Northwest Austin | October 2020

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION

VOLUME 14, ISSUE 9  OCT. 24NOV. 20, 2020

ONLINE AT

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Find deals in a snap: Point your camera to the QR code or visit communityimpact.com/deals .

IMPACTS

4 ELECTION

11 DELAWARE SUB SHOP

17

Austin’s service industry looks to carry pandemic lessons to 2021

“This pandemic has shif ted our thinking about our future plans dramatically— everything from how we

BY IAIN OLDMAN

dramatically—everything fromhowwe do our service to the size of space that we need,” said Raf Robinson, owner of SLAB BBQ & Beer in North Austin. On Oct. 7, Gov. Greg Abbott announced at a press conference that eective Oct. 14, bars could begin to reopen and operate at 50% capacity indoors. Outdoors bars are not subject to an occupancy limit, according to materials from the governor’s oce. However, county judges were ultimately left the power to dictate CONTINUED ON 18

Many restaurants and bars across Northwest Austin have experienced hurdles in their ght against the eco- nomic downturn brought on by the coronavirus pandemic. Across the city, as the state’s corona- virus safety enforcement and capacity limits have yo-yoed, local business owners said they have adapted to the pandemic by reimagining basic ele- ments of their business operations. “This pandemic has shifted our thinking about our future plans

do our service to the size of space that we need.”

RAF ROBINSON, COFOUNDER AND COOWNER OF SLAB BBQ & BEER

Massive $7.1B transit expansion plan in the hands of Austin’s electorate

WILL THE

? JACK FLAGLER COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

In November, Austin residents will decide whether to approve a tax increase allowing Capital Metro and Austin to build $7.1 billion of infrastructure. The data below shows an example of a Fiscal Year 2020-21 tax bill breakdown for the owner of a median-value $362,000 home in Austin who lives within Austin ISD and Travis County limits.

As vice chair of the city’s mobility com- mittee, District 6 Council Member Jimmy Flannigan said he sees Project Connect as a smart and holistic approach to the city’s worsening transit problems. “The system reaches parts of Austin that have never before had access to high-quality transit, and it includes improvements to bus service, bike lanes and sidewalks,” he said. If approved, Project Connect would build an Orange Line—a north-south rail service CONTINUED ON 20

BY JACK FLAGLER

The city of Austin and Capital Metro will ask Austin voters Nov. 3 to fund a plan that would connect neighborhoods throughout Northwest Austin to downtown through public transportation. Project Connect, a $7.1 billion investment, with about $3.85 billion coming from local property tax funds, would include two light-rail lines, an additional commuter rail line and a down- town, underground train station.

KEY

$6,134 $1,616

NONCITY ENTITIES

CITY OF AUSTIN

$317

PROJECT CONNECT TAX INCREASE

SOURCES: CAPITAL METRO, CITY OF AUSTIN, TRAVIS COUNTY TAX ASSESSOR AND COLLECTOR COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Contribute today! Use your phone camera to scan the QR code or visit

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Any amount matters. Together, we can continue to ensure our citizens stay informed and keep our local businesses thriving. Make an impact. Become a #CommunityPatron .

SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON

ABOUT WHAT’S HAPPENING AT AUSTIN CITY HALL

Facts on

Facts on

Facts on

The city staff has tried twice to go around a state court ruling that stopped Code Next in its tracks! The council and staff still want to force high-density, multi-family hous- ing into what have always been single family neighborhoods. This will increase traffic congestion and decrease parking, while making it more difficult for fire and EMS emer- gency responders to use neighbor- hood streets. The fate of Code Next will depend on who is on the next City Council! You must remember that when you vote!

In a scientifically accurate survey, 62% of Austinites did not think hir- ing fewer police officers will make Austin safer. People also did not think the answer to racist actions among our police officers is to get rid of the Organized Crime and Gang Unit nor the Park Police. Finally, research shows that in all parts of Austin and among all eth- nic and racial groups, people want police officers patrolling their neigh- borhoods to deter burglaries, thefts, assaults, and vandalism. We contin- ue to advocate, not for fewer, but for better-trained officers.

In the middle of a pandemic, when so many are out of work, behind on rent or mortgage payments and struggling to cover the basic ne- cessities, the city wants you to pass Prop A on the November 3 rd ballot. They want to impose a permanent 24.6% tax hike on homeowners, and at a least 26.3% tax hike on renters. This tax hike will be per- manent. These hikes would pay for an “initial investment” on what could be a $10 BILLION or more rail project. Finally, the Board ad- ministering this huge sum of money will be appointed, and you will have no influence over waste, fraud, or incompetent spending.

YOUR CHOICE IS HOW YOU USE THESE FACTS. A great deal of money is being spent to tell you what a few powerful people want you to hear! WE ARE THE VOICES OF AUSTIN. 82% of Austinites are concerned that Austin is going the wrong way. We’re here to make sure you hear the truth before election day!

USE OUR TAX INCREASE CALCULATOR . Homeowners can see for themselves what their personal tax increase will be.

PAID FOR BY VOICES OF AUSTIN. NOT AUTHORIZED BY ANY CANDIDATE OR CANDIDATE COMMITTEE.

2

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

4

Now Open, Coming Soon &more

FROMPHYLLIS: Almost every day, I have the pleasure of meeting some very tenacious and talented people who have opened and are running small businesses during this pandemic. There have been signicant struggles for many, but what about restaurants? How are they managing their changing business model? Senior Reporter Iain Oldman visited several and got answers in his story (see Pages 18-19). Phyllis Campos, GENERALMANAGER

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Phyllis Campos, pcampos@communityimpact.com EDITOR Brian Perdue, bperdue@communityimpact.com SENIOR REPORTER Iain Oldman GRAPHIC DESIGNER Mel Stea ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Taylor Caranfa METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Travis Baker MANAGING EDITOR Amy Denney ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Haley Grace CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across ve metropolitan areas providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON

FROMBRIAN: Project Connect—a $7.1 billion transportation initiative—is on the Nov. 3 ballot. While the sweeping project aims to alleviate trac and reach some underserved communities, Project Connect comes with a price: $3.85 billion of the total cost will come from local property taxes, according to the city. Our front-page story addresses the pros and cons of the monumental proposal. Brian Perdue, EDITOR

TODO LIST

6

Local events and things to do TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 9 Transit agency expects sales tax hit

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Local sources 29

New businesses 13

3

43

Tollway repairs

Election Day polling locations

ELECTION 11 Pandemic forces election ocials to pivot ELECTION 13 Election Day polling locations

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact

Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

Our local teams tailor campaigns for all business sizes and industries wanting to reach their customer base and accomplish their nancial goals. Our products ADVERTISEWITHUS

SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

Newspaper’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens

stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON CONTACT US 16225 Impact Way, Ste. 1, Pugerville, TX 78660 • 5129896808 PRESS RELEASES nwanews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

include newspaper ads; mailbox-targeted sticky notes, inserts and direct mail; and digital options. We also partner with Community Impact Printing for nationwide specialty orders. Our advertising clients self- report 97% satisfaction with their overall experience, and a recent third-party Readex survey proved 78% of paper recipients read three of the last four editions, and from what they read, 83% “took action” of some kind. Contact us today for more info! communityimpact.com/advertising

DAILY INBOX

Sign up for our daily newsletter to receive the latest headlines direct to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter

BUSINESS FEATURE Black WidowMMA DINING FEATURE

15

17

Delaware Sub Shop IMPACT DEALS

Proudly printed by

23

communityimpact.com

@impactnews_nwa

facebook.com/impactnewsnwa

city tree limbs... You can report it!

WE’VE MOVED! PLEASE COME SEE US AT OUR NEW LOCATION!

Your Austin area source for fabulous fabrics and trims, custom window treatments, upholstery, and custom bedding.

OCTOBER ANNIVERSARY SALE all fabric and trim for the month of October 20% off

Call

12332 RR 620 NORTH | AUSTIN, TX 78750 512.331.7503 | PLUSHHOMEFABRIC.COM

RIDGELINE DR.

620

183

3

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

45 TOLL

12

LYNDHURST ST.

PECAN PARK BLVD.

LAKELINE MALL DR.

12

MOPAC

WELLS BRANCH PKWY.

LAKE CREEK PKWY.

1

Green Herbal Care

POND SPRINGS RD.

COURTESY GREEN HERBAL CARE

183

The health and wellness retailer, which has one other Austin location, sells can- nabidiol creams, oils, gummies and more. 512-770-1064 13 Purple Mattress opened its doors in Domain Northside at 3200 Palm Way, Ste. 146, Austin, in mid-October. The nationwide retailer sells mattresses and pillows using custom technology designed to stay cool and comfortable. www.purple.com COMING SOON 14 Local chain Tony C’s Pizza & Beer Garden will open a North Austin location later this fall at 2900 W. Anderson Lane, Austin, according to a company news release. The Italian eatery oers pizzas, subs, gelato and imported wines on tap. www.tonycsbeergarden.com 15 Shoemakers Soludos will open a retail location in Domain Northside at 11700 Rock Rose Ave., Ste 140, Austin, lat- er this fall. New York-based Soludos sells sandals, espadrilles and other footwear for men and women. www.soludos.com 16 Enjoy Nails and Spa is opening a location in The Shops at Domain at 3310 W. Braker Lane, Austin, according to a news release from commercial real estate company Resolut RE. The nail salon oers a full menu of pedicure and mani- cure services as well as nail enhancements and waxing services. 512-465-2253. www.enjoynailspaaustin.com 17 Juliet Italian Kitchen will open its second location in February 2021 at The Arboretum. The new restaurant, set to be located at 10000 Research Blvd., Austin, will serve classic Italian fare with dishes made from pasta made fresh daily. The Arboretum kitchen will also make dishes unique to that location. 512-479-1800. 18 Chabad of Austin announced Aug. 14 it will move its synagogue and Hebrew Preparatory School to a new property at 3500 Hyridge Drive, Austin. Construc- tion began in August to demolish the existing space and set up 8,000 square feet of modular classrooms, according to Rabbi Yosef Levertov. Chabad of Austin’s synagogue is moving from Spicewood Springs Road, and its school is moving from Parmer Lane. 512-977-0770. www.chabadaustin.com www.juliet-austin.com RELOCATION 35

620

NORTHWEST AUSTIN

6

SPICEWOOD SPRINGS RD.

183

RENFERT WAY

21

JOLLYVILLE RD.

3

CENTURY OAKS TERRACE

13

WALNUT CREEK PARK

15

7

22

16

ARBORETUM BLVD.

8

4

17

19

20

360

2

2222

HYRIDGE DR.

18

SPICEWOOD SPRINGS RD.

SHOAL CREEK BLVD.

9

14

35

CAPITAL OF TEXAS HWY.

5

ANDERSON LN.

11

10

MAP NOT TO SCALE

N TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 Barbershop Modern Gents opened Sept. 18. It oers men’s haircuts, beard trims, waxing and conditioning. The shop is located at Ste. 159 inside Salon Repub- lic, which is itself located at 13343 N. US 183, Ste. 400, Austin. 512-983-0230 2 Taqueria Los Regios began operating in September at 2601 W. Braker Lane, Austin, in the parking lot of the Sunoco gas station. The food truck serves break- fast and lunch tacos and emplames, a Mexican specialty dish from Nuevo León. 512-736-1839. www.facebook.com/pepetono23 3 Krewe opened Sept. 14 in Domain Northside. The eyewear company, which is located in a tiny house across from Flower Child at 11721 Rock Rose Ave., Ste. 160, Austin, sells designer glasses and sun- glasses. 504-320-2814. www.krewe.com 4 Domain Northside opened its West Chelsea Contemporary Art Gallery pop-up in mid-September at 11621 Rock Rose Ave., Ste. 116, Austin. The gallery space showcases the work of a handful of contemporary artists from across the world, including Takashi Murakami and Alex Katz. The pop-up is expected to run through Jan. 3. 512-919-4221. www.artsy.net/west-chelsea-contemporary

5 Tatsumi Sushi opened Sept. 10 at 2700 W. Anderson Lane, Ste. 212, Austin. Executive Chef Elvin Jin helms the new restaurant. Jin said he grew up shadowing his parents at their own sushi restaurant in the San Francisco area, then after college traveled to Japan to cook. The restaurant is open for dine-in and takeout seven days a week for lunch and Friday through Sunday for dinner. 512-906-0229. www.tatsumiaustin.com 6 Los Angeles-based Dog Haus opened its rst Austin brick-and-mortar location in late September at 7701 N. RM 620, Austin. The restaurant and beer hall, which is fo- cused on gourmet hot dogs and sausages, is owned by spouses Frank and Cathy Zoel- la. The newly constructed, 2,600-square- foot space will feature 24 beers on tap. 512-344-9481. www.doghaus.com 7 Four Points Outdoor Eatery opened in October at 6901 N. RM 620, Austin. The outdoor eatery features eight to 10 international food trailers and a covered patio. The owners also operate the four locations of Mesa Rosa Mexican Restaurant, which has been in the Austin area for 27 years. 512-789-6250 8 Madera & Grill held its grand opening Aug. 8 at 6811 N. RM 620, Austin. The Venezuelan food truck serves wood-red smoked meat plates, chicken wings, are-

pas and more. 305-608-9978. www.instagram.com/maderandgrill 9 Child Neurology Consultants of Austin opened a new 10,000-square-foot clinic in late September at 7940 Shoal Creek Blvd., Ste. 100, Austin. This new clinic location replaces CNCA’s former Far West Boulevard clinic. CNCA helps children with neurological and neuromus- cular disorders. 512-494-4000. www.childneurotx.com 10 China Fu opened in late June at 825 E. Rundberg Lane, Ste. G5, Austin, in the space formerly occupied by Li Hot Pot. The restaurant serves Chinese cuisine, such as yakisoba and Mongolian beef, and oers delivery to surrounding areas. 512-852-8166. https://china-fu.business.site 11 Nido Verde di Reggio Emilia Spanish Immersion Preschool opened Oct. 7 at 1701 W. Anderson Lane, Austin. The Spanish-language and instruction school serves students from 3 months old to rst grade, owner Henry Rodridguez said. The school follows the International Bac- calaureate Program. 512-202-8295. www.nidoverdedireggioemilia.com 12 Green Herbal Care celebrated its grand opening in early October at 6301 W. Parmer Lane, Ste. 602, Austin.

4

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY IAIN OLDMAN

14

17

Tony C’s Pizza & Beer Garden

Juliet Italian Kitchen

COURTESY TONY C’S PIZZA & BEER GARDEN

COURTESY JULIET ITALIAN KITCHEN

Northwest Austin residents Haley and Derek Lawwill open Slackers Brewing Co. in Anderson Mill in spring 2021. (Iain Oldman/Community Impact Newspaper)

EXPANSION 19 Rockwell Automation has expanded into an 18,319-square-foot space at 9500 Arboretum Blvd., Austin, according to real estate company Aquila Com- mercial. Rockwell Automation builds software and technology for industrial automation, and it operates internation- ally. www.rockwellautomation.com NAME CHANGES 20 North Austin staple Ross’ Old Austin Cafe ocially reopened in mid-August as Luisa’s Patio at 11800 N. Lamar Blvd., Austin. Luisa’s Patio sells traditional Mexican dishes, such as street tacos and sopes, and serves Latin American-in- spired alcoholic drinks. The restaurant has also kept on cooks from Ross’ Old Austin Cafe and oers dishes from the

former restaurant’s menu. 512-835-2414. Facebook: Luisa’s Patio 21 Insight Behavioral Health, located at 12221 Renfert Way, Austin, rebranded as Pathlight Mood and Anxiety Center in September. Pathlight oers treatments for anxiety disorders, mood disorders and trauma-related conditions. 512-814-8255. www.pathlightbh.com CLOSING 22 Austin pizzeria Brick Oven , which opened its rst location in 1982, and its sister restaurant Baretto are closing in the Arboretum at 10710 Research Blvd., Aus- tin, on Nov. 30. Co-owner Donnie Johnson said ownership is currently searching for a new location for Brick Oven. 512-345-6181 (Brick Oven). www.brickovenaustin.com. 512-345-799. (Baretto). www.barettoatx.com

FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON Northwest Austin residents Derek and Haley Law are set to open Slackers Brewing Co. , Anderson Mill’s rst-ever brewery, sometime in spring 2021. Derek said malty beers, such as Belgian ales and stouts, will be the “heart and soul” of Slackers Brewing Co.’s oering. Slackers Brewing Co. will have a private room for breastfeeding parents; a quiet room for families; and play areas for children of all ages, with Lego sets, board games and more, Haley said.

12233 N. RM 620, Ste. 204, Austin www.slackersbrewing.com

183

EL SALIDO PKWY.

620

LAKE CREEK PKWY.

ANDERSON MILL RD.

N

$5 off $50

One per person. One time use. Can’t Combine. Expires Nov. 15, 2020. code: CI-NWA-OCT5 or $10 off $100 One per person. One time use. Can’t Combine. Expires Nov. 15, 2020. code: CI-NWA-OCT10

The healthiest pet supplies for 74 years and counting.

Braker & 183 in North Hills plaza

Far West West of Mopac on Far West Blvd

Free Same-Day Delivery on local orders $49+ We temporarily waived all fees!

www.tomlinsons.com

Don’t put off your mammogram. One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer during her lifetime. Mammograms can find cancer before a lump can be felt and early detection saves lives. ARA’s imaging centers are set up to protect you from COVID-19 so you can feel free to get your mammogram safely.

Schedule now. Visit ThanksMamm.com today.

5

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

TODO LIST

October and November events

COMPILED BY IAIN OLDMAN

START YOUR HOLIDAY SHOPPING EARLY BLUE GENIE ART BAZAAR

OCT. 24 NOV. 7

NOV. 5 NOV. 13

LOCAL FILMFESTIVAL GOES VIRTUAL AUSTIN JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL

VIRTUAL EVENT OCT. 31NOV. 15 TEXAS BOOK FESTIVAL This year, for the rst time in its 25- year history, the Texas Book Festival will be held entirely online. The festival will host more than 100 featured authors for book discussions and panels over two weeks of online programming. Free. Times vary. 512-477-4055 All events held online at www.texasbookfestival.org The Texas Book Festival will be all-virtual this year. (Courtesy Bob Daem)

The Blue Genie Art Bazaar features hundreds of artists at its North Austin location and on its website. Free. Daily, 10 a.m.- 10 p.m. Blue Genie Art Bazaar, 6100 Airport Blvd., Austin. 512-222-7303. www.bluegenieartbazaar.com

The Austin Jewish Film Festival returns in November with dozens of lms online and special drive-in movie events. $120- $200. Showtimes vary. Dell Jewish Community Center, 7300 Hart Lane, Austin. www.austinj.org

24 THROUGHNOV. 7 SCREAMHOLLOWRETURNS Smithville’s haunted park attraction, Scream Hollow, returns with precautions to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Only groups of six or fewer will be permitted to go through the four haunted house attractions at any time. Scream Hollow features live music on Friday and Saturday nights. Ticket prices vary. Times vary. Scream Hollow, 149 Split Rail Lane,

OCTOBER 24 THROUGHNOV. 1 CATCHA SLASHER FILM Alamo Drafthouse Lakeline is screening horror movie classics to celebrate Halloween. Through Nov. 1, guests can watch “A Nightmare on Elm Street,” “Ghostbusters” and more on the big screen in a safe environment. Ticket prices vary. Showtimes vary. Alamo Drafthouse Lakeline, Austin. 14028 N. US 183, Bldg. F, Austin. 512-861-7070. www.drafthouse.com

NOVEMBER 21 PAINT LIKE BOB ROSS Cordovan Art School invites guests to an afternoon of learning to paint sunset scenes in the style of famous art instructor Bob Ross. This class, taught by a Bob Ross-certied instructor, is designed for beginners and intermediate painters, and no previous experience is necessary. $50. 1:30-4:30 p.m. Cordovan Art School NW Austin Studio, 8108 Mesa

Smithville. 512-669-1292. www.screamhollow.com

Drive, Austin. 512-300-1200. www.cordovanartschool.com

Find more or submit Northwest Austin events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

Scheduling care before Dec. 31 may save you money If you’ve met your deductible or have unused FSA dollars, schedule care now Make an appointment today for the things you may have put off this year. • Annual physical • Mammography • Joint replacement • Gynecological surgery • Spine surgery • Digestive health • Screenings (colonoscopy, heart, lung) Use your FSA money to pay for qualified medical care you need that is not covered by your health plan. And if you have met your deductible, you may only have to pay a copay for a visit.

Schedule your appointment before Dec. 31 at GetSetonCare.com

© Ascension 2020. All rights reserved.

6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Get instant listing alerts, save your favorites, share comments with your co-buyer and see sold prices on the new realtyaustin.com.

realtyaustin.com/p/6453913

realtyaustin.com/p/5623425

$519,000

$449,900

4 bds

3 ba

3,603 sq ft

3 bds

2 ba

1,332 sq ft

Our campuses are open. Come for a tour today!

13500 Briar Hollow Dr, Austin, TX 78729 David Zavaletta | 512-810-1734

11719 Spotted Horse Dr, Austin, TX 78759 Kathy and Winona Team | 512-461-6816

Challenger School offers uniquely fun and academic classes for preschool to eighth grade students. Our students learn to think for themselves and to value independence.

Avery Ranch (PS–8) (512) 341-8000 15101 Avery Ranch Boulevard, Austin Round Rock (PS–K) (512) 255-8844 1521 Joyce Lane, Round Rock Spicewood Springs (PS–K) (512) 258-1299 13015 Pond Springs Road, Austin

realtyaustin.com/p/6118366

realtyaustin.com/p/8296195

$430,000

$410,000

3 bds

2 ba

1,228 sq ft

2 bds

2 ba

1,564 sq ft

4711 Spicewood Springs Rd #8-148, Austin, TX 78759 Joe and Cara Keenan | 512-415-7653

1900 Dauphine Cv, Austin, TX 78727 Robie Dodson | 512-565-4701

© 2020, Challenger Schools Challenger School admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin.

An independent private school offering preschool through eighth grade

Give me a call and I can help answer your Medicare questions so you can find the UnitedHealthcare® Medicare Advantage plan that fits your needs. LocalhelpwithyourMedicarequestions. Takeadvantageof it. MEDICARE 2021 ANNUAL ENROLLMENT IS HERE! Before you enroll in a Medicare plan, visit us at the United Healthcare Enrollment Center. Enrolling in a Medicare plan that fits your needs starts with find- i g the right information. Stop by when it fits your schedule to speak with a licensed agent one on one and get the answers to your Medicare questions. We will help you compare plans and will ensure your enrollment is complete. Take the confusion out of Medicare Get help comparing plans

realtyaustin.com/p/5251635

realtyaustin.com/p/7045344

$350,000

$265,900

2 bds

2 ba

1,194 sq ft

3 bds

2 ba

1,312 sq ft

8821 Honeysuckle Trl, Austin, TX 78759 Elena Howard | 512-925-2456

12212 Brigadoon Ln #146, Austin, TX 78727 Lily Lynn | 512-771-5865

realtyaustin.com/p/1679329

realtyaustin.com/p/2130464

Receive one-on-one service

$205,000

$179,900

We look forward to helping you explore your Medicare options so that you can enroll with confidence.

2 bds

1 ba

942 sq ft

1 bds

1 ba

740 sq ft

Make switching plans easier

2320 Gracy Farms Ln #1231, Austin, TX 78758 Michelle Kopp | 512-657-3305

2320 Gracy Farms Ln #333, Austin, TX 78758 Schaffer Team | 512-202-9643

United Healthcare Enrollment Center 1150 S Bell Blvd Bldg 5, Cedar Park, Tx 78613 www.thecochrungroup.com • info@thecochrungroup.com

I’m Adela Nino-Cochrun The Cochrun Group, a licensed sales representative in Austin and surrounding areas. When it comes to Medicare, one size definitely doesn’t fit all. What works well for your neighbor may not be the best fit for you. And what met your needs last year might not be the best fit this year. Take advantage of this time to explore your Medicare choices so you can enroll in a plan with confidence. I’m here to help. I know the ins and outs of Medicare, and I can help make it easier for you to understand too. Go ahead, take advantage. Adela Nino-Cochrun The Cochrun Group Licensed Sales Representative Cpl, US Marine Corps, 8 years served 512-627-3475, TTY 711 www.MyUHCagent.com/the.cochrun.group Adela Cochrun 512-627-3475 Daniela Thomas 210-872-0984 Antonieta Graham 210-872-0873 Tim Graham 915-539-9035 Gayle Emerson 512-233-9953

ACTIVE UNDER CONTRACT

ACTIVE UNDER CONTRACT

realtyaustin.com/p/6557619

realtyaustin.com/p/1513220

$399,900

$275,000

3 bds

2.5 ba 2,030 sq ft

2 bds

2 ba

1,283 sq ft

4603 Oak Creek Dr, Austin, TX 78727 Terri Michelle | 512-608-1158

12212 Brigadoon Ln #150, Austin, TX 78727 Lisa Munoz | 512-856-4549

7

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

Savings around the corner. Let us help you save on car insurance and more.

Let’s Get Virtual Your Campus Visit is One Click Away Thursday, Oct. 29 at 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 12 at 6 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 6 at 1:30 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 10 at 1:30 p.m. D AT E S Designed for prospective boarding and day students, grades 5 and above. To learn more and register, visit www.sstx.org/campusvisits.

11101 Burnet Road, Austin Graves Erskine | 512-993-3980 geico.com/austin-north

Learn More. Live More. Become More.

Some discounts, coverages, payment plans, and features are not available in all states, in all GEICO companies, or in all situations. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, DC 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image © 1999–2020. © 2020 GEICO 20_234891

Austin, TX • 512-327-1213 ext. 210 • admission@sstx.org

KEEPING YOU CONNECTED To all the places you live, work, and play

Whether you drive, take the bus, bike, or walk, the Mobility Authority has a path for you. Our roadway network connects residents to everything they love about Central Texas. More reliable travel, for any way you travel.

www.MobilityAuthority.com

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Capital Metro budget sees $14million dip in sales tax revenue Projected

COMPILED BY JACK FLAGLER & IAIN OLDMAN

CAPITAL METRO BUDGET BY THE NUMBERS Capital Metro is forecasting a decrease in available sales tax revenue for its upcoming scal year.

Operating expenses are down

Early in the summer, when Capital Metro began the process of drafting its budget for the upcoming scal year, Chief Financial Ocer Reinet Marneweck said sta would prepare best- and worst-case scenarios for the public transportation agency’s board of directors regarding revenue. Capital Metro is not funded through property taxes. To pay bus operators and mechanics, build new infrastructure, maintain its vehicles and cover other budget expenses, Capital Metro largely relies on a 1% sales tax levied throughout the area it serves. That sales tax revenue took a sig- nicant dive this spring as businesses struggled in the wake of government shutdown orders intended to keep the public safe from the spread

$251.7 MILLION in FY 2020-21 sales tax revenue

State crews are working on the I35 frontage roads near Parmer Lane. (Courtesy Texas Department of Transportation)

$14MILLION decrease from FY 2019-20

3.4%

in FY 2020-21

ONGOING PROJECTS

SOURCE: CAPITAL METROCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

35

Mobility Authority, a transportation organization, is performing mainte- nance work on numerous roadways in Northwest Austin throughout October and November. In a Sept. 23 news release, the Mobility Authority stated road main- tenance will begin on 183A Toll, the express lane on MoPac and SH 45 N. Work on the roadways will include replacing road striping, delineator posts and signage. According to the Mobility Author- ity, the new delineator posts installed of COVID-19. However, sales have rebounded since April. When the Capital Metro board of directors voted to adopt the agency’s budget for scal year 2020-21 in a 6-0 vote Sept. 28, the sales tax revenue projections for the upcom- ing year landed squarely between Marneweck’s best- and worst-case projections. Capital Metro projects it will bring in $251.7 million in sales tax revenue during the FY 2020-21 budget cycle,

a $14 million drop from the number it forecasted last year. In June, Marneweck estimated the revenue for the next budget cycle could come in somewhere between $245.1 million and $264.4 million. Overall, the $390.5 million FY 2020-21 budget is down 3.27% from FY 2019-20, and operating expenses— money spent on vehicles, salaries, fuel and other ongoing expenses to run the transportation network—are down 3.4%.

W. YAGER LN.

N

Parmer Lane diverging diamond TxDOT crews began reconstruction of the southbound I-35 frontage road between Parmer Lane and Yager Lane in October. The road will be reduced to one lane through November. Timeline: July 2019-mid-2021

MobilityAuthority starts tollwaymaintenance The Central Texas Regional on MoPac near Parmer Lane will change the gap that currently exists

The Central Texas Regional Mobility Authority is doing maintenance work on three tollways through November.

183

35

45 TOLL

183A TOLL

on the roadway. The new break directs vehicles to exit the express lane, merge into the untolled lanes and exit MoPac at the Parmer exit. “Unfortunately, we’ve observed unlawful and dangerous ‘lane divers’ illegally crossing over into the express lane from the general-purpose lanes at this location,” the agency wrote in its Sept. 23 news release. Short term lane closures are sched- uled throughout the maintenance work during o-peak hours.

N

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF OCT. 15. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT NWANEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. include new trac signals, cross- walks, new curbs and a median. Timeline: spring 2020-late fall 2020 North Lamar Blvd. improvements City of Austin crews are continuing construction at North Lamar Boule- vard and West Powell Lane. Additions

MOPAC

183

360

2222

N

SOURCE: CENTRAL TEXAS REGIONAL MOBILITY AUTHORITYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

3 easy ways to get your flu shot at ARC:  Visit any of our ARC Flu Clinics  Ask your doctor at your next appointment  Get a curbside flu shot – Limited availability at select locations Protect yourself and your loved ones too!

Book your flu shot ARCappointments.com

9

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

Make your business more profitable. UNLIMITED 2%CASH BACK ON ALL PURCHASES $ 0 Annual Fee $ 0 Balance Transfer Fee $ 0 Fraud liability on unauthorized purchases

Apply today at rbfcu.org

Membership eligibility required. Subject to credit approval. Rates and terms subject to change. Other restrictions may apply. RN606812

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

ELECTION

PATH TO THE POLLS

Voter confidence, safety alter election plans

BY OLIVIA ALDRIDGE & TAYLOR JACKSON BUCHANAN

by the Early Voting Ballot Board. “We’ve never really concerned ourselves with putting a self-service application on the website before, because the volume of inquiries and corre- spondence was manageable,” Davis said. “With so many folks applying for ballot by mail for the first time we’re well past the manageable point now.” DeBeauvoir and Davis agree that voting early is the best way for voters to ensure they make it to the voting booth with the expectation of long lines on Election Day. While voting lines can be unwieldy in any elec- tion year, 6-foot social distancing requirements are likely to lengthen them in November, Smith said. Travis County will operate 37 early voting and 177 Election Day polling locations. Williamson County will operate 19 early voting and 57 Election Day polling locations. During the voting period, residents can use their county’s website to check wait times at nearby polls and choose one with a short wait. Health and safety Social distancing is just one aspect of the health and sanitation requirements planned for area polling places. Many of these precautions, including plastic barriers, finger cots for signatures, popsicle sticks for voting screens and personal protective equipment for poll workers and voters, were already put in place during July’s primary run-off elections. Nathan Ryan, a local business executive who volunteered at the polls in July, said he felt satisfied by the precautions taken at that time. “We took safety measures extremely seriously. We would listen to any concerns that any voter had, and make sure that [if] they felt like they needed PPE, or if there were things like that that we could be helpful with, then we would make sure that they have what they needed,” he said. Neither Travis County nor Williamson County experienced a significant increase in positive coro- navirus tests following the July election, something local health experts have attributed to good health practices at the polls. Assuming the current statewide and local mask mandates remain in place through Nov. 3, voters will be asked to wear masks to the polls. However, DeBeauvoir and Davis said voters who refuse to wear a mask will still be allowed to vote. “We really want all of our voters to wear a mask,” Davis said. “But we cannot require them to do so. We cannot turn them away from voting.” The most important mission of the clerk’s office for this election, DeBeauvoir said, is to make voters feel safe and confident to vote. “They’ve been frightened by coming inside the polling place, and they’ve been frightened about putting ballots in the mail. What else is left to vot- ers?” she said. “Don’t let them take those options away from you. You can vote by mail and you can vote in person—safely.”

Both Williamson County and Travis County election officials are preparing for record-setting numbers of ballots by mail in the upcoming election. As of Oct. 20, the eighth day of early voting, Williamson County reported 18,674 residents voted early by mail— approximately 7,000 more than the number who voted by mail for the entire 2016 election, according to county election results. “We are certainly seeing the highest number of applications for ballot by mail that the county has ever seen in a given election,” Williamson County Election Administrator Chris Davis said. Travis County Clerk Dana DeBeauvoir said 100 million mail-in ballots are expected nationally, 100,000 of them from Travis County voters. That is around 12% of the county’s 828,644 registered voters as of the July 2020 midterm elections. In order to prepare for this influx and in person voters’ health and safety, Davis and DeBeauvoir are expanding voting options through lesser-known avenues in Texas’ legal code, including options like drive-thru drop offs, curbside voting and mail-in ballot tracking. “We really are trying to make sure that voters feel safe enough that they will not discount any of those methods of voting that are available to them,” DeBeauvoir said. In Texas, only certain voters can receive and cast ballots via mail: those who are over the age of 65, confined to jail, expecting to be out of the county or who have a disability. While Texas Democrats have petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court to allow all registered voters access tomail-in ballots during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, Texas’ rules will likely be unchanged come November, according to a local elections expert, professor Brian Smith of the St. Edward’s University Political Science Department. “Texas has very restrictive mail-in voting require- ments. Don’t assume that they’re going to be really relaxed anytime before Election Day,” said Smith. While many states, including Texas, examined mail-in voting regulations this year, the U.S. Postal Service came under scrutiny for budget cuts that some politicians said would threaten the office’s ability to process mail-in ballots. In August, U.S. Postmaster General Louis DeJoy testified to Con- gress about the cuts. DeBeauvoir called his decision to remove some high-volume mail-sorting machines “deliberate sabotage.” In a tweet, the Postal Service expressed confidence in smoothly handling election mail, saying “delivering America’s election mail is our number one priority between now and Election Day.” Williamson County launched a new online tracking system in mid-September. One of the first of its kind in Texas, the system allows registered voters who have requested a ballot by mail to track the sta- tus of their ballot: application processing, ballot en route to the voter, completed ballot received by the county and completed ballot accepted for counting

Local voters have two options to cast their vote in the November 2020 election after the mail-in ballot application window ended Oct. 23.

SOURCES: TRAVIS COUNTY, WILLIAMSON COUNTY/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

EARLY VOTING Travis County residents can vote at 37 early voting locations, and Williamson County residents can vote at any of 19 early voting locations. Vote from 7 a.m.- 7 p.m. through Oct. 30. In Williamson County, early voting polls are open 1 p.m.-6 p.m. on Sundays. MAIL-INVOTING The application deadline for mail-in ballots was Oct. 23. If you received one, there are two ways to return a ballot received through the U.S. Postal Service: • Return the ballot via mail • From Oct. 1-Nov. 3, hand deliver your election ballot at 5501 Airport Blvd., Austin, for Travis County residents and 301 SE Inner Loop, Ste. 104, Georgetown, for Williamson County residents.

ELECTIONDAY VOTING

On Nov. 3, 177 polling places will open to Travis County voters, and 57 will open to Williamson County voters. Longer lines are likely due to social distancing requirements. Anyone in line by 7 p.m., when polls close, will be able to cast a vote.

PROTOCOL FOR THE POLLS

Many standard COVID-19 protocols, such as social distancing, are planned for area polls, as are some specifically geared toward voters. FINGER COTS/POPSICLE STICKS Will help voters avoid touching screens directly BARRIERS Will separate voters from poll workers, offering protection to both SANITIZING STATIONS Will be available at entrances and exits MASKS Will be offered to voters who do not have them; anyone entering the polling place will be asked to wear a mask covering their mouth and nose

11

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

Content paid for by Upper Brushy Creek WCID

In November 2020, the District will ask voters to consider an $85 million bond issuance to fund flood safety projects throughout the Upper Brushy Creek Watershed. Why Bonds? Since 2001, the District has leveraged the maximum voter-approved two-cent tax rate to slowly save funds for flood safety projects. While this system has allowed the District to implement projects over time, it takes years of saving to fund smaller rehabilitation projects and delays larger projects. In the same way that a mortgage allows homeowners to buy a home and pay over time, using bonds allows the District to fund flood safety projects now, paying off the debt with future tax revenue. With quicker construction periods, the projects are less likely to be subject to additional costs from deferred rehabilitation and inflation in construction and right-of-way costs. How will the bonds affect my tax rate? The District utilizes most of its current maximum two-cent tax rate to incrementally raise capital funds. Less than a third of the two-cent tax rate is required for ongoing Maintenance & Operations (M&O). The existing two-cent tax is currently projected to support debt payments for over $100 million of bond debt. It is also currently projected that the bond debt payments coupled with the M&O costs would not exceed the full two-cent tax.

Flood Mitigation Projects will mitigate flooding in two of the most at-risk areas in the County in accordance with the Flood Plan. These projects will also protect infrastructure and improve emergency access to the area. As bond capacity allows, the District will work with other communities to address regional flood mitigation risks identified in other areas. • Block House Creek is a proposed multi-phase project, in partnership with the City of Cedar Park, that plans for channel and other drainage improvements. • Lake Creek is a proposed multi-phase project, initiated in partnership with the City of Round Rock, including the construction of the new Dam 101. Dam Rehabilitation Projects come from the 2020 Study which categorized breach risk using the Joint Federal Risk Category method – an approach developed by multiple federal dam agencies for use in portfolio risk management (FEMA 2015). The Study prioritized rehabilitation projects to evaluate and implement the most cost-effective ways to alleviate current issues and protect against future ones. The District operates and maintains twenty plus dams across southern Williamson County, from Leander to Hutto, serving a population of over 400,000. If approved by the voters, the bonds would fund flood safety projects that were identified in the District’s 2016 Flood Protection Plan (Flood Plan) and 2020 Dam Assessment Study (2020 Study). The bond projects consist of two categories: Flood Mitigation and Rehabilitation

For more information visit us at ubcdams.org

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

ELECTION

Information for November elections

COMPILED BY BRIAN PERDUE

POLLING LOCATIONS ELECTION DAY IN NORTHWEST AUSTIN

POLLING LOCATIONS

SOURCES: TRAVIS COUNTY CLERK, WILLIAMSON COUNTY CLERKCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER Polls will be open from 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Nov. 3. Those waiting in line to vote at 7 p.m. will be allowed to cast a vote.

21 Northwest Hills UMC Youth Center 7027 Hart Lane, Austin 22 Parmer Lane Baptist Church 12424 Scoeld Farms Drive, Austin 23 Peace Lutheran Church 10625 N. RM 620, Austin 24 Renaissance Austin Hotel 9721 Arboretum Blvd., Austin 25 Shops at Arbor Walk 10515 N. MoPac, Ste. C320, Austin 26 Sky-View Baptist Church 211 W. Koenig Lane, Austin 27 Staybridge Suites Austin North 13000 N. I-35, Bldg. 9, Austin 28 St. John’s Episcopal Church 11201 Parkeld Drive, Austin 29 St. Mark United Methodist Church 601 W. Braker Lane, Austin 30 St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church 8134 Mesa Drive, Austin 31 United Christian 3500 W. Parmer Lane, Austin 32 Unity Church of the Hills 9905 Anderson Mill Road, Austin 33 Yarborough Branch Library 2200 Hancock Drive, Austin 34 YMCA North Austin 1000 W. Rundberg Lane, Austin WILLIAMSON COUNTY 35 Anderson Mill Limited District 11500 El Salido Parkway, Austin 36 Bethany United Methodist Church 10010 Anderson Mill Road, Austin 37 Gateway Church 7104 McNeil Drive, Austin 38 Harteld Performing Arts Center 5800 McNeil Drive, Austin 39 Kelly Reeves Athletic Complex 10211 W. Parmer Lane, Austin

TRAVIS COUNTY 1 Austin Fire Station No. 28 2410 W. Parmer Lane, Austin 2 Ben Hur Shrine Center 7811 Rockwood Lane, Austin 3 Brentwood Bible Church 6301 Woodrow Ave., Austin 4 Celebration Church Central Austin 1006 W. Koenig Lane, Austin 5 Certain Anity Oce 7620 Guadalupe St., Austin 6 The Church at Highland Park 5206 Balcones Drive, Austin 7 Davis Elementary School 5214 Duval Road, Austin 8 Disability Rights Texas 2222 W. Braker Lane, Austin 9 GAMA Event Center 8801 Research Blvd., Austin 10 Grant AME Worship Center 1701 Kramer Lane, Austin 11 Harteld Performing Arts Center 5800 McNeil Drive, Austin 12 Highland Village Church of Christ 4716 Bull Creek Road, Austin 13 Indeed at Domain 10721 Domain Drive, Austin 14 Juan P. Navarro High School 1201 Payton Gin Road, Austin 15 Junior League of Austin 5330 Blustone Lane, Austin 16 Lakewood Homeowners Association 7317 Lakewood Drive, Austin 17 Milwood Branch Library 12500 Amherst Drive, Austin 18 National Instruments Company 11500 N. MoPac, Austin 19 North Brooke Plaza 12636 Research Blvd., Ste. B108, Austin 20 North Village Branch Library 2505 Steck Ave., Austin

183A TOLL

40

35

39

45 TOLL

LAKE CREEK PKWY.

620

MOPAC

35

41

ELKHORN MOUNTAIN TRL.

36

11 38

WELLS BRANCH PKWY.

EL SALIDO PKWY.

183

23

32

42

37

43

31

19

1

7

17

NORTHWEST AUSTIN

AMHERST DR.

18

SPICEWOOD SPRINGS RD.

22

27

SCOFIELD FARMS DR.

ARBORETUM BLVD.

8

DOMAIN DR.

13

BRAKER LN.

15

25

BLUFFSTONE LN.

24

PARKFIELD DR.

28

10

2222

360

16

STECK AVE.

29

LAKEWOOD DR.

9

34

30

35

20

FAR WEST BLVD.

2

14

PAYTON GIN RD.

21

HART LN.

ROCKWOOD LN.

5

WOODROW AVE.

3

BALCONES DR.

GUADALUPE ST.

4

33

6

26

12

W. KOENIG LN.

290

N MAP NOT TO SCALE

BULL CREEK RD.

40 Lord of Life Lutheran Church 9700 Neenah Ave., Austin 41 Pinballz Lake Creek 13729 N. US 183, Austin 42 Rattan Creek Park Community Center 7617 Elkhorn Mountain Trail, Austin 43 Spicewood Springs Library 8637 Spicewood Springs Road, Austin

*This is not a complete list of polling locations in Travis and Williamson counties. Residents of both counties can vote at any polling locations within their respective counties on Election Day. For a full list of polling locations in Travis County, visit https://countyclerk.traviscountytx.gov/ elections. For a full list of polling locations in Williamson County, visit www.wilco.org/departments/elections.

For more election information, visit communityimpact.com/vote .

13

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

the power of we

Together we thrive. Connection is key to a longer and more vibrant life, and powers everything WE do here at Maravilla @ The Domain senior living community. It’s like being part of a super supportive family of waiters, chefs, housekeepers, ZEST® activity coaches, care and wellness teams, and even a bunch of really friendly and fun neighbors, all helping you thrive. This is what “we’re in this together” is all about. It’s all here at Maravilla @ The Domain.

Please call 512.361.2074 to schedule your personalized tour.

INDEPENDENT & ASSISTED LIVING, MEMORY CARE AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES MaravillaAtTheDomain.com Located in The Domain at Austin Lane (formerly Newman Drive) & Kramer Lane 11001 Austin Lane, Austin, TX 78758 • 512.361.2074

FACI L I TY ID #110291

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNI TY

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28

communityimpact.com

Powered by