Heights - River Oaks - Montrose Edition | July 2021

HEIGHTS RIVER OAKS MONTROSE EDITION

2021 R E A L E S T A T E E D I T I O N

ONLINE AT

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 4  JULY 2AUG. 6, 2021

Houston’s lack of zoning allows developers to quickly add new housing in high-demand areas. A study from the Rice University Kinder Institute for Urban Research mapped this trend from 2005-18. RESIDENCES RISING 1-300 301-1,000 NEW UNITS BUILT FROM 2005-18

290

45

10

IMPACTS

6

1,001-2,000 2,001-3,000 3,001-10,408

SOURCE: RICE KINDER INSTITUTE FOR URBAN RESEARCH COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Mobility upgrades proposed in Old SixthWard

288

59

N

While Houston’s Inner Loop accounts for 15% of the city’s land area, housing production there between 2005-18 was more than the entire metro area of some major cities. HOUSING MARKET BOOMING

610

NEW UNITS PER YEAR

Houston’s Inner Loop 5,345

San Diego 4,100

San Francisco/ Oakland 2,913

Atlanta 1,945

Study: Local growth osets gentrication elsewhere If anyone knows how quickly real estate development canmove in Hous- ton, it is Jason T. Hyman. Founder of the Third Ward Real Estate Council, Hyman brought together Third Ward- based investors to gain a sense of con- trol in the gentrifying area. The group pools funds to buy and redevelop properties while gathering community input on their use. The council organized its rst land purchase in April. Beginning with a food truck park that will eventually feature an oce building, Hyman said the approach is a way to bring economic opportunity into the com- munity rather than new, expensive housing that is unattainable for many current residents. “We’re trying to create models for responsible development,” he said “It’s a more tangible impact that people can CONTINUED ON 18 BY EMMA WHALEN

REAL ESTATE EDITION 2021 TRANSPORTATION

9

SPONSORED BY • Belmont Village Senior Living

MARKET SNAPSHOT

13 17

Lights back on atMontrose, Heights entertainment venues

HOME GUIDE

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

Rudi Bunch, owner of Numbers, the Montrose night- life staple that has operated on Westheimer Road since the 1978, managed to keep his club alive over the 14 tumultuous months of the coronavirus pandemic—but only just barely. “I knew that I couldn’t last years, so I had towrapmymind around the fact that I may lose the business I’ve worked at CONTINUED ON 21

Guests line up outside Numbers night club in Montrose, which reopened in May after closing for 14 months.

NONPROFIT

20

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL J OURNALISTS

COMMUNITY IMPACT PATRON PROGRAM

Want to learn more? Scan the QR code to watch our video.

DONATE TODAY! COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM CIPATRON

2

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

What goes UP ,

must come DOWN .

If you hear celebratory gunfire: • Call 911 • Notify Crime Stoppers Anonymously at 713-222-TIPS

Stray bullets CAN KILL.

It’s pretty simple. No fine print. We find the lowest electricity rates. Guaranteed.

Get $50 off your first bill with code HRM50.

RealSimpleEnergy.com

3

HEIGHTS - RIVER OAKS - MONTROSE EDITION • JULY 2021

People said Lindsay’s recovery would slowher down. Apparently not.

Even before we meet one another, we know we have something in common. Because if you’re facing a neurological issue — you not only want compassion and technology, you want expert physicians with a never-give-in, never-give-up attitude. The kind of attitude that put Lindsay, and her recovery, in the fast lane.

We’re Baylor St. Luke’s, taking pride in changing destinies. Find out how at StLukesHealth.org/Neuro .

4

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROM JAY: As the new general manager of this edition, I have seen a resurgence of members of the business community meeting together in person, which brings an energy that has been missing for some time. The world of real estate is always a hot topic in Houston, and this year is no dierent, so please enjoy our look into the market and the eects in your neighborhood. Jay McMahon, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMSHAWN: The past 15 years in Houston came with a whirlwind of activity in the real estate market as people moved into Houston’s Inner Loop at a rapid rate. This has had profound eects on the Heights, River Oaks and Montrose areas in terms of development and housing costs. Our annual Real Estate Edition digs deeper into the trends of this past year as well as what the future could hold for these communities. Shawn Arrajj, SENIOR EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

WHATWE COVER

Sign up for our daily newsletter to receive the latest headlines direct to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter DAILY INBOX Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Jay McMahon SENIOR EDITOR Shawn Arrajj

SENIOR CITY HALL REPORTER Emma Whalen SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Anya Gallant ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Dimitri Skoumpourdis METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kristina Shackelford MANAGING EDITOR Kelly Schaer ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Kaitlin Schmidt CORPORATE LEADERSHIP GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES &MARKETING DIRECTOR Tess Coverman CONTACT US

BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION &DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

HOWWE’RE FUNDED

Join your neighbors today by giving any amount to the CI Patron program. Funds support our PATRON PROGRAM

ADVERTISING

Our local teams customize advertising

campaigns for all business sizes and industries wanting to reach their customer base and accomplish their goals. A third-party Readex survey proved 78% of paper recipients read three of the last four editions, and from what they read, 83% “took action” of some kind. We ask our readers to thank our advertisers by shopping locally.

$20 average donation choose to give monthly 35% edition newsletter called The InCIder and occasionally reach out with other opportunities to directly engage. hyperlocal, unbiased journalism and help build informed communities. As a thank you, we’ll include you in a special Saturday

245 Commerce Green Blvd., Ste. 200 Sugar Land, TX 77478 • 3463682555 PRESS RELEASES hrmnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions

communityimpact.com

facebook.com/impactnewshrm

@impactnews_hrm

© 2021 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All rights reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

Proudly printed by

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM ADVERTISING

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM CIPATRON

HOLISITIC MEDICINE • BIOIDENTICAL HORMONES • ACUPUNCTURE • HEALTH COACHING • MASSAGE THERAPY

Create a vibrant

mind body ,

and

spirit

We utilize functional medicine to help patients find extraordinary health naturally. Dr. Nellie Grose, MD and Dr. Miiko Rowley, MD

Proudly serving Houston for 30 years. Schedule your appointment today! 230 Westcott, #208, Houston 77007 | tchh.net | 713-660-6620

5

HEIGHTS  RIVER OAKS  MONTROSE EDITION • JULY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

2

MBERS ST.

E. 29TH ST.

11

290

T. C. JESTER BLVD.

W. 20TH ST.

GARDEN OAKS BLVD.

W. 18TH ST.

Homestead Kitchen & Bar

3

W. 11TH ST.

COURTESY HOMESTEAD KITCHEN & BAR

6

meals, freshly baked pastries and other desserts. The dining room seats 35, while a full-service bar can seat six. Guests also have access to a patio with umbrella-cov- ered bistro patio tables overlooking North Post Oak. 713-804-1244. www.nopocafe.com 4 Daisy Buchanan Lounge opened June 19 at 4321 Montrose Blvd., oering craft cocktails, late-night eats and live music. The interior is decorated with black and gold coloring, marble accents, leather banquette seating and chandeliers. The bar area oers 13 seats, while another 52 seats are available in the lounge. In addition to cocktails and spirits, wine and beer are also available. All-night food service will include popular items from the menu at Gatsby’s Prime Steakhouse— which is located nextdoor and owned by the same people—such as deluxe deviled eggs, maple glazed bacon and a 16-ounce Delmonico steak. 713-393-7282. www.daisybuchananhtx.com 5 A grand opening took place June 11 for Go Easy , a Dallas-based self-care store oering a range of supplements, skin products, and other bath and beauty items. The new store, the rst in the Houston area, can be found in the M-K-T Heights development at 600 N. Shepherd Drive, Ste. 120, Houston. Some products are exclusive to the Houston area, and an on-site drink fridge includes products from Recess, Mad Tasty and Unity. www.goeasy-shop.com COMING SOON 6 Ocials with The Gentry Men’s Salon and Upscale Barbershop are aiming

1 2 5

8

WHITE OAK PARK

WHITE OAK DR.

WASHINGTON AVE.

12

10

MEMORIAL PARK

STUDEMONT ST.

N A V E .

BUFFALO BAYOU PARK

K

45

610

9

7

527

RICHMOND AVE.

10

4

69

59

288

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 Fast-casual salad chain restaurant Sweetgreen opened June 15 at M-K-T Heights, 600 N. Shepherd Drive, Ste. 149, Houston. The eatery specializes in salads, warm bowls and sides that are made with seasonal and locally sourced ingredients. 832-730-4262. www.sweetgreen.com 2 Homestead Kitchen & Bar opened June 4, also in the M-K-T Heights devel-

opment at 600 N. Shepherd Drive, Ste. 440, Houston. The all-day breakfast eatery is being run by Houston native Je Svenvold, who worked with A La Carte Foodservice Consulting Group on the menu. The menu blends elements of Tex-Mex, Cajun and Southern cooking with items such as the Tex-Mex steak and eggs Benedict, chilaquiles verdes and au- thentic slow-cooked carnitas. Lunch and dinner items are also available, such as

crawsh pistolettes, seafood enchiladas and ribeye chicken-fried steak. 281-888-4697. www.homesteadkitchenandbar.com 3 The newest concept from Berg Hospi- tality Group— NoPo Cafe, Market & Bar — opened June 10 at 1244 N. Post Oak Road, Ste. 150, Houston. The venue oers classic American cuisine for breakfast, lunch and dinner. An on-site market oers premade

ENJOY THE GREAT INDOORS

OPEN REGISTRATION

HAROLD ST.

Kids Summer Classes Ballet and latin ballroom, ages 6-12 Instructors vaccinated

www.riveroaksdancing.com | 713-529-0959 | 2621 S. Shepherd Dr.

WholeEarthProvision.com

6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ & SAVANNAH KUCHAR

4

10

Daisy Buchanan Lounge

Golf Galaxy

COURTESY DAISY BUCHANAN LOUNGE

COURTESY GOLF GALAXY

to open in July at 948 Heights Blvd., Houston. Services will include haircuts for both adults and children, shaves and beard trimming, facials and hand grooming. This will be the second location of the business with the original located in the Memorial area. 713-492-0919. www.thegentry.com 7 Marine Corps veteran Brandon Foss plans to open Surveillance Secure in July at 2100 Loop 610 South, Ste. 900, Houston. The security integration com- pany consults, designs and installs a full range of electronic security technology for commercial clients, including security cameras, access-control systems, alarm and video monitoring, and video image analytic software. Foss’ experience in- cludes eight years working for Blackwater, a private military company. www.surveillancesecurehouston.com 8 A property on Washington Avenue near Old Katy Road in Houston will be converted into a Volvo dealership after Grubbs Automotive signed a 20-year lease, according to Henry S. Miller Cos., the real estate rm that negotiated the lease along with Transwestern. The prop- erty at 7620 Washington Ave.—formerly a brick and construction material supply business—includes a 12,595-square-foot showroom and a 19,250-square-foot warehouse. Founded in Dallas in 1948, Grubbs Automotive operates four deal- erships in Grapevine and San Antonio, according to the company’s website. The new location will be the company’s rst in Houston. www.grubbs.com 9 The Italian-inspired neighborhood restaurant iL Bracco will open this fall at 1705 Post Oak Blvd., Ste. A, Houston, in a space formerly occupied by California

Pizza Kitchen. The venue will be open for lunch and dinner and will oer a con- temporary take on classic Italian dishes, including homemade pastas, breads and desserts. The 6,000-square-foot space will seat 160 people indoors, including at a bar area and cocktail lounge, and 35 people outside on a patio. www.ilbraccorestaurant.com RENOVATIONS 10 A newly remodeled Golf Galaxy reopened to customers June 5 at 5078 Richmond Ave., Houston, near Post Oak Boulevard. The redesigned store oers golfers an immersive golf experience using simulation technology. Other services include the use of hitting bays and custom ttings, and the shop also sells equipment, apparel and footwear. 832-203-1518. www.golfgalaxy.com IN THE NEWS 11 Kids Meals Inc. , a Garden Oaks-based nonprot that delivers meals to pre- school-age children across Houston, has embarked on a capital campaign to raise money for a new, larger facility to meet a growing demand for assistance. The campaign—dubbed Building Hope—seeks to raise around $15 million-$20 million with the goal of using that money to build a 50,000-square-foot facility on 4-6 acres at a location to be determined. While the nonprot currently serves about 7,000 children per day from its location at 330 Garden Oaks Blvd., Houston, ocials said they hope to increase that to 25,000 chil- dren per day by 2031. 713-695-5437. www.kidsmealsinc.org

Valentin Garcia serves as head chef of the new FM Kitchen & Bar in Montrose.

COURTESY FM KITCHEN & BAR

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN The long-awaited second location of FMKitchen & Bar opened June 23 in Montrose at 907 Westheimer Road, Houston. With its original location on Shepherd Drive o Washington Avenue, the eatery is known for its signature cocktails, a large patio area, and menu of original burgers and sandwiches. The new location brings a more expansive bar area and menu, and a new late-night menu will be available on top of the food and drink oerings from the original location. Both locations are open until midnight on Thursdays and 2 a.m. on Friday and Saturday nights. The Montrose site includes a sidewalk beer garden along Westheimer with lounge seating as well as more intimate seating at banquettes that are surrounded by planters. An indoor bar oers 24 beers and two craft cocktails on tap. A 96-inch projector screen in 12 Bayou Greenways Park opened in late May at the intersection of the White Oak Bayou Greenway and the Heights Hike and Bike Trail. The 1.47-acre park is surrounded by wooded forest areas and sycamore trees and features a 50-foot grass knoll near the White Oak Bayou

a dining area will be used to broadcast sports and other events. Valentin Garcia, who formerly worked at Tiny Boxwoods, is the eatery’s chef de cuisine. New, lighter food options such as grilled salmon tacos and crispy Brussels sprouts are available alongside items from the original location’s menu. The new late-night menu includes the FM Burger, a spicy fried chicken sandwich and birria tacos. Brunch is oered on weekends from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 832-509-5233 www.fmkitchenandbar.com

D

N

channel with views of the Houston sky- line. Park features include bicycle racks, a shaded boardwalk area, seating areas and panels along the lawn with poetry. A parking lot for parkgoers can be found at

1648 Studemont St., Houston. www.houstonparksboard.org

T I L E • COUNT ERTOPS • WOOD F LOOR ING • CARPE T • CAB INE TRY • S INKS • L I GHT ING • PLUMB ING • APPL I ANCES • HARDWARE

CONTACT US FOR AN APPOINTMENT

450 LOCKHAVEN DRIVE, HOUSTON, TX 281-784-1700

INFO@MCSURFACESINC.COM WWW.MCSURFACESINC.COM

LOOKING TO ENHANCE YOUR HOME? With nearly 30 years in the home surfaces industry, we have experienced estimators, project managers and contractors ready to help you tackle any job.

HOME ENHANCEMENT FULL SERVICE REMODELING HOUSTON, TEXAS

7

HEIGHTS  RIVER OAKS  MONTROSE EDITION • JULY 2021

TODO LIST

July & August events

COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ & SAVANNAH KUCHAR

JULY 04 SHELL FREEDOMOVER TEXAS The downtown Independence Day celebration is virtual for the second year in a row and is broadcast live by ABC 13. The event features performers such as country singers Jimmie Allen and headliner Lee Brice. The events ends with a massive rework nale. 7-10 p.m. Free. www.houstontx.gov/july4 13 713 DAY The 713 Day celebration of Houston culture and music includes performances from Lil Keke and OG Ron C. 6 p.m.-2 a.m. $30. Rise Rooftop, 2600 Travis St., Ste. R, Houston. 832-449-0640. www.stilltippin.us 20 TX GHOST STORIES Families can come out to learn how to build a campre and roast s’mores while listening to authentic Texas ghost stories. Registration is required. 7-9 p.m. $25 (member), $35 (nonmember). Houston Arboretum and Nature Center, 4501 Woodway Drive, Houston. 713-681-8433. www.houstonarboretum.org 23 THROUGH 25 SUMMER SHAKES Two students from The Julliard School along with 12 Houston-area high school

JULY 30

FAMILYMOVIE NIGHT LEVY PARK

AUG. 04

BUFFALO BAYOU EASTWELLNESSWALK GUADALUPE PLAZA PARK

Sponsored by Texas Children’s Hospital, Levy Park presents “Dora and the Lost City of Gold” in the event pavilion. Attendees can bring blankets but should not bring outside furniture. Park chairs are available on-site. 8 p.m. Free. Levy Park, 3801 Eastside St., Houston. 713-522-7275. www.levyparkhouston.org/calendar (Courtesy Levy Park)

Bualo Bayou Partnership hosts a scenic walk led by Laura Conley, founder of Urban Paths Wellness Coaching. Registration is required. Participants leave from Guadalupe Plaza Park and walk through the East End. 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Guadalupe Plaza Park, 2311 Runnels St., Houston. 713-752-0314. www.bualobayou.org (Courtesy Bualo Bayou Partnership)

students perform William Shakespeare’s “As You Like It.” Hosted by 4th Wall Theatre Co., the shows come after students took part in a monthlong program with 4th Wall mentors studying Shakespeare’s works. 7:30 p.m. (July 23 and 24), 3 p.m. (July 25). $20. 4th Wall Theatre Co., 1824 Spring

St., Ste. 101, Houston. 832-767-4991. www.4thwalltheatreco.com 29 WORTH THE TRIP THE HELLAMEGA TOUR Green Day, Fall Out Boy and Weezer perform at Minute Maid Park on their Hella Mega Tour along with special guest

The Interrupters. The tour, originally set for summer 2020, was rescheduled due to COVID-19. 5:30 p.m. $29.50 and up. Minute Maid Park, 501 Crawford St., Houston. 866-800-1275. http://mlb.com/astros/tickets/concerts/ hella-mega-tour

ready for life. ready for college. At Marine Mi l i tary Academy, challenge leads to growth and growth leads to success. By providing a college-preparatory curriculum in a structured, di scipl ined and focused sett ing, our cadets ri se to new he ights as scholars and leaders. No other school can unlock a boy’ s potent ial l ike MMA. The sooner he starts, the sooner hi s transformat ion begins. » » AT T END A F R E E LOCA L PR E S ENTAT I ON ! Wedne sday, Ju ly 7 @ 7 pm & F r i day, August 13 @ 7pm Houston Marr i ot We st Loop Ga l l e r i a 1750 We st Loop South • 713 .960 . 0111 MARINE MILITARY ACADEMY Find more or submit Heights-River Oaks-Montrose events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

A Co l l e g e - Pr e p Board i ng Schoo l f or Boys i n Grade s 7- 12 »» 320 Iwo J ima B lvd . Har l i ng en , TX »» R E G I ST E R NOW F OR FA L L » MMA-TX . ORG » 956 . 423 . 6006 »» ADMI S S I ONS@MMA-TX . ORG

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Draft plan proposes mobility upgrades in Old SixthWard area Ocials with the Old SixthWard Tax Increment Reinvestment Zone released a draft plan in June outlining a collection of mobility projects and community improvements in the

COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

UPCOMING PROJECT

SAWYER ST.

610

PHASE 1

20TH ST.

N G T

N

T. C. JESTER BLVD.

L

PHASE 2

10

N

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JUNE 28. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT HRMNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. Funding sources: Memorial Heights Tax Increment Reinvestment Zone, Houston-Galveston Area Council Shepherd and Durham drives rebuild Construction could begin this fall on the rst phase of a project to rebuild Shepherd and Durham drives between Loop 610 and I-10. Goals of the proj- ect include improved street design; reduced lanes; updated drainage; and pedestrian, bike and safety features. Phase 1 runs from Loop 610 to 15th Street while Phase 2 continues to I-10. Timeline: fall 2021-2025 (Phase 1), winter 2023-2026 (Phase 2) Cost: $115 million (both phases)

district, an area that includes parts of Washington Avenue as well as Silver, Sawyer and Center streets within Arts District Houston. The 94-acre TIRZ—which was created in 1998 and is also known at TIRZ No. 13—brought on consulting rm Trac Engineers Inc. in October to facilitate the development of the plan while tasking the rmAsakura Robinson with community outreach. The goal of the plan is to reimagine key corridors in a way that makes themmore accessible to dierent modes of transportation while also sustaining economic activity for businesses in the area, according to ocials with Asakura Robinson. Proposals along Washington

Proposals on Washington Avenue include adding a new signalized crossing section at Silver Street among other improvements. (Rendering courtesy Old Sixth Ward TIRZ)

Avenue include adding a high-comfort bikeway, enhanced transit stops, an improved pedestrian realm and a new signalized crossing section at Silver. Meanwhile, plans on Silver would include a bikeway, trail connections, and intersection and crossing improvements. OnWinter Street, planners have pitched the creation of a walkable and bikeable promenade area between

Henderson and Sawyer streets. A multiuse trail would ultimately connect the Silver bikeway to Sawyer. Other improvements in the plan target Center and Lubbock streets. A public input period on the draft plan wrapped up June 30 and yielded around 260 responses as of June 28, said Nour Ghadanfar, a senior planner with Asakura Robinson. A nal report is expected to be released in early July.

M E M O R I A L H E R M A N N G R E A T E R H E I G H T S

Your diabetes-related complication doesn’t have to lead to an amputation

Joyful, Academically Excellent Schools in Your Community Escuelas alegres y académicamente excelentes en su comunidad

ONE OUT OF EVERY FOUR PEOPLE WITH DIABETES COULD DEVELOP A FOOT COMPLICATION, PUTTING THEM AT RISK FOR AMPUTATION.

LIMITED SEATS STILL AVAILABLE FOR GRADES PRE-K – 12 LOS ASIENTOS LIMITADOS AÚN ESTÁN DISPONIBLES PARA LOS GRADOS PRE-K – 12

If you have been told an amputation is your only option, contact the Amputation Prevention Center® 713.867.2432

Tuition-Free Public Schools Escuelas públicas gratuitas

Free Breakfast and Lunch For All Desayuno y almuerzo gratis Free Breakfast and Lunch For All Desayuno y Almuerzo Gratis para Todos

Extracurricular Activities Actividades extracurriculares

Free Bus Transportation Transporte escolar gratis

Memorial Hermann Amputation Prevention Center® and Wound Care – Greater Heights 1635 North Loop West | Houston, TX 77008 www.MemorialHermann.org

ENROLL TODAY • INSCRÍBETE HOY • WWW.KIPPTEXAS.ORG

9

HEIGHTS  RIVER OAKS  MONTROSE EDITION • JULY 2021

GOVERNMENT City of Houston avoids budget shortfall using federal funds

The American Rescue Plan Act provided the city of Houston with $608 million of federal aid in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The city received $304.3 million to use during scal year 2021-22. Here are Houston’s plans to spend its rst allocation. BREAKING DOWN THE BUDGET SAVED BY FEDERAL FUNDS

BY EMMA WHALEN

forth an eort to create a struc- turally balanced budget, and until we do that, the city of Houston is going to see its demise,” she said. “Sustainable one-time expenses would have been building grocery stores [or] a citywide Wi-Fi system, for example.” Council members voted for amendments to the budget that pulled about $8 million from the city’s fund balance, which serves as the city’s budget reserves. Accord- ing to nance department projec- tions, the city was going to end up with $44.5 million above the required 7.5% of the general fund. With the budget amendments in place, the city will now end up with about $36 million above the required amount of reserves. Among the new expenditures were increased funding for low-cost spay and neuter services through the city animal shelter and an increase in district council members’ oce budgets from $750,000 to $1 million each. In a separate vote in October, City Council will set its tax rate. City ocials projected raising about $1.23 billion in property tax revenue in FY 2021-22, down by about 0.16% compared to FY 2020- 21 but up from the $1.22 billion brought in during FY 2019-20. Sales tax revenue is projected at $703 million, up from $675 million in the previous scal year, or 4.15%, according to budget data. Houston’s voter-approved revenue cap, which has been in place since 2004, limits property tax revenue growth to 4.5% or a calculation that factors in ination and population growth, whichever is less. However, Texas Senate Bill 2, which passed in 2019, limits the total revenue from property taxes to no more than 3.5% higher than the previous year. An exception to that allowed cities to set a tax rate that results in up to 8%more revenue if a state of emergency is declared, which was the case in 2020 because of the COVID-19 crisis. The city’s current property tax rate is $0.56184 per $100 of valuation.

Houston City Council approved a $5.1 billion budget June 1 for scal year 2021-22 and avoided a $201 million shortfall, thanks to an infusion of federal funds. “2020 was a year like none other; nancially it was worse than Hurricane Harvey because it was a disaster that lasted 14 months,” Mayor Sylvester Turner said. The budget comprises a $2.58 bil- lion general fund, which supports a majority of city functions outside of debt payments and self-sustaining funds such as the Houston Airport System. The general fund grew by 3.9% from the FY 2020-21 budget, or a $96 million increase. Sales, hotel and property tax revenue decreases due to the COVID-19 pandemic put the city in a precarious position leading into the new scal year that could have forced layos, land sales and a withdrawal from the city’s reserves, Turner said. A $608 million infusion of funds from the American Rescue Plan Act helped the city resolve the shortfall. The city will receive the funds in two installments in 2021 and 2022 and will have until the end of 2023 to spend them. In addition to lling the $201 million FY 2021-22 budget gap, the ARPA funds will provide about $3 million for a sixth police cadet class instead of the typical ve per scal year. Turner also committed to spending $25 million over the next three years on increased mental health interventions through the Houston Police Department and an 18% pay raise for Houston reghters. Council Member Mike Knox voted against the budget proposal, and Council Member Letitia Plum- mer attempted to as well but had her vote recorded as a “yes” due to a procedural error. Plummer said she planned to vote “no” because of concerns with using ARPA funds for recurring expenses such as new hires and increased police and re salaries. “We need to have a plan to put

AMERICAN RESCUE PLAN ACT $201 million to ll budget shortfall

$54M Not fully allocated

$38 million for a 6% reghter pay raise $8.3million for mental health interventions through Houston Police Department $3 million for an additional police cadet class

TOTAL $304.3M

GENERAL FUND SPENDING

The general fund is mostly supported by sales and property taxes. City departments also receive funding through special revenue funds and grants.

FY2020-21 budget

FY2021-22 budget

Police department Fire department Municipal courts

$955M

$515M

$515M

Health department Parks department Library system Solid waste department Housing and community development

$60M $67M

$44M

$89M

$418K

$0

$200M $400M $600M $800M $1B

NOTABLE AMENDMENTS

Each year, City Council members can propose amendments to the city’s budget before it is approved. Here are ve notable amendments passed for the FY 2021-22 budget.

Improved drainage ditch cleaning

HPD mental health allocations

Proposed by: District C Council Member Abbie Kamin and District A Council Member Amy Peck Purpose: The amendment allows the council members to oer on-call drainage ditch maintenance services through Houston Public Works, reducing ood risk.

Proposed by: At-Large Council Member Letitia Plummer Purpose: The amendment adds two Mobile Crisis Outreach Teams, which address mental health calls without police, for a total of 20. It was funded by reducing the number of new Crisis Intervention Response Teams.

Increase in council district funds

Curbing illegal dumping

Proposed by: District A Council Member Amy Peck Purpose: The amendment increases each district council member’s service fund from $750,000 to $1 million. The funds may be used for specic projects within a district identied by the council member or the community.

Proposed by: District B Council Member Tarsha Jackson Purpose: The amendment extends the hours and days of operation at the city’s depositories to encourage proper junk and bulk waste disposal and provide an alternative to illegal dumping.

SOURCE: CITY OF HOUSTONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Harris County & Houston

QUOTEOFNOTE “IT’S SO IMPORTANT FORUS TODO EVERYTHINGWE CAN TOHOLDON TO ASMUCHOF THAT HISTORYANDNOT LOSE IT BECAUSE IT DEFINES, IN LARGE PART, WHOWE ARE AS A CITY.” HOUSTON MAYOR SYLVESTER TURNER ON NAMING FREEDMAN’S TOWN HOUSTON’S FIRST HERITAGE DISTRICT OTHER HIGHLIGHTS JUNE 9 Houston City Council approved a six-month extension of a pilot program that allows members of the Houston Fire Department to call and send pictures and videos to an o-site police ocer at the scene of a freeway accident. The ocer can remotely approve the towing of vehicles instead having to do so at the scene. JUNE 14 Robert Mock was named the new director of the Houston Emergency Center, which manages the city’s communications among 911 dispatchers and the police and re departments. Previously, he served as the center’s interim director and its division manager of operations for police and 911 call takers. He is a former Houston police ocer and Houston ISD police chief. JUNE 23 Houston City Council approved a water rate hike that will result in a $5 increase in monthly bills for most residents. The increase will fund infrastructure improvements required by a federal judge to resolve federal Commissioners could approve $14.8 million worth of initiatives to reduce the backlog in criminal district courts and boost funding to the Sheri’s Oce. As of press time, commissioners were considering the matter at their monthly meeting. Houston City Council will meet at 1:30 p.m. July 6 for public comment and 9 a.m. July 7 for regular business at 901 Bagby St., Houston. Meetings are streamed at www.houstontx.gov/htv. Harris County Commissioners Court will meet at 10 a.m. July 20. MEETINGSWE COVER Clean Water Act violations. JUNE 29 Harris County

Conict continues over federal HurricaneHarvey relief funds

BY DANICA LLOYD

allocating $1 billion in funding to Harris County. County ocials said they believe the formula Texas GLO ocials used to determine which grant applica- tions would be awarded funding was discriminatory against large, urban areas such as Harris County and Houston. Bush, on the other hand, has put the blame on the federal government’s “red tape.” As previously reported by Community Impact Newspaper , the Harris County Flood Control District submitted $915 million in grant applications last October in hopes of receiving federal funds earmarked in 2018 for ood mitigation eorts following Harvey in 2017. According to county ocials, 40% of the $125 billion in damage caused by Hurricane Harvey took place within Harris County.

HARRIS COUNTY Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush announced June 17 plans to award Harris County $750 million in ood mitigation funding following the denial by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, according to a news release. The Texas General Land Oce informed Harris County and Houston leaders neither entity had been awarded any Hurricane Harvey ood-mitigation funds in May. Following requests from county leaders to reconsider, Bush requested a direct allocation to Harris County for ood mitigation eorts fromHUD less than a week later May 26. It began when HUD sent the Har- vey relief money to the Texas GLO to be made available in the form of competitive grants instead of directly

Nearly $400Mproject to boost Houston-area water supply by up to 500Mgallons per day

BY EMMA WHALEN

an additional 240 million gallons of water per day from the Trinity River. Eventually, it could supply up to 500 million gallons of water per day, ocials said. “The Luce Bayou Interbasin Transfer Project is helping to meet water supply demands of a growing population,” Mayor Sylvester Turner said at a ribbon-cutting.

HOUSTON A water supply project completed in June will help meet the growing demand in the Greater Houston area. Ocials announced the comple- tion of the Luce Bayou Interbasin Transfer Project June 15. It will supply Lake Houston and the North- east Water Purication Plant with

4

Hydrating Houston

The Luce Bayou Interbasin Transfer Project increases water supply for much of the Houston region.

5

3

1

2

1 Surface water gets siphoned from the Trinity River. 2 Water travels through a 23-mile canal system into Luce Bayou and then Lake Houston. 3 Water is puried

at a treatment plant at Lake Houston. The new project expands capacity by 500 million gallons per day. 4 Water is carried by 120-inch pipelines to pumping stations

managed by regional water authorities. 5 Smaller pipes carry treated water to individual homes in Fort Bend and Harris counties.

Meetings are streamed at www.harriscountytx.gov.

SOURCE: NORTH HARRIS COUNTY REGIONAL WATER AUTHORITYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

11

HEIGHTS  RIVER OAKS  MONTROSE EDITION • JULY 2021

R E A L E S T A T E E D I T I O N 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER IS PROUD TO SAY THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSOR

GOLD SPONSOR

The Community Built for Life. You worked hard to create a good life for your family. Now it’s time to live the life you earned. At Belmont Village, we take care of the details. Residents enjoy expansive amenities and services in thoughtfully designed apartments and common spaces for Independent Living, Assisted Living, and Memory Care. Our community design and award-winning programs make it easy for residents to make new memories with family and friends, continue lifelong learning and stay active. Hospitality is unparalleled, with a dining program second to none, concierge and transportation services, full-service salon and spa, heated pool, o-site trips, and a daily calendar of enriching activities tailored to resident interests. Resident health and wellness are supported by highly trained caregivers and nurses on-site 24/7. Telehealth with board-certied physicians is available around the clock. A professionally managed tness center oers therapy services and resident-centered wellness. Tours available. BelmontVillage.com/HuntersCreek

Whether you’re a business or a reader, there is a way to support Community Impact Newspaper ’s mission of hyperlocal, unbiased journalismwhich builds informed communities. JOIN CI PATRON WITH A CONTRIBUTION OF ANY AMOUNT AT COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM CIPATRON JOURNALISM support local

   ®                            

of Th e He i g h t s Assisted Living & Memory Care

       

         

      

Houston Height’s Most Trusted Senior Living Community.

$3,500

        

(346)800-5973 SCHEDULE YOUR TOUR TODAY!

      

1407 Studewood St. Houston, TX 77008 | www.villageoftheheights.com

From FORTUNE. © 2020 FORTUNE Media IP Limited All rights reserved. Used under license.

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

MARKET AT AGLANCE The Heights, River Oaks and Montrose area—which covers the 77006, 77007, 77008, 77019 and 77098 ZIP codes—saw increases across the board in the number of homes sold and the average price of homes sold over the past 12 months compared to the previous 12 months. The average number of days a home spent on the market fell in most ZIP codes in the area, rising only in the 77098 ZIP code.

COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

610

77008

45

10

77007

77019

77006

SOURCES: KIRSTEN ABNEYBETTER HOMES AND GARDENS REAL ESTATE GARY GREENE, FREDDIE MAC COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

77098

N

69

NUMBER OF HOMES SOLD June 2019-May 2020 June 2020-May 2021

June 2019-May 2020 June 2020-May 2021 AVERAGE DAYS ON THEMARKET

77006 -18.46%

77007 -8.77%

65

53

57

52

77008 -8.89%

77019

-10.96%

45

41

73

65

+27.22%

+28.98%

+41.02%

+64.37%

+39.29%

77098 +32.69%

52

69

169

215

773

997

963

1,358

174

286

84

117

77006

77007

77008

77019

77098

AVERAGE HOME SALES PRICE June 2019-May 2020 June 2020-May 2021

Although 30-year and 15-year xed-mortgage rates declined during the heart of the pandemic in 2020, they have since risen in the early months of 2021. NATIONALMORTGAGE RATE DATA

$750,652

77006 SOLD

30-year xed-rate mortgage

15-year xed-rate mortgage

+9.87%

$824,733

5%

$522,810

77007 SOLD

+9.21%

$570,959

4%

$541,306 $575,773

77008 SOLD

+6.37%

3%

$1,647,253

77019 SOLD

+3.71%

$1,708,302

2% 0

$903,683

77098 SOLD

+8.69%

$982,168

January 2018

January 2019

January 2020

January 2021

HEIGHTS | 716 E 18TH ST. | CALL FOR PRICE

AFTON OAKS | 4611 MERWIN ST. | $599,000

RICE/MUSEUM DISTRICT | 1718 OAKDALE ST. | $469,000

7 1 3 . 2 0 8 . 8 3 0 7 kirsten.abney@garygreene.com

In Luxury Real Estate, Expertise Matters.

K I R S T E N ABNEY

©2021 Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate LLC. Better Homes and Gardens ® is a registered trademark of Meredith Corporation licensed to Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate LLC. Equal Opportunity Company. Equal HousingOpportunity. Each Franchise is Independently Owned andOperated.

13

HEIGHTS  RIVER OAKS  MONTROSE EDITION • JULY 2021

A LIFE WELL LIVED. A LIFE WELL EARNED.

Since 1998, Belmont Village has safely delivered an unparalleled senior living experience for thousands of families. Collaborations with experts from the nation’s top universities and healthcare institutions, including the University of Texas Health Science Center, have established our national leadership in demonstrably effective cognitive health and wellness programs. Combining the highest levels of hospitality and care, our communities make life worth living.

BelmontVillage.com/HuntersCreek | 832-479-4426

The Community Built for Life.® H U N T E R S C R E E K

Licensed nurse on-site 24/7 | Circle of Friends® award-winning memory care | Urgent care telehealth Dedicated Alzheimer’s care | Physical therapy, rehabilitation and f itness | Nationally-recognized, highly trained staff

©2021 Belmont Village, L.P. | ALF 106016

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DEVELOPMENT

NewHouston committee looks to improve development, planning

BY HUNTER MARROW

developments to protect neighbor- hoods and their existing character, said Suvidha Bandi, city of Houston planner and project lead for the Livable Places Initiative. The goal is to not only make housing more aordable, but to encourage mixed-income households by adding more options. While townhomes and apartments are common in Houston, Bandi said the city is lacking in a mid- dle-ground housing type that typically is between two and three stories and has more than two units. “Per the ordinance right now, we have only two units allowed in a lot, and if you are building anything more than two units you have to develop them as apartments,” she said. The committee’s work is expected to continue through August 2022. Bueringandconservation In addition to the conversations on subdivision development regulations, the committee has also worked to improve development in two key areas: buering and conservation districts. Approximately 10 years ago the city of Houston passed a buering ordinance for midrises and high-rises, protecting single-family residences but not residents living in townhomes, condominiums or apartments. The committee sought to protect those residents by adjusting the city’s ordinances in case they need dump- ster screening, need lighting from cars in nearby parking garages addressed, or have noise or space concerns. “This time around, the entire group

In late July or early August, Houston City Council could vote on amend- ments to the city’s development regulations aimed at creating more opportunities for walkability, aord- ability and equity. The amendments are not submit- ted by a particular council member or group but rather a culmination of yearslong eorts by Houston stakeholders and government o- cials—known as the Livable Places Initiative—to improve and update development codes. The Livable Places Action Commit- tee has been tasked with guiding the process. The group, which comprises industry representatives, subject experts, community leaders and other agencies, has been working since September to help sta create, analyze and propose regulatory changes. “We’re not just talking about next week; we’re talking about 10, 15 or 20 years from nowwhere these changes are going to aect the development community and individuals,” commit- tee co-chair Sonny Garza said. The committee meets once a month in an attempt to address at least 50 goals set by two previous planning eorts—Plan Houston, a strategic framework for more eective orga- nization in Houston, and Resilient Houston, a strategy to protect Houston against future disasters, aging infra- structure and poor air quality, among other stressors. The committee will look for ways to incentivize urban and dense

One element of Houston’s Livable Places study relates to how buering can protect single- family homes frommidrises and high-rises. (Hunter Marrow/Community Impact Newspaper)

said, ‘Why did we leave out everybody else? Doesn’t everyone deserve to be shielded from noise and light and all those things?’” Garza said. “The answer of course is a unanimous, ‘Yes, let’s change the ordinance to make sure that residential—not single family—is aided and considered when we’re looking at development.’” Still in development, conservation districts would provide a more exible way for property owners to protect their community’s character and address concerns stemming from redevelopment, according to the Houston Planning Department. The size of a district could be a few lots up to an entire neighborhood or the limits of an area of cultural signicance. Though the city of Houston continues to work on the language for the districts, neighbors would need to come together and vote on what they want and how it will aect them. “The problem is that unless you are a historic district, there are no tools in the toolbox to help you conserve your

A livableplace for everyone The livable places project is expected to run through August of 2022 and includes four main steps. 1 Minor technical amendments • Chapter 42 subdivision development regulations 2 Consultant work • Parking, residential and code studies • development code recommendations 3 Committee work • Review community input and consultant ndings • Make nal recommendations 4 Adoption • Present plan for adoption to committee, Houston Planning Commission and Houston City Council SOURCE: HOUSTON PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER neighborhood, even though you’re the management district or a [tax increment reinvestment zone] or any number of things that invest in your area,” Garza said.

I N M A I L B O X E S T H I S A U G U S T EDUCATION EDITION

LOCAL BUSINESSES: CONTACT US FOR ADVERTISING

PRINT

DIGITAL

DIRECT MAIL

�866� 989�6808 � COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM�ADVERTISE

15

HEIGHTS  RIVER OAKS  MONTROSE EDITION • JULY 2021

We’re bringing high-tech, high-touch care to patients. Our doctors and staff partner with you to understand your needs and work with you—not just on treatment, but also education and preventive care. Clinics are now open in Houston Village Medical Primary Care

Virtual visits

Walk-ins welcome

Same-day appointments available

Extended and weekend hours offered at some locations

To schedule an appointment or learn more VillageMedical.com

Several area locations to serve you:

OPENING JULY 2021 Village Medical 600 North Shepherd, Suite 530

Associates in Medicine, a member of Village Medical 4543 Post Oak Place, Suite 105

Village Medical 1351 W. 43rd St. Houston, TX 77018 Phone: 832-336-3920

Village Medical 427 W. 20th St., Suite 708

Houston, TX 77007 Phone: 713-461-2915

Houston, TX 77027 Phone: 713-797-1087

Houston, TX 77008 Phone: 713-461-2915

© 2021 Village Medical

16

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GUIDE

Local businesses oer home improvement tips

2 0 2 1 R E A L E S T A T E E D I T I O N

HOME IMPROVEMENT COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ & HUNTER MARROW

ASKAN INTERIOR DESIGNER

Now that the summer months are here, homeowners may be looking to spruce up one of their rooms or be eyeing a renovation. Houston design expert Yésely Love from Canaima Design provides tips for homeowners and insight into the market.

ASKA REALTOR FOR SA L E

WHAT SHOULD A HOMEOWNER KNOW AHEAD OF A VISIT TO AN INTERIOR DESIGNER? Usually when a homeowner has an idea of what they want, that helps a lot. Like if they want to build a new house for example. If they begin to align items of what is important to them, like a three-car garage, a pool or a gym, or they want a party patio for their dog. Simple line items really help us a lot to prepare when we are going to meet them for the rst time. When we contract, we do something that is actually very interesting: We interview our clients. We have a format where we basically get to know a client on if they like a white house or if they want a Greek house. We also ask questions like if they have allergies, if they have elderly people living with them in their house, if they have kids and how many kids they have.

We have very specic questions that we ask because that inuences us a lot on what we’re going to propose and design because what we do is make daily life for our clients the most comfortable, most livable and most healthy for them. WHAT POPULAR INTERIOR DESIGN TRENDS ARE YOU SEEING RIGHT NOW? Brick wash as well as vinyl are getting to be bigger and bigger. Vinyl ooring is becoming more and more aordable; it’s easy to clean; and it’s easy to repair, too, like if you have a crack, then you don’t need to change the whole space. Dekton is a really good countertop that I highly recommend. Air puriers are also getting very trendy especially after last year. Cork is also really, really good for sound, and you can put cork in the wall, cork in the oor; you’d be surprised.

Homes are selling fast in Houston, but there are some things both buyers and sellers should keep in mind. Daniel Herrington and Miranda Gilbert with JLA Realty oered some tips to those entering the market as well as some insights into how the Houston market stands out from other major U.S. cities and metro areas.

WHAT ARE THE MAIN THINGS PEOPLE WHO ARE LOOKING TO BUY A HOME NEED TO KNOW RIGHT NOW ABOUT THE REAL ESTATE MARKET IN HOUSTON? In today’s market, buyers must be preapproved to purchase. [Buyers] must be prepared to compete with multiple oers and pay over the asking price to have their oer considered. WHAT IS ONE CRUCIAL TIP YOU WOULD GIVE TO SOMEONE LOOKING TO SELL THEIR HOME THAT THEY MIGHT NOT THINK OF? To be patient with the process. While

getting multiple oers is exciting and the inventory of homes in the Houston area is short, the process is taking longer for completion due to the overwhelming demand for appraisers and underwriters. IS THERE ANYTHING ABOUT THE MARKET IN HOUSTON’S INNER LOOP THAT MAKES IT STAND OUT FROM OTHER CITIES IN THE U.S.? The cost of living in the Houston area compared to other cities is pretty low, and buyers are able to get more bang for their buck.

Daniel Herrington and Miranda Gilbert

Yésely Love Founder/Designer, Canaima Design 3200 Southwest Freeway, Houston 346-800-4080 info@canaimadesign.com

34TH ST.

Agents/assistant managers, JLA Realty-Greater Heights 2040 North Loop W., Ste. 204, Houston 832-638-0095 (Herrington) 832-527-7733 (Gilbert)

T. C. JESTER BLVD.

59

610

N

N

MAINTAINING YOUR HOME

EXTERIOR

INTERIOR

The National Association of Home Builders oers routine home maintenance tips for homeowners looking to maintain their homes’ value and ensure their

1 Roofs should be inspected by a qualied roofer every three years, and skylights should be inspected so leaks do not develop. 2 Ensure downspouts and gutters do not get clogged with leaves and other debris. 3 Inspect siding each year to see if it needs repainting, and trim shrubs away so they do not touch the siding. 4 Check for split or cracked caulking on windows and doors annually, and replace the caulk as necessary. 5 Moving parts of garage doors need to be oiled once every three months.

6 Air lters require regular replacement, generally once every three months.

1

safety. Find other useful home ownership tips at www.nahb.org.

7 Safety and security : Regularly check security alarms and circuit breakers. Check batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors twice a year. 8 Clean each faucet’s aerator every three to four months. Maintain garbage disposals by running cold water through them. 9 Masonry walls can develop a white powder that can be scrubbed o with water and a sti brush. 10 Hardwood oors without polyurethane need to be waxed with a liquid or paste “spirit” wax. Use emulsion wax on vinyl.

2

6

9

7

4

8

10

5

3

SOURCE: NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HOME BUILDERSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

MAKE A GARDEN

Tips for choosing a container The bigger the better—larger containers allow for larger root systems and larger plants as well as holding more water for hot days. Container types can include: • half wooden barrels, buckets or baskets • old bathtubs, galvanized metal tubs, or other tubs or troughs

Popular vegetables to grow:

Care tips:

Watch and treat for insects as needed. Support “climbing” vegetables with cages, twine or a trellis. Liquid fertilizer should be “fed” to plants at least twice per month. Add about an inch of coarse gravel in the bottom of containers to improve drainage. Plants need at least ve hours of sunlight per day and may need to be watered once or twice per day.

zucchini squash

bush beans

tomatoes

beets

chards

lettuce radishes

• hanging baskets, which are a good use of extra space and can be used for plants such as herbs or cherry tomatoes

cabbage

carrots

peppers

SOURCE: THE OLD FARMER’S ALMANACCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

17

HEIGHTS  RIVER OAKS  MONTROSE EDITION • JULY 2021

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24

communityimpact.com

Powered by