Sugar Land - Missouri City | June 2021

SUGAR LAND MISSOURI CITY EDITION

2021 H E A L T H C A R E E D I T I O N

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VOLUME 8, ISSUE 10  JUNE 9JULY 6, 2021

Fort Bend ISDexpands mental health oerings

A NEED FOR NURSES While the supply of full-time registered nurses is projected to grow by 27.7% between 2018- 32, the demand could grow by 46.8%. Projected demand Projected supply Demand unmet GULF COAST REGISTEREDNURSES

BY CLAIRE SHOOP

As Fort Bend ISD seeks federal funding for mental health services on campus for a third year, the dis- trict’s program has continued to evolve and expand while supporting increased student needs through- out the coronavirus pandemic. The number of FBISD students seen by a district mental health counselor jumped from 99 in February 2020 to 243 in March 2020. As the demand for care increased and the program continued to ramp up, the number of students seen during the remainder of 2020 was consistently higher than prepandemic CONTINUED ON 30 support Fort Bend ISD has six full-time counselors who Seeking are available to every student in the district. 250 Students seen by a district mental health counselor

21.9% demand unmet

0 60,000 70,000 80,000 90,000 100,000

University of Houston at Sugar Land nursing students train in simulation facilities, which oer hands-on clinical simulation training.

SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Area hospitals, educators assess nurse shortage As hospitals nationwide face an ongoing nursing shortage, the decit is top of mind for many Sugar Land- and Missouri City-area health care profes- sionals and educators. COVID-19 patients for more than a year, according to a February study from the U.S. Oce of Inspec- tor General. BY MORGAN JONES & CLAIRE SHOOP

1st month of pandemic

150 200 100 50 0

Texas hospitals, however, have faced nursing shortages since long before the pandemic. The Texas Department of State Health Services projects the Gulf Coast region will have a decit of 21,400 registered nurses by 2032 as the growing demand CONTINUED ON 28

Hospitals across the county reported higher rates of turnover and sta burnout as nurses faced heavier workloads and treated critically ill

2019

2020

SOURCE: FORT BEND ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

HEALTHCARE EDITION 2021 SPONSORED BY • DaVita Kidney Care • HoustonMethodist - Sugar Land • Fort Bend Dental • Mobility City

Looking into the feasibility of Hwy. 36A

IMPACTS

TRANSPORTATION

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We’re bringing high-tech, high-touch care to patients. Our doctors and staff partner with you to understand your needs and work with you—not just on treatment, but also education and preventive care. Village Medical Primary Care Clinics are now open in Sugar Land and Missouri City

Virtual visits

Walk-ins welcome

Same-day appointments available

Extended and weekend hours offered at some locations

To schedule an appointment or learn more VillageMedical.com

Several area locations to serve you:

Village Medical at Walgreens 20675 FM 1093 Suite A Richmond, TX 77407 Phone: 713-461-2915

Village Medical at Walgreens 1600 Jackson St. Suite 100

Village Medical at Walgreens 1307 FM 1092 Rd., Suite 100 Missouri City, TX 77459 Phone: 832-376-3860

Village Medical at Walgreens 11525 S Highway 6 Sugar Land, TX 77498 Phone: 713-461-2915

Village Medical 15200 SW Fwy., Suite 175 Sugar Land, TX 77478 Phone: 713-461-2915

Richmond, TX 77469 Phone: 713-461-2915

© 2021 Village Medical

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F O R T B E N D I N D E P E N D E N T S C H O O L D I S T R I C T

F O R H I S O U T S TA N D I N G S E L F L E S S S E R V I C E !

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SUGAR LAND - MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JUNE 2021

Joe’s surgery is now in the rearviewmirror. We put it there. Even before we meet one another, we know we have something in common. Because if you’re facing a neurological issue — you not only want compassion and technology, you want expert physicians with a never-give-in, never-give-up attitude. The kind of attitude that put Joe’s surgery in the rearview mirror, and put Joe back on the dance floor.

We’re St. Luke’s Health, taking pride in changing destinies. Find out how at StLukesHealth.org/Neuro .

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMAMY: Every June we publish a special Health Care Edition focusing on our community’s medical industry and health care environment. This year, COVID-19 created some unique challenges while illuminating others. Stang shortages in nursing and increasing mental health concerns for our students are just two of the issues we are unpacking in this month’s Health Care Edition.

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

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FROMLAURA: In this month’s Health Care Edition, we break down some health barriers and oerings in the Sugar Land and Missouri City areas—looking into Fort Bend County’s lack of trauma centers and providing a directory of local hospitals. Laura Aebi, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JUNE 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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MATLAGE WAY

in plastic surgery and postnatal recovery. DePuma-Aparicio is a licensed massage therapist with more than 19 years of experience, and True Recovery has been in business for more than 12 years. 832-729-5323. www.atruerecovery.com COMING SOON 6 Saladworks , located at 18802 University Blvd., Sugar Land, will open June 16 in the Riverstone area. With create-your-own salad oerings as well as wraps, soups and sandwiches, the restaurant strives to be a convenient and healthy option. 281-207-6004. www.saladworks.com 7 Dog Haus Biergarten is constructing a new location at 5414 Hwy. 6, Missouri City. Known for its gourmet hot dogs, Dog Haus dogs, sausages and burgers are all served on grilled King’s Hawaiian rolls. The franchise also serves plant-based options along with sides, craft beer and ice cream. Dog Haus has one Houston-ar- ea location with two others coming soon. www.doghaus.com 8 Lazy Dog Restaurant & Bar is plan- ning to open a location at The Grid devel- opment in Staord in 2022. Located near the intersection of Hwy. 59 and Airport Boulevard, Lazy Dog’s sprawling menu includes burgers, soups and salads as well as drinks and oerings for dogs. The California-based restaurant chain has six Texas locations, including one in Cypress. www.lazydogrestaurants.com 9 MediOAK Pharmacy will open at 3129 Hwy. 6, Sugar Land, in early July. In ad- dition to prescription and compounding services, the pharmacy will sell over-the-

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BEES CREEK CT.

NOWOPEN 1 Wishbone Pet Care began operat- ing under a soft opening in Riverstone on May 10. Located at 17034 Universi- ty Blvd., Ste. 200, Sugar Land, this is Wishbone Pet Care’s second location with the rst being located in Missouri City. Wishbone Pet Care oers a variety of pet supplies as well as doggie day care, overnight boarding, pet grooming, vacci- nations and dental services. The business also has a loyalty program. 281-242-7297. www.wishbonepetcare.com

2 KB’s Hot Chicken , located at 636 Hwy. 6, Ste. 500, Sugar Land, opened May 14. Specializing in Nashville-style halal hot chicken, the restaurant features chicken at six dierent spice levels. 281-302-5710. www.facebook.com/KBshotchicken 3 D’s Cajun Eats and Barbecue held a soft opening May 28 for its restaurant located at 13134 Dairy Ashford, Ste. 800, Sugar Land. The restaurant serves au- thentic Cajun, soul and barbecue meals, including seafood and gumbo. 713-851-4128. www.facebook.com/

Ds-Cajun-Eats-and-Barbecue- 103909254654614

4 Hanguk Taekwondo opened in early March at 6850 Hwy. 6, Ste. 100, Mis- souri City. The business oers authentic, traditional South Korean taekwondo to students ages 3 and up. 832-486-9135. www.facebook.com/hanguktkd.tx 5 True Recovery Lymphatic Massage held a grand opening May 15 for a new location at 4502 Riverstone Blvd., Ste. 1002, Missouri City. The business, owned by Delmie DePuma-Aparicio, a lymphatic drainage massage therapist, specializes

    

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COMPILED BY LAURA AEBI & CLAIRE SHOOP

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Landmark Community Center

The T.E. Harman Center

COURTESY TEAL CONSTRUCTION COMPANY

COURTESY CITY OF SUGAR LAND

ANNIVERSARIES 13 Sugar Land Toastmasters Club celebrated its 25th anniversary May 21 with a virtual celebration. While the club typically meets at Classic Chevrolet at 13115 Hwy. 59, Sugar Land, it has held Zoom meetings throughout the pan- demic. Toastmasters International aims to teach public speaking and leadership

counter medication, diabetes supplies and women’s health care products. MediOAK Pharmacy will also oer free delivery for customers. 10 Quick Quack Car Wash is construct- ing a new facility at 11719 S. Hwy. 6, Sugar Land. With a variety of wash pack- ages, Quick Quack Car Wash promotes fast service, guided service and brushless technology. The new location will be ad- jacent to Taco Bell in the Kroger parking lot and will open in the next four months. www.dontdrivedirty.com EXPANSIONS 11 ChampionX opened an addition to its corrosion laboratory at the company’s headquarters at 11177 S. Stadium Drive, Sugar Land in mid-April. The lab is a part of its Research, Development and Engineering Center and expanded Cham- pionX’s capacity to help customers with corrosion technology needs, according to a press release. 281-632-6500. www.championx.com 12 Accredo Packaging, Inc. will execute its fourth expansion—the development of a two-story, 83,000-square-foot building with covered parking and about 40,000 square feet of oce space—at its Sugar Land Business Park location at 12682 Cardinal Meadow Drive, Sugar Land. The construction is expected to be done before fall 2022. Accredo manufac- tures and supplies sustainable packaging for prepackaged food and consumer product markets, including barrier lms, premade pouches, tissue wrap and bun- dling lm. The expansion will create 30 new jobs. 866-203-3554. www.accredopackaging.com

Upon opening, the museum featured work from 12 local artists. (Courtesy Art Museum TX)

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Art Museum TX , a nonprot organization in Fort Bend County, opened a location in Sugar Land Town Square. Located at 16165 City Walk, Sugar Land, the museum held a grand opening on May 27 and aims to exhibit the region’s best contemporary art. At the time of its opening, the museum featured work from 12 local artists. “I think when most people think about Texas art, they imagine longhorns and bluebonnets, and that’s not at all what we do,” Museum Director Ana Villaronga said. “We are trying to change how people think about Texas art.” The art museum was the rst project approved through the city of Sugar Land’s placemaking initiative, which asks the community for project suggestions that would improve quality of life, support small businesses and plant’s capacity to 33 million gallons of drinking water per day. www.missouricitytx.gov 16 The T.E. Harman Center reopened at 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land, on May 17 following more than yearlong closure due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The center,

revitalize underused areas. The request for the museum was submitted in early February and approved within a month. “The adaptive solutions the city is sourcing through this program will support Sugar Land business and residents now and into the future,” said Elizabeth Hu, Sugar Land’s economic development director. “Projects like this will increase resiliency for local businesses and further invigorate the

skills. 281-468-9185. www.toastmasters.org IN THE NEWS

14 Fort Bend County Commissioners Court held a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Landmark Community Center on June 5. Located at 100 Louisiana St., Mis- souri City, the gymnasium was originally built in 1935 as part of the former Mis- souri City High School. The $4.6 million restoration project included the creation of a new lobby, basketball rims, a tness center, a game center, a juice and coee bar, a meeting space and a museum. 281-403-8000. www.fortbendcountytx.gov 15 Missouri City held a ribbon-cutting and grand opening ceremony May 26 for the Phase 2 expansion of the Regional Surface Water Treatment Plant located at 4655 1/2 Bees Creek Court, Missouri City. With the $20 million expansion, the plant’s processing capacity doubles from 10 million gallons per day to 20 million gallons per day. The city said the project was necessary to meet a mandate that requires cities to convert 60% of their water demand to alternative, or nongroundwater, supplies by 2025. A future expansion will further increase the

community.” 346-387-1192 https://artmuseumtx.org

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which sells an annual membership, oers a variety of programs and daily activities for adults over the age of 50. Tempera- ture checks will be required, and social distancing is encouraged. Many classes will still be available virtually. 281-275-2893. www.sugarlandtx.gov

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JUNE 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TODO LIST

June & July events

COMPILED BY CLAIRE SHOOP

16 THROUGH 19 SUGAR LAND SUPERSTARWEEKEND

Sugar Land’s “American Idol”-like singing competition is hosting several events June 16-19. The singing contest is in its 16th year of showcasing local talent. June 16 : Virtual auditions are due for Fort Bend County residents age 14 and older. Free. Virtual. June 18 : Enjoy Music in the Plaza featuring Zach Person, an indie rock artist based in Austin. Person is a former Sugar Land Superstar nalist who appeared on Season 15 of “American Idol.” 7:30-9:30 p.m. Free. 15958 City Walk, Sugar Land. June 19 : The Junior Superstar winner will be crowned. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Free. 15958 City Walk, Sugar Land. 281-242-2000. www.sugarlandtownsquare.com 19 MISSOURI CITY JUNETEENTH CELEBRATION Missouri City Juneteenth Celebration Foundation’s 2021 event includes the 18th annual One Mile of Smiles Parade followed by a concert in the park. The One Mile of Smiles Parade route begins on Texas Parkway and concludes at Hunters Glen Park. 7 p.m. Free. 2440 Texas Parkway, Missouri City; 1340 Independence Blvd., Missouri City. 281-545-5009. www. missouricityjuneteenthcelebration.com

JUNE 26

NOLANIGHTS SUGAR LAND TOWN SQUARE

JULY 04

RED, WHITE AND BOOM THE CROWN FESTIVAL PARK

The New Orleans Hustlers Brass Band performs as part of the NOLA Nights concert series. The group incorporates the styles of R&B, funk, Zydeco and more. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Free (registration required). Sugar Land Town Square, 15958 City

Sugar Land’s Independence Day event will feature family- friendly activities and reworks. Guests can enjoy food trucks as well as a variety of music throughout the evening. A rework display will cap o the night. 7-10 p.m. Free. The Crown Festival Park, 18355 Hwy. 59, Sugar Land. 281-275-2900. www.sugarlandtx.gov

Walk, Sugar Land. 281-242-2000. www.sugarlandtownsquare.com

JUNE 12 GROWYOUR OWN The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service in Fort Bend County and the Fort Bend County Master Gardeners are presenting a six-class program on creating an edible garden at home. June’s session

the question, “What is the Return on Investment for Diversity and Inclusion?” The webinar will talk about how diversity and inclusion initiatives promote employee performance, creativity and prots while reducing turnover. Noon-1 p.m. $20 (member), $25 (prospective member). Virtual. 281-566-2152. www.fortbendchamber.com

will focus on best practices for identifying and managing garden pests and vegetable diseases. 9-10:30 a.m. $15. Virtual. 281-342-3034. www.mg.org 16 THE ROI FOR D&I The Fort Bend Chamber of Commerce is hosting a conversation for the business community centered around

Find more or submit Sugar Land and Missouri City events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

HOMEDEPOT.COM/MYCABINETMAKEOVER 281-971-9092

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JUNE 2021

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY HALEY MORRISON & CLAIRE SHOOP

TxDOT, advocacy group look at feasibility of Hwy. 36A corridor The Texas Department of Trans-

ONGOING PROJECT

POTENTIAL PATH FOR HWY. 36A Hwy. 36A has not been approved, so a route has not been determined. However, a study of where the road might travel has the northern and southern parts of the road meeting near I-10.

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Fort Bend and Waller counties, all of which are anticipating growth. “Fort Bend is expected to grow by half a million by 2050. These people will need ways to get from their jobs, school and shopping,” Fredricks said. “The more you grow, it puts more pressure on the existing infrastructure.” The Highway 36A Coalition advocates the need for this project and is hoping it will be placed on the Houston-Galveston Area Council’s 2045 Regional Transportation Plan. However, the feasibility of the project, the availability of funding and the road’s route could all aect whether the project becomes a reality, Fredricks said. “These are very long-term proj- ects that take place over years and decades,” Fredricks said. “We need to get them in motion and begin to identify corridors, and part of that is building public support.” Finding corridors with the least impact to the environment and to existing communities is one of the goals for the Highway 36A Coalition and TxDOT right now, Fredricks said. For example, there are several rivers and creeks the road would need to cross as well as natural habitats to consider, he said. “Every road ever proposed will have some people who agree and some who disagree,” he said. “There will be meetings to gather input and address community concerns to create solutions that are a win-win for everybody.”

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portation is in the midst of feasibility and environmental studies for Hwy. 36A. If the project comes to fruition, it would include building 65 miles of Hwy. 36A, creating a corridor from Port Freeport to Brazosport to north of Houston, Highway 36A Coalition spokesperson Jim Fredricks said. The project is separated into two sections: Hwy. 36A South would run from the existing Hwy. 36 south to the I-10 and Hwy. 90A intersection. Hwy. 36A North would run from that intersection to Hwy. 6 north of Hempstead. The road would be a four-lane divided road and would look similar to the expanded, existing Hwy. 36, Fredricks said. The existing Hwy. 36 is under construction; the road runs from Freeport to Rosenberg. The project was rst proposed in the Waller County Mobility Plan in 2017, said Deidrea George, Texas Department of Transportation public information ocer, in an email. It is too early in the planning phase of the project to have a construction timeline or project cost, George said. The new road is necessary for three reasons, Fredricks said: hurricane evacuation, moving freight from Port Freeport and accommodating the growing population. Once the Harbor Channel Improvement project is completed, Port Freeport will be the deepest port on the Gulf Coast and will be handling more trac, Fredricks said. The road will run through Brazoria,

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Hwy. 6 expansion Construction to expand Hwy. 6 to eight lanes from Lexington Boulevard to Brooks Street will nish June 15 after delays due to Winter Storm Uri, according to Deidrea George, a public information ocer with TxDOT. Timeline: February 2020-June 2021 Cost: $12.1 million Funding sources: TxDOT, city of Sugar Land, Fort Bend County

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MAY 19. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SLMNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. continuous access to 420 acres of park land along the Brazos River and 9.5 miles of trails. Timeline: February 2020-May 2020 Cost: $2.3 million Funding sources: city of Sugar Land Brazos River Park Road extension and trail The new road and trail connecting Memorial Park and Brazos River Park in Sugar Land opened for through trac in May, according to the city of Sugar Land. The mile-long, two-lane road and accompanying trail provides

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• A hurricane evacuation route • Moving freight from Port Freeport • More infrastructure for growth REASONS FOR THE ROAD “There are three main reasons to build Hwy. 36A”, Hwy. 36A Coalition spokesperson Jim Fredricks said:

SOURCE: TXDOTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Looking for an opportunity to grow as a leader? Fort Bend Leadership Forum is the answer. Apply today! .................................................................... � Contact Juliette Nessmith FORT ,("'BEND atjuliette@fortbendcc.orgor LEADERSHIP FORUM 281-566-2161 for more information.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Fort Bend ISD

Fort Bend ISD reversesmask policy after order fromGov. GregAbbott

Fort Bend ISD postpones school construction

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students were at their desks or during lunch, recess, physical education or athletics.

Eective June 5, Fort Bend ISD no longer requires students, sta, parents and visitors to wear masks in schools and district buildings, the district said in a May 18 press release. The district announced the change in policy following an executive order from Gov. Greg Abbott that prohibits public schools from requiring masks after June 4. In the release, the district said any individual may choose to wear a mask and that choice should be respected. “FBISD remains committed to making prudent decisions, no matter how dicult, to keep students, sta, parents and their families as safe as possible,” the release said. Before the order, FBISD was plan- ning to require masks when social distancing was unachievable. Masks would not have been required while

BY CLAIRE SHOOP

Leaders in Fort Bend ISD have decided to delay the construction of recently named Almeta Craw- ford High School due to labor and supply shortages brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. The district’s 12th high school was originally scheduled to open in the 2022-23 school year; however, the school is now expected to open with ninth to 11th grades during the 2023-24 school year, according to Anthony Indelicato, the dis- trict’s chief of sta and collabora- tive communities. Indelicato announced the change during a May 10 presenta- tion to the FBISD board of trustees on district facilities. “We are disappointed by the delay, but labor, distribution and

supply chain disruptions due to the pandemic are factors the district cannot control,” Superintendent Charles Dupre said in a video recap of the meeting. Crawford High School will be located in the southeast portion of the district on FM 521 south of Hwy. 6 near Sienna Parkway, according to district documents. The school will relieve overcrowd- ing and growth at Ridge Point High School. Additionally, the FBISD School Boundary Oversight Committee will meet later this year to discuss several proposed changes to atten- dance boundaries as the district continues to add new schools and programs, Indelicato said.

Fort Bend ISD board of trustees 16431 Lexington Blvd., Sugar Land. Meetings are in-person and livestreamed. June 14 at 6 p.m. MEETINGSWE COVER QUOTEOFNOTE “TEXANS, NOT GOVERNMENT, SHOULDDECIDE THEIR BEST HEALTHPRACTICES, WHICH ISWHYMASKSWILL NOT BEMANDATEDBY PUBLIC SCHOOL DISTRICTS OR GOVERNMENT ENTITIES.” GREG ABBOTT, GOVERNOR OF TEXAS

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JUNE 2021

CITY& COUNTY

New funding for pandemic-hit businesses in Fort Bend County

Joyful, Academically Excellent Schools in Your Community Escuelas alegres y académicamente excelentes en su comunidad

BY MORGAN JONES

RELYING ON REVENUE The grant amount a business is eligible for relies on its revenue from 2020. Revenue in 2020 Grant eligibility $25,000- $100,000 Up to $5,000 $100,000- $2 million Up to $15,000

FORT BEND COUNTY Small businesses in Fort Bend County that have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic can apply for up to $25,000 in relief funding due to new funding made available by Fort Bend County. Fort Bend County officials made new funding from the American Rescue Plan Act available through the county’s small-business emergency grant program, a program designed to help small businesses recover from the pandemic. Fort Bend County has already awarded more than $47 million through the program, said King Banerjee, Fort Bend Chamber of Commerce business and professional division chair. To be eligible for the funding— among several other requirements—a business must be for profit and in good standing; have its principal office located in Fort Bend County; have 2020 revenue between $25,000

$2 million- $5 million

LIMITED SEATS STILL AVAILABLE FOR GRADES PRE-K – 12 LOS ASIENTOS LIMITADOS AÚN ESTÁN DISPONIBLES PARA LOS GRADOS PRE-K – 12

Up to $25,000

SOURCE: MPACT STRATEGIC CONSULTING/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

and $5 million; have at least one employee and no more than 50; and have been fully operational by Dec. 30, 2019, or preparing to open prior to March 1, 2020. The online application portal opened May 17 and will close June 30 or when all funds are expended. For more information or to apply for the funding, visit www.fortbendcounty.com/grants.

Tuition-Free Public Schools Escuelas públicas gratuitas

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OLD & NEW GUIDELINES Officials from Missouri City and Sugar Land have announced the end of mask requirements, but most protocols remain. SOURCES: CITY OF SUGAR LAND, CITY OF MISSOURI CITY/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Sugar Land Missouri City

Temperature checks Social distancing Requires masks Disinfection practices

Missouri City, Sugar Land to no longer require masks followingAbbott’s executive order

BY CLAIRE SHOOP

Director Doug Adolph said. Missouri City Mayor Robin Elackatt said Missouri City will comply with Abbott’s order. Missouri City will still, however, require temperature checks for all staff and visitors at city facil- ities, according to the city’s release. City officials also encourage social distancing and the use of sanitizer. The order stated local government entities that continue imposing a mask mandate could face a fine.

MISSOURI CITY& SUGAR LAND Cities across the state, including Sugar Land and Missouri City, are ditching mask policies in accordance with Gov. Greg Abbott’s May 18 executive order. Sugar Land will continue other health protocols, including tempera- ture screenings, social distancing, occupancy limits and routine clean- ings, Sugar Land Communications

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12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

News from Fort Bend County, Missouri City & Sugar Land

Abbott puts end to pandemic benefits

HOURLY BREAKDOWN In Texas, more than 3 out of 4 jobs available are paying more than $11.50 per hour.

of all posted jobs pay more than $15.50 per hour .

45%

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

of all posted jobs pay more than $11.50 per hour .

TEXAS Effective June 26, unem- ployed Texans will no longer be eligible to receive the $300 weekly unemployment supplement from the Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation program, as Gov. Greg Abbott informed the U.S. Department of Labor on May 17 that Texas would be opting out of further federal unem- ployment compensation related to the pandemic. Abbott said he decided to opt out of the program due to the vast number of well-paying jobs available statewide. “The Texas economy is booming and employers are hiring in commu- nities throughout the state,” Abbott said in a statement. “According to the Texas Workforce Commission, the number of job openings in Texas is almost identical to the number of Texans who are receiving unemploy- ment benefits. That assessment does

76%

of posted jobs pay around the minimum wage of $7.25 per hour .

2%

SOURCE: TEXAS WORKFORCE COMMISSION/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

not include the voluminous jobs that typically are not listed, like construc- tion and restaurant jobs. In fact, there are nearly 60%more jobs open—and listed—in Texas today than there was in February 2020, the month before the pandemic hit Texas.” According to Texas Labor Market Information, the state’s unem- ployment rate sat at 6.9% in March 2021—down from its 12.9% peak in April 2020. However, this is still higher than Texas’ prepandemic rate of 3.7% in February 2020.

Missouri City City Council gives official green light to city employee pay increases

BY CLAIRE SHOOP

Sugar Land City Council 2700 Town Center Blvd. N., Sugar Land. Meetings are livestreamed. June 15 at 5:30 p.m. Missouri City City Council 1522 Texas Parkway, Missouri City. Meetings are livestreamed and in- person. June 21 at 7 p.m. Fort Bend County Commissioners Court • 401 Jackson St., Richmond. Meetings are livestreamed and in- person. June 22 at 1 p.m. Fort Bend ISD board of trustees 16431 Lexington Blvd., Sugar Land. Meetings are in-person and livestreamed. June 14 at 6 p.m. MEETINGSWE COVER Interim City Manager Bill Atkinson said city staff will be revisiting the topic during budgeting. The ordi- nance will go into effect retroactively beginning March 28.

MISSOURI CITY City Council officially approved a pay increase for Missouri City employees. City employees will receive a 3.5% salary adjustment, according to the May 3 ordinance. The annual cost is estimated at $895,000 with a prorated cost of $465,000 for fiscal year 2020-21. Employees whose salaries are more than 10% below the market median will be brought into alignment. Financial Services Director Allena Portis said it will cost about $178,000 a year to bring the affected individu- als up to the market median. Council Member Floyd Emery proposed lowering the threshold to include employees who are more than 5% misaligned. Portis said 81 employees fall into this category, costing the city $512,000 per year.

13

SUGAR LAND - MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JUNE 2021

H E A L T H C A R E E D I T I O N 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER IS PROUD TO SAY THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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ANNUAL COMMUNITY  HEALTH CARE REAL ESTATE  EDUCATION COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. VISIT

HEALTH CARE SNAPSHOT

COMPILED BY LAURA AEBI

COMPARING COUNTY HEALTH

COMBATING COVID19

These rankings are updated annually but include data from previous years. There are other factors included that are not listed.

VACCINATIONS BY ZIP CODE

77478

More than half of Fort Bend County residents over the age of 12 are vaccinated. Data was accurate as of May 28.

HARRIS COUNTY MONTGOMERY COUNTY FORT BEND COUNTY

HEALTH OUTCOMES INCLUDE:

77498

90

77489

• LENGTHOF LIFE • QUALITYOF LIFE , such as the number of poor mental and physical health days reported

99 TOLL

59

6

COUNTYVACCINATIONS

77479

2021 STATEWIDE HEALTH CARE RANKINGS OUT OF 254 COUNTIES

HEALTH FACTORS INCLUDE:

PEOPLE AGE 12+ FULLY VACCINATED

77459

• HEALTHBEHAVIORS , such as smoking, obesity, physical activity, excessive drinking, alcohol-impaired driving deaths, sexually transmitted infections and teen births • CLINICAL CARE , including health insurance coverage; number of physicians, dentists and mental health providers; preventable hospital stays; and u vaccinations • SOCIOECONOMIC FACTORS , such as educational attainment levels, children in poverty, income inequality and violent crimes • PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT FACTORS , such as air pollution, drinking water violations, housing problems and long commutes

54.98%

N

HEALTH OUTCOMES

PEOPLE AGE 12+ WITH AT LEAST ONE DOSE

18 9

2 3

30 30 69

Length of life Overall Quality of life

67.58%

PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL POPULATION FULLY VACCINATED

8

4

VACCINATION DEMOGRAPHICS

54.0% 58.5% 55.9% 35.6% 45.2%

77459 77478 77479 77489 77498

22.15% 13.79% 18.73% 11.91% 6.32% 27.10%

Asian Black

HEALTH FACTORS

13 24 35 28

2 3 8 8

15 90

Overall

White Hispanic

Health behaviors

61

Socioeconomic Physical environment Clinical care

SOURCES: ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION, UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN POPULATION HEALTH INSTITUTE, COUNTYHEALTHRANKINGS.ORG, TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Other

160 241

Unknown

238

177

15

SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JUNE 2021

Don’t let mobility challenges keep you from doing what you

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Repairs and Cleaning Available for Mobility Scooters, Lift Chairs, Hospital Beds, Power Chairs and Wheelchairs. Mobile Service available. OPENING LATE JUNE 7746 Highway 6, Suite H, Missouri City, TX 77459 Mon - Fri 9-5, Sat 10-2 | (832) 539-6881 | MobilityCity.com

Oilfield Rd

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

W . A I R P O R T

HOSPITALS

Information on local hospitals in Sugar Land & Missouri City

COMPILED BY XXXXXXXX 2 0 2 1 H E A L T H C A R E E D I T I O N

T B

HOSPITALS

Leapfrog, ve-star rating from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, recognized as one of the best maternity care hospitals 4 OakBend Medical Center-Williams Way Campus 22003 Hwy. 59, Richmond 2813412000 www.oakbendmedcenter.org • Number of employees: 350 • Number of beds: 61 • Telemedicine oerings: available through OakBend Medical Group • Latest news: A rating for safety from Leapfrog, four-star rating from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services SPECIALIZEDHOSPITALS www.atriummedicalcenter.com • Number of employees: 65 • Number of beds: 66 6 Encompass Health Rehabilitation Hospital of Sugar Land 1325 Hwy. 6, Sugar Land 2812767574 www.encompasshealth.com • Number of employees: 228 • Number of beds: 50 7 Kindred Hospital Sugar Land 1550 First Colony Blvd., Sugar Land 5 AtriumMedical Center 11929W. Airport Blvd., Staord 2812078200

5

1 CHI St. Luke’s Health-Sugar Land Hospital 1317 Lake Pointe Parkway, Sugar Land 2816377000 www.chistlukeshealth.org • Number of employees: 500 • Number of beds: 100 • Telemedicine oerings: ICU Telemedicine • Latest news: successfully completed Maternal Level II designation 2 Houston Methodist Sugar Land Hospital 16655 Hwy. 59, Sugar Land 2812747000 www.houstonmethodist.org • Number of employees: 2,410 • Number of beds: 347 • Telemedicine oerings: primary care and specialists 3 Memorial Hermann Sugar Land Hospital 17500W. Grand Parkway S., Sugar Land 2817255000 www.memorialhermann.org • Number of employees: 979 • Number of beds: 179 • Telemedicine oerings: Language Line iPad, virtual care options for Memorial Hermann Medical Group primary care physicians, Nurse Health Line and telestroke in conjunction with Texas Medical Center • Latest news: Spring A rating from

59

6

1

90

7

.

LAKE POINTE PKWY.

FIRST COLONY BLVD.

99 TOLL

59

6

8

2

SUGAR LAND

9

3

BRANFORD PL.

COMMONWEALTH BLVD.

4

N

• Number of employees: 125 • Number of beds: 6 9 Sugar Land Rehab Hospital 7622 Branford Place, Sugar Land 2817669002 www.sugarlandrehabhospital.com • Number of employees: 130 • Number of beds: 41

2759 2812756000 www.kindred.com • Number of employees: 266 • Number of beds: 91 8 Memorial Hermann Surgical Hospital First Colony 16906 Hwy. 59, Sugar Land 2812431000 www.memorialhermannrstcolony.org

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JUNE 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

19

SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JUNE 2021

We are located in a neighborhood near you with three locations in Fort Bend County

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3717 Township Lane, Missouri City, TX 77459 | 1601 Main St, Ste 209, Richmond, TX 77469 7417 W Grand Pkwy S, Unit 140, Richmond, TX 77407 FORTBENDDENTAL.COM Call Today! (281) 800-9271

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HOSPITALS As Fort Bend County population grows, trauma care remains at ‘basic’ level

2 0 2 1 H E A L T H C A R E E D I T I O N

Trauma level Only Level IV Trauma centers are available in Fort Bend County.

Level I COMPREHENSIVE

• Highest level of care • Full range of specialists, equipment in-house 24/7 • Oer teaching, research components

BY CLAIRE SHOOP

receive its Level IV trauma designa- tion in the next 18 months. “Trauma has been on our radar for some time as a community need,” Foster said. “It is for the best outcome of the patient to have many trauma-level facilities within a county to support any potential issue that comes up for a growing community.” A Level IV trauma designation is classied as basic, according to the Texas Department of State Health Services. Level IV is the lowest desig- nation, and Level I—a comprehensive trauma center—is the highest. There are three Level I hospitals in the Houston area, and all are in the Texas Medical Center. There are no Level II hospitals in or near Fort Bend County—and the closest Level III is Memorial Hermann Katy Hospital. “[At a Level IV trauma center] what they’re going to do is they’re going to stabilize you, and then they’re going to ship you to a higher-level hospi- tal,” Temple said. “Or, if you need surgical interventions, they’re going to ship you there to have surgery.” Temple said in the case of an emergency, Fort Bend County EMS would use medical helicopters at local hospitals to transport patients to a higher-level trauma facility. Fort Bend County EMS is the primary medical responder for most emergencies in the county, and local re departments will also administer care at the scene. However, the city of Sugar Land has its own EMS department. Temple said Fort Bend County’s

Hospital with trauma designation

Since Memorial Hermann Fort Bend Hospital closed in Missouri City in 2006, Missouri City residents have lacked access to a hospital within their city limits. Despite this, Fort Bend County EMS Chief Graig Temple said Mis- souri City patients can be transported to a nearby hospital in 14-20 minutes. Other areas of Fort Bend County— including Needville, Fulshear and Guy—have average transport times to a hospital closer to 25 or 30 minutes, Temple said. “There’s other areas of Fort Bend County that also experience this—that also don’t have hospitals within their jurisdiction—so it’s not abnormal,” Temple said. The bigger issue facing Fort Bend County EMS, he said, is the county does not have a hospital with a major trauma designation or better. Hospitals can apply for a trauma designation by fullling the nec- essary stang requirements, data tracking, and inspections, said Steven Foster, president of CHI St. Luke’s Health-Sugar Land Hospital. In Texas there are 296 trauma-designated facilities, according to the Depart- ment of State Health Services. Three area hospitals—Memorial Hermann Sugar Land Hospital, OakBend Medical Center-Williams Way Hospital Campus and OakBend Medical Center-Jackson Street Hospi- tal Campus—have a Level IV trauma level designation. Additionally, Foster said CHI St. Luke’s Sugar Land Hospital hopes to

MONTGOMERY COUNTY

Level II

MAJOR

45

• Specialists on call 24/7 • Can transfer to Level I facilities • No research component required

105

WALLER COUNTY

69

Level III ADVANCED

290

• Oer resources for emergency surgery, intensive care • May have to transfer to Level I and II centers

HARRIS COUNTY

99 TOLL

90

10

Level IV BASIC

610

Provide initial evaluation, stabilization, diagnostic capabilities • Will likely have to transfer to higher-level trauma center

90

59

FORT BEND COUNTY

6

45

36

35

GALVESTON COUNTY

288

SOURCES: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES, TEXAS SECRETARY OF STATE’S OFFICE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

N

BRAZORIA COUNTY

rapidly growing population further necessitates a more advanced level of trauma care. “It’s great having the Texas

Montgomery County in North Hous- ton, which has two Level II hospitals. St. Luke’s ocials said hospitals typically start as a Level IV facility, and each additional level requires more resources. “That region looks very similar to a growing Fort Bend County, but they’ve already took the ball and moved ahead a little bit by having Level II trauma centers, whereas we’re stuck with basic trauma centers,” Temple said.

Medical Center next door,” Temple said. “It’s a short transport, generally. However, it would denitely behoove us to be ahead of the ball by having a trauma center established here within the county.” Furthermore, Temple compared the Fort Bend County region to

2021

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