Northwest Austin | February 2021

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION

VOLUME 15, ISSUE 1  FEB. 25 2021MARCH 27, 2021

ONLINE AT

Samsung requests nocity property taxon$17Bplant

G I A N T A M O N G G I A N T S Samsung’s proposed $17 billion chip-making plant would dwarf other recent megaprojects that sought tax incentives in the region. *SAMSUNG IS PROPOSED $18B $15.75B 8,000 7,000

BY CHRISTOPHER NEELY

Samsung has asked the city for a record tax incentive package for the plant—a 100% property tax rebate for 25 years, according to documents reviewed by Community Impact Newspaper . According to the documents, the plant would come with $5.6 billion in construction costs CONTINUED ON 16

Samsung Semiconductor is shopping around a $17 billion, 6.1 million-square- foot chip manufacturing plant, and if the tech giant chooses Austin, one of three U.S. locations under consideration, the project would be one of the largest single economic investments in Texas history. However, in return,

3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 1,000 0 2,000

$11.25B $13.5B

$9B

$6.75B $4.5B $2.25B 0

Samsung 2021*

Samsung (2006/2012, Austin)

Tesla (2020, Del Valle)

Apple (2018, Austin)

Kalahari Resort (2016, Round Rock)

Amazon (2020, Pugerville)

SOURCES: COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER, CITY OF AUSTIN, CITY OF ROUND ROCK, CITY OF PFLUGERVILLE, TRAVIS COUNTY, WILLIAMSON COUNTY

Countdown to kicko in Capital City How Austin FC fostered a fan base through community work and a metro full of homegrown soccer zealots

“WE KNOWKIDS ARE MORE ISOLATED. ... IT WAS IMPORTANT FOR US TO SHOWUP FOR THOSE KIDS AND SHOW THEM THEY MATTER MORE NOW THAN EVER.”

BY IAIN OLDMAN

By the time Austin FC begins its inaugural season of play in Major League Soc- cer later this spring, its philanthropic arm will have been fully operational for two years. In that time, 4ATX Foundation, which was sprung by a $1 million donation from Austin FC owner Anthony Precourt, has already made connections with thou- sands of kids citywide through youth soccer programs, eld rehabilitation and leadership programs, according to Kaitlin Swarts, Austin FC’s vice president of CONTINUED ON 18

KAITLIN SWARTS, VICE PRESIDENT OF COMMUNITY IMPACT FOR AUSTIN FC

The 4ATX Foundation uses soccer to teach local kids life and leadership skills.

Texans struggle through ERCOT power grid strain

CAMP GUIDE 2021

CAMP LISTINGS

14

IMPACTS

WEATHER

6

11

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON . Join your neighbors with a contribution of any amount to CI Patron. Funds support Community Impact Newspaper ’s hyperlocal, unbiased journalism and help build informed communities. Choose IMPACT . Make a CONTRIBUTION . Strengthen JOURNALISMFORALL . S nap or visit Contribute today!

Local Ownership. Premium Appliances. Immaculate Showrooms . At Harway Appliances we provide the highest quality home appliances to builders, remodelers, designers and homeowners (and have for over 29 years). Come explore our amazing showrooms in Bee Cave and north Austin, featuring more than 30 leading brands and professional installation. You’ll be greeted by the best and most experienced folks in the business.

CENTRAL: 2209B RUTLAND DR. #100, AUSTIN, TX 78758 (512) 491 7600 BEE CAVE: 12400 HWY 71 STE 600, BEE CAVE, TX 78738 (512) 980 0430

CALL TODAY FOR AN APPOINTMENT.

Dell Children’s pediatricians, now in your neighborhood At the new Dell Children’s Medical Group primary care clinics, our pediatricians and care teams start by listening to deliver the care that’s right for your child. From newborns to teens, children need routine wellness visits to check how they’re growing, identify health issues, get recommended vaccinations and get care for common illnesses and injuries. And if your child needs more care, we’ll connect you to pediatric specialists in heart, cancer, brain and spine, emergency care and more. Ask if a virtual visit is an option for your child’s care. We are maintaining strict precautions for your family’s safety while in our care. Don’t delay, talk with a pediatrician in your neighborhood today. Welcoming new patients, in-person and virtual visits available

Dell Children’s Medical Group Pediatrics Park Valley 16040 Park Valley Drive, Suite 227 Round Rock, TX 78681 512-806-0960 • Gabriel C. Millar, MD • Angelyn Tarrant, MD • Renda Joy Holladay, DNP, APRN, FNP-C • Justine Self, MSN, RN, FNP-C

Dell Children’s Medical Group ‘Specially for Children 1000 Hesters Crossing Round Rock, TX 78681 512-596-1918

• Marta Maria Katalenas, MD

To schedule an appointment, go to GetDellChildrensCare.com or call one of the clinic locations.

© Ascension 2021. All rights reserved.

2

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Curious about new listings in your neighborhood? Scan me.

SOLD $66K OVER

SOLD $57K OVER

SOLD $55K OVER

SOLD $55K OVER

realtyaustin.com/p/4611600

realtyaustin.com/p/3472303

realtyaustin.com/p/5729887

realtyaustin.com/p/3574687

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

3 bds

2 ba

1,482 sq ft

3 bds

2 ba

1,570 sq ft

4 bds

2.5 ba 2,938 sq ft

4 bds

2.5 ba 2,546 sq ft

1210 Doonesbury Dr, Austin, TX 78758 Trevor Heuser | 512-998-5111

6600 Three Oaks Cir, Austin, TX 78759 Barbara DeBow | 512-657-5122

7708 Blue Lilly Dr, Austin, TX 78759 Chad Proctor | 512-870-7292

10648 Floral Park Dr, Austin, TX 78759 Kelvin Glover | 512-400-6035

SOLD $53K OVER

SOLD $51K OVER

SOLD $46K OVER

SOLD $40K OVER

realtyaustin.com/p/9131145

realtyaustin.com/p/3942718

realtyaustin.com/p/1164755

realtyaustin.com/p/1202558

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

4 bds

2.5 ba 2,576 sq ft

4 bds

2.5 ba 1,905 sq ft

4 bds

3 ba

2,130 sq ft

3 bds

2 ba

1,290 sq ft

12533 Sir Christophers Cv, Austin, TX 78729 Kelvin Glover | 512-400-6035

13124 Kellies Farm Ln, Austin, TX 78727 Kimberly Fodor | 512-809-3844

11704 Quartz Cir, Austin, TX 78750 The Hill Team | 512-230-4953

12103 Scissortail Dr, Austin, TX 78750 Lauri Schroeder | 830-237-1279

SOLD $27K OVER

SOLD $15K OVER

SOLD $12K OVER

SOLD $11K OVER

realtyaustin.com/p/3702934

realtyaustin.com/p/1285755

realtyaustin.com/p/2475398

realtyaustin.com/p/1864292

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

3 bds

2 ba

1,428 sq ft

4 bds

2 ba

2,080 sq ft

3 bds

2 ba

1,251 sq ft

4 bds

2 ba

1,738 sq ft

3202 Spaniel Dr, Austin, TX 78759 Lily Clason | 512-627-4688

13217 Armaga Springs Rd, Austin, TX 78727 Ruth and Evonne | 512-964-3434

11700 Elk Park Trl, Austin, TX 78759 Catherine Hall | 512-217-4196

1011 Bob White Dr, Austin, TX 78758 Suzanne Valentine | 512-217-6946

#1 Independent Brokerage in Austin Realty Austin has grown into one of the most innovative and progressive real estate companies in Austin, uniquely suited for its high tech and home grown culture. Learn how we can help you sell your home faster and for more money. Visit RealtyAustin.com to learn more.

3

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

ENHANCE YOUR COMFORT WITH HVAC EFFICIENCY, INSULATION, WEATHERPROOFING, AIR BALANCING, SOLAR SHADING, AND MORE!

AUSTIN ENERGY-SPONSORED 10-YEAR, 0% FINANCING †

SAVE UP TO $ 7500 REBATES AND SAVINGS **

IMPROVED COMFORT ENERGY EFFICIENCY LOW MONTHLY PAYMENTS

*For Austin Energy residential electric customers with homes 10 years and older. **Call for complete details. Expires 3/30/2021. †Financing with approved credit and on select systems only. All offers subject to change without notice.

www.coolmenow.com 512-886-4729

TAC L B 26116 E

4

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMPHYLLIS: After being shut inside while a deep freeze ravaged Texas recently, the thought of kids playing outside at summer camp brings visions of normalcy and, well, warmth! We hope we can help in your family’s summer plans this year with our annual Summer Camp Guide in this edition. Here’s to sunshine and better days ahead. Phyllis Campos, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMGREG: We had a historic week in Austin with a winter storm that aected us all. I never thought I’d see Austin look as if it were in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. As this edition of our newspaper is completed, our community is just digging out from the ice and snow. This month you will nd some initial coverage of the storm. Greg Perliski, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

WHATWE COVER

Sign up for our daily newsletter to receive the latest headlines direct to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter DAILY INBOX Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Phyllis Campos EDITOR Greg Perliski SENIOR REPORTER Iain Oldman GRAPHIC DESIGNER Mel Stea ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Taylor Caranfa METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Travis Baker MANAGING EDITOR Amy Denney

BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION &DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Haley Grace CORPORATE LEADERSHIP GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES &MARKETING DIRECTOR Tess Coverman CONTACT US 16225 Impact Way, Ste. 1, Pugerville, TX 78660 • 5129896808 PRESS RELEASES nwanews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2021 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All rights reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

HOWWE’RE FUNDED

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of PATRON PROGRAM

ADVERTISING

Our local teams customize advertising

campaigns for all business sizes and industries wanting to reach their customer base and accomplish their goals. A third-party Readex survey proved 78% of paper recipients read three of the last four editions, and from what they read, 83% “took action” of some kind. Thank you to the advertisers in this edition who support our work. We would love for our readers to thank them as well.

local, reliable reporting. Become a CI Patron today with a contribution of any amount. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens stay informed and keep businesses thriving.

communityimpact.com

facebook.com/impactnewsnwa

35%

of Patrons opt for recurring monthly contributions

@impactnews_nwa

$10 is the average minimum

Patrons have chosen to give

Proudly printed by

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM ADVERTISING

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM CIPATRON

For the expected, unexpected, and everything in between

Same-Day Appointments Pediatric Televisits 24/7 Phone Nurse

Learn more at myARCpediatrician.com

5

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

45 TOLL

2

CEDAR PARK

11

PECAN PARK BLVD.

9

15

14

5

13

3

1

LAKE CREEK PKWY.

35

Lazeez Mediterranean Cafe

N

POND SPRINGS RD.

COURTESY LAZEEZ MEDITERRANEAN CAFE

183

oxtail stew with plantain and yucca. www.saborcolombia512.com 10 Oce Evolution , which provides co- working and private oce space for rent, is opening a location at 8911 N. Capital of Texas Hwy., Ste. 4200, Austin. The company provides workspaces equipped with furnished private oces, staed reception for guests, printers, copiers 11 ZP Better Together , a technology company that provides communica- tions solutions for the deaf and hard of hearing, has relocated its headquarters from California to Northwest Austin. The communications technology company’s relocation is eective Jan. 28. ZVRS and Purple Communications, divisions of ZP, will occupy a portion of the Paloma Ridge development located at 13620 N. RM 620, Austin. www.zvrs.com 12 Exercise franchise Pure Barre on Jan. 1 opened its new temporary space in The Domain at 3220 Feathergrass Court, Ste. 100, Austin. Pure Barre, previously located at 10710 Research Blvd., Austin, oers barre exercise classes every day of the week. According to the company, it is looking for a permanent space in The Domain and is nalizing build-out plans to open in summer 2021. 512-574-2344. www.purebarre.com 13 Art + Academy , which hosts a wide variety of art training classes for children and adults of all skill levels, on March 22 is relocating its Northwest Austin to 9300 Anderson Mill Road, Ste. 200, Austin, from 8650 Spicewood Springs Road, Austin. 512-701-8070. www.artclassesaustin.com EXPANSIONS 14 Pinballz Lake Creek , located at 13729 Research Blvd., Austin, unveiled its new ax-throwing facility in the beginning of February. Pinballz Lake Creek also has bumper cars, laser tag and private party rooms alongside its collection of classic arcade games. 512-537-8737. www.pinballzarcade.com NEWOWNERSHIP and more. 512-865-4678. www.oceevolution.com RELOCATIONS 15 In mid-December, the Austin Aord- able Housing Corporation, a nonprot subsidiary of the Housing Authority of the 35

620

SPICEWOOD SPRINGS RD.

NORTHWEST AUSTIN

MOPAC

16A

MOPAC

JOLLYVILLE RD.

2

CENTURY OAKS TERRACE

8

SETON CENTER PKWY.

WALNUT CREEK PARK

4

16B

6

TUDOR BLVD.

10

360

SPICEWOOD SPRINGS RD.

2222

17

12

CAMERON RD. 7

CAPITAL OF TEXAS HWY.

35

18

183

MAP NOT TO SCALE

N TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 Valentino’s Pizza, Pasta and Wings opened mid-January at 8863 Anderson Mill Road, Ste. 101, Austin. The locally owned pizza joint is currently open for carry-out and delivery orders, featuring specialty pizzas, subs and pasta dishes with vegetarian options. 512-551-2690. www.valentinospizzalove.com 2 A new Mediterranean restaurant opened in the Four Points region Feb. 1. Lazeez Mediterranean Cafe at 6812 N. RM 620, Austin, serves a variety of Medi- terranean and Middle Eastern menu items including hummus, grilled Mashawi BBQ 3 Home goods retailer Furniture Mall of Texas held its grand opening Feb. 13 at 12901 N. I-35, Austin. The store, founded by Austin’s Couch Potatoes and the co-owners of the Furniture Mall of Kansas, features nearly 700 display rooms across 100,000 square feet of showroom space, with furniture and de- cor available from Austin-based creators. 512-886-1266. www.thefurnituremall.com 4 Picolé in late February held a grand opening for its rst Austin location at and more. 512-215-9356. www.lazeezaustin.com

11501 Rock Rose Ave., Ste. 156, Austin. The confectionary store sells picoles—gourmet Brazilian frozen popsicles—made with an assortment of llings, ranging from fruit to tequila. 512-291-3741. www.picolepop.com 5 Local restaurant chain One Taco on Feb. 10 celebrated the opening of its new location at 12233 N. RM 620, Bldg. C, Austin, in the Anderson Mill area. One Taco serves breakfast and lunch tacos and sells fresh, handmade tortillas by the dozen. 737-209-0311. www.onetaco.com 6 National restaurateur and Food Net- work icon Guy Fieri has opened a location of Guy Fieri’s Flavortown Kitchen at 3612 Tudor Boulevard, Austin, near the Gateway Center. The restaurant operates out of a ghost kitchen space and serves burgers, wings, salads and appetizers like cheesesteak egg rolls. www.guysavortownkitchen.com Husband-wife duo Franco and Hillary Coniglione began a new business venture Jan. 5 in the West Austin area to provide a safe, fun experience for families and friends amid the coronavirus pandemic. Bluebonnet Picnic Company creates luxury, pop-up picnic experiences for various events, such as romantic dates, birthday parties, bachelorette parties, en- gagements and more. Bluebonnet Picnic

Company serves the Lakeway, Spicewood, Bee Cave, Westlake, Dripping Springs and West Austin areas. 508-340-3356. www.bluebonnetpicnic.com COMING SOON 7 Prep ATX , a new multipurpose com- mercial kitchen and food manufacturing facility, is set to open at 1300 E. Anderson Lane, Austin, in April. The 55,000-square- foot facility will serve as a hub for cater- ers, bakers and prepared meal companies as well as a “ghost kitchen” for pickup and delivery-only restaurants. With 42 private kitchens, 16 shared kitchens and space for 16 food trucks available, representatives for Prep ATX say it will be the largest facility of its kind in Texas. www.prepatx.com 8 Italian fashion brand Golden Goose later this year is opening a store in The Domain at 11600 Century Oaks Terrace Space, Ste. 124, Austin. Golden Goose sells high-end sneakers for men, women and children alongside jackets, bags and accessories. www.goldengoose.com 9 Round Rock eatery Sabor Colombia is opening a brick and mortar kitchen at 13201 N. RM 620, Austin. The restaurant serves authentic Colombian fare such as arepas, picada and sancocho de cola—an

6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY IAIN OLDMAN

12

15

Pure Barre

The Royce at 8100

COURTESY PURE BARRE

IAIN OLDMANCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

NEWMANAGEMENT 17 Juniper Communities on Feb. 1 announced it is taking over management of Juniper Village at Spicewood Summit, formerly Brookdale at Spicewood Springs, at 4401 Spicewood Springs Road, Austin. The senior housing community provides care for nearly 100 assisted living resi- dents. 512-418-8822. www.junipercommunities.com IN THE NEWS 18 Point of Care Health Services , located at 7000 N. MoPac, Austin, in late January launched rapid COVID-19 testing mobile units that can be contracted by employers, venues and public institutions. According to the company, these units can also pro- vide on-site vaccinations. 512-831-3660. www.pochealthservices.com

After closing its doors in September at its decades-old location o Research Boulevard, Capitol City Comedy Club announced Feb. 10 it will reopen in October in The Domain.

City of Austin, nalized the purchase of the former Broadstone 8 One Hundred apart- ment complex 8100 Anderson Mill Road, Austin, and rebranded it as The Royce at 8100 . HACA will price at least half of the units at The Royce to serve residents at or below 80% of Austin’s median family income. 512-812-9701. www.theroyce8100apts.com 16 Austin-based hospitality company K&N Management in early January sold Mighty Fine Burgers Fries & Shakes to lifelong Austinites Tony Ciola and Creed Ford, co-owners and founders of Tc4 & Co., the hospitality company behind Tony C’s Coal Fired Pizza and The League Kitchen & Tavern. The burger chain operates out of ve locations, including a trailer at Four Points at A 6900 N. RM 620, Austin, and a storefront at B 10515 N. MoPac, Austin. www.mightyneburgers.com

IAIN OLDMANCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FEATURED IMPACT RELOCATION After closing its doors in fall 2020, Austin stand-up icon Capitol City Comedy Club will reopen in October at a new location in The Domain. Brothers Brad and Marc Grossman, owners of Helium Comedy Club—which has ve nationwide locations—announced Feb. 10 they bought the club after it closed due to a combination of an expiring lease and nancial hardships resulting from the coronavirus pandemic. The new Cap City location will feature two showrooms, with the main

MOPAC

N

showroom dedicated to national touring acts. Cap City will continue to run the “Funniest Person in Austin” competition and will continue to sponsor the Moontower Comedy Festival, Marc Grossman said. 11506 Century Oaks Terrace, Austin www.capcitycomedy.com

7

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES After brief delay, 183North toll moves toward construction again

1 8 3 N O R T H QUICK FACTS

sta, but the board wanted more time to review. The design-build contract makes up the majority, but not the entirety, of the project cost. “Essentially it was a 10-minute presentation,” board member John Langmore said Jan. 27. “All we got was the nal score, not the underlying compo- nents that were most critical to evaluating that. I guess I feel like on a half a billion dollar contract, I’m certainly more than willing to dedicate some time ... to feel we have done everything within our power to ensure the design and construction of 183 North goes really, really well.” The board ultimately voted Feb. 8 to accept sta’s recommendation to move forward with a $477 million bid from Great Hills Constructors. Bill Chapman, chief nancial ocer for the Mobility Authority, on Jan. 27 presented the board with potential toll rates for the length of the project, which he said the board has the authority to change throughout the four years leading up to the opening of 183 North. According to the numbers Chapman presented, it would cost a minimum of $1.42 to drive the length of the project in the express lane, with rates uctuating based on demand.

BY JACK FLAGLER

Before making any decisions on the contract for the 183 North project, the Central Texas Regional Mobility Authority’s board of directors requested a fewmore days to dig into the details of how sta evaluated and scored proposals from contractors. Following a Jan. 27 decision to delay a vote, the board voted unanimously Feb. 8 to move forward in the process and stay on track to have the Northwest Austin tollway project open to trac in 2026. The project to add two tolled lanes in each direction along US 183 fromMoPac to SH 45 N in Travis and Williamson counties is expected to begin construction later in the year. Before work can begin, the Mobility Authority has to award a design-build contract—which means that the contractor will both design and execute the work—to one of three competing companies. Mike Sexton, the Mobility Authority’s acting director of engineering, presented the three proposals to the board Jan. 27 from Capital Express Partners, Colorado River Constructors and Great Hills Constructors. The proposal from Great Hills Constructors came in at the lowest price—$477 million—and received a perfect technical score, according to a rubric from

• will add two tolled lanes in each direction • will maintain 4 nontolled lanes • approximately 9 miles of roadway • $612 million cost • scheduled to fully open in 2025 Construction on the 183 North project between SH 45 N and MoPac is expected to begin before the end of the year. Here are some things to know about the project.

620

MOPAC

35

2222

360

183

N

SOURCE: CENTRAL TEXAS REGIONAL MOBILITY AUTHORITY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

City startswork to add sidewalks along Burnet Road The city of Austin Corridor Program Oce, along with the Austin Public Works Department Sidewalk Program, in late February began construction of a new sidewalk on northbound Burnet Road from at Q2 Stadium. At a stadium-naming ceremony Jan. 24, Austin FC President Andy Loughnane said he anticipates the rst events at the stadium will take place in June. It is unclear at this time if fans will be able to attend home games at Q2 Stadium during Austin FC’s inaugural season. BY IAIN OLDMAN

S I DEWAL K S C H E D U L E The city of Austin is starting work on a new sidewalk on Burnet Road that will partially connect The Domain and Q2 Stadium—home of Austin FC.

• Late February: construction of 2,100-foot sidewalk begins • May-June: work on sidewalk expected to nish • June: anticipated start date for events at Q2 Stadium

Braker Lane to Kramer Lane, according to Dea Crichton, public information and communications manager for the corridor program oce. Construction on the 2,100-foot sidewalk project will last approximately three months. The project will cost approximately $700,000 and is funded by the 2016 mobility bond, according to Crichton. That timeline potentially opens the sidewalk in time before Austin FC hosts its rst home games

Also in North Austin, a new sidewalk is currently under construction on North Lamar Boulevard. The Austin Public Works Sidewalk Program is construct- ing a sidewalk on northbound North Lamar between Caddo Street and On the Green Apartments, which is approximately a half-mile south of Yager Lane. Construction on this new stretch of sidewalk is expected to nish by late spring.

SOURCES: AUSTIN FC, CITY OF AUSTIN CORRIDOR PROGRAM OFFICE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

ONGOING PROJECTS

RUNDBERG LN.

FOUR POINTS DR.

DESSAU RD.

MOPAC

CAMERON RD.

620

RIVER PLACE BLVD.

35

N. LAMAR BLVD.

290

35

RIVER PLACE BLVD.

2222

N

N

N

183

US 183 at I-35 yovers TxDOT crews are preparing for the long-term closure of the northbound I-35 to northbound US 183 yover by readying the work site for detours. Timeline: January 2018-fall 2021

Parmer Lane diverging diamond The northbound and southbound I-35 bypass lanes at Parmer Lane opened in late February. Improve- ments continue on the I-35 frontage road. Timeline: July 2020-mid-2021

RM 620/RM 2222 bypass State crews have almost completed earthwork activities on the bypass. TxDOT will soon install infrastructure for future trac signals on RM 620 and RM 2222. Timeline: December 2019-late 2021

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF FEB. 11. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT NWANEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

A lifestyle you deserve

Parsons House Independent & Assisted Living is located in the heart of Austin. Privately owned by the Parsons family, who have operated the community for 17 years, Parsons House is a unique blend of care and services to meet the individual needs of our residents. If you haven’t been to visit in a while, stop in so we can show you around. If you have never toured the community, we hope to see you soon!

35

Nelson Field

(512) 454-0524 P ARSONS H OUSE A USTIN . COM

CHCP Campus

290

1130 C AMINO L A C OSTA A USTIN , TX 78752

Movability congratulates our members who have earned a place on the Best Workplaces and Sites for Commuters List! • 301 Congress Ave • Archer Malmo • Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization • Capital Metro • Cirrus Logic • City of Austin • Downtown Austin Alliance • dwg. • Maxwell Locke & Ritter LLP • Silicon Labs • Texas Mutual Insurance Company • The Thrival Company LLC • Whole Foods Market • Google • IBM

Our campuses are open. Come for a tour today!

Challenger School offers uniquely fun and academic classes for preschool to eighth grade students. Our students learn to think for themselves and to value independence.

Avery Ranch (PS–8) (512) 341-8000 15101 Avery Ranch Boulevard, Austin Round Rock (PS–K) (512) 255-8844 1521 Joyce Lane, Round Rock Spicewood Springs (PS–K) (512) 258-1299 13015 Pond Springs Road, Austin

© 2021, Challenger Schools Challenger School admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin.

Movabilitytx.org

An independent private school offering preschool through eighth grade

9

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

WEATHER Winter conditions bring outages to isolated Texas power grid

The Electric Reliability Council of Texas manages an electric grid that covers most of Texas and is disconnected from larger interconnections covering the rest of the U.S.

1

2

Winter collapse A Feb. 11 press release from ERCOT stated the agency issued notices from Feb. 8-11 about the cold weather expected to hit Texas and that gener- ators were asked to prepare for it. ERCOT followed with a Feb. 14 notice asking customers to reduce electricity through Feb. 16. The next day, ERCOT announced the council had begun rotating outages at 1:25 a.m. Feb. 15. More than 4.3 million Texans were without power the morning of Feb. 16, according to poweroutage.us. Despite early warnings, Ramanan Krishnamoorti, a chemical engineer- ing professor and chief energy ocer at the University of Houston, said he believes the state’s reliance on market conditions to manage supply and demand is partially responsible for outages given providers’ lack of incen- tive to begin production in advance of the supply shortage. He and Cohan also cited a low supply of natural gas. “The shortfall in natural gas supply is about 20 times as large as the shortfall in wind supply compared to expectations for a winter peak cold event,” Cohan said. Planning ahead The statewide outages were the fourth such event in ERCOT’s history. One result of the most recent event in February 2011—also caused by win- ter weather—was the publication of a federal report outlining past failures of power generators and recommending ERCOT and other authorities make winterization eorts a top concern.

BY BEN THOMPSON

WESTERN INTERCONNECTION Includes El Paso and far West Texas 1 EASTERN INTERCONNECTION Includes portions of East Texas and the panhandle region 2 3

Widespread power outages prompted by severe weather across Texas in February led to increased focus on the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, whichmanages statewide electric power ow. The failure of portions of the state’s power grid left millions of Texans without electric service the week of Feb. 15-19. As blackouts and power restoration eorts continued, public ocials, including Gov. Greg Abbott, called for an investigation of ERCOT. ERCOT did not respond to phone calls or email requests for comment. An independent system Texas’ power grid has long been controlled within the state, separate from eastern and western North Amer- ican interconnects. Founded in 1970, ERCOT operates under the supervision of the Public Utility Commission of Texas and the Texas Legislature and manages most of the state’s electric system and retail market. ERCOT ocials have highlighted benets of the insular system in the past, although its disconnect from the continent’s larger grids has left it prone to isolation issues during high-demand events, such as Febru- ary’s winter storms, experts said. “Staying independent keeps the management of our power systems within Texas. But it means that we can barely import any power when we need it most,” Daniel Cohan, a Rice University civil and environmental engineering professor, said via email.

3

ERCOT INTERCONNECTION

ERCOT’s grid provides electric

ERCOT man- ages 90%

ERCOT provides for 26 million customers.

ERCOT’s grid includes 46,500 miles of transmission.

power to the majority of Texans.

of the Texas electrical load.

Real-time data varies, but more than half of ERCOT’s generation capacity comes from natural gas. Experts cited a natural gas shortage in February’s power outages.

POWER BREAKDOWN

2021 ERCOT grid power generating capacity 51% Natural gas 4.9% Nuclear

24.8% Wind 3.8% Solar

13.4% Coal 1.9% Other

0.2% Storage

TRACKING THE OUTAGES Millions of Texans lost power during winter storms Feb. 15-18.

• At 1:25 a.m. Feb. 15 , ERCOT began rotating outages from customers statewide • 4.3 million Texans were without power at 9 a.m. Feb. 16

• As much as 16,500 megawatts removed from the grid due to forced outages Feb. 15 • At least 210,000 Ausin Energy customers lost power in Travis and Williamson counties

• 1 megawatt can power about 200 households during peak demand

SOURCES: AUSTIN ENERGY, ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL OF TEXAS, PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION OF TEXAS, POWEROUTAGE.US COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Beyond just following previous recommendations, the state and power suppliers could have further incentivized preparation for the record-breaking conditions experi- enced, Krishnamoorti said. “We knew that this polar vortex was coming at least a week ahead. We

could have planned,” he said. Cohan said he hopes the state will take a broader range of issues into consideration for potential updates to its energy systems. “We need to look beyond the elec- tricity system and realize that this is an energy systems crisis,” he said.

COMING IN MARCH TO THE ARBORETUM!

We’re excited to announce our second location coming soon to 10000 Research Blvd. You and your guests can expect classic Italian-American fare with pasta and dishes made fresh daily

LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED

1500 BARTON SPRINGS | 10000 RESEARCH BLVD | JULIET�AUSTIN.COM/MENU

11

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

CITY& COUNTY Travis County warned against price gouging

News from Travis & Williamson counties

BY OLIVIA ALDRIDGE

Disaster Declaration, which went into eect Feb. 12. Additionally, Brown issued an extension of standing orders related to the COVID-19 pandemic, including the prohibition of gatherings of over 10 people, the requirement to wear face coverings in most public situations and the order to socially distance by at least 6 feet. This set of orders extends to April 21.

TRAVIS COUNTY Judge Andy Brown issued an order Feb. 16 warning against price gouging by businesses in response to height- ened need during extreme winter weather. “This winter weather emergency is not an excuse to take advantage of our neighbors when they are vulnerable,” Brown said in a news release. Businesses that engage in price gouging—demanding, selling or leasing goods and services at an exorbitant price—could be ned up to $10,000, per the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices-Consumer Protection Act. Fines can reach $250,000 if the victim of price gouging is 65 years of age or older. Items specically named in the order included, but were not limited to, groceries, beverages, ice, restau- rant meals, medicine and medical supplies, lodging and transportation provisions. Brown’s order is eective through the extent of Gov. Greg Abbott’s

Ice covered utility lines across Austin. (Iain Oldman/Community Impact Newspaper)

Judge: Williamson County has no control over local water, electric utility service

BY ALI LINAN

The Electric Reliability Council of Texas, or ERCOT, operates the state's electric grid and manages approximately 90% of the state's electric load. Gravell said the county was working with area cities to help bolster services, including the opening of stations throughout the county for those needing to recharge oxygen equipment. “I know folks are just exhausted with where we’re at, but we’re Texans,” Gravell said. “We got this. We just need to pull up, take care of ourselves, take care of our family and take care of our neighbors because that’s what sets us apart.”

WILLIAMSONCOUNTY Like Texans statewide, people living in Williamson County dealt with rolling blackouts during February’s winter storm, and county Judge Bill Gravell reminded those residents the county had no control over water or electric utilities. “Let me be clear: Williamson County does not control the power,” Gravell said. At one point on Feb. 17, Gravell said 40% of the county was with- out power. The county continued to face rolling blackouts for the following days as Austin Energy brought customers back online.

DISASTER PROTECTION

Price gouging consumers during emergencies in Texas carries heavy penalties under the Deceptive Trade Practices Act. Charging excessive prices to Texans over the age of 65 is of particular concern.

$10,000 per violation $250,000 if consumer is 65 years or older Up to

SOURCE: ATTORNEY GENERAL OF TEXAS COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SNAPDRAGON PRESCHOOL

Ages 3-5

Well-Rounded Curriculum Outdoor Play Academics STEM Art's & Crafts Gymnastics Sport Skills

6800 West Gate Blvd, 78745 (512)593-6226 2117 West Anderson Ln, 78757

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Austin & Pugerville ISDs

Austin ISD trustees agree to pay one-time incentive bonus AUSTIN ISD An estimated 11,205 Austin ISD employees will receive an extra $1,000 on paychecks, possibly as soon as March 12. BY NICHOLAS CICALE extra eorts and hardships sta have faced as frontline workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. AISD full-time and part-time sta the insurance account to make the $1,000 payments.

Northwest elementary to have fall opening

BY JACK FLAGLER

AUSTIN ISD More than three years after voters passed a $1 billion Austin ISD bond, six new campuses funded with bond dollars have opened since October 2020. Among the 11 schools currently undergoing renovation construction is Hill Elementary School at 8601 Tallwood Drive, Austin. Hill Elementary is scheduled to fully open in fall 2021 at a cost of $17.8 million. The modernization construction will add classroom space and improvements to technology and equipment, as well as heating and air conditioning improvements.

“We recognize that right now, for whatever reason, over the last few years there has been money that has been put in this [insurance] account, and we have not needed to expend that account at the same rate that it must have been done in years before,” Elizalde said. “What we can do is we can cease putting the money into that account for a couple of months, still keeping us very solvent, but freeing up [funds].” Trustees asked the district to distribute the $1,000 incentive across the board after hearing public testimony from some part-time staers. Education Austin President Ken Zaris said many part-time employ- ees work multiple jobs to make ends meet.

with salaries less than $150,000 will receive the $1,000 retention incentive. Employees categorized as temporary sta and substitute teachers are not eligible, according to the district. Initially, Superintendent Stepha- nie Elizalde had recommended that $1,000 go to full-time sta, with about 650 part-time employees receiving $500 each. According to the resolution, the retention incentive will come from a fund the district has set aside for health insurance accounts. Although Elizalde said the district is running at a budget decit overall, that fund has a surplus. AISD cannot access that money directly, but it will tem- porarily stop allocating new funds to

The district’s board of trustees on Feb. 11 approved the one-time $1,000 retention incentive for district sta to acknowledge the

Austin ISD teachers and sta will receive a $1,000 incentive in March. (Courtesy Austin ISD)

MEETINGSWE COVER

Round Rock ISD board of trustees Meets third Thursday at 7 p.m. 300 Lake Creek Drive, Round Rock 512-464-5000 www.roundrockisd.org Pugerville ISD board of trustees Meets third Thursday at 7 p.m. 1401 W. Pecan St., Pugerville Austin ISD board of trustees Board information sessions: second Monday at 6 p.m.; voting meetings: fourth Monday at 7 p.m. 4000 S. I-35, Austin www.austinisd.org Austin Community College board of trustees Meets rst Monday at 5 p.m. 5930 Middle Fiskville Road, Austin 512-223-7613 www.austincc.edu 512-594-0000 www.psd.net

Pflugerville ISD sees tough year as enrollment, state funding dip

altered sta interactions with students in addition to teachers handling both in-person and virtual curricula. Fewer students hits budget Additionally, the coronavirus pandemic has impacted PfISD’s enrollment, which subsequently resulted in decreased funding. Approximately 1,500 fewer students are enrolled at PfISD for the 2020-21 school year compared to previous projections of 26,800 students, Killian said. More than half of the student losses extend from pre-K and kindergarten programs.

BY KELSEY THOMPSON

STUDENT SHORTAGE PfISD enrollment fell short of projections by 1,500 students. This resulted in a $9.4 million shortfall in state funding.

PFLUGERVILLE ISD In a Feb. 2 State of the District address, Puger- ville ISD Superintendent Douglas Killian said 77% of secondary students and 59% of elementary students who failed one or more classes in the fall were enrolled in virtual learning. Overall, the coronavirus pandemic has disrupted education, particularly for those pivoting between in-person and virtual learning to prevent virus transmission. In-person learning does not resemble what it did in years prior, Killian said; safety protocols have

Students enrolled

2020-21

25,295

PROJECTED

26,800

2022-23 PROJECTED

26,300

SOURCE: PFLUGERVILLE ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Provide relief for disaster survivors who need emergency shelter, transportation, long-term housing, clothing, food, building supplies, and more.

Give Online AmplifyADRN.com

DEEP ROOTS.

BIG HEARTS.

13

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

C A M P G U I D E GUIDE

A noncomprehensive list of camps in the area

Parents looking for camps for their kids have a number of options to choose from in the Northwest Austin area, including virtual options for families looking to socially distance during the pandemic. This list is not comprehensive.

1

2

A+ Academics ART Arts DAY Day SP Sports

Dates: June 1-Aug. 13 Cost: $320 (per week) 9308 Anderson Mill Road, Ste. 200, Austin 512-701-8070 www.artclassesaustin.com 6 Art Amore Excursion & Studio oers creative studio camps and excursion camps to help young artists discover and expand their skills. Each camp has a unique theme, and groups are kept small. ART Ages: 4-16 Dates: May 31-Aug. 20 Cost: $350-$590 6507 Jester Blvd., Ste. 107, Austin 512-983-7022 www.artamoreaustin.com 7 At Austin Ninjas , campers have train- ing sessions on the various ninja obstacle courses, play group games and create their own obstacle course designs. SP Ages: 5-12 Dates: June 1-Aug. 13 Cost: $300 per week 6001 W. Parmer Lane, Ste. 430, Austin 512-514-0555 www.austinninjas.com 8 Bluebonnet Summer Camp is oering seven unique sessions for campers to learn about cultures, customs, traditions, food and art from across the world. The curriculum of the camp focuses on science, technology, engineering, art and math. Campers can also play at the camp’s swimming pool, playground area and large splash pad . A+ ART Ages: completed kindergarten to 5th grade Dates: June 1-Aug. 11 Cost: $250-$275 10321 Boulder Lane, Austin 3420 El Salido Parkway, Cedar Park 512-219-5100 (Canyon Creek), 9 Camp Doublecreek , which celebrates its 50th year of hosting day camps for kids this summer, oers more than 30 outdoor activities for campers. The camp oers free transportation from pickup spots around the Austin area. DAY Ages: 4-14 Dates: June 1-Aug. 13 Cost: $410 (per week with discounts for multiple weeks and siblings) 800 Double Creek Drive, Round Rock 512-255-3661 www.campdoublecreek.com 10 Camp Jump ’s theme-based camps include a variety of activities, such as 512-331-9009 (Cedar Park) www.bluebonnetschool.com

SPRING BREAK CAMPS 1 Camp Doublecreek oers more than 30 outdoor activities for campers. The camp oers free transportation from pickup spots around the Austin area. DAY Ages: 4-14 Dates: March 15-19 Cost: $325 (per week) 800 Double Creek Drive, Round Rock 512-255-3661 www.campdoublecreek.com 2 Cordovan Art School oers drawing, painting and ceramics classes with class- es divided into smaller age groups. Lunch and snacks are not provided by the camp. ART Ages: 5-16 Dates: March 15-19 Cost: $55-$449 8108 Mesa Drive, Ste. B-102, Austin 512-300-1200 www.cordovanartschool.com 3 Fantastic Magic Camp is an on- line-only camp that teaches magic, jug- gling and puppetry through an inclusive day camp environment. ART Ages: 5-12 Dates: March 15-19 Cost: $225 (one week) 7500 Woodrow Ave., Austin 512-988-3045 www.magiccamp.com SUMMER CAMPS 4 At All-Star Sports Camps , trained coaches will oversee games of soccer, basketball, dodgeball, capture the ag, volleyball and other games at Soccer- Zone. The camp is open to a limited number of participants this year. SP Ages: 5-12 Dates: May 28-Aug. 13 Cost: $199 per week (half day), $299 per week (full day) 920 Old Mill Road, Cedar Park 512-940-4025 www.allstarsportscamp.org 5 Young artists can improve their draw- ing and painting skills at Art + Academy camps. Classes aim to balance fun with expert instruction to improve campers’ skills. ART Ages: 5-17

Camp Doublecreek

Cordovan Art School

COURTESY CAMP DOUBLECREEK

COURTESY CORDOVAN ART SCHOOL

3

4

Fantasic Magic Camp

All-Star Sports Camps

COURTESY FANTASTIC MAGIC CAMP

COURTESY ALLSTAR SPORTS CAMPS

gymnastics, interactive centers, yoga, arts and crafts, games, music and dance. SP Ages: 3-10 Dates: June 7-Aug. 13 Cost: $265-$470 per week Jump Gymnastics, 2117 W. Anderson Lane, Austin 512-593-6226 www.jump-austin.com 11 Cordovan Art School campers learn from artist-educators and create works of art in various mediums, such as clay, paint- ing, drawing, sculpture, anime and drama. COVID-19 safety measures are in place, according to Cordovan Art School. ART Ages: 5-16 Dates: May 26-Aug. 19 Cost: $107-$449 (per week, supply fee additional) 8108 Mesa Drive, Ste. B-102, Austin 737-300-1200 www.cordovanartschool.com 12 DiveWorld Summer Camp is holding three separate scuba camps for kids and teens interested in diving. The Seal Team Camp is not a scuba certication, but pre- pares young divers with basic diving skills for certication. Dive World’s Teen Scuba Camp gets teens to achieve certication and the Teen Advanced Open Water + Specialties camp is a new oering for teens holding certications that are looking to take their diving skills to the next level. SP Ages: 8-18

Dates: June 7-Aug. 13 Cost: $550-$675 Dive World Austin, 12129 N. RM 620, Ste. 440, Austin 512-219-1220 www.diveworldaustin.com 13 ESTEAM Learning Labs is hosting a handful of dierent camps this year for kids with varying interests. Camps include a Lego creation lab, two Battle Bots camps, a comic book creation week, a YouTube content creation camp and a Lego engineering camp for junior kids. A+ Ages: 5-14 Dates: June 1-Aug. 12 Cost: $350-$400 (per week) Dell Jewish Community Center, 7300 Hart Lane, Austin 512-740-3024 www.esteamlearninglabs.com/camps 14 Fantastic Magic Camp teaches magic, juggling and puppetry through an inclusive day camp environment. Each day ends with a show from a professional magician, juggler or clown. ART Ages: 5-12 Dates: June 7-Aug. 20 (in person) Cost: $650 (two weeks) 7500 Woodrow Ave. 512-988-3045 www.magiccamp.com 15 Game Worlds campers learn from game developers and build their own vid- eo games. Developers help students bring their vision to life by teaching campers programming, design, business, audio

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2021

COMPILED BY IAIN OLDMAN & GREG PERLISKI

engineering, art and business presenta- tion. Students end each week with a play- able game they have created themselves. A+ Ages: 8-18 Dates: June 14-Aug. 20 Cost: $550-$650 (per week) Austin Community College Northridge, 11928 Stonehollow Drive, Austin 512-609-0052 www.gameworldscamp.com 16 JWSD Dance Arts North Dance Camps students can explore dance through hip-hop, jazz, theater, crafts and games. Camp runs Tuesday through Friday, 1-4 p.m. This year, camp is oered in small group sizes in order to provide a safe camp experience. ART Ages: 5-6 and 7-10 Dates: every week in June and July Cost: $200 (per student) 12687 Research Blvd., Austin 512-633-6213 www.jwsd.net 17 This year, kidsActing Summer Camp is oering single and multiple week camps. Each camp ends with performanc- es for friends and family. ART Ages: 4-18 Dates: May 31-Aug. 13 Cost: $265-$365 (per week) Multiple locations 512-836-5437 www.kidsactingstudio.com 18 Campers at Magic Shot Doc & Hall of Fame Camps can improve their shoot- ing percentage and learn new scoring techniques by training with professional coaches. Drills focus on mechanics, fun- damentals of movement, dribbling and jumping while preventing injury. SP Ages: kindergarten-12th grade Dates: June 7-9, June 28-30, July 26-28 Cost: $135 Multiple locations 512-791-9464 www.magicbasketballclub.com 19 Quarries Camp is an activity-based camp for kids to have fun over the sum- mer with a faith-based mission. DAY Ages: 5-12 Dates: rst week of June to last week of July Cost: $65 (per day), $285 (per week) 11400 N. MoPac, Austin 512-241-0233 https://quarriesrec.org 20 Campers with a passion for Mi- necraft can participate in a variety of themed camp options. The Scholar Ship Gaming Camps has added a Spanish lan- guage camp to help teach kids a second or third language. Other camp themes

include arts and crafts, astronomy and climate change science. A+ Ages: 5-12 Dates: May 31-Aug. 17 Cost: $250 (per week) 6001 W. Parmer Lane, Ste. 390, Austin 512-333-4684 www.thescholarship.rocks 21 Waterloo Swimming is oering two camps this summer, with one geared to- ward novice-level swimmers who want to learn more about water safety awareness and develop stronger swim skills, and an- other for more experienced swimmers to strengthen skills through guided swims, games and crafts. SP Ages: grades 1-6 Dates: June 7-July 29 Cost: $160 (per week) Waterloo Swimming Northwest, 12332 N. RM 620, Austin Waterloo Swimming Central, 3200 W. Anderson Lane, Austin 512-401-3404 www.waterlooswimming.com 22 Triumphant Love Lutheran Church’s Camp Hope teaches lessons and stories from the Bible through worship, activities, snacks, art, STEM, drama and music. The theme of this year’s camp is “Action Packed.” DAY Ages: 4-12 Dates: July 12-16, 19-23 Cost: $150 (with discounts for additional siblings) 9508 Great Hills Trail, Austin 512-346-5683 www.tllc.org 23 At Wet & Wild Adventure Camp , kids go on a dierent eld trip every day. Activities include swimming in pools, lakes, rivers and water parks as well as trips to arcades, go-kart tracks and more. DAY Ages: 6-15 Dates: June 21-25, July 19-23, Aug. 2-6 Cost: $400-$480 (per week) Balcones District Park, 12017 Amherst Drive, Austin (drop-o/pickup location) 512-771-3188 www.wetwildcamp.com CAMPSWITH VIRTUAL OPTIONS 24 At Abacus Brain Gym , children are introduced to mental math training and high-speed thinking through using an abacus that helps build mental calcu- lation skills. The camp is oering its training online for now, though in-person camps may be oered at a later date. A+ Ages: 4-13 years old

17

23

kidsActing Summer Camp

Wet &Wild Adventure Camp

COURTESY KIDSACTING SUMMER CAMP

COURTESY WET & WILD ADVENTURE CAMP

28

26

Parinama Academy

Brandy Perryman Shooting Camp

COURTESY PARINAMA ACADEMY

COURTESY BRANDY PERRYMAN SHOOTING CAMP

Dates: June 7-Aug. 20 Cost: $175 (per week) or $455 (three months) 8650 Spicewood Springs Road, Ste. 124, Austin 512-775-0454 www.abacusbraingym.com 25 Badgerdog Creative Writing Summer Camp workshops allow children to work with writers to explore, exper- iment, imagine and create new written works for publication. In-person summer camp workshops may be added later in the spring based on campuses’ ability to meet COVID-19 safety guidelines. A+ Ages: rising 3rd-12th grades Spring break: March 15-19 (virtual) Summer camp: June 7-25; June 28-July 2; July 5-9, 12-30; Aug. 2-6 Cost: $125-$300 512-542-0076 www.austinlibrary.org 26 The Brandy Perryman Shooting Camp basketball camp for boys and girls includes competition and intensive drills. Skills are developed through instruction that includes repetition, self-discipline, team concepts and fun. SP Ages: 7-16 Dates: June 14-Aug. 5 Cost: $240 Multiple locations 512-799-8891 www.bperrymanshootingcamp.com 27 Mad Science & Crayola Imagine Arts Academy programs are designed with exciting hands-on science and art activi-

ties for children. Campers will become a junior scientist or artist and experience a variety of adventures. A+ Ages: 5-12 Dates: March 15-19 (spring camp), June 1-Aug. 13 (summer camp) Cost: $18 (virtual per day), $58 (in-person per day) Multiple locations 512-892-1143 www.austin.madscience.org, www.austin.imagineartsacademy.com 28 Parinama Academy campers have the opportunity to learn chess, public speaking skills, creative writing, spelling bee prep, Bollywood dance and geogra- phy bee prep, among other topics. A+ Ages: 5-14 Dates: June 1-Aug. 17 Cost: $179 (half day), $249 (full day) 3109 Kenai Drive, Unit 103, Cedar Park 512-586-7824 https://parinama.academy 29 Youth musicians of all skill levels are invited to a week of music lessons and workshops at School of Rock Austin to sharpen skills on guitar, bass, drums, keyboard and vocals. Songwriting and band musicianship are among the topics covered. A+ Ages: 6-18 Dates: June 7-Aug. 13 Cost: $440 (online), $275-$550 (in person) 2525 W. Anderson Lane, Ste. 138 512-670-2360 www.austin.schoolofrock.com

15

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28

communityimpact.com

Powered by