Northwest Austin Edition | May 2021

ELECTION

Results from elections in Northwest Austin

Election results: Austinites strike down strong-mayor proposition

Austin voters approved ive prop- ositions May and voted down three others, including one that would have phased out the city manager position and given additional respon- sibilities to the mayor. More than 85% of voters opposed the strong- mayor measure. BY OLIVIA ALDRIDGE & JACK FLAGLER

“We are not Chicago; we’re not Seattle; and we’re not Houston. We’re Austin, and Austinites saw that the clear strengths in our city is under the current form of government,” said Nico Ramsey, director for community engagement for Austin for All People, a citizens group that opposed the strong-mayor measure.

Voters stand in the rain at the Shops at Arbor Walk in North Austin on May 1. (Olivia Aldridge/Community Impact Newspaper)

Andrew Allison, campaign chair for Austinites for Progressive Reform, a group that supported the initiative, said while it was clear Austinites

did not support the strong-mayor proposal, he also believes community members “have concerns about the status quo.”

PROPOSITION A FIREFIGHTERS UNION CHARTER AMENDMENT

PROPOSITION B

PROPOSITION C

PROPOSITION D

REINSTATING THE HOMELESS ORDINANCES

APPOINTING THE DIRECTOR OF POLICE OVERSIGHT

CHANGING THE DATE OF MAYORAL ELECTIONS

YES

YES

YES

YES

90,424 (57.67%)

96,966 (62.87%)

102,138 (66.48%)

124,281 (81.03%)

NO

NO

NO

NO

29,085 (18.97%)

66,353 (42.33%)

57,256 (37.13%)

51,494 (33.52%)

If the Austin Fireghters Association and the city reach an impasse in collective bargaining negotiations, either side has the ability to force negotiations into binding arbitration.

Certain behaviors, including sitting or lying down in public areas, panhandling, sleeping outdoors or camping became criminal oenses.

City Council will create rules for appointing the director of police oversight through an ordinance.

The Austin mayor will be elected in presidential election years beginning in 2024. This means the mayor city residents elect in 2022 will serve a two-year term.

PROPOSITION F

PROPOSITION G ADDING AN 11TH CITY COUNCIL DISTRICT

PROPOSITION H

PROPOSITION E

ESTABLISHING RANKEDCHOICE VOTING

INSTITUTING A STRONGMAYOR FORM OF GOVERNMENT

CREATING AN ALTERNATIVE CAMPAIGN FINANCE SYSTEM

YES

YES

YES

YES

87,579 (57.96%)

21,793 (14.15%)

65,288 (43.34%)

65,544 (42.78%)

NO

NO

NO

NO

63,515 (42.04%)

132,234 (85.85%)

85,360 (56.66%)

87,669 (57.22%)

Austin will continue in a council- manager form of government. If this strong-mayor proposition had passed, the mayor would have become City Hall’s top executive.

Austin will not add an extra City Council district. The city’s redistricting committee is in the process of redrawing its 10 districts ahead of the 2022 election.

Voters rejected a program that would have distributed $25 taxpayer-funded vouchers to each registered voter in the city for each race the voter could cast a ballot in.

Austinites supported a ranked-choice voting system, which will allow them to rank up to ve candidates on their ballots in both City Council and mayoral races.

SOURCES: HAYS COUNTY CLERK, TRAVIS COUNTY CLERK, WILLIAMSON COUNTY CLERKCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

BY IAIN OLDMAN Aguirre wins Pflugerville ISD board of trustees contest by fewer than handful of votes

Travis County and another two in Williamson County, the only votes cast for the PfISD race in that county. “We realized in this election that every vote counts,” said Vernagene Mott, president of the PfISD board of trustees, on May 11 when the board canvassed the ocial results. After all votes were reported on May 1, Aguirre was leading the race by a total of two votes. However, three provisional or mail-in ballots had yet

to be counted in Travis County. The county ocially added those tallies May 7, extending Aguirre’s lead by one vote and ocially handing him the election win. According to the Texas Secretary of State’s Oce, a candidate can legally call for a recount if the dierence between the number of votes between the candidates is less than 10% of the number of votes received by the person elected. In

this race, that would mean 10% of the 2,968 votes received by Aguirre. That comes to 296 votes—far more than the gap between the candidates. Garcia chose not to le a petition for a recount in Travis or Williamson county, saying he wanted to allow Aguirre to “hit the ground running” in his job on the board. “I’m really proud of the campaign we ran. I wish [Aguirre] all the luck in the world,” Garcia said.

In a race that tallied nearly 6,000 votes across two counties, David Aguirre was ocially declared winner of the election for Place 1 on the Pugerville ISD board of trustees May 7 when Travis County published its ocial election results. Aguirre in the end won the race by just three votes, collecting 2,968 tallies in Travis County. Challenger Marc Garcia collected 2,963 votes in

15

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION • MAY 2021

Powered by