Phoenix-Chandler-March 2020

CHANDLER EDITION

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 8  MARCH 26APRIL 29, 2020

ONLINE AT

CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

rising cost of recycling City urges residents to 'recycle right' in order to reduce contamination, cost

Due to the fast-changing nature of coronavirus in the region, readers should visit communityimpact.com to nd the latest coverage on announcements, case numbers, school closures and more.

INSIDE

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CITY& COUNTY IMPACTS

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Workers sort recycled materials from residents at United Fibers in Chandler. (Alexa D'Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

PUBLIC ART GUIDE

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Chandler police, re departments benet fromnew training center

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

ring range for police ocers. The cost of the facility has been about $23.9 million to date, with taxpayers footing $18.8million of that bill in pub- lic safety bonds. Other funding came from the sale of a police department building, and the land the center sits on was gifted to the city by Intel. Chandler Police Sgt. Dan Greene said the training facility has been a “bless- ing” for the department. “This is one-of-a-kind training for most of the police departments in the East Valley,” Greene said. “All pub- lic safety over the last 10 years have really been working hard at making training more realistic. When we get

The city of Chandler is nearing com- pletion on the second phase of its Pub- lic Safety Training Center this spring—a rst-of-its-kind facility in Chandler that oers training opportunities to both police ocers and reghters. The complex, which is tucked away on Dobson Road, is nearly fully oper- ational and will serve the police and re departments as they train their employees. The facility rst opened in August 2018, with the classroom and audito- rium building that serves both depart- ments. The second phase includes a multipurpose building for the re department and a state-of-the-art

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

OUR COMMITMENT TO READERS

PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett PUBLISHERPHOENIXMETRO Amy Ellsworth, aellsworth@communityimpact.com EDITORIAL EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Lanane MANAGING EDITOR Krista Wadsworth EDITOR Alexa D’Angelo STAFFWRITER Tom Blodgett COPY CHIEF Andy Comer COPY EDITORS Ben Dickerson, Kasey Salisbury ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Michelle Johnson DESIGN CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway GRAPHIC DESIGNER Damien Hernandez STAFF DESIGNER Isabella Short BUSINESS GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Claire Love ABOUT US John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. CONTACT US 610 N. Gilbert Road, Ste. 205 Gilbert, AZ 85234 • 4804824880 PRESS RELEASES chnnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

FROMAMY: We know that each of you has been aected by the decisions related to the coronavirus over the past few weeks. As your local source for trusted news, our writers have worked hard to ensure we are providing you news that is factual, as information is rapidly being released and is regularly changing. Our readers expect us to uphold our mission to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses. To this end, we remain committed to in-depth coverage of hyperlocal news. That is why in this and future editions, even as we face breaking news, you will continue to receive in your mailbox a high-quality print edition with useful, local content. As we navigate ever-evolving direction from the government regarding our daily activities—from school schedules to event cancellations and more—we pledge to continue helping the community to stay connected and support one another. It is our hope that as we move forward, you will continue to support your fellow residents and local businesses. Right now, the environment is uid, and our local entrepreneurs are making plans on how best to meet the needs of residents. We appreciate your loyal readership of this print product and our continually updated website, communityimpact.com. I also want to extend a special thank you to the local advertising partners who fund our ability to provide this important resource that is delivered to your mailbox.

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 6

The latest on road closures EDUCATION BRIEFS The latest school news CITY& COUNTY

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The latest local news GUIDE

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A non-comprehensive guide to Chandler's public art BUSINESS FEATURE

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d'Vine Gourmet DINING FEATURE

Amy Ellsworth, PUBLISHER

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Shimogamo Japanese Restaurant REAL ESTATE

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CORRECTION: Volume 1, Issue 7 The graphic on Page 12 in the story about the Chandler airport master plan incorrectly identied the location of a potential runway extension. It would be on the northeast portion of the runway. The graphic on Page 14 incorrectly identied Keap.

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CHANDLER EDITION • MARCH 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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Big Air Trampoline Park

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ALEXA D'ANGELO/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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Corridor, at 3133 W. Frye Road, Chan- dler, according to city officials. Clarivate expects to employ about 150 people. The Chandler office will be one of three new Centers of Excellence for Clarivate, with the other locations in London and Malaysia, according to the city. The op- eration in Chandler will include divisions from finance, administration, sales and customer service, along with several ex- ecutive positions. https://clarivate.com 5 Shinme Sushi , a Japanese restaurant serving sushi, will open soon in Chandler at 3020 S. Gilbert Road in Chandler. It has not been announced when the restaurant expects to open. The restau- rant had no website or social media pres- ence at the time of print deadline. 6 WellSky , a health care software solutions company, inked a deal to move into part of the third floor in the office building at the New Square develop- ment in downtown Chandler. It is not yet known when the business will move in to the development. https://wellsky.com 7 Banner Ocotillo Medical Center is set to open in Chandler at the end of 2020. The medical center is situated on an 18- acre campus, located on the southeast corner of Alma School Road and Loop 202 Santan Freeway. The medical center is currently hiring for new positions according to the Banner website. www.bannerhealth.com 8 lazaderm az , a medical spa in Chan- dler, will soon open a location in down- town Ocotillo. The business will offer a range of services at the new location at 2551 W. Queen Creek Road. It is not yet known when the business will open. 480-573-7546.

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NOWOPEN 1 Great Western Bank is now operat- ing out of Chandler’s latest addition to downtown—the New Square develop- ment. The business is occupying office space on the second floor and operating a branch on the bottom level of one of the new structures intended for both office and retail use. The bank opened Feb. 24 and is located at 180 S. Arizona Ave., Ste. 108.

COMING SOON 3 Big Air Trampoline Park , an indoor trampoline park, anticipated opening in Chandler. The location will be at 2840 S. Alma School Road. Big Air Trampoline Park is known for its locations in Califor- nia. 619-347-1886. www.bigairusa.com 4 Clarivate Analytics, a data and analytics company , signed a lease at Chandler Viridian, located in the Price

480-732-0732. www.greatwesternbank.com/locations/ az/chandler 2 The Taco Spot opened in Chandler in late January. The restaurant serving tacos and other Mexican dishes including burritos is located at 698 E. Chandler Blvd., Ste. B. The restaurant also serves burgers and fries and combination plates. 480-917-7883. https://thetacospotaz.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

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DC Steakhouse

Civic Market

ALEXA D'ANGELO/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

ALEXA D'ANGELO/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

RELOCATIONS 9 DC Steakhouse will close its long- time location in downtown's historic square and move to its new location in the New Square development, the new- est development in downtown Chandler. The new building offers an expanded space for the Chandler restaurant and a large, wrap-around patio. 480-899-4400.

https://www.facebook.com/Civic- Market-304090950463319/

Jeremiah's Italian Ice is set to open at the end of April. (Courtesy Jeremiah's Italian Ice)

11 Phoenix ER & Medical Hospital celebrates its one-year anniversary in Chandler in March. The emergency room and medical hospital offers imaging and lab services and outpatient services. The business intends to have a ribbon cutting celebration with the Chandler Chamber of Commerce to mark its one-year anni- versary in Chandler. 480-284-5867. www.PhoenixERhospital.com CLOSINGS 12 Zoe’s Kitchen , a restaurant serving sandwiches and Mediterranean cuisine, recently closed in Chandler. The location was at 2985 S. Alma School Road. https://zoeskitchen.com

FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON Jeremiah’s Italian Ice , an Italian ice business that began in Florida, is expanding into Chandler this spring. The business is expected to open in late April and planned to celebrate a grand opening in May. Jeremiah's Italian Ice oers soft ice cream; Italian ice; and The Gelati, a combination of ice cream and Italian ice. Jeremiah’s Italian Ice will occupy the space adjacent to Black Rock Coee at 4050 S. Alma School Road. 480-782-0211. www.jeremiahsice.com

www.dc-steakhouse.com ANNIVERSARIES

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10 Civic Market celebrates its one-year anniversary in downtown Chandler in March. The business, which serves food, beverages and coffee, is also home to a hair salon. The business is located at 201 S. Washington St. 480-621-8005.

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CHANDLER EDITION • MARCH 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES House Bill 2899 proposes doubling

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

ONGOING PROJECTS

tax people,” Sellers said. “The bill is saying, ‘Let’s make people pay for what they are using.’” The bill was proposed by state Rep. Noel Campbell, RPrescott, who represents District 1. According to the Arizona Legislature website, the bill passed out of the House Rules Com- mittee on Feb. 20. In order to pass, the bill would need to be approved by both chambers of the Legislature and signed into law by the governor. Sellers said a user fee is going to be necessary to maintain the existing infrastructure in Arizona. “People 20 years ago put together a great plan; that’s why we are better than most metropolitan areas today,” Sellers said. “But we are growing at 200 people per day; if we don’t have a plan for the next 20 years, it could impact the quality of life we see in Arizona.” GAS TAX PLAN Current rate: $0.18 Proposed rate in July: $0.24 Increase annually until 2023: $0.06 SOURCE: HOUSE BILL 2899COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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existing gas tax A bill in the Arizona Legislature proposes doubling the current gas tax in the state to help pay for infrastruc- ture maintenance on the state’s roads and highways. The bill, House Bill 2899, would increase the existing gas tax of $0.18 per gallon to $0.36 over the course of three scal years, according to the text of the bill. Arizona gas taxes were last increased in 1991. The bill would add $0.06 to the current $0.18 per gallon eective on July 1 of this year and it would go up another $0.06 a year until July 2023. The bill unanimously passed the House Transportation Committee. Maricopa County Supervisor Jack Sellers, who served on the Arizona State Transportation Board for six years, said he sees the tax as more of a “user fee.” “I don’t like to see government

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Loop 101 widening The Arizona Department of Trans- portation is widening Loop 101 by adding a travel lane in each direction on a stretch of the freeway through Chandler, Mesa and Tempe. Status: The northbound o-ramp at Baseline Road will remain closed until 5 a.m. April 16. In addition, the north- bound on-ramp at Warner Road and o-ramp at Elliot Road will reopen March 26. Timeline: May 2019-summer 2020 Cost: $76 million Funding sources: half-cent sales tax, federal highway funds

Queen Creek Road improvements Queen Creek Road between McQueen and Gilbert roads will be widened to six lanes and include raised medians. Status: In the week of March 6, crews began reconstructing the intersection of Queen Creek Road and Emmett Drive. This involved preparing the subsurface of the road, paving back the area and also constructing a concrete valley gutter across Emmett Drive on the north side of Queen Creek Road. The work took about 10 days. Timeline: March 2019-August 2020 Cost: $17.25 million Funding source: city of Chandler

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MARCH 13. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT CHNNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

News from Chandler USD, Mesa Public Schools, Gilbert Public Schools

EDUCATION BRIEFS

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE Readers should visit communityimpact.com to nd the latest coverage on how the coronavirus is aecting Chandler schools. “We have a lot of money invested in the furniture at our schools.” MESA PUBLIC SCHOOLS The school district announced at a Feb. 25 meeting that there will be a meet the candidates event and livestream for superintendent candidates April 6, with a goal of announcing a superintendent appointment at a meeting April 14. GILBERT PUBLIC SCHOOLS The board approved Feb. 25 an increase in fees for the rental of district facilities. In most cases, the increase is 5%. Chandler USD board April 8, April 22, 7 p.m. 1525 W. Frye Road, Chandler 480-812-7000 • www.cusd80.com Gilbert Public Schools board March 31, April 7, April 28, 6:30 p.m. 140 S. Gilbert Road, Gilbert 480-497-3300 www.gilbertschools.net Kyrene School District board March 31, April 14, April 28, 7 p.m. 8700 S. Kyrene Road, Tempe 480-541-1000 • www.kyrene.org Mesa Public Schools board April 14, April 28, 5 p.m. 549 N. Stapley Drive, Mesa 480-472-0000 • www.mpsaz.org Tempe Union High School District board March 25, April 8, April 22, 7 p.m. 500. W. Guadalupe Road, Tempe 480-839-0292 • www.tempeunion.org MEETINGSWE COVER

Chandler USDboard approves Weinberg School renovations

Chandler USD to have new internet services provider with Cox CHANDLERUSD The Chandler governing board approved Feb. 26 an agreement with Cox to provide internet services to the district, eec- tively changing the district’s internet provider. The contract includes wide area network and internet services in an amount of $441,900 per year, according to the documents attached to the board agenda. This is a one-year contract with up to four additional one-year contracts, according to the district. The district had previously received internet services from Century Link, but ocials determined Cox would be the most cost-eective provider after receiving proposals frommultiple internet providers. The board approved the item unanimously. at Ocotillo Road and 148th Street in Gilbert, servicing students in Gilbert and Chandler, and is expected to open for the 2020-21 school year. CUSDOFFICE, CLASSROOM FURNITURE PURCHASES $367,964.64

Chandler USDboard approves purchase of newschool furniture include: a full replacement of the re sprinkler system; demolition of existing ceilings and exterior sots; paint, drywall demolition and replacement as necessary; procurement of interior and exte- rior lighting xtures; construction of a Sally-Port; daily cleanup CHANDLER USD At a meeting Feb. 26, the Chandler USD governing board approved the purchase of classroom and oce furniture for the district’s new elementary school in Gilbert. The board approved $367,964.64 for classroom furniture at Bob Rice Elementary School and $91,656.21 for oce furniture, totaling $459,620.85, according to board records. CHANDLER USD The governing board approved Feb. 26 a $1.1 million contract to begin renova- tions at Weinberg School, which will transition to Weinberg Gifted Academy next academic year. The scope of work will be completed in two phases, accord- ing to Assistant Superintendent Frank Fletcher during the Feb. 26 governing board meeting, in order to minimize disruption on the campus during construction. The rst phase of work will

and site preparation for next day operation; and night and weekend work. The second phase is scheduled to nish by winter 2020, according to ocials. According to documents attached to the governing board agenda, the rst phase includes 15 classrooms, the media center and the current oce wing. The anticipated construction schedule is March 9 to July 14.

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The school will take on students from the existing Weinberg Ele- mentary School and students from nearby schools experiencing over- crowding. The school is being built by McCarthy Building Companies and will serve kindergarten through sixth-grade students with a capacity of about 800 students, according to the district. The $23 million school will include a gym/multipurpose room, a media center, classrooms and adminis- trative space in 93,000 square feet, according to the district. The new school will be located

for classroom furniture at Bob Rice Elementary School $91,656.21 for oce furniture TOTALING $459,620.85

SOURCE: CHANDLER USDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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CHANDLER EDITION • MARCH 2020

CITY& COUNTY

News from the city of Chandler

Chandler ocials encourage residents to participate in census

CITY HIGHLIGHTS CHANDLER City Council authorized a resolution renaming a segment of Ryan Road between Gilbert Road and Emmett Drive to Insight Way. Insight Enterprises announced in November the company was moving to Chandler. CHANDLER Council approved an agreement with Parsus Solution LLC for the business registration and specialty license web portal, increasing the existing spending limit by $100,000, for a revised amount not to exceed $332,390.62. CHANDLER The council approved a professional services agreement with Aztec Engineering Group Inc. for the concept development and trac study of the Kyrene Road improvements, from Chandler Boulevard to Loop 2020, in an amount not to exceed $207,456. CHANDLER Chandler voters passed an amendment to the city’s charter that will move up the date of the August primary to the rst Tuesday of the month. The all-mail election had a 23.77% turnout with 92% of voters voting yes on the charter amendment proposition, according to nal results from the Maricopa County Recorder. Chandler City Council April 9, 23, 6 p.m. 88 E. Chicago St., Chandler 480-782-2181 • www.chandleraz.gov MEETINGSWE COVER CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE Readers should visit communityimpact.com to nd the latest coverage on how the coronavirus is aecting city of Chandler services, events and programs.

CENSUS BY THE NUMBERS

55 PROGRAMS

Census data helps with the allocation of federal funding

$2,959 EACH

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

everyone in the community,” Powell said. Chandler last had a census in 2015, a special census that was called for to account for a signicant increase in population. Chandler has partnered with other regional cities to promote partici- pation in the census in an initiative called iCount 2020, Powell said. Powell said this census is unique in that it is entirely digital for the rst time. For those who are not able to access the census digitally, they are able to call in their answers over the phone, Powell said. Mark Stewart, a City Council mem- ber, said it is important for people to understand that personal data from approved by the CIDA and then approved by council in February 2019. Those bonds were issued by Intel in 2019 for acquisition, construction, and equipping of industrial sewage and wastewater treatment facilities and solid waste disposal or recycling facilities as part of Intel’s semiconductor manufac- turing plant. The CIDA again received a request from Intel to issue additional tax-exempt bonds in an amount not to exceed $6 million. Intel will use the proceeds toward

CHANDLER Every decade, the U.S. counts every person living in the country to determine the number of congressional seats a state gets and to distribute billions of dollars in federal funds. Chandler city ocials and City Council members have spent months in the run-up to April 1, National Census Day, to engage with the community so they participate in the census. Leah Powell, neighborhood resources director for the city, said the goal of the census, from the city’s perspective, is to get everybody in the city counted. “What comes from the census, the resources and the funding, it impacts

for every person counted

EVERY 10 YEARS

since 1790

the census is not shared with other entities and that citizenship status is not a question on the census. “What we really need is to know what the average age is in Chandler,” Stewart said. “With that we can make sure as a city we are putting services and programs in places where it matters most. As a council, we use it to plan our budget and to make sure we understand our city’s vision and how we can act on that vision for the people who live here.” SOURCE: ICOUNT 2020COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER capital expenditures for certain environmental facilities. At the meeting, an Intel representative said the company is looking to return 100% of the water that it uses to the community by 2025. The city and the CIDA are a “conduit” for the issuance of the bonds and have no responsibility or liability when it comes to repayment, according to the city.

Council approves issuance of industrial development revenue bonds for Intel project

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

CHANDLER City Council approved a resolution Feb. 27 approving the issuance of industrial development revenue bonds from the city of Chandler industrial development authority in an aggregate principal amount not to exceed $6 million. According to Chandler city records, the Chandler Industrial Development Authority received an application from Intel Corp. requesting the city issue tax-exempt bonds in 2018 in an amount not to exceed $5 million. The request was

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GUIDE

COMPILED BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

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Areas with multiple art pieces

Chandler is home to more than 30 public art installations. This is a non-comprehensive guide to art in Chandler curated from the city of Chandler online virtual public art tour.

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1 DOWNTOWNCHANDLER “Turbulent Shade” is a stainless steel shade structure by Ned Kahn Studios completed in 2010 as part of the new Chandler City Hall. “FamilyMatters” is a sandstone, copper andmetal sculpture that was purchased in 2012 fromartist Russell Marohnic. “ThroughOne’s Eyes” is also a piece by Russell Marohnic, which was installed in 2000. “Split Personality” is a stone and steel sculpture completed in 2011 by Russell Marohnic. “Dr. A.J. Chandler and Frank Lloyd Wright” by artist Igor Zorkin is two bronze monuments dedicated to the friendship between Chandler andWright. “Kickin’ III” is an aluminum sculpture completed in 2013 by artist Gary Slater, a local Arizona artist. “Oracle of Victory” is a steel sculpture installed in 1999 by artist Lyle London, a Tempe-based artist. “Event Fence” is a decorativemetal fence by artist Joel Tyler. The fence surrounds a portion of the west side of Dr. A.J. Chandler Park. “Victor Hugo” is a wood, steel and stone sculpture by Arizona artist Geoffrey Gross, which was installed in 1998. “Rosales Family Fountain” was

different artists, including Susan Berzelius, Kathleen Escobedo, Steven Fitch, Alvin Pace and TedWolter. The project consists of handmade tiles on bench seating and art pedestals. It was installed in November 2011. “Desert Flower VII” was created by artist Gary Slater and was purchased in 1998. The sculpture is made of rustedmetal and mirrors. “5 C’s” represents five elements of Arizona history: cattle, citrus, climate, copper and cotton. Artist Joe Tyler created the metal sculpture for Chandler’s centennial celebration in 2012. “Monuments toUs” is amural installed by CamDeCaussin and Joey Salamon in 2020. Themural features images of Chandler’s roots closer to downtown Chandler’s historic square andmoves into iconic, contemporary buildings. “ToHonor and To Serve: Public Safety Memorial” bronze sculptures were created by artists Jesus and AdamRomo of Romo Sculpture Studios in Sacramento, California, and were installed in September 2009. “The Guardian” was created by Russell Bowers. The bronze sculpture was purchased in 1999 and consists of three figures as amonument to the work of the Chandler Police Department. 2 ARROWHEAD PARK “UseWaterWisely: ADesert Diamond” is a concrete andmosaic sculpture created

by Juanita Hull Carlson and purchased in 2007. 3 CHANDLERYMCA “Pima Pete” is a clay sculpture purchased in 1999 fromartist Rosemary Lonewolf. 4 CHANDLERMUSEUM “Party Crashers fromOuter Space” was created by Anne Coe. The city received the acrylic painting in 2005. 5 DESERT BREEZE PARK “Shortcut” is a bronze sculpture purchased in 1995 fromartist Jane DeDecker. “Las Brisas: Tree Ramada and Hummingbird Arch” was created by artist Joe Tyler. Themetal sculpture was purchased in 1997. “The Spirit of Service” was created by BJ Katz. The piece is made of meltdown glass and is ametal sculpture purchased in 2007. 6 TUMBLEWEEDPARK “The Seed” is a powder-coated aluminum sculpture created by artist Kevin Caron Mediumand commissioned inMay 2012. “Field of Dreams” is by artist Craig Cheply and was installed inMay 2012. Themural is a mixed-media artwork on a wood panel. “Wall withWaves” was the first major artwork commissioned by the Chandler Arts Commission in 1985 by artist James O’Hara.

commissioned in 2003 as a bronze sculpture by artist Emanuel Martinez to commemorate the pioneering family who settled in Chandler before 1910. “Morning at Saddle Canyon” is a landscape wall mural completed in 1990 by Arizona artist Merril Mahaffey. “Roosevelt Dam1922” is a hand-painted muslin theatrical curtain completed in 2001 by David Carrick Swing. “CoreMemory: Eye Dazzler” was completed in 1989 by Joyce Crain and is a metallic ribbon tapestry. “Landscape” is a painted clay tilemural by ElizabethMcDonald that was purchased in 1989. “Campienda de la Tierra” is a ceramic wall sculpture that was completed by artist Don Reitz in 2001. “Kickin’ I” is a stainless steel sculpture by artist Gary Slated that was completed in 2012. “Staring into the Sun ” is ametal sculpture by artist Kevin Berry that was purchased in 1996. “TheOstrich” is ametal sculpture by artist Mike Lynch that was purchased in 1993. “CrazyQuilt” is ametal tapestry by artist Marianne Flenniken. “C-Note” is a steel sculpture by artist Kevin Caron that was installed inMay 2012. “Tileworks” is a collaboration from several

"Shortcut" is a piece by artist Jane DeDecker.

"Tileworks" is a collaboration among several artists.

"Las Brisas: Tree Ramada and Hummingbird Arch" is by Joe Tyler.

"Monuments to Us" is a piece by Cam DeCaussin and Joey Salamon.

9

CHANDLER EDITION • MARCH 2020

BUSINESS FEATURE d’Vine Gourmet Business oers Chandler a place to shop local D enise McCreery rst began her business as a means to rid her home of half-con- handmade gift baskets lled with local goods, McCreery’s wine jellies and so much more—and McCreery has her hands in all of it. BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

sumed wine bottles her husband, a wine distributor, brought home. She made wine jelly from the half-empty wine bottles, substitut- ing wine where recipes called for juice, and sold it at farmers markets in Tucson until one day someone from AJ’s Fine Foods approached McCreery about carrying the jellies on their shelves. “I just was making it to

“The best thing we can do to sup- port our community is be localvores, and I’m a huge localvore,” McCreery said. “I try really hard to buy as much as I can locally. My jars are from a local distributor; I pay a little extra to have local things. That’s kind of our thing—we are all about the local.” McCreery comes up

Denise McCreery says d’Vine Gourmet is dedicated to buying and selling local goods. (Photos by Alexa D’Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

“I TRYREALLYHARD TOBUYASMUCHAS I CAN LOCALLY. MY JARS ARE FROMA LOCAL DISTRIBUTOR; I PAY A LITTLE EXTRA TO HAVE LOCAL THINGS. THAT’S KINDOF OUR THINGWE ARE ALL ABOUT THE LOCAL.” DENISE MCCREERY, OWNER

with the recipes for the wine jellies and creates the caramels for the business. She said she loves seeing regulars come into the store for caramels and other treats, but that the business also draws in patrons from all over the Valley and beyond, something she said she takes a lot of pride in.

sell at farmers markets,” she said. “Then we were in AJ’s the rst month we were in business. Then we had

McCreery and her employees put together the gift baskets.

An entire wall in the store is dedicated to Arizona-sourced wines.

Design, Print andDirectMail for lesswith where she said she puts an emphasis on all things local. The shop oers handmade caramels, Arizona wines, customers ask if we could do gift baskets and we said, ‘Sure, yeah!’ So me and my girlfriends were learning how to make gift baskets on my dining room table.” She then opened a storefront in Tucson where she ran her business. When her husband got a job transfer that brought the family to the Valley, she opened up a location in Chan- dler and split time between the two cities. Now, McCreery owns and operates d’Vine Gourmet only in Chandler

LOCAL WINES • Merkin Vineyards • Arizona Angel • Eclipse • 1912 LOCAL BRANDS • Cactus Candy • Cerreta’s • d’Vine Gourmet • Relish This • Sting N Linger • Urban Oven

LOCALLY SOURCED

McCreery said she tries to source as many Arizona and Chandler products at d’Vine as possible.

“We are very good at listening to our customers, and our business had changed to meet our customers’ desires,” she said. “We are a desti- nation, but we also pull in a lot of business from our 3-mile radius.” The business owner said she is looking forward to the future of d’Vine Gourmet in Chandler and hopes to one day expand operations. “We are fresh; we are local; and we support other local businesses,” she said. “I love it here; we will never leave.”

d’Vine Gourmet 4955 S. Alma School Road, ste. #4, Chandler 480-275-5320

https://stores.dvinegourmet.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

DISHES TO TRY

$15

The restaurant oers bowls, such as the pork katsu bowl.

$10-$25

Yoshio Otomo (left) and his wife, Sanae, started the restaurant. Mika Otomo and her husband, Daisuke Itagaki, nowwork there. (Alexa D’Angelo/ Community Impact Newspaper)

Shimogamo oers sushi, sashimi, wagyu, steak, chicken and more.

Shimogamo Japanese Restaurant Family-owned restaurant oers homestyle Japanese cuisine W hen Yoshio Otomo and his wife, Sanae, moved to Arizona from Japan, they Sanae came up with the menu—the key, she said, is that everything is homemade. “We make all the sauces,” Sanae

The restaurant oers specialty rolls, which vary in price starting at $10.

working at her parents’ restaurant. Daisuke is the executive chef at Shimogamo. “It really is coincidental even though it doesn’t seem like it,” Mika said of her and her husband’s involvement with the business. Mika is the director of operations. Despite the coincidental nature of her involvement, Mika said she is happy to be working at the restaurant. “We are the only [Japanese restaurant] owned and operated by Japanese in Chandler,” Mika said. “We oer only high quality.” The family is looking to expand the square footage at the Chandler location and potentially add another East Valley location in the coming year, Mika said.

Shimogamo Japanese Restaurant 2051 W. Warner Road, Chandler 480-899-7191 www.shimogamoaz.com Hours: Mon.-Thu. 5-9:30 p.m., Fri. 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. and 5-10 p.m., Sat. 5-10 p.m., Sun. 5-9 p.m.

loved nearly everything—except the lack of traditional Japanese food. When Yoshio retired, he and his wife decided to take some of the money they had collected over the years and put it into a restaurant. Now, 16 years later, Shimogamo Japanese Restaurant is a family operation, with the couple’s daughter, Mika, and her husband, Daisuke Itagaki, also working at the Chandler Japanese and sushi restaurant. “I never thought to open a business like this,” Yoshio said. “But there were no good Japanese restaurants here, and we love Arizona very much, so we opened our own.”

said. “We are not a chain restaurant.” Her husband chimed in to say it is also good sh and a good kitchen sta that make everything on the menu a favorite of restaurant patrons. “Everything we have is all the best,” Yoshio said. The menu features lunch, dinner, sushi, sashimi and rolls, desserts and drinks. Dinner options include steak, chicken, snapper, spare rib, salmon and more. Mika, who moved to Arizona from Japan with her husband and young son, said it was pure coincidence that she and her husband ended up

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CHANDLER EDITION • MARCH 2020

Chandler plans for future 0f recycling

Recycling Revenue Recycling used to result in revenue for the city of Chandler, but with changes to the recycling processing contract, that is no longer the case. The city is now paying to run the recycling program, a trend ocials hope they can turn around.

2019

2020

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May June Jul.

Aug.

Sep.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

2010: $481,000 2015: $489,000

Recycling contract revenue from years past

CONTINUED FROM 1

Over the span of two years, the city of Chandler has gone from earning revenue on recycling to paying for recycling processing. Ocials say the change in prot- ability is due to changes in the global recycling market and in turn, a dif- ference in what Chandler’s recycling contractor can accept from resi- dents. City Council approved Feb. 27 a renegotiated contract with Chan- dler-based United Fibers that carries a higher processing fee and a new con- tamination fee per ton of recycling. The United Fibers contract was the only contract presented to council. Between April 2017 and March 2018, the city made $517,943 from its recycling contract, according to ocials. Due to changes in the recy- cling market, the city has generally seen a regular decrease in revenue since then. The city started paying for recycling services in March 2019, and now, with the renewed contract, the city anticipates paying an estimated $1.2 million over the next one-year contract between March 2020 and Recycling process The city of Chandler contracts with United Fibers to collect and process residents’ recyclables.

February 2021. Gregg Capps, water resources man- ager also overseeing solid waste, said residents will not see a rate increase due to recycling cost, that exist- ing rates will cover the cost for this year. Capps said the $1.2 million will come out of the city’s solid waste fund. Council was presented with two options: either renew the United Fibers contract, or send all recyclable materials to the landll. “We’re just trying to keep that recycling program alive in Chandler,” Capps said. Traci Conaway, recycling coordina- tor for the city of Chandler, said the city hopes to educate its residents on what is acceptable in their blue recy- cling bins so that it may help drive down costs.

SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Contamination is trash, ocials said, and includes any materials that are not explicitly accepted in the blue bins and items that have not been cleaned of food or liquid contami- nants. Those contaminated materials end up in the landll. The one-year contract extension with United Fibers is in an amount not to exceed $1.2 million. United Fibers requested in this contract the processing fee be increased to $80 per ton from $67 per ton and requested the implementation of a new waste disposal fee of $40 per ton for the disposal of contaminated materials. Chandler ocials project that of the 19,800 tons of recycled material col-

that contamination rate by educating residents. “Contamination, or items that aren’t accepted, are now going to have an additional fee, so it’s more important than ever that people are only placing the items that we accept in their bins,” Conaway said. Conaway said the increase in con- tamination is directly related to what the contractor can and cannot accept. Products that used to be acceptable, in some cases, are no longer accept- able. Acceptable items for recycling are directly related to what the con- tractor can market, Conaway said. If there is no market or use for the material, it is sent to the landll. The

lected in the city in the next year, 19%, or 3,762 tons, will be contami- nated, but ocials hope to decrease

Recyclables are dropped o at United Fibers after being picked up from residents' homes.

United Fibers turns paper into insulation.

PHOTOS BY ALEXA D'ANGELOCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

2. Collection trucks deliver recycling loads to United Fibers

4. Quarterly audits of recycling loads determine the percentage of each category

6. Recycling commodities are sold to create new products

1. Collection trucks pick up contents of blue recycling cans

3. Recyclables are sorted into categories by equipment and workers

5. Items not accepted for recycling are landlled

SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

What to Recycle

increase in contamination is directly related to what residents are placing in their cans, even before the market changed, Conaway said. A large por- tion of what is considered contamina- tion has never been accepted in the city’s recycling program, including plastic bags, plastic wrap, Styrofoam, food wrappers, textiles, pizza boxes, wood and toys. “What we want our residents to know is to focus on the items that the city accepts that will actually get recycled,” Conaway said. “We want to emphasize recycling right. We want residents to only recycle the items we want for recycling that will actually turn into a new product, and we want residents to not put the items in the blue bin that can’t be recycled. That’s really contamination, or what we consider to be trash, and that item is going to be landlled anyway. When it is landlled after going to the recy- cling center it is actually costing the city more to landll that item than if they simply put it in the trash can in the rst place.” Changes in the recyclingmarket Erin Jordan, a public information ocer with the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality, said the change in the global recycling mar- ket is aecting not just Chandler, but all cities and counties in Arizona and across the nation. “China used to accept everything in recycling bundles, which allowed the U.S. to be able to send highly contami- nated bales for recycling,” Jordan said. “China has since changed their pol- icies and will not accept contamina- tion. To meet the new requirements, there are now increased processing costs due to high volumes of contam- ination in the recycling bins. And, the materials formerly accepted by China are now left behind. Cities and coun- ties in Arizona are doing their best to

continue their recycling programs, but it will take some time to build up end markets that can take the addi- tional baled material and turn it into a product.” In Chandler, Conaway said materi- als that can be recycled include paper, cardboard, glass bottles and jars, alu- minum or steel cans, and plastic bot- tles and jugs. “The more citizens don’t know about their local recycling program, the more likely fees and other mone- tary adjustments will be put in place to deal with contamination in the recycling bins,” Jordan said. “It’s very important that we all ‘educate so we don’t contaminate.’ This will create a cleaner product that is more desirable to end markets and could help drive the creation of more end markets in the future.”

SAVE FOR FUTURE RECYCLING

can and cannot be recycled. “If a company isn’t making a product out of that [recycled] material, it’s going to be disposed of anyway,” Capps said. Recyclingmoving forward Conaway said there will be a push to educate residents about recycling in order to reduce con- tamination, thus reducing the overall cost to the city. “It’s a hard concept for people because they want to recycle as much as possible, and we encour- age that,” Conaway said. “But we don’t want people to ‘wishcycle,’ where sometimes people want it to be recycled or hope it can be recy- cled and they put something in the bin, and it’s not able to be recycled and they are just hoping that we’ll nd a way and, unfortunately, we kind of let that go for a bit, but now scally it is important to the city and therefore our ratepayers.” City Council Member Mark Stew- art said one piece of contaminated material has the potential to ruin an entire ton of recyclables, ren- dering the material useless. He said he hopes the city will work toward sustainable solutions before the contract is up again in 2021. “We have to gure something out,” Stewart said. “We have to nd innovative solutions to creat- ing sustainability stories. The great thing about Chandler, and some- thing that benets the community, is everybody pitches in, everyone takes a role in it. We used to make money from recycling, and nowwe aren’t, and I want to x it.”

All items should be empty of liquids and free from food or grease before placing them in the recycling container. Place recyclables in the container loosely. Do not bag recyclables.

Paper: oce and writing paper, newspapers, magazines and mail Cardboard: shipping boxes, shoeboxes, prepared food boxes and cardboard rolls from paper towels and toilet paper

Metal: steel/tin and aluminum cans

Glass: food and beverage bottles and jars

Plastic: bottles and jugs

reminders: Plastic bags and wrap can be recycled at special containers at every grocery store in Chandler, but not in residents' blue recycling containers. The city is no longer accepting bags of shredded paper in its recycling program. The recycle symbol on items does not guarantee that the item is accepted in the curbside recycling program. Some items, such as metal appliances, metal furniture and electronics, are recyclable through the curbside bulk program or drop-o at the city’s collection center. If in doubt leave it out or call solid waste services at 480-782-3510.

At United Fibers, the recycled paper collected is turned into insula- tion and then sold to contractors. The other materials are sorted by about 30 people who sort through the recycled materials to get rid of the trash and materials they do not accept. Then those materials are bailed so they can be sold to companies and countries that are looking for that material to create their products. Capps said the recycling contractor in each municipality dictates what

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLER COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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