Richardson June 2020

Expectant parents have a lot to think about and do, from understanding the changes in mom’s body to preparing your home for baby’s arrival. At Methodist Richardson Medical Center, our birthing philosophy is centered on providing a supportive birthing experience that encourages family involvement. Methodist Richardson joyfully welcomes hundreds of babies to our community each year. Our maternity facilities and services are designed to meet the needs of expectant families, and we are proud to set high standards of care for mom and baby. We offer: • Nicely appointed labor and delivery and postpartum suites featuring baby rooming-in • Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit • Full-time neonatologists

• 24-hour obstetric hospitalist and anesthesia support • New parent education classes and lactation consultants. Trust. Methodist.

To find an OB-GYN on the medical staff or to schedule a maternity tour, visit MethodistHealthSystem.org/Richardson.

Texas law prohibits hospitals from practicing medicine. The physicians on the Methodist Health System medical staff are independent practitioners who are not employees or agents of Methodist Health System, Methodist Richardson Medical Center or any of its affiliated hospitals. Methodist Health System complies with applicable federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • JUNE 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

6

Now Open, Coming Soon &more

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Leanne Libby, llibby@communityimpact.com ASSOCIATE MANAGING EDITOR Olivia Lueckemeyer REPORTER Makenzie Plusnick GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chelsea Peters ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Tracy Ruckel

FROMLEANNE: Black lives matter in our community. Over the last few weeks unrest began to overow in communities across the country. Anger spurred by a long list of injustices toward black Americans seemed to reach a boiling point, pushed over the proverbial edge by the killing of Minneapolis resident George Floyd. Community Impact Newspaper is a hyperlocal news outlet. How do we cover this national story from the perspective of Richardson residents? How do we make sure local voices are being heard, and how do we give our readers information that is actionable during this time? There is a popular

METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across six metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper’s legacy

saying: “Do not listen with the intent to reply, but with the intent to understand.” On June 3, we were there at Berkner Park doing just that, listening and learning to capture the voices of the neighborhood and to share them with you. Our coverage in this edition is just a small window into this ongoing discussion in our community. Going forward, we feel it is imperative to commit to continue listening rst. We want to hear from you, and we want to have conversations with organizations and individuals who can help us connect our readers with resources to better understand and to act. Please reach out to me directly at llibby@communityimpact.com with story ideas, recommendations of groups we should connect with and ways we can grow in our coverage. Leanne Libby, GENERALMANAGER

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 8 Ongoing road projects in Richardson and a breakdown of coronavirus-related revenue impacts for the North Texas Tollway Authority CITY& COUNTY 9 The latest local news

HealthCareEdition

FROMOLIVIA : In the days that followed the death of George Floyd, I spent time reecting on my role in this moment, not only as a white woman but also as a journalist. As reporters, we pledge to be unbiased and neutral. In the age of social media, upholding that promise can be hard. The urge to repost a meme or tweet weighs heavily on us all. As journalists, we ultimately choose to channel that energy into the pen—after all, journalism can be a powerful form of social justice. After much introspection, here is where I landed: my role in this moment is to be silent at rst, to listen,

SNAPSHOT 11 The latest health care trends in Dallas and Collin counties LISTINGS 12 Local hospitals, clinics and ERs

of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT. COMPATRON CONTACT US

BUSINESS FEATURE Meredith G. Davis, DDS

14

and then to write. We are committed now more than ever to giving all of our readers a platform to tell their stories. We promise to acknowledge our blind spots and to be open to criticism. We promise to do our best to be a light during these times. Please email me at olueckemeyer@communityimpact.com with suggestions on how we can better support Richardson’s minority community. We want to hear from you. Olivia Lueckemeyer, EDITOR

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5

RICHARDSON EDITION • JUNE 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

7

PGBT TOLL

9

RENNER RD.

1

4

SHIRE BLVD.

BRECKINRIDGE BLVD.

TELECOM PKWY.

CAMPBELL RD.

2

DMH Fiber & Yarn Store

COLLINS BLVD.

COURTESY DMH FIBER & YARN STORE

8 Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen is ex- pected to open sometime between July and September at 7975 Belt Line Road, Dallas. The fast-food restaurant serves fried chicken and sides, such as red beans and rice, mashed potatoes with gravy and Cajun fries. www.popeyes.com 9 Rooster Town Cafe should open by Labor Day at 3613 Shire Blvd., Ste. 180, Richardson. The restaurant will serve breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Rooster Town is the latest culinary proj- ect by restaurateur Dale Wamstad, owner of the adjacent Texas Chophouse and Two for the Money BBQ. RELOCATIONS 10 Al Baghdady Bakery & Restaurant opened its new location April 28 at 327 N. Greenville Ave., Richardson. The Middle Eastern bakery, formerly located at 116 S. Greenville Ave., Richardson, offers sandwiches, plates, breads and desserts. 972-913-4461. www.facebook.com/ albaghdady.bakery CLOSINGS 11 Venezia Italian Café looks to have closed its location at 908 Audelia Road, Richardson. The restaurant served a vari- ety of pasta dishes as well as sandwiches and calzones. Its phone number is no longer operational, and there is a notice posted from the property manager that says that the locks have been changed. The business has given no indication of its status on its website or its Facebook page. 972-889-8559. www.veneziaitaliancaferichardson.com

ARAPAHO RD.

7 8

10

RICHARDSON

MAIN ST.

3

BELT LINE RD.

75

6

78

SPRING VALLEY RD.

5

11

BUCKINGHAM RD.

TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MAP NOT TO SCALE N

3 Richardson Mercantile held its grand reopening May 26 at 101 S. Coit Road, Richardson. The store temporarily closed in March following the issue of county- wide stay-at-home orders. Safety mea- sures, such as the installation of plexi- glass shields at front registers, have been put in place to protect customers and employees, according to the business. Richardson Mercantile houses dozens of different vendors who showcase and sell a variety of items. 972-479-9990. www.richardsonmercantile.com 4 Starbucks at the Northside devel- opment on The University of Texas at Dallas campus reopened June 8. Just two days after its original grand open- ing, the coffee shop temporarily closed its doors at 800 Synergy Park Blvd., Ste. 101, Richardson, due to the coronavirus pandemic. The facility features lounge seating, study tables and a patio with a walk-up window where guests can order drinks and food. 469-518-8050. www.starbucks.com 5 Your CBD Store opened May 29 at

2113 Buckingham Road, Richardson. The store sells a variety of hemp-derived products, including hemp oil, skin care and pet items. This is the business’s sec- ond Richardson location. 214-730-0044. www.cbdrx4u.com/find-us/texas/garland COMING SOON 6 Bollywood Spice expects to open by mid-June at 310 E. Main St., Richardson. The restaurant and hookah bar will serve a variety of Indian food, such as chicken tikka masala and tandoori roti. 347-419-4561. www.richardsonhookahbar.com 7 DMH Fiber & Yarn Store will open by July 1 at 7989 Belt Line Road, Ste. 112, Dallas. The store includes a wide selec- tion of knitting, weaving and spinning products as well as repair and blocking services. Guests can learn to crochet, knit, spin, weave and tat by enrolling in on-site classes. www.dmhfiberandyarn.com

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER & MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

NOWOPEN 1 Perception Eyecare + Eyewear opened May 12 at 4150 E. Renner Road, Ste. 300, Richardson. The business offers compre- hensive eye exams for adults, infants and children as well as a selection of unique and personalized eyewear. 972-250-0700. www.perceptioneyecare.net 2 Richardson Family YMCA is sched- uled to reopen June 15, according to a June 8 news release. A phased reopen- ing approach, which began June 1, has allowed the organization to prepare facilities as well as to train staff on new safety protocols, the release said. The Richardson branch, located at 821 Custer Road, Richardson, will operate at 50% capacity for the time being. Day camps, summer camps and youth sports have be- gun a phased relaunch, according to the release. 972-231-3424. www.ymcadallas. org/locations/richardson

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W. Arapaho Rd.

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ANTIQUE • ECLECTIC • COLLECTIBLES • SHABBY CHIC DECOR • JEWELRY • CLOTHING • FURNITURE • DOLLS & TOYS • PERSIAN RUGS • ANDMORE!

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN The Darling Co. opened June 1 at 111 E. Polk St., Richardson. The cooperative houses seven wedding vendors as a one-stop shop for brides, founder Lacie Coker said. Along with Coker’s hair and makeup business, the cooperative includes a orist, wedding planner, calligraphy services, coee and cocktail mobile vendor, decor designer and

MAIN ST. POLK ST.

75

N

photographer. A grand opening celebration is planned for June 29 at 6 p.m. The event will include live music, food, drinks and a chance to meet The Darling Co. vendors. 903-517-2195. www.facebook.com/ the-darling-co-104376777779081

any purchase of $50 or more $10 OFF Offer expires 7/31/20

972-479-9990 • 101 S. Coit Rd. Richardson, TX richardsonmercantile@gmail.com

for bus i ness ! Open Limited hours. Cal l for detai ls. Dine in, to-go, and curbside pick up avai lable.

The retailer has filed for bankruptcy. (Anna Lotz/Community Impact Newspaper)

FEATURED IMPACT CLOSED Tuesday Morning Corp. announced May 27 the company has led for bankruptcy and plans to close Richardson stores at A 1750 E. Belt Line Road, Ste. 100, and B 819 W. Arapaho Road, Ste. 14. The Dallas-based retailer known for closeout merchandise will hold sales of up to 30% o all items until its last day of business, which both locations said will be sometime in late July or early August. 800-457-0099. www.tuesdaymorning.com

BELT LINE RD.

A

N

ARAPAHO RD.

B

3600 Sh i re Bl vd. | (972) 881-7570

N

7

RICHARDSON EDITION • JUNE 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

TOLLWAY AUTHORITY TO DELAY SOME PROJECTS The North Texas Tollway Authority has developed a plan to address the loss of revenue caused by COVID-19. Money-saving tactics include an in- definite hiring freeze and budget cuts, according to the authority. Construc- tion currently underway will continue, but planning and design for corridor expansion projects will be put on hold. The authority is still in the process of determining which future projects to defer, according to spokesperson Michael Rey. Toll revenue in North Texas has nose- dived since drivers began sheltering in place earlier this spring. The region’s tollway authority recorded $41.7 million of revenue in April, an annual decline of about 47%. APRIL REVENUE Toll revenue collected by the authority was down by nearly half in April.

BELT LINE RD.

CAMPBELL RD.

ARAPAHO RD.

CAMPBELL RD.

1

75

2

N

BELT LINE RD.

3

BUCKINGHAM RD.

RECENT PROJECTS 1 Campbell Road widening at US 75 Improvements to Campbell Road began May 18. The $2 million project will extend the right-turn lane and add a left-turn lane on the southbound US 75 frontage road, install a westbound auxiliary lane on Campbell from Alamo Road to Collins Boulevard, extend the left-turn lane to allow westbound traffic access to Alamo from Campbell and improve the traffic signal at the intersection of Campbell and Collins. Timeline: May-December Cost: $2 million Funding sources: city of Richardson, Tex- as Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration

N

BUCKINGHAM RD.

N

2 Jupiter Road construction Drivers can expect lane closures on Jupiter Road between Belt Line and Buckingham roads due to a franchise utility project. The right lane of south- bound Jupiter between Sunrise Trail and Buckingham may be closed to traffic from 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. through the end of July due to fiber optic work. Manhole work has been postponed, and the reschedul- ing will be determined at a later date. Timeline: estimated completion July 30 Cost: unknown Funding source: One Global Telecom

3 Yale Boulevard street rehabilitation Concrete street repairs along Yale Bou- levard between Belt Line and Bucking- ham roads will begin in August and be complete by December. Then, crews will move north to work on concrete repairs along Yale between Belt Line and Camp- bell roads. That work is expected to be complete by the end of the year. Timeline: August-December Cost: $1.1 million Funding source: city of Richardson

$79.3 M

$41.7 M

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JUNE 6. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT RICNEWS@ COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Richardson and Richardson ISD

QUOTEOFNOTE “WEDIDN’T FEEL LIKEWE COULDASKOURTEACHERS, STUDENTSANDCOMMUNITY TOCOMEBACKEARLYAFTER ALL THATHASOCCURRED THESEPAST 10WEEKS.… HOWEVER,WEWILLREMAIN OPENANDFLEXIBLE IN THE EVENTTHATDATES MUSTBEADJUSTED IF CONDITIONS CHANGE.” SUPERINTENDENT JEANNIE STONE ON THE DISTRICT DECISION CITY HIGHLIGHTS Plano ISD The district announced June 3 that it will create a planning task force that will focus on ve core areas: safety and operations; learning and teaching; training; human resources and health services; and technology and information. This includes developing a “return to instruction plan” as well as identifying training needs for sta and protocols for safely returning to school in the fall. The district is also working to plan face-to-face and at-home learning options for students after receiving mixed feedback from its May 2020 family and community survey. Richardson City Council Meets June 22 and July 13 at 6 p.m. Council has encouraged citizens to watch meetings online at www.cor.net. Richardson ISD Board meetings are on hiatus until trustees return from summer break in August. www.risd.org Plano ISD Meets June 23 at 7 p.m. The board has been holding meetings via video conference, which can be viewed at www.pisd.edu/pisdlive. MEETINGSWE COVER TO STICK WITH ITS AUG. 19 RETURNTOSCHOOL DATE

Estimates show local property values up by 8%

RICHARDSONVALUES YEAR OVER YEAR Appraised property values have steadily increased since 2011. mates to calculate its tax rate, Dagen said. This means the resolution of future outstanding protests will “pos- sibly have a negative impact on scal year 2020-21 tax collections,” he said. the state-mandated July 25 deadline to provide a certied roll to taxing entities, Dagen said. Instead, they will provide a certied estimate. The city will then use these esti-

Increased revenue from property taxes in these zones is used to fund infrastructure and development and therefore cannot be used for budget- ary purposes, Dagen said. The city has seen property val- ues increase each year by 5.2% on average over the past decade. In 2011, it saw a 3% decline. All taxable property is appraised as of Jan. 1, which means this year’s estimated values predate economic hardships tied to the coronavirus; however, appraisal districts have warned of “multiple impacts” due to the pandemic, Dagen said. The chief appraisers of Collin and Dallas central appraisal districts have opted to delay all in-person appraisal review board hearings and will be conducting protests by phone only, Dagen said. Neither district expects to meet

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

RICHARDSON The city is expecting citywide property values to increase by 7.8% this year to $19.5 billion; however, only about $17.3 billion will be used to sustain the city’s budget. Properties in the Dallas County side of the city have an estimated total appraised value of $11.8 billion, Finance Director Keith Dagen told City Council on June 1. Collin County properties represent $8.2 billion of the city’s tax roll. Dagen is expecting the combined total of $20 billion to fall by about $470 million once residents protest their values. Property value growth in the city’s three tax increment nance zones accounts for about $2.2 billion of the total tax roll, which means the city’s taxable value is reduced to $17.3 billion, Dagen said.

$18.1M (certied)

+7.8%

$19.5M (estimated)

SOURCE: CITY OF RICHARDSONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

City gets boost in CARES Act funding

RISDgreenlights fall e-learning option

BY DANIEL HOUSTON

BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

RICHARDSON The city will receive an additional $549,780 in federal Corona- virus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act funding after Dallas County com- missioners agreed June 2 to consider a newer set of population counts. This amount—which represents the second-highest funding adjustment in the county thus far—brings Richardson’s total allocations to $4.7 million from Dallas County and $2.4 million from Collin County.

RICHARDSON ISD Parents of students in the district will have the option of keeping their children home this fall. The district announced in a June 4 video that it will oer in-person, online and hybrid programs when school resumes Aug. 19. The district is designing an online curriculum with highly trained teachers, Stone said.

Stone announced the option via a June 4 video. (Courtesy YouTube)

“This virtual option will be very dierent than the at-home learn- ing model that you experienced this spring,” Superintendent Jeannie Stone said in a June 4 video message.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • JUNE 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER IS PROUD TO SAY THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSOR.

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Health CareDirectory 2020

Data and information on health care trends in Collin and Dallas counties

HEALTH CARE SNAPSHOT RI CHARDSON

State health rankings show that health outcomes and factors for residents of Dallas and Collin counties are quite dierent. For 2020, Collin County was ranked No. 1 among the healthiest counties in Texas, while Dallas County landed at No. 45, according to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. In terms of overall health factors, Collin County again was ranked No. 1, while Dallas County was ranked No. 120.

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

HOWHEALTHY IS YOUR COUNTY?

CORONAVIRUS CASE ANALYSIS

Here is a breakdown of coronavirus statistics provided by public health agencies in Dallas County and Collin County.

These rankings are updated annually but include data from previous years. There are other factors included that are not listed below.

75

380

NEW CASES PER WEEK

CASE BREAKDOWN

121 TOLL

HEALTH OUTCOMES:

PGBT TOLL

March 8-14 March 15-21 March 22-28

8 12

Collin County

• LENGTHOFLIFE • QUALITYOFLIFE , such as the number of poor mental and physical health days reported per year

20

35

Active cases 30.24%

23

80

88 99

635

N

Total cases: 1,597

45

2.32% Deaths

344

Collin County Dallas County

HEALTH FACTORS:

March 29 -April 4

76

67.44% Recoveries

• HEALTHBEHAVIORS , such as smoking, obesity, physical activity, excessive drinking, alcohol-impaired driving deaths, sexually transmitted infections and teen births • CLINICALCARE , including health insurance coverage; number of physicians, dentists and mental health providers; preventable hospital stays; and u vaccinations • SOCIOECONOMICFACTORS , such as educational attainment levels, children in poverty, income inequality and violent crimes • PHYSICALENVIRONMENTFACTORS , such as air pollution, drinking water violations, housing problems and long commutes

576

2020 STATEWIDE HEALTH CARE RANKINGS (out of 244 counties*)

April 5-11 April 12-18 April 19-25

140

629

1 38 3 113 1 120 3 105 1 45

Health outcomes

Dallas County*

84

Length of life

680

Active cases 32.06%

Quality of life Health factors Health behaviors

132

585

Total cases: 12,645

2.14% Deaths

April 26- May 2

114

990

Socioeconomic 2 152 Physical environment 145 234 Clinical care 2 34 *RANKINGS WERE NOT AVAILABLE FOR 10 OF THE 254 COUNTIES IN TEXAS.

63.50% Recoveries

May 3-9

119

1,720

May 10-16 May 17-23 May 24-30

118

1,631

119

C OMPA R I N G C O U N T I E S : PHYSICIANS ANDNURSES

1,399

161

1,357

Here is a look at how many physicians and registered nurses there were in Collin and Dallas counties over the last few years in comparison with other Texas counties.

May 31- June 6

216

1,824

*DALLAS COUNTY NUMBERS ARE BASED ON PRELIMINARY DATA RELEASED BY THE STATE, WHICH LAG BEHIND STATISTICS PROVIDED BY THE COUNTY.

June 7-10

103

1,115

PHYSICIANS

REGISTERED NURSES

2018

2019

2018

2019

All coronavirus data is up to date as of press time June 10. For updated coronavirus data and information, go to communityimpact.com. SOURCES: ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION, UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN POPULATION HEALTH INSTITUTE, HTTPS:COUNTYHEALTHRANKINGS.ORG, TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES, DALLAS COUNTY, COLLIN COUNTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

947

2,373

1,002

2,381

9,502

24,469

10,067

27,192

Total

Total

Per 100,000 residents

Per 100,000 residents

88.9

91.9

99.1

88.3

891.7

1025.3

995.9

1008.1

24

18

16

32

33

21

24

22

State rank

State rank

11

RICHARDSON EDITION • JUNE 2020

HOSPITALS, CLINICS AND ERS

Health Care Edition 2020

NICU LEVEL TEXAS

COMPARING CARE

URGENT CARE CL INI CS

FREESTANDING EMERGENCY ROOMS

Can treat: same conditions as retail clinics as well as broken bones, stitches and burns Stang: nurse practitioners and physician’s assistants; more likely to have medical doctor on sta than retail clinics Equipment: may have X-ray, ultrasound and lab test equipment on-site Estimated cost: typically $35-$100* 4 PrimaCare Urgent Care 1810 N. Plano Road 9726649888 www.pmc.nextcare.com/locations/richardson 5 Sanitas Medical Center 350 S. Plano Road 2149795420 www.mysanitas.com/en/locations/ sanitas-richardson 6 Texas Medical Home 101 S. Coit Road, Ste. 317 9725258917 www.texasmedicalhome.com Emergency rooms 7 ER Near Me Richardson 15767 N. Coit Road 4697069296 www.ernearmetx.com/locations/richardson

Can treat: life-threatening conditions, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, severe burns, head or spinal trauma, serious broken bones and sports injuries Stang: medical doctors and surgeons Equipment: X-ray, ultrasound, CT

LEVEL I I I

There are several dierences between these three types of facilities. These breakdowns are general and may not apply to every facility listed, and costs will vary based on insurance. Contact each facility for specic services oered. SOURCES: TED CHAN, CEO OF HEALTH CARE DIRECTORY, CAREDASHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER *WITH INSURANCE Urgent care centers 1 CareNow Urgent Care 377 W. Campbell Road, Ste. 100 4692322945 www.carenow.com 2 Children’s Health PM Urgent Care 1291 W. Campbell Road, Ste. 100 9724497677 www.childrens.com 3 Fastercare 4011 E. Renner Road, Ste. 110 9722343299 www.faster-care.com COMPILED BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK This is a noncomprehensive listing of local urgent care clinics, emergency rooms and hospitals.

• Number of beds: 284 • New programs, expansions: A recent $85 million expansion added a ninth operating room with a new da Vinci surgical robot, a 7-story parking garage and two additional oors. A 164-slice CT scanner has been added to the radiology department. A $2 million upgrade to the Gastrointestinal Laboratory is in progress. • Neonatal intensive care unit • Can care for mothers, infants of all ages with mild to critical illnesses • Can provide consultation for pediatric medical and surgical subspecialists; can provide major pediatric surgery on-site

scanners, laboratory services Estimated cost: $500-plus*

Hospitals 8 Methodist Campus for Continuing Care 401 W. Campbell Road 4692041000 www.methodisthealthsystem.org/ texas-locations/ • Trauma level: undesignated • NICU level: undesignated • Number of beds: 43 9 Methodist Richardson Medical Center 2831 E. President George Bush Hwy. 4692048000 www.methodisthealthsystem.org/ methodist-richardson-medical-center • Trauma level: undesignated • NICU level: III

400+ employees at both Methodist campuses in Richardson

SOURCE: METHODIST RICHARDSON MEDICAL CENTERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Health Care Edition 2020

CONTINUED FROM 1

In an online survey of 175 users nationwide, medical software company eMDs found that the majority have come to think of virtual care as a necessary treatment option. TELEMEDICINE p os t -coronavirus

rapid learning to do to have every- thing approved legally.” Plummeting patient volumes as a result of the pandemic spurred rapid adoption of the technology, which has since become the new normal of health care, said Neil Simon, chief operating ocer for eMDs, a company in Richardson that responded to the crisis by augmenting its software with telehealth capabilities. “Telehealth was always something that was in the industry, but it was still very limited and had never really taken o the way people thought it would,” he said. “Once a lot of these business closures came down, [doc- tors] recognized they needed a way to see their patients.” Less than a quarter of the nation’s health care organizations had an existing virtual care program as of January 2020, according to Forrester, a market research rm. By the end of this year, telehealth appointments are projected to surge to at least 1 bil- lion. Ninety percent of those visits, Forrester projected, will be related to COVID-19. The spread of the tech-

has been the fact that, up until recently with this COVID thing, physi- cians were not getting paid the same as an in-person visit,” he said. In late March, the Centers for Medi- care andMedicaidServices responded to calls from struggling physicians by allowing 85 telemedicine services to be billed at the same rate as in-person visits. Many private insurers quickly followed suit, Edsel said. Because of this change, doctors could turn to televisits as a source of much needed revenue, Simon said. “Once the physicians recognized that what they were getting paid for a televisit was very similar to what they were getting paid for an oce visit, … they were able to pick their [patient] volumes back up,” he said. By late March, Dean said her oce was seeing a majority of its patients virtually. Her practice is expected to log more than 25,000 visits in May, which is about 80% of its pre-COVID appointment totals. There was a slight learning curve at rst, but Dean said she now sees tele- health as a necessary service.

KEY

80% MORE THAN of respondents said they are at least somewhat likely to use telemedicine moving forward.

How likely are you to continue using telemedicine post-COVID-19?

Very likely

SURVEY RESULTS

Somewhat likely

Somewhat unlikely Very unlikely

SOURCE: EMDSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

huge swath of people like the conve- nience of it,” he said. “There’s going to be a huge chunk of patients that are going to start pushing telemedicine.” The forced shift to telehealth has been dicult on providers, but ulti- mately, it should serve to heighten a doctor’s ability to provide convenient care for patients, said Britt Berrett, director of the Center for Healthcare Leadership and Management at The University of Texas at Dallas. “All of us agree that [telemedicine] ... will provide greater value for pri- mary care,” he said. Telemedicine will be essential as health care providers turn their focus away from treating the acute condi- tion of COVID-19 and back to the man- agement of chronic conditions, such as diabetes, Berrett said. “Individuals have not been able to get to the primary care physicians or their doctors because of the pan- demic,” he said. “They have post- poned treatment and care, even diagnosis, and there is a very large concern about it.” According to a recent nationwide

survey by the Primary Care Collabo- rative, preventive care is largely not taking place. Survey results from May 15-18 show only 5% of doctors reported the continuation of cancer screenings, and only 15% reported administering routine childhood vaccinations. “The fear of COVID has certainly outweighed some of the everyday concerns that patients have,” Dean said. The long-term survival of tele- health will depend on several factors, including changes to reimbursement, Edsel said. But now that the ood- gates have opened, health care pro- fessionals are more likely to oer the service in the future. “I don’t know if it’s the new nor- mal—I think it’s too early to make that prediction,” he said. “What we can say is the adoption rate will increase signicantly.”

“This is thrusting us all into that telev- ideo universe,” Dean said. “I think just about every

nology was slow for sev- eral reasons, said Alex Edsel, digital market- ing professor at The University of Texas at Dallas. Doctors tend to be leery of technology that could compro- mise patient privacy, but

Individuals have not been able to get to

primary care physicians or their doctors because of the pandemic. They have postponed treatment and care, even diagnosis, and there is a very large concern about it. Britt Berrett, director of the Center for Healthcare Leadership andManagement at UT Dallas

doctor would like to be able to have that option for patients.” Many patients have also become accustomed to virtual

opposition was mostly driven by unequal reimburse- ment, Edsel said.

visits and will likely demand more convenient access to care once the pandemic is over, Edsel said. “It’s not for everybody, but now, a

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RICHARDSON EDITION • JUNE 2020

DR. DAVIS’ TIPS FOR EASING ANXIETY If a patient is nervous about going to the dentist, Dr. Davis suggests the following steps to help calm nerves.

WE KEEPUPWITHAS MUCHASWE CAN TOOFFER THE LATEST AND THE GREATEST TOOUR PATIENTS SO THAT THEY CANHAVE THE RIGHT CARE, NOT JUST SOMETHING THAT’S BEEN DONE FOR THE LAST 50YEARS.

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BUSINESS FEATURE

MeredithG. Davis, DDS Richardson dentist committed to giving patients back their smiles

MeredithG. Davis, DDS 1112 N. Floyd Road, Ste. 5, Richardson 972-231-4876 www.meredithdavisdds.com Hours: Mon.-Tue. 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Wed. 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Thu. 8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m., closed Fri.-Sun. The Orthophos SL is a hybrid 2D/3D X-ray machine. (Makenzie Plusnick/ Community Impact newspaper)

M eredith G. Davis said she became a dentist because she wanted to facilitate quick transformations that improve a patient’s well-being. “A lot of the things I do help [patients] that day,” she said. “I also give people back their smiles, and that is a really great side benet.” Davis, an East Texas native, moved to the Dallas-Fort Worth area in 2010 for dental school. In 2017, she took over an existing practice in Richardson owned by Neill Clayton. “If I’m diagnosing something, it’s because it needs to be done, not because I’m trying to pad my BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

schedule,” Davis said. “Dr. Clayton had the same view and was very conservative with his patients. It was a good t.” Building relationships is a priority for Davis. Proper treatment requires earning a patient’s trust, she said. “If you’re shuing through [patients] as fast as possible, you miss out on getting to know ... what their motivations are and their goals and what makes them comfortable,” she said. Davis oers dierent payment plans and nancing options because she said she does not want money to be a barrier to treatment. “I do not like that money really

dictates what care people will choose,” Davis said. “I just want them to be able to aord the care that they need.” Davis’ practice uses the latest technology, including a Cone Beam CT machine, which makes 3D version of X-rays, and a digital radi- ography machine, which fast-tracks the process of viewing an X-ray. Excluding emergency dental work, Davis was unable to see patients for seven weeks when stay- at-home orders went into eect. Since reopening in mid-May, Davis said she has been fully booked. “I spend a lot of time helping my sta feel safe and my patients feel safe,” she said.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE Mumtaz

Chicken tikka masala ($12.50) is made with barbecued boneless chicken morsels cooked in an aromatic tomato and herb cream sauce.

Richardson eatery specializes in cuisine from state of Punjab F orty years ago, Kulwinder Dhaliwal emi- grated from India in hopes of a better future. As soon as he arrived in Dallas, he joined the food service industry. “My rst job was at a restaurant called India House. … It was the only Indian restaurant in town at that time,” he said. In 2008, Dhaliwal opened Mumtaz in the Canyon Creek Shopping Center. Shortly after, he faced the rst major crisis of his career. “As soon as we opened this place, the economy collapsed,” he said. “All of the companies moved, and we struggled.” Mumtaz weathered the storm and developed a loyal following of customers. The restaurant became known for its Punjabi recipes, some of which Dhaliw- al’s mother cooked for him as a child. Cuisine in the state of Punjab is characterized by the use of poultry, lamb, dairy and grains. Dishes include biryanis, curries and kebabs. Perhaps the most signicant hallmark is the tandoori oven, which is made of clay and uses heat from charcoal to reach temperatures of up to 900 degrees Fahrenheit. “You slap [naan against] the wall, and it is cooked in maybe one minute,” he said. “You can’t leave your arm in there for more than a few seconds.” It seemed unthinkable that a second economic crisis could be more disruptive than the rst, but the coronavirus has decimated sales at Mumtaz, Dhaliwal said. “We lost 70% of our business,” he said. “We are just barely surviving. The restaurant’s lunch and dinner buets are on hold until the restaurant regains its footing. “I have a lot of loyal guests who have been supportive, and I appreciate that,” he said. “We just request that they still keep supporting us during this hard time.” BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

Chicken shahi korma ($11.50) is a curry made with lightly spiced boneless chicken that is cooked in an almond cream sauce.

Punjabi cuisine includes various types of cream curries. (Photos by Olivia Lueckemeyer/Community Impact Newspaper)

Fast facts about Punjab When India gained its independence from the British empire in

PUNJAB

1947, the state of Punjab was split

between India and Pakistan. Language spoken: Punjabi Population: 28 million Majority religion: Sikhism Capital city: Chandigarh

INDIA

Kulwinder Dhaliwal opened Mumtaz in 2008.

SOURCES: ENCYLOPEDIA BRITTANICA, CENSUS OF INDIA 2011 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Mumtaz 216 W. Campbell Road, Richardson 214-575-2100 www.mumtazrestaurant.com

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RICHARDSON EDITION • JUNE 2020

CONTINUED FROM 1

the city of Richardson and RISD need to do more to diversify and address systemic racism. A good first step would be to hire more minorities in schools, said Ramos, whose District 102 includes part of RISD. “Reading a couple of policy books and going to a couple of workshops— it’s not enough,” she said. “They need to go into the trenches and really lift up the community.” The district reacts In the days following Floyd’s death, Stone announced the forma- tion of a Racial Equity Committee that will strive to make RISD a “more inclusive, anti-racist, multicultural organization.” This is the logical next step, Stone said, in enforcing the RISD Equity Pol- icy, which was adopted last June and seeks to “eliminate bias, prejudice or unlawful discrimination.” “The policy is an overt statement of what we want to be as an organiza- tion, but now, we have to put action behind the words,” Stone told Com- munity Impact Newspaper. An equity committee is just “the tip of the iceberg” of what needs to hap- pen to heal wounds caused by a his- tory of racism in RISD, Ramos said. The representative added that district leaders should invest time and effort into “aggressively recruiting” in communities of

45% of school administrators now classified as non-white. Berkner High School student Isa- bela Marcano, one of the organizers behind the June 3 protest, said the dis- trict needs to incorporate more black history into its curriculum. “We are teaching kids white history by white teachers,” she said. “That breeds misunderstandings about cul- ture, and it breeds racism. … I think it’s important that RISD sees that the way they teach kids impacts the way that those kids grow up.” Several students and faculty mem- bers spoke during the Berkner Park protest about their own experiences with racism in the district. Andre Wat- son, who has taught in the district for seven years, said he would no lon- ger remain quiet about what he has endured, including racist comments made at his expense. “I was silent. I was complicit. That’s why I have to speak now,” Watson said. “I promise you I will stay in this community and make sure there is change.” Change at the city level About 10% of Richardson resi- dents are black or African American, according to the latest estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau. The current makeup of City Council is all white. “Richardson has not had a [police brutality] incident, ... but we do still believe the city needs more diversity,” said Joel Montfort, an organizer of a June 6 protest put on by the Richard- son Area Democrats. “We need atten- tion paid to it. We need some actual mechanics put in place.” To foster more minority representa- tion in City Council, Ramos suggested the city follow RISD’s lead and switch to a single-member district system. “I believe our citizens, [who] have elected this City Council in contested elections, want to be able to vote for

Superintendent Jeannie Stone said. “[Their perspectives are] valuable because our board is more reflective of the stu- dents and families that we

serve than it’s ever been before in the history of Richardson ISD,” Stone said. State Rep.

RACIAL DIVERSITY IN RICHARDSON

Ana-Maria Ramos, D - R i cha rd s on , said she believes

Some Richardson protesters said they want representation in local leadership that better reects the racial makeup of the community. The following shows the racial breakdowns of several local entities.

White Hispanic or Latino (any race) Asian Black or African American Other

2%

10%

CITY OF RICHARDSON POPULATION: 120,954 SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU 2018 AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

17%

52%

19%

5%

7%

RICHARDSON POLICE DEPARTMENT OFFICERS: 170

12%

76%

SOURCE: RICHARDSON POLICE DEPARTMENTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

3%

color so that staff can better empathize with the experi- ences of students.

7%

RICHARDSON ISD ENROLLMENT: 39,622 39%

22%

According to Stone, efforts have been made to diversify leadership. In her three years as superintendent, the numbers of minority princi-

29%

3%

1%

10%

RICHARDSON ISD STAFF MEMBERS: 2,662 SOURCE: RICHARDSON ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

15%

71%

pals and assistant principals have increased, with

Photos byMakenzie Plusnick/Community Impact Newspaper

*PERCENTAGES ARE NOT EXACT DUE TO ROUNDING.

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