Richardson June 2020

RICHARDSON EDITION 2020 HEALTHCARE EDITION

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VOLUME 2, ISSUE 10  JUNE 17 JULY 23, 2020

Virtual care on the rise

THE switch

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As people stay home to limit the spread of the coronavirus, medical professionals in Richardson are using telehealth services to connect with patients for certain TO TELEMEDICINE

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

Medication adjustments

Sinus infections

Colds or u

Virtual appointments were not oered at Methodist Richardson Family Medical Group pre-coro- navirus. That all changed when lockdown orders kept patients from coming into the doctor’s oce. “We weren’t really set up for video with patients prior to this,” Dr. Jessica Dean said. “We all had some pretty CONTINUED ON 13 LOCAL VOICES UNITE

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Neurological issues

Injuries/ trauma

Vaccinations

SOURCE: METHODIST RICHARDSON FAMILY MEDICAL GROUPCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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Young people in Richardson have been the driv- ing force behind a series of local protests that have unfolded in thewake of the deathof George Floyd. The rst major demonstration was held June 3 in Berkner Park. A group of current and former Richardson ISD high school students organized the event to honor Floyd and to highlight the rac- ismtheyhaveexperienced in their ownbackyards. “Just because people have not been killed in our area does not mean that we are excluded from the hate that we are experiencing and being shown all over the country,” said Autumn Ray, one of the protest organizers and a recent Berkner High School graduate. Eighteen months ago, Richardson ISD became the subject of intense scrutiny when a former trustee sued the district on the grounds that its at-large voting systemnot only favoredwhite can- didates but also discouraged minority candidates from seeking election. After a year of negotiations, the district settled the lawsuit by agreeing to implement a majority single-member district system. One black trustee, Regina Harris, was elected in November. The additions of Harris and Debbie Renteria, who, in May, became the rst Latina woman to serve on the board, are steps in the right direction, BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER AND MAKENZIE PLUSNICK Calls for equality spurred by stories of racism at home

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SPONSOREDBY • Baylor Scott & White Health Snapshot HEALTH CARE EDI T ION 2020 I ALSOGIVE PEOPLE BACK THEIR SMILES, AND THAT IS AREALLYGREAT SIDE BENEFIT. MEREDITH G. DAVIS, DDS

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"WE HAVE TO BE THE ONES TO DO SOMETHING. WE CAN'T JUST SIT THERE AND LET NOTHING BE DONE." MONIQUE MITCHELL, CO-ORGANIZER OF THE JUNE 3 PROTEST AT BERKNER PARK

Members of the Richardson ISD community spoke about their experiences with racismat a June 3 protest. (Makenzie Plusnick/ Community Impact Newspaper)

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