Cy-Fair Edition | September 2021

CYFAIR EDITION

VOLUME 13, ISSUE 1  SEPT. 430, 2021

ONLINE AT

Three years after voters passed a $2.5 billion ood bond referendum in response to Hurricane Harvey, the Harris County Flood Control District continues to work on ood prevention projects while dealing with funding and land acquisition issues. Although millions of dollars in proj- ects are underway in Cypress Creek, HCFCD Deputy Executive Director Matt Zeve said the district would need nearly $4.5 billion to protect the Cypress Creek watershed from 100-year storms, such as the Tax Day ood of April 2016, which have a 1% likelihood of occurring each year. “Hurricane season brings risk for residents across Harris County. No single project or even group of projects will mitigate all ood risk for an area.” Zeve said. “However, the district has completed a lot of work, with more ongoing, that will improve drainage conditions across the Cypress Creek watershed, and overall, the drainage level of CONTINUED ON 26 Cypress Creek ood projects on track despite challenges BY BROOKE ONTIVEROS

The Harris County Flood Control District has 14,000 acre-feet of stormwater detention planned for the Cypress Creek watershed. Experts recommend 25,000 acre-feet of additional stormwater detention. One acre-foot equals about 326,000 gallons, and 25,000 acre-feet is about 8.15 billion gallons. MAKING PROGRESS

IMPACTS

6

14,000 acre-feet of stormwater detention planned as of mid-August SOURCE: HARRIS COUNTY FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

56% planned

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES 12

Health agencies ‘overwhelmed’ by COVID19

HEALTH CARE

15

A Cypress Creek stormwater detention basin repair project is underway o Cypresswood Drive near the Jones Road intersection. (Danica Lloyd/Community Impact Newspaper)

More Cy-Fair-area students are realizing a four- year university route may not be the path for them, as alternative certications have grown in popularity. Career and technical education, or CTE, program- ming is becoming increasingly popular because indi- viduals can earn a comparable salary to someone with a bachelor’s degree, according to Lisa Bogany, CONTINUED ON 28 Career and technical education programenrollment expands BY EMILY JAROSZEWSKI

“I NOTICED SOME PEOPLE, HONESTLY, THE ONES THAT HAVE EVEN THE TWO YEARS OF EDUCATION

LIVE MUSIC GUIDE

19

... THAT ARE ABOVE ANDBEYOND THE PEOPLE THAT HAVE FOURYEARS.” MOUFID RABIEH, OWNER OF ELITE AUTO EXPERTS

MEZZANOTTE RISTORANTE

EMILY JAROSZEWSKICOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

23

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL J OURNALISTS

COMMUNITY IMPACT PATRON PROGRAM

Want to learn more? Scan the QR code.

DONATE TODAY! COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM CIPATRON

NEW SECTION NOWOPEN:

DESIGNED for those 55 AND BETTER.

Heritage Cove is a gated enclave inside The Heritage at Towne Lake and features gorgeous patio homes, designed by Caldwell Homes. Residents enjoy an active lifestyle centered around The Heritage Lodge, which includes a lap pool and spa, fitness center, billiards room, arts & crafts room, library, and ballroom. Don’t let this amazing lifestyle pass you by; discover Heritage Cove today!

TowneLakeTexas.com | 281.256.2772 | 10855 Towne Lake Pkwy, Cypress, TX 77433 #TowneLakeLife Homes from the $ 200s to the Millions

2

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Leading Medicine IN TOWNE LAKE

Comprehensive care — close to home.

At Houston Methodist in Towne Lake, we offer primary care and specialty care, as well as mammograms and physical therapy — all close to home. And, you can be confident that we are taking every necessary precaution to keep you safe during your visit.

We offer the following services: • Cardiology • Neurology • Oncology • Orthopedics and sports medicine

HOUSTON METHODIST PRIMARY CARE GROUP AND SPECIALTY PHYSICIAN GROUP

• Physical therapy and rehabilitation • Plastic and reconstructive surgery • Primary care • Women’s services, including mammography

HOUSTON METHODIST BREAST IMAGING AT TOWNE LAKE HOUSTON METHODIST PHYSICAL THERAPY AND REHABILITATION *

*Towne Lake offers screening mammograms only

To schedule an appointment, visit houstonmethodist.org/towne-lake or call 281.737.1555 .

3

CY-FAIR EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

4

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMEMILY: Fall is just around the corner, and lots of great events are planned in Cy-Fair. We are excited to bring you our Live Music Guide this month, featuring local venues hosting live music throughout the week (see Page 19). Jump to our To-Do List (see Page 9) to see ways to get involved, support local charities, learn new skills and plan fall outings. Emily Heineman, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMDANICA: This edition marks our paper’s 12th anniversary in Cy-Fair, and we remain dedicated to delivering useful, relevant information about what is going on in your backyard. Flip to Page 26 to read about ood-mitigation projects, and see how local agencies are responding to the latest COVID-19 surge on Page 15. Have a story idea for us? Reach out at cyfnews@communityimpact.com. Danica Lloyd, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

WHATWE COVER

Sign up for our daily newsletter to receive the latest headlines direct to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter DAILY INBOX Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Emily Heineman EDITOR Danica Lloyd REPORTER Emily Jaroszewski GRAPHIC DESIGNER Taylor White ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Karen Nickerson METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens

BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION &DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Kaitlin Schmidt CORPORATE LEADERSHIP GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES &MARKETING DIRECTOR Tess Coverman CONTACT US 8400 N. Sam Houston Parkway W., Ste. 220, Houston, TX 77064 • 2814696181 PRESS RELEASES cyfnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2021 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All rights reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

HOWWE'RE FUNDED

Join your neighbors today by giving any amount to the CI Patron program. Funds support our PATRON PROGRAM

ADVERTISING

Our local teams customize advertising

campaigns for all business sizes and industries wanting to reach their customer base and accomplish their goals. A third-party Readex survey proved 78% of paper recipients read three of the last four editions, and from what they read, 83% "took action" of some kind. We ask our readers to thank our advertisers by shopping locally.

$20 average donation choose to give monthly 35% edition newsletter called The InCIder and occasionally reach out with other opportunities to directly engage. hyperlocal, unbiased journalism and help build informed communities. As a thank you, we'll include you in a special Saturday

communityimpact.com

facebook.com/impactnewscyf

@impactnews_cyf

Proudly printed by

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM ADVERTISING

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM CIPATRON

WE’VE TEAMEDUP TOBRING YOUMORE OF THE STORIES YOU CARE ABOUT

CALL . SWITCH . SAVE LOCALOFFICE Denise Ramirez 24324 NWFwy, Cyp geico.com/cypress-r 832-349-7211 | ¡H

CALL . SWITCH . SAVE . LOCALOFFICE

Denise Ramirez-Buckley 24324 NWFwy, Cypress geico.com/cypress-ramirez 832-349-7211 | ¡Hablamos Español!

Some discounts, coverages, payment plans, and features are not available in all states, in all GEICO companies, or in all situations. Boat and PWC coverages are underwritten by GEICOMarine Insurance Company. Homeowners, renters, and condo coverages are written through non-affiliated insurance companies and are secured through the GEICO Insurance Agency, LLC. Motorcycle and ATV coverages are underwritten by GEICO Indemnity Company. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, DC 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko® image © 1999-2021. © 2021 GEICO. 21_662671044

Denise Ramirez-Buckley 24324 NWFwy, Cypress geico.com/cypress-ramirez 832-349-7211 | ¡Hablamos Español! Some discounts, cov rages, payment plans, and features are not available PWC coverages a e underwritten by GEICOMarine Insurance Company. non-affiliated insurance c mpanies and are secured through the GEICO In underwritten by GEICO Indemnity Company. GEICO is a registered servic DC 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko® image ©

Denise Ramirez-Buckley 24324 NWFwy, Cypress geico.com/cypress-ramirez Some discounts, coverages, payment plans, and features are not available in all states, in all GEICO companies, or in all situations. Boat and PWC coverages are underwritten by GEICO Marine Insurance Company. Homeowners, renters, and condo coverages are written through non- affiliated insurance companies and are secured through the GEICO Insurance Agency, LLC. Motorcycle and ATV coverages are underwritten by GEICO Indemnity Company. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, DC 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko® image © 1999-2021. © 2021 GEICO. 21_662671044

5

CYFAIR EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

8

SCHIEL RD.

1

HUFFMEISTER RD.

12

4

15

CHAPPELL KNOLL DR.

U E T T

VINTAGE PARK BLVD.

7 19

249

Urban Bird Hot Chicken

18

5

17

COURTESY URBAN BIRD HOT CHICKEN

HOUSE & HAHL RD.

2

27126 Hwy. 290, Ste. 200, Cypress. The facility provides affordable medical diag- nosis imaging through MRIs, MRAs, bone mass density, ultrasounds and digital X-rays. The clinic is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m.-6 p.m., and appoint- ments can be made online. 713-425-8116.

21

J

6

MILL

10

290

99 TOLL

N. BRIDGELAND LAKE PKWY.

3

N . H O U S T

www.houstonmri.com COMING SOON

R E S S

14

1960

8 Urban Bird Hot Chicken is set to open a second location in October at 12719 FM 1960, Houston, where Bullritos was formerly located. The restaurant serves Nashville-style hot chicken sand- wiches, tenders and french fries, and its original location is in Katy. Online order- ing is also available. 832-460-3966. www.urbanbirdhotchicken.com 9 A new location of Ollie’s , a national discount retailer, is slated to open Sept. 15 at 10701 Jones Road, Houston. Ollie’s buy- ers purchase overstock items, closeouts and manufacturer refurbished goods from well-known national brands. The store offers food, home goods, books, clothing, toys, sporting goods, pet supplies and electronics. 281-640-0151. www.ollies.us 10 Officials with Baker Katz, a Hous- ton-based commercial real estate brokerage firm, announced July 26 that Bel Furniture purchased the former Star Furniture located at 7111 FM 1960, Houston, on June 9. The 60,935-square- foot store sits on 2.38 acres near Willowbrook Mall. Bel Furniture plans to open in November after remodeling. The retailer offers a range of dining room, bedroom and living room furniture. www.belfurniture.com

9

16

L

13

11

8

6

E

20

L O

TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. N MAP NOT TO SCALE

529

NOWOPEN 1 A new location of Jersey Mike’s Subs opened Aug. 18 at 14044 Grant Road, Cypress, near the Spring Cypress Road intersection. The eatery offers a variety of cold and hot subs. Diners can place orders online, and delivery is available through third-party apps. This location operates from 10 a.m.-9 p.m. daily. 832-534-1998. www.jerseymikes.com 2 Hideaway Social Poker Club opened at 12215 Grant Road, Ste. K, Cypress, on July 18. The club welcomes players of all experience levels from beginner to advanced. The business is open 24/7 and

hosts tournaments as well. 281-251-0987. www.hideawaysocial.com 3 Wrestling Collector Shop opened for business Aug. 2 at 12234 Queenston Blvd., Ste. 200, Houston. The wrestling shop sells new and limited-edition WWE action figures. Shipping options are avail- able online. 281-213-4185. www.wrestlingcollectorshop.com 4 Water Tree Cypress One opened July 24 at 16726 Huffmeister Road, Ste. A 100, Cypress. The business provides pure alkaline water through filtration systems, solutions, refills and portable options. 713-482-1894.

www.watertreecypress.com 5 Adilene Hair Salon opened this summer at 13750 N. Eldridge Parkway, Ste. 3, Cypress. The salon offers haircuts, hair coloring, extensions, waxing and other beauty services. 281-569-9523. www.instagram.com/adilene_hair_salon 6 Wholemind Psychiatry opened July 1 at 16518 House & Hahl Road, Ste. E, Cypress. The clinic focuses on mental health conditions such as anxiety, stress, depression, bipolar disorder and more. Appointments can be made online. 713-489-8964. www.wholemindmd.com 7 Houston MRI opened in August at

6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY EMILY JAROSZEWSKI & DANICA LLOYD

14

18

Uncle Beans Coffee

The Toasted Yolk Cafe

COURTESY UNCLE BEANS COFFEE

COURTESY THE TOASTED YOLK CAFE

RELOCATIONS 16 Carrie F. Blades Wellness & Aes- thetics relocated from Barker Cypress Road to Creekstone Office Condos, 10242 Greenhouse Road, Ste. 201, Cypress, on Aug. 2. The clinic specializes in bioidentical hormone replacement therapy and aesthetic procedures de- signed to help with symptoms of aging. 832-240-1032. www.bladeswellness.com ANNIVERSARIES 17 Houston Yoga & Ayurveda at 13602 Kluge Road, Cypress, will host a 10-year anniversary celebration Sept. 12, according to owner Sharon Kapp. The business offers health-based yoga prac- tices. The celebration will be open to the public and feature vendors specializing in holistic practices, the wellness field and classical dance. 281-256-8461. www.houston-yoga-ayurveda.com 18 The Toasted Yolk Cafe cel- ebrated one year in business at 27008 Hwy. 290, Ste. 100, Cypress, on Aug. 2. The eatery specializes in break- fast, brunch and lunch, featuring menu items such as French toast, doughnuts and mimosas. The business is open daily from 7 a.m.-3 p.m. 281-304-2935. www.thetoastedyolk.com CLOSINGS 19 Rio Lindo Mexican Grill at 27200 Hwy. 290, Ste. 160, Cypress, per- manently closed in mid-August. The Mex- ican restaurant began serving Tex-Mex items in January after rebranding from

11 A new Raising Cane’s restaurant is coming to the Cy-Fair area in late 2021. The 8956 Barker Cypress Road, Cypress, location is slated to open by the end of the year, according to a July 22 news release. The fast-casual chicken finger eatery will feature a double drive-thru and a patio with ample outdoor seating, officials said. www.raisingcanes.com 12 Image Church will congregate at its new location Sept. 12 at 20402 Chappell Knoll Drive, Cypress, at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. The church is led by Pastor Joe Ogletree and is relocating from Black Elementary School, 14155 Grant Road, Cypress. Services will be held online exclusively until Sept. 12, officials said. 281-758-5346. www.yourimagechurch.com 13 7Friday Sushi is slated to open in October at 18121 Tuckerton Road, Houston. The sushi restaurant offers a selection of sushi, bao sandwich- es, poke bowls and vegan options made with high-quality ingredients. www.facebook.com/7fridaysushi 14 Uncle Beans Coffee is slated to open in October at 12105 Jones Road, Houston. Uncle Beans has one other location in the Heights at 3024 Houston Ave., Houston. The coffee shop serves coffee, tea, and a variety of breakfast items and baked goods. www.unclebeanscoffee.com 15 By Faith Childcare-2 is slated to open Sept. 7 at 15014 Spring Cypress Road, Ste. 100, Cypress. The child care center accepts children ages six weeks to 12 years old, and registration fees are waived for September and October applicants. 832-334-5267

The Chef’s Table in Vintage Park offers a range of cuisine, including the bone-in short rib.

PHOTOS COURTESY THE CHEF’S TABLE

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Owner and Master Chef Paul Friedman opened The Chef’s Table in Vintage Park, 110 Vintage Park Blvd., Bldg. J, Ste. P, Houston, on July 19. With a menu inspired by Friedman’s own personal travels, dishes available range from Beef Osso Buco and Portuguese Chicken Pendurada to Portobello Ravioli and the Bahji Burger.

In addition to boasting a full bar with craft cocktails, The Chef’s Table has also partnered with Anura Wines to provide the restaurant’s featured line of wine. The restaurant serves lunch and dinner daily as well as brunch on Saturdays and Sundays from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Reservations can be made online, and catering services are also available. 832-559-7489. www.chefstablehouston.com

VINTAGE PARK BLVD.

249

The New Zealand lamb chops are served with mint sauce.

N

The Original New York & Chicago Pizza Co. 832-220-6662. www.riolindogrill.com IN THE NEWS 20 Restaurant officials announced Aug. 3 that local Italian eatery Adriatic Cafe , 17402 Hwy. 290, Jersey Village, was dam- aged due to a fire. The restaurant will be closed until further notice as renovations take place but has additional locations in

Tomball and in Spring. Menu items include pasta, pizzas, calzones and seafood. 713-983-6565. www.adriaticcafe.com 21 Soto’s Cantina at 10609 Grant Road, Houston, is temporarily closed after a fire occurred at the restaurant in late June. Owner Juan Soto said he hopes to reopen by the end of the year. The Tex-Mex eat- ery serves nachos, tacos, fajitas, seafood and combination plates. 281-955-5667. www.sotoscantina.com

more information at stmaryscypress.org

FIND OUT WHAT MAKES US THE BEST

Must mention coupon when scheduling appointment. Code CIFALL2021. Expires 10/4/2021. $50.00 OFF $1000

Bring a friend and reconnect while enjoying food, fun and unique shopping presented by local craftspeople at our indoor/outdoor 15th Annual Market.

Friday and Saturday, September 24 & 25 , 2021 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

T R E E S E R V I C E

EXPERTLY CARING FOR CYFAIR’S URBAN FOREST FOR OVER 23 YEARS!

St. Mary’s Episcopal Church 15415 N. Eldridge Pkwy Cypress, Texas 77429

@ stmarys fgm

www.JonesRoadTreeService.com Nationally Accredited by the Tree Care Industry Call today for your complimentary consultation 281-469-0458

No charge for admission. Proceeds benefit church-affiliated projects and outreach.

7

CY-FAIR EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

L U X U R Y A C T I V E S E N I O R L I V I N G O P E N I N G S O O N !

Enjoy an unparalled lifestyle and extraordinary experiences in a spacious 25,000 square foot clubhouse . • Multiple Elevators • Wide Air-Conditioned Hallways • Garages & Storage Available • Resort-Style Pool with Swim-Up Bar • Fitness Center & Yoga Studio • Full-Service Salon & Spa • Paw-some Dog Park

A COMMUNITY CHOIR FOR OUTSTANDING 4TH, 5TH, AND 6TH GRADE SINGERS IN NORTH HOUSTON AND SURROUNDING AREAS. LOVE TO SING? Register today for Sept. 21 auditions!

• Spacious Movie Theaters • Billiard + Poker Lounges • Arts & Crafts Workshop + Social Calendar and Events!

A L A CART E D I N I NG COM I NG 2 0 2 2 !

��� ���� ���� �� �� ���.����������.���

1 2 840 J on e s Rd , Hou s t on , TX 7 7070 ( 8 3 2 ) 9 5 2 - 3 0 1 2 • A r e l l a J on e s . c om

Student banking that fits you to a

Make the grade with Trustmark’s Student Checking account. You’ll have quick and easy access to your money with online and mobile banking, and there’s no monthly service fee. Our account just for students is banking that fits you to a T. Learn more at trustmark.com.

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TODO LIST

September events

COMPILED BY EMILY JAROSZEWSKI

SEPT. 11

SHOP ‘TIL YOU DROP BERRY CENTER

SEPT. 11 12

WORTH THE TRIP: DINO STROLL GEORGE R. BROWN CONVENTION CENTER

Creekwood Grill regularly hosts live music events. (Courtesy Creekwood Grill) LIVEMUSIC THE BARNAT FRIO 16416 Mueschke Road, Cypress 281-968-4220 www.barntx.com SEPTEMBER 18 Def Leppard tribute, 7 p.m. 24 The Powell Brothers, 7 p.m. 26 Satisfaction—Rolling Stones tribute, 7 p.m. THE BURGER RANCH 16702 House & Hahl Road, Cypress 832-881-9080 www.theburgerranch.com SEPTEMBER 09 Roger Tienken, 6 p.m. 17 Brandon Smith Band, 6 p.m.

The Cy-Fair Women’s Club will host its annual shopping fundraiser with more than 250 vendors selling clothing, cosmetics, food, home goods, accessories and gifts. 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. Free (admission). 8877 Barker Cypress Road, Cypress. www.cyfairwomensclub.org (Courtesy Cy-Fair Women’s Club)

Participants can walk through realistic dinosaur displays in a prehistoric setting. About 75 dinosaurs will be featured. 9 a.m.-8 p.m. (Sat.), 9 a.m.-7 p.m. (Sun.). $14.99. 1001 Avenida de las Americas, Ste. E, Houston. 713-853-8000. www.dinostroll.com (Courtesy Dino Stroll)

SEPTEMBER

21 can receive a non-alcoholic beverage of choice. 4-8 p.m. Free. Senate Avenue Brewing Co., 16000 Dillard Drive, Ste. F, Jersey Village. 832-295-3188. www.senateave.com 18 CELEBRATE OKTOBERFEST Brew:30 Taphouse will host an Oktoberfest celebration featuring about 10 breweries serving their beer. The Homebrewed Brass Ensemble will perform polka music, and the Berlin Food Factory will serve German food. 4-8 p.m. Free. Brew:30 Taphouse, 15914 Telge Road, Cypress. 281-516-9315. www.brew30taphouse.com 18 CHECKOUT VINTAGE CARS A Cypress/West Houston car meetup will be held at Twistee Treat. Any vintage car from the year 1995 and older is welcome to be showcased. No loud music, revving engines or acceleration will be allowed at the event. 6-9 p.m. Free. Twistee Treat, 7018 Fry Road, Cypress. www.carcruisender.com 18 VISIT THE CYFAIR OPENAIRMARKET Cy-Fair Town Center will host an outdoor artisan and small-business pop-up shop. Local artisans and small businesses

will be selling jewelry, food, apparel, accessories and clothes. The event is family friendly, and pets are also welcome. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Cy-Fair Town Center, 25680 Hwy. 290, Cypress. 23 GOLF FOR A CAUSE The 17th annual Amber Alert pro-am golf tournament will raise money for the Texas Center for the Missing. Lunch and refreshments will be provided, and a happy hour, an awards dinner, an online auction and a rae will follow the tournament. The format is a four- person team scramble. Noon. $300 (individual player). BlackHorse Golf Club, 12205 Fry Road, Cypress. 713-599-0235. www.centerforthemissing.org 24 THROUGH 25 ATTEND THE FALL GIFTMARKET St. Mary’s Episcopal Church will be hosting its 15th annual fall gift market. An assortment of jewelry, home decor, handcrafted gifts, collectibles, sports memorabilia, clothing, candles, soaps and bath products will be available for purchase. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, 5415 N. Eldridge Parkway, Cypress. 281-370-8000. www.stmaryscypress.org

12 CELEBRATE FIESTAS PATRIAS The annual Fiestas Patrias will feature a mariachi band, a regional Mexican band, a cumbia group, Aztec dancers and folkloric ballet. 11 a.m.- 6 p.m. Free (admission), $5 (parking). Traders Village, 7979 N. Eldridge Parkway, Houston. www.tradersvillage.com/houston/events 12 SHOP THE BRIDGELAND FARMERSMARKET Farmers market vendors sell products such as organic produce, juices and dog treats. Pets are welcome. 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Free. Lakeland Village Center, 10519 Fry Road, Cypress. 832-473-0559. www.ynfma.org 13 VISIT A FREE VACCINATION CLINIC Senate Avenue Brewing Co. will host a COVID-19 vaccine clinic conducted by the Texas National Army Guard. The clinic will be for those who wish to receive their rst or second dose of the Pzer or Moderna vaccine. Vaccine recipients ages 21 and older can receive a free alcoholic beverage, and participants younger than

18 Hurry Sundown, 6 p.m. 23 Joseph Rauma, 6 p.m. CREEKWOOD GRILL 12710 Telge Road, Cypress 281-746-6352 www.creekwoodgrill.com SEPTEMBER 11 Matt Sebastian, 6:30 p.m. 17 Randy Hulsey, 6:30 p.m.

Find more or submit Cy-Fair events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

open 24/7 walk-in NO WAIT

9

CYFAIR EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES METROoutlines light-rail funding developments, COVID-19 ridership effect onMETRONext plan

COMPILED BY EMILY JAROSZEWSKI, DANICA LLOYD, & JISHNU NAIR

ONGOING PROJECTS

249

1960

Two years after the Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County’s $3.5 billion bond got the voter green light to move forward with funding traffic projects in November 2019, President and CEO Tom Lambert described the METRONext Moving Forward plan’s progress as “a collabo- rative effort” with local governments and agencies. The Moving Forward plan is described as over 500 miles of improvements to city transit centers, light rail and bus services, according to the project’s website. Lambert spoke at an Aug. 4 North Houston Association Transportation Committee meeting, where he thanked the Houston-Galveston Area Council for $180 million in funds to begin the first phase of planning the METRORapid light-rail plan in Katy. “We’re now looking at connecting our northwest transit center to downtown Houston, inside [Loop] 610 from [I-10] to downtown,” Lambert said. “It’s not just [Loop] 610 to downtown. It’s all those com- muter buses that also come through the [Hwy.] 290 corridor, all those commuter buses that come from the I-10 corridor, and we’ll have them connect the uptown line as well.” Lambert said METRO ridership on local systems was 56% of its prepandemic levels, while Park & Ride systems were at 86%. Lambert attributed the drop to decreased employment in Houston’s downtown areas, where commuters would normally fill those seats. “Prior to the pandemic, 37%

COVID-19’S RIDERSHIP EFFECTS Officials said commutes into downtown Houston have decreased due to the pandemic.

290

N ELDRIDGE PKWY.

6

N

FM 1960 resurfacing The Texas Department of Transporta- tion is nearing the end of its efforts to resurface the old asphalt overlay on FM 1960 from north of North Eldridge Parkway to Hwy. 249. Angel Brothers is the contractor on the project. Timeline: set for October completion Cost: $3.6 million Funding source: Texas Department of Transportation

Park & Ride ridership on local systems is 86% of its pre- pandemic levels.

METRO ridership on local systems is 56% of its pre-pandemic levels.

56%

86%

SOURCE: METROPOLITAN TRANSIT AUTHORITY OF HARRIS COUNTY/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

rerouting and expanding I-45 through East Downtown and the Northside while abandoning its path through Midtown. Lambert said METRO’s priority was keeping the Texas Department of Transportation’s planned $7.9 billion funding for the I-45 project in Hous- ton. He added the agency had been in “constant contact” with TxDOT and that it had “made assurances” on all of METRO’s concerns. The North Houston Association published a call to action to support the controversial expansion on its website in July. “This money needs to stay,” Lambert said. According to Lambert, the MET- RONext Moving Forward plan was designed in line with the specifi- cations TxDOT has made publicly available in its record of decision for the I-45 project. Lambert ended his presentation with a continued call for collabora- tion and public input. “We’re not in competition with each other; it’s how do we leverage what each of us brings to the table,” Lambert said.

“YOU’RE STILL GOING TONEED LONG- HAUL SERVICES, BUT THE QUESTION IS HOWMUCH LONG- HAUL SERVICES, ANDHOWDOYOU BEST DELIVER IT.” TOM LAMBERT, METROPOLITAN TRANSIT AUTHORITY CEO

O

K D

WEST RD.

N

Gessner Road extension Construction began in mid-June on the extension of Gessner Road from West Road to Fallbrook Drive as a four-lane concrete boulevard with a raised median and gutter drainage system and two detention ponds. Timeline: set for March

of work trips downtown were by METRO,” Lambert said. “Downtown Houston does not have the same number of employment.” Lambert said METRO had an opportunity to study and adapt the agency’s models with employees potentially opting for remote work. “I think we’re going to learn a lot,” he said. “You’re still going to need long-haul services, but the question is how much long-haul services, and how do you best deliver it.” The North Houston Highway Improvement Project in part involves

2023 completion Cost: $10.3 million Funding source: Harris County Precinct 4

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF AUG. 20. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT CYFNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

This course will help you: • Define & Create Your Retirement • Determine howmuch Your Retirement will Cost • Evaluate Your Sources of Income • Invest in Your Future • Protect Your Health &Wealth • Strategize methods to Receive Funds from Your Retirement Plans • Manage Your Estate Distribution • Manage Investment Risk Attendees will receive a Free Personal Financial Assessment & Free Retirement Planning GuideWorkbook Email support@mintwm.com or call us directly at 713-398-7487 to register

Develop the skills you need to enjoy the rewards that retirement can bring Passport to Retirement Your “HowTo” Guide to Financial Success September 14 & 16 • 6:30-8:30

Prairie View A&M University Northwest Houston Center 9449 Grant Road, Houston, TX 77070 www.mintwm.com

“Securities and investment advisory services offered through Royal Alliance Associates, Inc. member FINRA/SIPC. Royal Alliance Associates, Inc. is separately owned and other entities and/or marketing names, products or services referenced here are independent of Royal Alliance Associates, Inc. This communication is strictly intended for individuals residing in the states of CA, CO, FL, GA, LA, MN, MO, MT, NY, OH, OK, OR, TN, TX & WI. No offers may be made or accepted from any resident outside the specific state(s) referenced.”

11

CY-FAIR EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

BUT WAIT, THERE'S MORE.

EMILY JAROSZEWSKICOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

ARELLAON JONES New 55-plus residential project Arella on Jones broke ground in July 2019 at 12840 Jones Road, Houston, and is expected to be completed this fall with 229 units. Amenities include a swimming pool, a dog park, a golf putting green, an outdoor gaming area, a clubhouse, walking paths, two private dining rooms, a bar and lounge area, a theater, a billiard room, a tness center, a dance oor, an arts and crafts room, a library, a salon, massage rooms, a business center and a medical holding room. Space: 9.92 acres

Chesmar Homes is planning a new collection (and 4 models) for Elyson—the perfect addition to our recently opened model home village and Welcome Center. Elyson Café has reopened with a new menu. And more will keep coming, like a new 145-acre regional park opening this year. Visit Elyson.com/more

CYPRESS NORTH HOUSTON RD.

COPELAND DR.

Estimated cost: $37.6 million Timeline: opening in October

N

NEWHOMES FROM THE $300S–$800S 281.640.4004 23634 Savannah Sparrow Lane, Katy, TX 77493

COURTESY CYPRESS ASSISTANCE MINISTRIES

EMILY JAROSZEWSKICOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

CYPRESS ASSISTANCE MINISTRIES Local nonprot Cypress Assistance Ministries is nearing the completion of a new facility where all programs will be housed—including the food pantry, the resale store, GED classes, emergency rent and utility assis- tance, and job readiness counseling.

FIRSTMETROPOLITAN CHURCH A new sanctuary is under construction at First Metropolitan Church, 8870 W. Sam Houston Parkway N., Houston, ocials said. The congregation has been worshipping in a multipurpose

From Grand Parkway, exit FM529 and travel west. Turn right at Elyson Blvd. and follow signs to Model Home Village.

building for about 20 years. Space: 23,000 square feet Estimated cost: $4 million Timeline: opening in April

Space: 20,000 square feet Estimated cost: $2.4 million Timeline: opening this fall

Newland is the largest private developer of mixed-use communities in the United States. With our partner, North America Sekisui House, LLC, we believe it is our responsibility to create enduring, healthier communities for people to live life in ways that matter most to them. newlandco.com | nashcommunities.com

CYPRESS NORTH HOUSTON RD.

R D .

Homes at Elyson ® are built and sold by home builders (“Builders”) unaffiliated with NASH FM 529, LLC (“Owner”), Newland Real Estate Group LLC (“Newland”) or their related entities. Buyers should review the purchase agreement, public offering statement, and other offering materials provided by the seller prior to signing any contract to purchase a home. Details on the prospective development are provided for informational purposes only and there is no guarantee that the final development will match the developer’s vision. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY. Copyright © 2021 NASH FM 529, LLC (“Owner”). All Rights Reserved. No reproductions, distribution, or unauthorized transmission of any portion is permitted without written permission of Fee Owner. (8/21)

N

N

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY EMILY JAROSZEWSKI & DANICA LLOYD

we can help you with your lighting and generator needs for your home or business. our lead time for a full home or commercial generator is 10-12 weeks, the fastest around! if a full home generator is not what you want, we can help with portable generators too! don’t need a generator? call us for your regular ‘ol electrician work! don’t sit in the dark

RENDERING COURTESY HOWARD HUGHES CORP.

COURTESY CYFAIR ISD

PRAIRIELAND VILLAGE Model homes in the third of four villag- es in the Bridgeland master-planned community will be under construction this fall, according to ocials with the Howard Hughes Corp. About 7,000 homesites are planned for Prairieland Village. Builders include Highland Homes, David Weekley Homes, Ches- mar Homes, Perry Homes, Coventry Homes, Westin Homes and Tri Pointe Homes, among others. Space: 3,000 acres Timeline: opening spring 2022

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL NO. 57 A new two-story elementary school funded by Cy-Fair ISD’s 2019 bond is under construction on a 16.7-acre plot at 21211 Tuckerton Road, Cypress. The yet-to-be-named school was designed by IBI Group and will be built by ICI Construction Inc.

Space: 120,000 square feet Estimated cost: $32.6 million Timeline: opening August 2022

99

TUCKERTON RD.

SHARP RD.

N

N

WEST RD.

either way, we want to serve you in any capacity, large or small. see you soon, neighbors!

RENDERING COURTESY VENTERRA REALTY

VENTERRA REALTY APARTMENT COMPLEX Venterra Realty has purchased a 12.78-acre parcel of land near Bridgeland and will be breaking ground soon on a new 336-unit apartment complex, according to an Aug. 2 news release. The project will be located along Tuckerton Road east of Fry Road. The name of the complex and a construction timeline has yet to be determined, ocials said. Space: 12.78 acres Estimated cost: TBD Timeline: TBD

281.909.4299 | arcelectricandlighting.com | 18512 Cypress Rosehill Rd, Cypress, TX 77429 | tecl #35651

N

13

CYFAIR EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

We’re bringing high-tech, high-touch care to patients. Our doctors and staff partner with you to understand your needs and work with you—not just on treatment, but also education and preventive care. Village Medical Primary Care Clinics are now open in Cypress- Fairbanks

Our experienced and compassionate team is here to provide full- service primary care, including:

Walk-ins welcome Walk-ins welcome

Same-day appointments available Same-day appointments available

Virtual visits

Extended hours offered at some locations Extended hours offered at some locati ns

Virtual visits

To schedule an appointment or learn more VillageMedical.com To schedule an appointment or learn more VillageMedical.com

Several area locations to serve you: Several area locations to serve you:

Village Medical at CyFalls 9511 Huffmeister, Ste 100 Houston, TX 77095 Mon – Fri: 8a –5pm

Village Medical at Vintage 10220 Louetta Rd., Ste 100 Village Medical at Vintage 10220 Louetta Rd., Ste 100 Housto , TX 77070 Mon – Fri: 8am –5pm

Village Medical at Walgreens 12314 Jones Rd. Houston, TX 77070 Mon - Fri: 7am – 7pm Sat & Sun: 9am – 5pm Village Medical at Walgreens 12314 Jones Rd. Houston, TX 77070 Mon - Fri: 7am – 7pm Sat & Sun: 9am – 5pm

Village Medical at Walgreens 14317 Cypress Rosehill Rd. Cypress, TX 77429 Mon - Fri: 7am – 7pm Sat & Sun: 9am – 5pm Village Medical at Walgreens 14317 Cypress Rosehill Rd. Cypress, TX 77429 Mon - Fri: 7am – 7pm Sat & Sun: 9am – 5pm

Village Medical at Copperfield Village Medical at Copperfield 15881 FM 529 Ste. A Houston, TX 77095 Mon – Fri: 8am – 5pm 15881 F 529 Ste. A Houston, TX 77095 Mon – Fri: 8am – 5pm

Village Medical at CyFalls 9511 Huffmeister, Ste 100 Houston, TX 77095 Mon – Fri: 8am –5pm

Houston, TX 77070 Mon – Fri: 8am –5pm

© 2021 Village Medical

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HEALTH CARE Cy-Fair health care systemoverwhelmed by latest COVID19 surge

BY DANICA LLOYD

GETTING VACCINATED

COUNTING THE CASES

Justin Reed, assistant chief of emergency medical services for the Cy-Fair Fire Department, said the most recent COVID-19 case surge has consistently overwhelmed the local health care system at unprecedented levels since the beginning of August. “Hands down, the worst I’ve ever seen in my career, and I just can’t fathom seeing it [get worse]. To get worse than what it is right now is a complete failure,” Reed said in an Aug. 19 interview with Community Impact Newspaper . “We’re managing, but anything worse than this—that’s that tipping point; that’s that breaking point where we start having massive failures.” As of Aug. 26, there were more than 54,000 active cases of COVID-19 in Harris County—the highest number of active cases since the start of the pandemic. About 7,300 of those cases were in one of the 10 ZIP codes that fall within Cy-Fair ISD’s boundaries. Nearly 470 Cy-Fair residents have died from COVID-19 since the start of the pandemic, according to Harris County Public Health. But patients who do not have the virus are dying due to a lack of resources because the local health care system is inundated as ocials manage the most recent wave of COVID-19, Reed said. The surge has burdened EMS pro- viders, emergency departments and intensive care units across the area, and the process of ooading patients from ambulances is taking longer due to sta shortages and capacity limitations, he said. “Right now, when we take a patient

Just over 50% of Cy-Fair residents over the age of 12 were fully vaccinated as of late August. To nd a local Harris County vaccination site, call 832-927-8787 or visit www.readyharris.org.

The number of active COVID-19 cases has grown 114% year over year in Cy-Fair. Data includes cases in the 10 ZIP codes that fall within Cy-Fair ISD’s boundaries.

2020

2021

Active cases in Cy-Fair as of Aug. 26

Total Cy-Fair deaths as of Aug. 26

115 468

2,692 7,308

40%-49% 50%-59% 60%-69% 70%-79%

Percentage of population fully vaccinated

Harris County COVID-19 hospitalizations as of Aug. 26

8,104 10,417

99 TOLL

249

77429

77070

SOURCE: HARRIS COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

290

77433

77065

77064

said the Cy-Fair Fire Department took an “unprecedented” step Aug. 18 and implemented provider-initiated refusals. This means when patients wish to be taken to a hospital but their condition does not warrant an emergency room visit, ocials will not take them to the hospital. “The problem is our playbook has run dry, and so we are now [operating by] trial and error on things,” Reed said. “And the hope is that we as a collective society ... can get a handle on that because we have the solution. We just need to accept it and to lift each other up. The recourse is if we don’t, we will have a catastrophic failure in the health care system.” As of Aug. 26, 58.6% of Harris County residents over the age of 12 were fully vaccinated. More than 10,400 patients with COVID-19 were hospitalized in Harris County at that time, according to the Southeast Texas Regional Advisory Council. Hospitalizations and deaths in the

to a hospital, our time on task has increased from an hour fromwhen the 911 call is made until that truck is ready to respond to another call. Now we’re seeing seven hours—seven hours fromwhen you call 911 until your loved one is in a bed in acceptable care and that ambulance is now available,” he said. Finding solutions Lone Star College System o- cials announced Aug. 18 rst- and second-year nursing students will be stepping in at Greater Houston-area hospitals to ll in gaps from regional nursing shortages. Students will work in non-COVID-19 areas so full-time sta can better serve severe patients, according to a news release. Reed said his department is also seeing an uptick in 911 calls from individuals who cannot access routine health care because providers are so overwhelmed. To help alleviate the situation, he

77095

77040

77041

6

77449 77084

10

SOURCES: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES, U.S. CENSUS BUREAUCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Harris Health System are almost entirely attributed to unvaccinated patients, according to CEO Dr. Esmaeil Porsa. Harris County has seen a sharp increase in residents getting vaccinated at its county-run sites since it started oering recipi- ents $100, Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo said. “The consequences of this tragedy are all the more tragic when we remember there is a vaccine that is safe and eective and widely available,” she said. Emma Whalen contributed to this report.

Looking for a better financial partner?

N

We don’t do can’t.

9212 Fry Rd., Suite 100 Cypress, TX 77433 713.852.6700 TexasBayCU.org

NMLS: #280545

This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration.

15

CYFAIR EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

Your Community Powered Alternative to Health Insurance

“My one-year-old was having recurring ear infections. The pediatrician and the ear, nose, and throat doctor told us that she’d have to get tubes in her ears. After a 15-minute procedure at the local hospital we got the bill: $8,000! Then our health insurance plan said they weren’t going to pay for it because it was not “medically necessary.” I had done everything right yet when I needed my health insurance it wouldn’t pay for basic healthcare needs. That’s why I started CrowdHealth.” Andy Schoonover, Founder

• No doctor networks, choose any doctor you want • OBGYN, Pediatrician, and Primary Care visits are covered

• Unlimited tele-health visits • No deductibles

Visit www.joincrowdhealth.com/Cimpact to learn how to cut your healthcare expenses.

“Healthcare desperately needs viable alternative payment approaches. I’m thrilled to see CrowdHealth leading the way.” Dr. Tanya Stewart, MD Former Chief Clinical Transformation Officer, UnitedHealth Group

16

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Harris County, Jersey Village & Cy-Fair ISD

QUOTEOFNOTE “WASHINGTON,

Harris County approves $11M in violence prevention efforts

JerseyVillage sets $17Mbudget, tax rate increase for 2021-22

D.C.; [LOS ANGELES]; BALTIMORE—THESE ARE NOT PLACES THAT I THINK THATWE SHOULDBE TRYING TO FOLLOWTHEIR MODEL. I AGREE ... [WE NEED TODO]WHAT WORKS BEST FORUS ANDNOTNECESSARILY IMPORT OTHER PEOPLE’S PROBLEMS TOWHEREWE ARE.” JACK CAGLE, HARRIS COUNTY PRECINCT 4 COMMISSIONER, ON VIOLENCE PREVENTION EFFORTS COUNTY HIGHLIGHTS HARRIS COUNTY In the latest effort to increase vaccination rates, Harris County is offering a cash incentive to get a COVID-19 shot at any of its county-run sites. Those who get vaccinated will receive $100 with their first dose, Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo announced Aug. 17 as the region faces a surge in hospitalizations. The incentive is funded by the American Rescue Plan Act. Register at www.readyharris.org or by calling 832-927-8787. HARRIS COUNTY Small businesses throughout Harris County that have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic will soon be able to apply for grants ranging from $5,000- $25,000. The new $30 million relief fund is subsidized by the American Rescue Plan Act Local Fiscal Recovery Funds. The selection process will be randomized but prioritized based on need. Social vulnerability index factors such as the location of businesses as well as the ethnicity and gender of business owners will be considered. Funds can be used to pay workers, suppliers and rent. The application window will open Sept. 20 at www.harriscountybusinessrelief.org. Jersey Village City Council Will meet at 7 p.m. Sept. 20 at Jersey Village City Hall, 16327 Lakeview Drive, Jersey Village. 713-466-2100. www.jerseyvillagetx.com Harris County Commissioners Court Will meet at 10 a.m. Sept. 14 at 1001 Preston St., Ste. 934, MEETINGSWE COVER

BY DANICA LLOYD

crime are related to health and social challenges, like mental illness, like substance use disorders,” Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo said. Currently, 911 dispatchers have three response options when a county resident calls: the fire depart- ment, emergency medical services and law enforcement. By the end of the year, the HART will be a fourth option in limited geographic areas with plans to later expand. A new division of Harris County Public Health that will house the HART program along with a Gun Vio- lence Interruption Program focused in these at-risk areas could launch by the end of the year, officials said. The Gun Violence Interruption Program, which will cost about $6 million to implement, will aim to address the root causes of violence and prevent it before it occurs through community-based street out- reach. It will connect at-risk residents to mental health, social, educational and employment services.

BY EMILY JAROSZEWSKI

HARRIS COUNTY As part of a series of criminal justice reform initiatives, Harris County Commis- sioners Court approved two new violence prevention plans in a 3-2 vote Aug. 10. Commissioners unanimously agreed at the June 9, 2020, meeting to set aside $25 million for criminal jus- tice intervention programs related to poverty, mental health and substance use. The new programs approved Aug. 10 will require about $11 million from those allocated funds. Harris County will invest $5 million to create a Holistic Alternative Responder Team to work with com- munity organizations to respond to nonviolent calls pertaining to issues such as mental health, substance use, homelessness and social welfare. “To reduce crime, we have to break that cycle of crime, incar- ceration, recidivism and get at the root causes of crime, and as we all know, too often, the root causes of

JERSEY VILLAGE The Jersey Village City Council approved a $17 million budget for fiscal year 2021-22 on Aug. 16 along with a property tax rate of $0.7425 per $100 valuation—up from $0.723466 in FY 2020-21. Mayor Bobby Warren said the council has made tax cuts when- ever possible. The no-new-revenue tax rate of $0.691336 per $100 valuation would have brought in the same amount of revenue as the previous fiscal year, but council members could have approved a rate as high as $0.888379 per $100 valuation before voter approval would be required, according to city documents. “The job of council is to try to balance that [budget] and propose a budget that tries to keep taxes as low as possible while continuing to meet the high expectations that our citizens have that they right- fully have,” Warren said. Although council members James Singleton and Drew Was- son voted to decrease the city’s $20 million capital budget, it was ultimately approved and will help fund the Jersey Meadow Golf Course clubhouse and a new city hall at Village Center. The FY 2021-22 budget also includes $2.1 million for the city’s fire department and $4.1 million for police department operations.

Harris County approved $11 million for two new violence prevention plans Aug. 10 as part of its criminal justice reform strategy.

Criminal justice reform

Holistic Alternative Responder Team

Gun Violence Interruption Program Cost to create: $6 million

Cost to create: $5 million How it works: The team will work with community organizations to respond to nonviolent calls relating to mental health, substance use, homelessness and social welfare.

How it works: The program will aim to address the root causes of violence and prevent it before it occurs through community-based street outreach.

SOURCE: HARRIS COUNTY/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

14 candidates running for Cy-Fair ISDboard

DATES TOKNOW There are several important dates to note ahead of the election.

BY DANICA LLOYD

of sales for American Alloy Steel, who has served on the board since 2005, are running for re-election to positions 5, 6 and 7, respectively. Position 5 challengers include Courtney Spradley, Xavier Leal, Grace Horner, Todd LeCompte and Natalie Blasingame. Ryan C. Irving, Jr., Chris Harrison and Scott Henry are running for Position 6, and Michael V. Perez, Lucas Scanlon and Craig A. Jacobs will be on the ballot for Position 7. Visit www.cfisd.net to learn more about the board of trustees and the upcoming election.

CY-FAIR ISD A total of 14 candi- dates are competing for one of three open Cy-Fair ISD board of trustees positions in the Nov. 2 election, including three incumbents who have each served on the board for at least 16 years. John Ogletree, a senior pastor at First Metropolitan Church, who has served on the board since 2004; Don Ryan, the owner of Cy-Fair Insurance Group, who was first elected to the CFISD board in 2000; and Bob R. Covey, the retired vice president

OCTOBER

4

Harris County voter registration deadline

12

Candidate forum hosted by Cy-Fair ISD

18-29

Early-voting period

NOVEMBER

2

Election Day

Houston. 713-274-1111. www.harriscountytx.gov

SOURCES: CY-FAIR ISD, HARRIS COUNTY/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

17

CY-FAIR EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44

communityimpact.com

Powered by