain conversation skills and cultural awareness. Language Kids World also oers virtual camps in Spanish, Mandarin Chinese, German, French, Italian, English

and American Sign Language. Dates: weekly Jun 7-Aug. 13

Cost: regular immersion $265 per week (9 a.m.-3 p.m.), extended immersion $45 per

SUMMER 2021 IN PERSON AND VIRTUAL PROGRAMMING

FOR KIDS AGES 6–12

To register or for more information, visit hmns.org.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2021

week (3-6 p.m.) 11325 Fountain Lake Drive, Staord 281-565-1388 https://languagekids.com 6 Spanish Schoolhouse’s immersive summer camps for ages 3-8 aim to educate while entertaining. Campers can choose from a variety of theme-based camps in which they will learn Spanish culture and participate in hands-on activities, including science, music, art, cooking and games. Dates: weekly June 1-July 30 (camps are oered for two, three, four or ve days a week, and extended hours are also available) Cost: $101-$540 1120 Soldiers Field Drive, Sugar Land 281-565-0390 www.spanishschoolhouse.com 7 Study Dorm’s academic summer camps oer full-day and half-day math, reading and writing instruction to students in fth through 12th grade. Students will cover topics they might not have mastered during the previous school year as well as new subjects to prepare for next year in a fun classroom envi- ronment. High school students will also prepare for the SAT, PSAT and ACT.

Dates: June 7-Aug. 6 Cost: varies depending on camp duration 609 Dulles Ave., Ste. 500, Staord 281-818-4760 www.mystudydorm.com ARTS 8 Abrakadoodle summer arts camps feature art lessons, games, crafts and other creative activities for children ages 3-12. Camp themes include It’s a Jungle Out There, Artosaurus STEAM, Under the Sea and Space Art Adventure. Dates: June 7-10, June 28-July 1, July 12-15, Aug. 2-5 Cost: $200-$250 Sienna Recreation, 10323 Mount Logan,

ration Stage will also have dance, musical theater and acting intensive camps, which will be taught by industry professionals. Dates: TBD Cost: $250 per week, cost for intensive camps varies 12794 Fountain Lake Circle, Staord 713-302-5329 www.inspirationstage.com 10 School of Rock camps are designed to help students ages 5-18 with varying levels of music experience improve upon their performance skills and build upon their musical foundations. The weeklong camps in 2021 each have a dierent focus, such as songwriting, classic rock, punk and metal. Dates: June 7-11, June 14-18, June 28-July 2, July 19-23, Aug. 2-6 Cost: $399 per week 1935 Lakeside Plaza Drive, Sugar Land 832-939-8788 www.schoolofrock.com/music-camps/ sugarland DAY CAMPS

ty. This year, Camp in the City has three Sugar Land and Missouri City locations. Campers entering rst through sixth grade will engage in Bible studies and outdoor activities. Dates: June 7-11, June 28-July 2 (depend- ing on location) Cost: $310 Sugar Creek Baptist Church-Sugar Land Campus Sugar Creek Baptist Church-Missouri City Campus Houston’s First Baptist Church-Sienna 877-474-6326 www.pinecove.com 12 The Walden School’s summer camps, which have been running for 42 years, include reading and math labs as well as arts and crafts activities for infants through fth-graders. The school also oers swimming, gymnastics, taekwondo and music programs as well as local eld

Room Varney A, Missouri City Other dates and locations: TBD 832-679-3238 www.abrakadoodle.com/tx-southwest -suburbs-of-houston-register 9 Inspiration Stage , a performing arts and theater studio, is oering a number of summer camp productions and master- classes. The weeklong camps, which are open to children and young adults ages 4-19, culminate in a performance. Inspi- trips as part of its camp program, but activities vary due to the pandemic. Dates: June 7-Aug. 13 Cost: varies but approximately $825 per month 16103 Lexington Blvd., Ste. A, Sugar Land 281-980-0022 www.thewaldenschool.com ready for life. ready for college. 11 Camp in the City , a program of Pine Cove Christian Summer Camp, brings summer camp to the Houston communi- At Marine Mi l i tary Academy, we are more than a college preparatory school - we are forging tomorrow’ s leaders. Thi s summer, your son can experi ence what MMA has to offer during 4 weeks of Summer Camp from June 26 - July 24. Your son wi ll learn valuable leadership ski lls, l i fe ski lls and make fri ends whi le part icipat ing in strength and adventure act ivi t i es des igned to bui ld conf idence and character. Scan the QR code to learn more about 2021 Summer Camp at MMA. » 2021 Summer Camp June 26 - July 24th MARINE MILITARY ACADEMY

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • MARCH 2021

2021

C A M P G U I D E

GUIDE

A noncomprehensive list of camps in the Sugar Land & Missouri City area

COMPILED BY CLAIRE SHOOP

ages 4-13 day camp activities such as an indoor zip-line and rock wall, a ninja warrior course, karate, gymnastics as well as other sporting activities. Activities oered vary by location. Dates: June 1-Aug. 14 Cost: $40 per day, $175 per week Safety America Karate, 2595 Cordes Drive, Sugar Land Sugar Land Gymnastics, 16215 Lexington Blvd., Sugar Land Sienna Gymnastics and Karate, 4545 Sienna Parkway, Missouri City 281-980-3030 www.summercampsugarland.com 16 At Sienna Stables , campers partici- pate in a variety of activities that include practicing basic horseback riding skills; practicing Western, English and dressage riding techniques; learning about horse management and safety; and playing horseback games. The weeklong camps are designed for rst-time, intermediate and advanced riders ages 6-15. Campers are placed in groups based on riding ability and age. Dates: weekly June 7-Aug. 13 Cost: $499 per rider 8255 Camp Sienna Trail, Missouri City 281-778-7433 www.siennastables.com

17 Camp Olympia summer camps at Olympia Gymnastics and Tumbling are open for students and nonstudents ages 4-13. Campers are placed in age groups and rotate through dierent activities, which include open gym time, sports and outside activities. During the course of camp, there will also be special event days such as Carnival Day or Water Day. Extended care and meal options are avail- able for an additional cost. Dates: June 14-18, July 12-16, Aug. 9-13 Cost: $225 per week for existing students, $240 per week for nonstudents (early bird, sibling discounts and bundles available) 7100 Knights Court, Missouri City 832-321-7100 www.olympiatx.com 18 USA Ninja Challenge’s day camps work to build condence in children ages 6-12 through fun and tness. Throughout the camp, children of all ability levels will engage in the sport of ninja, which combines jumping, climbing, swinging, traversing and oor exercise to navigate obstacle courses. Dates: TBD Cost: TBD 202 Industrial Blvd., Ste. 903, Sugar Land 281-201-1880 www.ninjasugarland.com

SPORTS

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13 Discovery Camp at the Fort Bend Family YMCA is available for children ages 5-11 years old. Campers will partic- ipate in activities including creative and performing arts, science and technology, and sports and outdoor games. Dates: weekly June 1-Aug. 20 Cost: $135 and up 4433 Cartwright Road, Missouri City 281-499-9622 www.ymcahouston.org 14 Summer camps through Fort Bend Tennis Services are designed for beginner, intermediate and advanced players ages 8-18. Campers will learn and advance their skills through tness drills, instruction, coaching and activities. Dates: weekly in the summer Cost: $145 for Sugar Land residents, $155 for non-residents

Safety America Summer Camps

COURTESY SAFETY AMERICA SUMMER CAMPS

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Location: TBD 281-980-4219 www.fortbendtennis.com

15 With three dierent locations in Sugar Land and Missouri City, Safety America Summer Camps provide campers

USA Ninja Challenge

COURTESY USA NINJA CHALLENGE

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BUSINESS FEATURE

BY CLAIRE SHOOP

“MY COFFEE ROASTER IS THE HEART AND THE LUNGS OF THE BUSINESS.” JOSEPH MASTRANGELO, OWNER AND ROASTER, ZELIE BEANS COFFEE

The shop oers roasted beans but does not sell prepared beverages.

Zelie Beans Coee oers roasted coee beans from Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala and Nicaragua. PHOTOS BY LAURA AEBICOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Zelie Beans Coee is priced from $15 to $18, depending on where it is harvested.

Zelie Beans Coee Sugar Land specialty coee roaster focuses on fair wages for growers J oseph Mastrangelo began Zelie Beans Coee in the summer of 2018 as a side families through specialty coee” is another way to serve others. While he is not planning to open as a coee shop due to the health permits and regulations that would

1. The dried coee fruit, known as green beans, is loaded into the roaster. 2. The beans enter the hopper, where heat is added. 3. The roaster controls the amount of heat, which determines the roast. 4. The beans transition in color from green to yellow to cinnamon to brown. 5. A trier, a removable metal element on the roaster that allows Mastrangelo to pull a sample of the roasting beans, gives him the ability to check the beans throughout the process. 6. Once completed, a fan cools down the beans to stop the cooking process. 7. The process takes from 8-12 minutes. THE ROASTING PROCESS

“Coming from youth ministry and youth pastoring, I’d worked with a lot of at-risk youth, and I know that when they are put in these rock-and-a-hard-place situa- tions, they are left with very little options,” Mastrangelo said. “My goal with this is to help provide for the [coee growers’] families so their children have better options.” Mastrangelo began roasting coee out of BlendIn Coee Club in Sugar Land, where he said owner Weihong Zhang let him store his coee and pay by the hour to use the roasters. “That basically opened up the door where I was able to do it,” Mastrangelo said. “There was no way I was going to be able to aord all of the equipment and every- thing to start out on my own.” However, in October 2020, Mastrangelo purchased his own coee roaster and moved into a retail space—from which he sells and roasts coee—in Sugar Land. Mastrangelo said his roaster, which was built in Italy, is energy ecient and allows him to highlight the strength of the coee. “[My coee roaster] is the heart and the lungs of the business,” Mastrangelo said.

business that grew out of passion for good coee and as a way to make some extra money for his family. “I had been roasting coee at home for my wife, myself and fam- ily,” Mastrangelo said. “By that point, I had been roasting coee for nine to 10 years, and my wife was like, ‘Why don’t you start selling your coee?’” Mastrangelo said he sources Zelie Beans Coee from small family farmers across the world, espe- cially those looking to transition from commodity coee to specialty coee. “Small family farmers cannot make a viable living by selling com- modity coee because commodity coee pricing is so low,” Mastran- gelo said. “My hope in this is that [coee growers] can earn more money, learn more about the trade, learn about getting better access to the specialty coee market and be able to grow a more sustainable business model for their family and for future generations.” Prior to launching Zelie Beans as a full-time business, Mastrangelo was working at a church in youth ministry. He said Zelie Beans Cof- fee’s mission of “Families helping

require, Mastrangelo envisions his space to one day serve as a community center where people can gather together to enjoy a cup of coee. Mastrangelo maintains a strong e-commerce business, shipping across the country and to Canada. Furthermore, he is growing his wholesale customer base. Currently, Jupiter Pizza & Waes serves Zelie Beans Coee’s espresso. Mastrangelo said his target audi- ence is the conscientious consumer who cares about the entire process from eld to cup. A bag of Zelie Beans Coee retails for $15-$18, depending on where the coee is sourced from. “My goal as a coee roaster is not just to be buying coee from the growers and producers, but to help educate the consumers to understand why we should put a higher value on all these coees,” Mastrangelo said. Mastrangelo said he is proud of the quality of his coee as well as the story and people behind it. “My favorite coee I have is … the cup I have in my hand,” Mastrangelo said.

SOURCE: ZELIE BEANS COFFEE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Zelie Beans Coee 937 Eldridge Road, Sugar Land 346-391-5259 www.zeliebeanscoee.com Hours: Mon., Wed., Fri. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; closed Tue., Thu., Sat.-Sun.

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • MARCH 2021

University of Houston professor and director of the Center for Sustain- ability and Resilience. “It’s not think- ing enough about extreme weather events.” Furthermore, state Rep. Jacey Jetton, RRichmond, said the Texas electrical grid is built to withstand the hot sum- mers, not extreme winter weather. “[The grid is] made to be more open so they can breathe and stay cooler,” Jetton said. “We do have to nd a way to make sure that our systems are pre- pared to handle the hottest of summers and the coldest of winters, and what that looks like is not going to be the eas- iest of answers.” Damage estimates for the February winter storm are not yet known, but the Insurance Council of Texas said it is expected to be the largest claims event in the state’s history. By comparison, in the rst month after Hurricane Harvey, the council predicted that event to cost insurers $19 billion. “This has impacted every single Texan to one degree or another,” said Camille Garcia, director of communica- tion for the Insurance Council of Texas, in a district press release. “We are pro- jecting into the hundreds of thousands of claims.” A substantial portion of damage came after the freeze as water lines broke and pipes burst. Two Fort Bend ISD campuses—Glover Elementary School and Hightower High School— sustained “signicant damage,” and the district was closed for several days. Weeks later, residents are still waiting to repair property damage. The state has been working to renew plumbing licenses and coordinating with out- of-state plumbing companies to bring in more licensed plumbers. In a Feb. 20 executive order, Gov. Greg Abbott allowed plumber’s apprentices who have completed all other qualica- tions to perform work without direct

CONTINUED FROM 1

rewood. Still, her house had three burst pipes; two collapsed ceilings; and oor, carpet and bathroomdamage. “No way would I have imagined after serving 30 years in the military to include seven sea tours that I would be conducting damage control in my new home,” Chatman said. Chatman was just one of 1.42 million customers in the CenterPoint Energy service area who were in the dark by 8 p.m. Feb. 15. At one point, 77% of Missouri City residents were without power—as were the majority of Sugar Land and Fort Bend County residents, according to government ocials. It would take four days before power would be restored to nearly all of Cen- terPoint’s customers, according to data from the transmission provider. The Energy Reliability Council of Texas, which manages statewide elec- tric power ow and is one of several regulatory bodies under scrutiny fol- lowing the storm, had to force outages for more than 70 hours statewide to avoid a wider, longer-lasting energy shutdown, ocials said. “It created a humanitarian crisis,” ERCOT board member Jackie Sargent said during a Feb. 24 meeting. “People in Texas should not have to endure such hardship—or anywhere, for that matter—in 2021.” Unprecedented crisis On Feb. 14, every county in Texas was under a winter storm warning, according to the National Weather Ser- vice. Houston beat its 1895 record for the lowest high temperature with 35 degrees and the cold weather also lin- gered for almost a week. “Part of the problem is, when ERCOT does its long-range planning and fore- casting, it’s looking at averaging; it’s looking at trends,” said Bruce Race, a

The Electric Reliability Council of Texas manages an electric grid that covers most of Texas and is disconnected from larger interconnections covering the rest of the U.S.

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WESTERN INTERCONNECTION Includes El Paso and far West Texas 1 EASTERN INTERCONNECTION Includes portions of East Texas and the panhandle region 2

ERCOT INTERCONNECTION 3

ERCOT’s grid provides electric

ERCOT man- ages 90%

ERCOT provides for 26 million customers.

ERCOT’s grid includes 46,500 miles of transmission.

power to the majority of Texans.

of the Texas electrical load.

SOURCES: ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL OF TEXAS, PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION OF TEXAS, POWEROUTAGE.US, U.S. ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

ERCOT did alert generators and dis- tribution partners that the stormwould bring “record-breaking demand” to the system, but some lawmakers pointed out the decisions that set up the grid for potential failure were made years in advance, such as the decision by many generators to not protect facilities from harsh weather conditions—known as winterizing—and not having natural gas plants in a position to ramp up. “We knew that it was going to get too cold for us tobe able togenerate enough wind, and there were turbine issues. ... That was not the big story,” said Daniel Cohan, a Rice University professor of civil and environmental engineering. “I think [it was] the lack of preparation to get coal-red power plants, natural gas- red power plants [and] nuclear going, having adequate natural gas supply, and having that started ahead of time, really a lack of preparation.” In a Feb. 17 statement, ERCOT said more than 46,000 megawatts of

supervision from a licensed plumber. Fort Bend County Judge KP George sustained substantial property damage to his home, including ooding due to burst pipes andwalls and ceilings need- ing to be completely repaired. “In the middle of [the storm], my house got ooded,” George said. “This is ne; I mean hundreds of thousands of people have the same situation, and I’m just saying I’m not on any dier- ent level—I’m in the same boat as our citizens.” ‘A lack of preparation’ ERCOT was founded in 1970 to manage the power grid that covers most of Texas. While it is technically a nonprot, it is regulated by the Pub- lic Utility Commission of Texas. The PUC facilitates the wholesale and retail markets, oversees grid capacity and generation, and ensures access to trans- mission, though the council itself does not own power plants or infrastructure.

Out of 285 weather-related disasters that caused at least $1 billion in damage across the U.S. from 1980 to 2020, 124 occurred in Texas. This includes hurricanes, oods, droughts, freezes, wildres and other events.

A mix of local and federal programs are oering assistance for those aected by the storm.

STATE OF SHOCK

GETTING RELIEF

Federal Emergency Management Agency: FEMA can provide assistance to cover underinsured or uninsured individuals and businesses. www.disasterassistance.gov Small Business Administration: The SBA oers low-interest loans to help cover repairs and lost revenues. https://disasterloanassistance.sba.gov

City of Sugar Land Winter Storm Relief: Sugar Land City Council passed an ordinance authorizing some water bill adjustments and a faster permitting and inspection process. www.sugarlandtx.gov Fort Bend County Appraisal District: Property owners who experienced physical damage amounting to at least 15% of their property may qualify for a temporary exemption. www.cad.org Texas Department of Emergency Management: https://damage.tdem.texas.gov Fort Bend County: www.coem.org/report-your- damage-february-2021/

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REPORTING DAMAGE

Ocials are collecting information to better understand the extent of the damage. Individuals who do not need government relief are also encouraged to report.

SOURCE: NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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