Spring - Klein Edition | September 2020

SPRING KLEIN EDITION

ONLINE AT 2020 PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION VOLUME 7, ISSUE 6  SEPT. 19OCT. 16, 2020 DIVERSE BECOMING MORE

While the number of white students enrolled at Spring, Klein and Cy-Fair ISDs has decreased over the past 15 years, white teachers remain the majority of teachers at KISD and CFISD. At the same time, the number of economically disadvantaged students has also increased across all three districts over the past 15 years. African American KLEIN ISD American Indian Hispanic White Multiple races Asian/Pacic Islander

Economically disadvantaged students

TEACHER DEMOGRAPHICS

STUDENT DEMOGRAPHICS

13.7%

0.3%

7.9%

5.2%

0.2%

0.6%

23.8%

54.3%

4%

90%

Total: 35,474

Total: 2,219.4*

2003-04 2008-09 2013-14 2018-19

23% 36%

2003-04 2008-09 2013-14 2018-19

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40.9% 45.2%

New!

41.4%

31.4%

0.4%

Total: 53,252

Total: 3,518.7*

71.9%

15% XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX 0.4% 8.5% 3.3%

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11.6% 0.4% 2.4% 13.3%

SPRING ISD

Economically disadvantaged students

TEACHER DEMOGRAPHICS

STUDENT DEMOGRAPHICS

9%

0.1%

1.4%

0.2%

5.8%

$

7.1%

82.4%

31.9%

31.1%

31%

Total: 26,664

Total: 1,787.4*

2003-04 2008-09 2013-14 2018-19

46.5% 61.9% 74.2% 70.1%

2003-04 2008-09 2013-14 2018-19

$

$

Total: 35,348

Total: 2,164*

21.1%

35.2%

40%

39.4%

46%

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1.9%

0.3%

3%

1.6%

7.5%

2.7%

1.3%

CYFAIR ISD

Economically disadvantaged students

TEACHER DEMOGRAPHICS

STUDENT DEMOGRAPHICS

6.3%

0.2%

1.3%

11.1%

0.2%

8.2%

7.4%

84.8%

Total: 74,730

Total: 4,884.1*

28.7%

51.8%

2003-04 2008-09 2013-14 2018-19

25.7% 41.5% 49.3% 54.5%

2003-04 2008-09 2013-14 2018-19

DISTRICT SNAPSHOT

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1.5%

66.4%

Total: 116,245

Total: 7,261.9*

18.6%

44.4%

24.1%

0.9%

9.4%

2.6%

13.8% 0.3% 2.5% 15.5%

SOURCE: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

*INCLUDES FULLTIME EQUIVALENT STAFF AND PARTTIME EMPLOYEES

majority-minority student popula- tions, ocials said. In the 2003-04 school year, white students made up more than 50% of students at KISD and CFISD and more than 30% of SISD students, The Spring and Klein area has seen a notable demographic shift over the past two decades, data shows, and Spring, Klein and Cy-Fair ISDs are evolving to better serve their now Local districts target equity to better serve diversifying populations while white teachers accounted for more than 80% of all teachers at each of the three school districts, accord- ing to Texas Education Agency data. Fifteen years later, the white student CONTINUED ON 24 BY DANICA LLOYD & HANNAH ZEDAKER

KOHRVILLE HISTORY

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SPRING - KLEIN EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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THIS ISSUE

FROMKIM: This September brings our annual Public Education Edition, where we dive into demographics and enrollment data for our local school districts. You can also read about The Tailored Teacher, which supports students and families by providing home-school support and tutoring. Even though this school year looks dierent, we wish all our educators and students a positive year of learning. Kim Giannetti, GENERALMANAGER

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Kim Giannetti, kgiannetti@communityimpact.com EDITOR Kelly Schaer SENIOR REPORTER Hannah Zedaker REPORTER Andy Li GRAPHIC DESIGNER Ronald Winters ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Kim Laurence

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SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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SPRINGWOODS VILLAGE

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CITY PLAZA DR.

OLD TOWN SPRING

SPRING STUEBNER RD.

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In-N-Out Burger

COURTESY IN-N-OUT BURGER

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new location is managed by Houston res- ident Bruce Zacaria, who has more than two decades of experience in the indus- try. The new location offers an extensive list of auto repair and maintenance ser- vices, including no-cost concierge pickup 5 A new Holiday Inn Express & Suites opened at 1010 FM 1960, Houston, on July 1. The four-floor, 83-room hotel is located within close proximity to George Bush Intercontinental Airport, and amenities include a pool, free breakfast, guest laundry, meeting room space and complimentary airport shuttle service. and drop-off. 832-698-2384. www.louettaautomotive.com 346-326-8500. www.ihg.com 6 Virus Kill Sanitation opened Aug. 18 at 17150 Butte Creek Road, Ste. 219, Houston. The business specializes in virus, bacteria and fungi sanitation and disinfection for residential and commer- cial properties using materials that are less harsh than bleach. 281-206-4280. www.viruskillsanitation.com COMING SOON 7 Fajita Pete’s plans to open a new location at 24345 Gosling Road, Ste. 225, Spring, in late September after press time. The fajita-focused eatery will offer a variety of Tex-Mex cuisine ranging from enchiladas and tacos to quesadillas and flautas. The restaurant also features a children’s menu, dessert items such as sopapillas and tres leches cake, and beverages including margaritas and aguas frescas. The location will also offer cater- ing and delivery. 832-639-8334. www.fajitapetes.com

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CUTTEN RD.

VINTAGE PRESERVE PKWY.

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MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 In-N-Out Burger opened at

2 Ceviches n’ Snacks had a soft opening Aug. 19 at 18379 Kuykendahl Road, Ste. A, Spring. The menu includes various seafood options, such as the Baja Michelada, the Tijuana Nachos and the Red Tuna Ceviche. The eatery also offers fruit cups, snacks with corn, and sweeter options such as milkshakes and flavored horchatas. 832-559-8765. www.veryfreshsnacks.com 3 Crafty Crab , located at 211 FM 1960 W., Ste. L, Houston, began offering

takeout Aug. 8. The homestyle seafood restaurant is inspired by New Orleans cuisine and offers seafood boils, featuring crab, lobster, shrimp, crawfish, clams and mussels; fried items, including catfish, tilapia and calamari; steamed oysters and scallops; and gumbo. 832-680-1111. www.craftycrabrestaurant.com 4 Louetta Automotive celebrated the grand opening of its 12th Greater Hous- ton-area location Aug. 3. Located at 9625 Spring Cypress Road, Spring, the GEARS RD.

7611 FM 1960 W., Houston, on Sept. 4. First announced in April 2019, the long- anticipated Willowbrook restaurant serves the brand’s signature hamburgers, shakes and french fries, which are also available “animal style.” The new location features indoor and outdoor seating, a covered patio and one drive-thru lane. 800-786-1000. www.in-n-out.com

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COMPILED BY ANDY LI, ADRIANA REZAL & HANNAH ZEDAKER

RELOCATIONS 12 Spring-Klein Baseball Academy opened in early August at its new location at 4750 FM 2920, Ste. 505, Spring. The business offers individual and team training for children new to or advanced in baseball. The business was previously located at 16666 Kleinwood Drive, Spring. After 25 years of business in the area, Club Z! Tutoring and Test Prep Services of Spring and The Woodlands changed ownership effective Aug. 1 and is now owned by Spring resident Monique Spell, according to a July 31 announcement. The business offers in-home and online tutoring for students in subjects includ- ing math, reading and science, in addition to preparation services for the SAT, ACT and college admissions, among others. Private tutors can be provided for stu- dents residing in Spring, The Woodlands and Tomball areas. The business is also offering free online workshops geared for parents with students enrolled in remote learning options for the 2020-21 school year. 281-408-2977. www.tutors.clubztutoring.com/spring CLOSINGS 13 After six years in business, Brazilian Joe’s permanently closed its restaurant and food truck in late July. Three years after starting their food truck business, Brazilian Joe’s owners Jordan and Aline Fowell expanded their eatery into a brick-and-mortar restaurant in 2019 located at 19640 Kuykendahl Road, Spring. The business offered Brazilian-American fusion cuisine. 14 After less than a year in business, 713-269-8788. www.skbsa.com NEWOWNERSHIP Kiera’s Dance Boutique , located at 9803 Spring Cypress Road, Ste. 150, Spring, announced its permanent closure June 25. The boutique, which opened Aug. 15, 2019, offered a variety of cloth- ing and supplies geared toward dancers and gymnasts, including tights, leotards, yoga pants and other athletic wear. 15 Contender eSports announced the permanent closure of its Spring location at 9702 Spring Cypress Road, Ste. 114, on

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Fajita Pete’s

The K. Corleone ($10.95) includes roasted turkey, apple bacon, American cheese, Roma tomatoes, mayonnaise and spring lettuce on crusty Italian bread.

COURTESY FAJITA PETE’S

8 Center Court Pizza & Brew plans to open its second Spring location at 24345 Gosling Road, Ste. 100, by the end of 2020. The eatery’s menu features hand-tossed pizzas, pizza rolls, calzones, flatbread pizzas, sliders, pasta, wings and salads. The pizzeria will also feature a full bar with craft beer and an outdoor play- ground. www.centercourtpizza.com 9 Island Fin Poke Co. plans to open at 24345 Gosling Road, Ste. 120, Spring, in November. According to co-franchise owner Matt Gustafson, this is the first of three franchise locations he plans to open this fall in the North Houston area. The Hawaiian-style restaurant will allow patrons to create their own poke bowl by choosing from eight proteins, more than 25 toppings, housemade sauces and specialty mix-ins. 832-310-0261. www.islandfinpoke.com 10 Viva Jalisco Taqueria & Restaurant will open a location at 10800 Spring Cypress Road, Tomball. The restaurant is expected to open in mid-October and will offer authentic Mexican fare such as fajitas, carnitas and carne guisada, in addition to catering services. www.vivajaliscobar.com 11 Painted Tree Marketplace plans to open a boutique at 5407 FM 1960 W., Houston, later this fall. The business offers a unique shopping experience, as each marketplace showcases hundreds of local boutiques, decorators, artisans and crafters while also offering a variety of workshops. Shoppers will be able to peruse gifts, home decor, clothing, accessories, soaps and candles, among other items. 844-762-3342. www.paintedtreemarketplace.com

COURTESY TONY’S ITALIAN DELICATESSEN

FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON Tony’s Italian Delicatessen in Montgomery will open a second location near the intersection of Kuykendahl and West Rayford roads in Spring in late 2020, restaurant ocials announced via Facebook on Aug. 18. The announcement comes just a few weeks after restaurant ocials announced delivery service would be expanded to the Spring area, which began Aug. 25, as previously reported by Community Impact Newspaper. According to restaurant ocials, the new location will feature an in-store dining room, an outdoor patio and a drive-thru for pickups. Currently, Spring-area delivery is available within a 7-mile radius of the intersection of the Grand Parkway and Kuykendahl Road on Tuesday through Sunday from 10 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Delivery is available through third-party July 7. Owned by husband and wife Adam and Erin Berger, Contender eSports first opened its Spring location Oct. 26. The gaming center hosted individual gaming, tournaments and lock-ins and also had a private room for birthday parties and team-building events. 16 Sur La Table permanently closed its store located at 5472 FM 1960 W., Houston, in August. The kitchen-centric

apps including Uber Eats, Grub Hub, Postmates, Waitr and ChowNow. In addition to hot sandwiches, stromboli and fresh salads, the sandwich shop is known for its signature subs named after famous Italians, ranging from the F. Sinatra and the A. Pacino to the Sophia Loren and the R. DeNiro. Homemade Italian desserts, such as tiramisu and cannoli, are also available. Orders can be placed for curbside pickup and delivery by phone or online. 832-319-4414. www.tonysitaliandelicatessen.com

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business offered a wide range of cook- ware, bakeware, kitchen tools, knives and small appliances, in addition to hosting cooking classes. 17 J . Jill permanently closed its loca- tion at 5454 FM 1960 W., Houston, on July 20. The women’s boutique offered clothing, shoes and accessories with collections including Pure Jill, Wearever, Fit and Christian Siriano.

Ages 18 months to 5 years 281-370-5001

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SPRING - KLEIN EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES FM1960 study outlines possible futuremobility projects

COMPILED BY KELLY SCHAFLER & HANNAH ZEDAKER

RECENTLY COMPLETED

The Texas Department of Trans- portation has outlined multiple projects for FM 1960 between I-45 in Spring and Hwy. 59 in Humble that could improve mobility and reduce crashes along the corridor. Mobility data shows 49,537 cars travel the corridor between I-45 and Hwy. 59 daily, according to the Texas A&M Transportation Institute’s annual list of the most congested roads in the state, which was released last December. TxDOT hosted a virtual public meeting Aug. 24-Sept. 8 to gauge feedback on the ongoing FM 1960 Access Management Study. The $750,000 study, which will be com- pleted in October, studies an 11-mile segment of FM 1960 between just east of I-45 at East Gatewick Road to east of Hwy. 59 in Humble at FM 1960 Business, according to TxDOT. Proposed improvements outlined in the preliminary study include short-, medium- and long-range improvements for the corridor, which, if all approved, could cost $88.8 million. TxDOT Public Information Ocer Danny Perez said via email the proposed improvements will be rened based on public comments and suggestions from the meeting. “After [the study is complete], funding will be identied for the implementation of the short-range improvements, which usually are the projects with low-cost and high impacts; and expected to be completed within ve years,” Perez said. “Further studies will be required for the medium/long-range improvements.”

49,537 vehicles travel daily between I-45 and Hwy. 59

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Hwy. 249 ramp reversal The Texas Department of Transporta- tion’s project to ease congestion along Hwy. 249 by reversing northbound entrance and exit ramps between Jones and Spring Cypress roads nished in mid-September, TxDOT Public Information Ocer Danny Perez said. Poor weather delayed the proj- ect’s original mid-July completion date. Timeline: April 20-mid-September Cost: $2.6 million Funding source: TxDOT

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Some short-range improvements outlined in the preliminary study include upgrading trac signal tim- ing; installing continuous lighting; and adding bike lanes, sidewalks and additional drainage along the FM 1960 corridor. Another short-range project could transform the corridor’s continuous center turn lane into a raised median with access points to businesses and side streets, according to the study. The project could cost almost $6.25 million to complete. Medium- and long-range improve- ments could include consolidating business driveways, improving side street approaches and constructing innovative intersection interchanges, per the study. In addition to proposed projects— which have not been funded and do not have a timeline associated with them—the study also includes planned projects for the corridor that have already been approved and FM 1960 Access Management Study Timeline: June 2019-October 2020 Cost: $750,000 Funding source: Texas Department of Transportation

FM 1960 BUSINESS

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funded by TxDOT. Planned projects for FM 1960 include improving the trac signals at Hwy. 59 and Treaschwig Road and implementing access management improvements along the corridor, according to the study. TxDOT is also improving the trac signal at Butte Road and FM 1960 just west of I-45, according to TxDOT’s website. SOURCES: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, TEXAS A&M TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER Estimated cost: $6.25 million Add bicycle lanes and markings Estimated cost: $1.5 million Construct sidewalks Estimated cost: $1.58 million POTENTIAL PROJECTS The preliminary study includes proposed projects that have not been funded and do not yet have timelines. Here are several short-term projects along the corridor. Install raised medians

ONGOING PROJECT

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF SEPT. 14. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SKLNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. Beltway 8 improvements Work continues on the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Phase 2E project to improve intersections and trac signals along the Beltway 8 frontage road between West Gulf Bank Road and TC Jester Boulevard. The project is on track to be completed by March 2022, according to Harris County Precinct 4. Timeline: Aug. 13, 2019-March 2022 Cost: $3 million Funding sources: Harris County Precinct 4, TxDOT

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

ENVIRONMENT Flood control officials roll out new project strategy for Cypress Creek

After several years of acquiring land along Cypress Creek, officials with the Harris County Flood Control District said they are now looking into where detention basins could be built to provide additional flood-control benefits. DELIVERING DETENTION

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

Hurricane Harvey, a little under $300 million in local money was dedicated to projects in the Cypress Creek watershed. The biggest portion—$100 million—was dedi- cated to land acquisition, while the next three largest funding areas were creek maintenance, home buyouts and drainage, which netted $60 million, $47 million and $34 million, respectively. St. Romain said the new approach involves using that land for additional flood-control measures—detention basins and channel improvements— that could provide regional benefits on a shorter timeline. A watershed study updated in February found flooding along Cypress Creek tributaries was predom- inately caused by stormwater backing up from the creek. This, St. Romain said, indicates that stormwater detention basins on the creek could be a viable way to reduce that flooding. “The watershed master plan update is sort of the starting point for this implementation plan,” he said. “The implementation plan transitions us from this more passive approach of

Planned detention basin Proposed detention basin

1 Mound Creek 2 Dry Creek 3 Faulkey Gully

4 Pillot Gully 5 Dry Gully 6 Spring Gully

7 Seals Gully 8 Lemm Gully

A historically passive approach to flood mitigation along Cypress Creek could be changing as officials with the Harris County Flood Control District look to adopt a new way of planning and executing projects. At its core, the Cypress Creek Implementation Program is a watershed-wide approach to planning projects and carrying out projects that are already underway, said Jonathan St. Romain, a project manager with the district. A similar approach is being taken in several other watersheds where projects are underway, he said, including Cedar Bayou and Halls Bayou. “Before the bond program, we would tackle things at an individual project level,” St. Romain said. “Now we’re trying to take a more holistic approach. That helps with efficiency, to look at things with a broader view.” In the past, efforts in Cypress Creek were mostly focused on acquiring land to prevent devel- opment, St. Romain said. In a flood-control bond referendum passed in 2018 in response to

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structures removed from the flood plain over 15 years.

other basin sites are being investigated between Hwy. 249 and I-45.

SOURCE: HARRIS COUNTY FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

flood plain preservation to a more aggressive approach to actually try to reduce the severity of flooding.” Only one new basin has been officially approved so far and is still in the early stages, St. Romain said, but more are likely to be launched. A 171.5-acre basin is in the planning phase at TC Jester Boulevard and Cypress Creek, and another potential basin is being investigated east of the Hardy Toll Road, he said. The district is awaiting the results of the grant application before deciding whether to move forward on the latter basin, St. Romain said. Two other specific sites had their own investigations funded with

2018 bond money: one new basin at Cypress Creek and Stuebner Airline Road and one existing basin that could be expanded at Cypress Creek and North Eldridge Parkway. Both projects were recommended for funding in the February tributary study. “We look at all of the potential properties up along Cypress Creek and essentially develop or build this road- map for what we can do in the Cypress Creek watershed over the next five, 10, 15 years,” St. Romain said. The TC Jester basin and potential future basins will likely be funded through a mix of flood-control district dollars and federal grants, St. Romain said.

THE IMPLEMENTATIONPLAN TRANSITIONS US FROMTHISMORE PASSIVE APPROACH OF FLOODPLAINPRESERVATION TOAMORE AGGRESSIVE APPROACH TOACTUALLY TRY TO REDUCE THE SEVERITYOF FLOODING. JONATHAN ST. ROMAIN, A PROJECT MANAGER WITH THE HARRIS COUNTY FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT

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SPRING - KLEIN EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

SEEING A PRIMARY CARE DOCTOR Is Still Important

For everything from annual checkups to managing chronic conditions, taking care of your health should always be a priority. Houston Methodist primary care doctors are still available to provide personalized care for you and your family — safely. We offer a variety of convenient ways to get care from us, from same-day sick visits to extended hours at select locations. And, you can be confident that we are taking every necessary precaution to keep you safe during your visit, including:

Screening all patients, and seeing COVID-19 patients virtually only — allowing us to treat everyone safely

Ensuring social distancing in waiting rooms

Offering video visits with your doctor

Wearing masks while providing care

Adding evening and Saturday hours to space out appointments

Enhanced cleaning of equipment and surfaces

houstonmethodist.org/pcg Call or text: 713.394.6724

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

NEWS BRIEFS

News from the Spring & Klein area

Lone Star College-University Park delays construction of performing arts center

Visual and Performing Arts Center

L

BY ANDY LI

Ardalan said the new construction plan will be approved by the board of trustees in the spring, with construc- tion planned to last about 18 months. He said the building is expected to be open by fall 2022. Jonathan Anderson, the college’s dean of arts and humanities, said the approximately 30,000-square-foot facility will feature a 338-seat main- stage theater, a band hall, a 100-seat black box theater and an art gallery. Anderson said the building will not only provide a place for instruc- tion and performance for the more than 1,000 students enrolled in the programs, but it will also act as a gateway for the Spring community.

249

Lone Star College-University Park has delayed the construction of the $21.67 million Visual and Performing Arts Center until 2021, according to campus ocials. Construction was originally set to begin May 2018 and end summer 2021, ocials said. LSCUniversity Park President Shah Ardalan said the delay is due in part to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic as well as the $60 million the college system spent to repair facilities following Hurricane Harvey. The project was part of Lone Star College System’s $485 million bond referendum, which was approved by voters in 2014.

N

SOURCE: LONE STAR COLLEGE SYSTEM COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

REAL . LOCAL . SAVINGS .

“This really gives us an oppor- tunity to really get out into that community and bring that visibility back to our campus,” Anderson said. Anderson said LSC has collabo- rated with local school districts to allow students to perform in the new facility. He said this creates an opportunity for the campus to recruit prospective students in the area.

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Harris County ESDNo. 11 terminates contract with Cypress Creek EMS

BY ANDY LI

CCEMS Chief Operating Ocer Wren Nealy said in an emailed statement that ESD No. 11 has said it intended to keep CCEMS as its emergency services provider despite ongoing disagreements. “Today’s vote is disappointing and shocking to everyone here,” Nealy said via email. “The reality is ESD 11’s attempts to replace the services we provide at our level of expertise is just not possible.” Harris County is in a legal ght over mail ballots for the Nov. 3 election. Here is what is known: Texas is one of seven states that does not allow all registered voters to vote by mail ballot. Nearly 400,000 mail ballot applications were sent to registered voters age 65 and older before the July runo election. About 80,000 people voted by mail in the July election. BALLOT BRAWL

decision in public session. Prior to the vote, ESD No. 11 board Assistant Treasurer Kevin Brost criticized the CCEMS board after receiving pages of requested nancial documents from the entity. “We need this to nd out where the tax money and everything else has gone, but just because we get a big document dump and go through this doesn’t mean all the problems are xed,” he said.

After months of disagreements, Harris County Emergency Services District No. 11 voted Sept. 3 to terminate its contract with Cypress Creek Emergency Medical Services early. After an executive session, the district’s commissioners voted to give CCEMS 360 days’ notice of the termination of the contract. The commissioners did not discuss the

713-224-3426 1403 Spring Cypress Rd Spring

Harris County halted again overmail ballots

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

its plans until the state district judge gave his ruling. The district judge ruled Sept. 11 that the county could move forward with mail ballots, but Paxton quickly led an appeal. In a Sept. 12 statement, Paxton said he led an appeal with the 14th Court of Appeals in Houston to halt the county’s applications. “I strongly commend the Texas Supreme Court for stopping the Harris County clerk from sending millions of mail-in ballot applica- tions, which would create voter confusion and jeopardize the integ- rity and security of our elections,” Paxton said in a Sept. 15 statement. In a Sept. 15 tweet, Hollins said applications had already been sent to voters age 65 and older.

A state district judge gave Harris County election ocials the go-ahead to send mail ballot applications to all registered voters Sept. 11, but on Sept. 15 the Texas Supreme Court ordered the county to stop sending mail ballot applications, according to court documents. The county clerk’s oce rst announced its plans to send mail ballots to all registered voters on Aug. 25. Soon after, the secretary of state’s oce sent Harris County Clerk Christopher Hollins a letter ordering those plans to be halted. By Aug. 31, Attorney General Ken Paxton’s oce led a lawsuit, and the Texas Supreme Court temporarily blocked the county from carrying out

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“My oce is prepared to send applications and educational mate- rials to remaining registered voters at the conclusion of this baseless litigation,” he said. Kelly Schaer contributed to this report.

11

SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER IS PROUD TO SAY THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS

2020 PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

K L E I N I S D  S P R I N G I S D  C Y  FA I R I S D S N A P S H O T DISTRICT DATA COMPILED BY HANNAH ZEDAKER While Klein and Cy-Fair ISDs continue to have increasing student enrollments, Spring ISD’s student enrollment has decreased over the past several years and is projected to continue to do so over the next decade. SISD also has the largest percentage of economically disadvantaged students and English language learners of the three. SOURCES: CYFAIR ISD, KLEIN ISD, MAGNOLIA ISD, SPRING ISD, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY, TOMBALL ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER 2020 PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION

201920 TEACHER STATS TOTAL NUMBER OF TEACHERS*

STUDENT ENROLLMENT

201920SUPERINTENDENT ANNUAL SALARY

NEIGHBORING DISTRICT COMPARISON

*INCLUDES FULLTIME EQUIVALENT STAFF AND PARTTIME EMPLOYEES

3,530.50 2,157.15 7,375.24

Tomball ISD: 1,082.89 Magnolia ISD: 856.03 NEIGHBORING DISTRICT COMPARISON

RETENTION RATE

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20 2020-21* *PROJECTED ENROLLMENT

86%**

90%**

84%

NEIGHBORING DISTRICT COMPARISON

FROM 201617 +4.4% -3.6% +3.2%

TOMBALL ISD 88.52%

MAGNOLIA ISD 80%**

**201819 RETENTION RATE

201920 ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS

201920 ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS

$55,500 $54,000 $55,550 STARTING TEACHER SALARY

45.59%

16.95%

Tomball ISD: $56,000 Magnolia ISD: $54,000 NEIGHBORING DISTRICT COMPARISON SCHOOL DISTRICT STATS TOTAL NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES 7,177.81 FUNDING PER STUDENT $8,778

82.61%

27.93%

54.18%

13.88%

60.24%

20.26%

STATE AVERAGE

STATE AVERAGE

HOWMUCH DO HOMEOWNERS PAY IN SCHOOL TAXES? This chart displays the amount of school district taxes the average homeowner has paid annually over the last four years based on the median home value in the district. FIGURING OUT THE FORMULA AMOUNT PAID = (Home value ÷ 100) x tax rate 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20

SCHOOL BOND UPDATES

NEW SCHOOL UPDATES

2015

FOX ELEMENTARY 4800 Port Aegean Drive, Spring Opened: September DEKANEY NINTHGRADE CENTER 22351 Imperial Valley Drive, Spring Opened: September SPRING NINTHGRADE CENTER 19640 Lockridge Drive, Spring Opened: September WESTFIELD NINTHGRADE CENTER 1500 Southridge Road, Houston Opened: September

$498.1 MILLION • Four new campuses • Expansions at nine existing campuses

$100K $150K $200K $250K $0 $300K

$3,035.49

$3,096.84

2016

$330 MILLION • Spring ISD stadium replacement • Three new ninth-grade centers

$2,748.41

$2,584

$1,875.04

$1,535.28

2019

TAX RATE PER $100 VALUATION

$1.43 $1.47 $1.44

$1.43 $1.51 $1.44

$1.43 $1.51 $1.44

$1.36 $1.43 $1.37

$1.76 BILLION • Two new campuses • Districtwide performing arts center

NOTE: THIS CHART DOES NOT ACCOUNT FOR HOMESTEAD EXEMPTIONS.

13

SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

NOW ENROLLING FOR FALL VIRTUAL LEARNING Imagine Early Education and Childcare is hosting School Age Virtual Learning this fall! Our Educators will guide, mentor, and coach your student as they navigate through online learning.

• Music & media • Science • Dramatic play • Theatre • Library

• Garden • Cooking • Bowling • Art • Gym

S.T.E.A.M CURRICULUM

OPENING SOON NOW ENROLLING, VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR DETAILS Imagine Early Education & Childcare Gleannloch offers the highest quality care for children ages 6 weeks to 12 years old 8901 Spring Cypress Rd. • Spring, TX 77379 ImagineChild.com • (833) 742-4453 Gleannloch Forest Dr.

Contact Us: gleannloch@imaginechild.com • Job Opportunities: employment@imaginechild.com

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all activities outdoor

social distancing observed

6th Annual Cactus Jack’s Campfire

Saturday, October 3, 2020 • 4:30 - 6:30 PM • Family Fun For All Tomball vfw hall post 2427 • 14408 Alice Road • Tomball, TX • 77375

www.cactusjackscampfire.com

Live Music • Dinner Tickets Available Online & At The Door • Suggested BBQ Dinner Ticket Donation Of $5.00 Veterans & Seniors Eat For Free Children (12 & Under) Eat For Free Children’s Activities Petting zoo • S’Mores Station • Armadillo races • longhorns • Coloring area

Pd. For By The Committee to Support R. Jack Cagle Campaign

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION Pandemic leads parents to explore alternatives to public education

Religious private schools in the Spring and Klein area are experiencing an increase in interest from parents, according to local school ocials. Ocials tout small class sizes that more easily enable them to enforce social distancing guidelines. For more information about home schooling, visit www.thsc.org. SOURCES: FRASSATI CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL, NORTHLAND CHRISTIAN SCHOOL, PROVIDENCE CLASSICAL SCHOOLCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER Exploring ALTERNATIVES

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

To serve the needs of those fam- ilies who prefer in-person learning, Frassati Catholic High School and Northland Christian School are oering in-person and synchro- nous, or real-time, remote learning options in the 2020-21 school year. Both schools began in-person instruction Aug. 12. “We’ve outtted each of our class- rooms with webcams so students who are participating in remote learning will still be active in the class with stu- dents who are there in person—they’ll just be interacting via Google Meet,” said Timothy Lienhard, director of communications and marketing for Frassati Catholic High School. At Providence Classical School— with the exception of students who have health concerns within their family—all students began in-person learning Aug. 24, Headmaster Richard Halloran said. “We are condent that due to our campus facilities with classrooms that open directly to the outside with windows and doors that let in fresh air, coupled with our enhanced clean- ing procedures, physical distancing measures and our naturally small class sizes, we will be able to successfully hold in-person learning,” he said. Halloran said Providence Classical School has also decreased its max class size for most grade levels from 16 to 13 students. Likewise, ocials with Northland Christian School and Frassati Catholic High School have identied specic classroom capaci- ties that allow for social distancing.

As the 2020-21 school year is fast approaching for some, while already having started for others, more parents are turning to public school alternatives due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. As they are the only schools exempt fromHarris County’s public health recommendation, which suggested all public and nonreligious private schools to remain closed for in-person instruction until at least Sept. 8, religious private schools in the Spring and Klein area are experiencing an uptick in interest from families. “We’ve had parents call because they don’t have the option of staying home with their kids any longer,” said Elizabeth Chavez, director of special projects, grants, foundation and busi- ness relations at Northland Christian School. “One couple called and said if they couldn’t nd a school that was open [for in-person learning] for their child, one of the adults was going to have to quit their job.” This year, KISD projected its enrollment to increase by only two students from the 2019-20 school year, while SISD’s enrollment is projected to increase by 50 students in 2020-21. Additionally, CFISD’s enrollment is projected to increase by 1,052 students this school year. Broader interest in distance learning options is continuing into the 2020-21 school year as roughly two-thirds of SISD students have opted for remote learning, compared with 50% of KISD students and 54% of CFISD students.

99 TOLL

1960

S R

SYLVANFIELD DR.

E R R D .

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Frassati Catholic High School 2019-20 enrollment: 300 Grades: 9-12 2020-21 maximum class size: 24-25 students

Northland Christian School 2019-20 enrollment: 550 Grades: pre-K-12 2020-21 maximum class size: 13 students

Providence Classical School 2019-20 enrollment: 450 Grades: pre-K-12 2020-21 maximum class size: dependent upon classroom

The home-school route When private school is not an option, more families are turning to home schooling. According to Stephen Howsley, a public policy analyst with the Texas Home School Coalition, the organi- zation has experienced a surge in interest from families across the state as more parents are withdrawing stu- dents from public school. THSC pro- cessed 201 withdrawals in July 2019; in July 2020, the entity processed 3,114—almost as many withdrawals as were processed in all of 2019. “We’ve seen a huge, huge increase,” Howsley said. “I think a lot of parents were just concerned about their chil- dren’s health and safety, and also, a lot of the parents were not excited by the [Texas Education Agency] guidelines.” To keep up with this surge, Howsley

said THSC recently launched a more user-friendly website and has been putting extra eort into contacting new home-school families and connecting themwith local support groups. THSC has also established a mentoring program between veteran and new home-school families to expand its bandwidth. “Home-schooling has changed so much—and home-school groups and co-ops have grown so much—over the past 30 years that there are a lot of ways you can make it similar to a traditional school,” he said. To further enhance student inclu- sion, Howley said THSC is pushing for public policy changes at the state level to allow home-school students to participate in University Interscholas- tic League-sanctioned extracurricular activities and sports.

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SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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