Grapevine - Colleyville - Southlake Edition | September 2021

GRAPEVINE COLLEYVILLE SOUTHLAKE EDITION

VOLUME 11, ISSUE 7  SEPT. 6OCT. 2, 2021

ONLINE AT

Mental health facility a ‘win for everybody’

While current passenger trac at the Dallas Fort Worth International Airport is still 8.5% less than in pre-pandemic years, ocials expect the airport to make a full recovery in scal year 2022-23.

Flying FORWARD

SOURCE: DALLAS FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Number of passengers coming through DFW Airport:

BY STEVEN RYZEWSKI

Tarrant County is inching closer to formally announcing the addition of a new mental health jail diversion center. The facility would serve as an alternative for local law enforcement ocers who encounter peo- ple suering from mental illness or a mental health episode. Oftentimes, ocers end up charging such people with low-level oenses. Police departments for Grapevine, Colleyville and Southlake would be among the 48 law enforcement agencies in Tarrant County eligible to use the facility. On July 27, the Tarrant County Commissioners Court gave county sta approval to identify and

CONTINUED ON 18

County Cases Trend

60.4% of criminal trespass cases in Tarrant County in 2020 involved individuals who had previously received services from My Health My Resources, which provides support for a variety of dierent social issues:

Dallas Fort Worth International Airport is estimating a 26.5% increase in passenger counts in 2022 compared to 2021, which Grapevine ocials say is helping bring tourists to the city. (Sandra Sadek/Community Impact Newspaper)

BY SANDRA SADEK Airport data suggests local recovery

• mental health • intellectual and developmental disabilities • addiction and substance use • child and family services • homelessness

DFW Airport saw a 35% decrease in total pas- sengers coming through the airport between s- cal year 2018-19 and scal year 2019-20, according to data from the airport due to travel restrictions resulting from the coronavirus pandemic. CONTINUED ON 16

With airplanes constantly taking o and land- ing at the Dallas Fort Worth International Airport these days, it is hard to imagine that trac at the world’s fourth-largest airport slowed to unprece- dented levels for over a year.

SOURCES: TARRANT COUNTY CRIMINAL DISTRICT ATTORNEY’S OFFICE, MY HEALTH MY RESOURCESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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THIS ISSUE

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Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMANA: We were honored to receive the award of Corporate Business of the Year at the Southlake Chamber of Commerce’s Annual Awards Banquet on Aug. 27. We know this recognition would not be possible without the support of our loyal readers, faithful advertising and community partners and our passionate team. We share this award with you. Cheers! Ana Erwin, GENERALMANAGER

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FROMSTEVEN: There is a saying in mental health circles that, in most metropolitan areas, the city or county jail is often the largest mental health care provider. Tarrant County is in the process of taking an important step toward changing that narrative locally. Read about the planned mental health jail diversion center on Pages 18-19. Steven Ryzewski, EDITOR

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GRAPEVINE  COLLEYVILLE  SOUTHLAKE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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COMING SOON 6 Knockout Sports Bar will be opening a location at 1720 William D. Tate Ave. in Grapevine in October. The location will have wall-to-wall at-screen televisions. Known for its wings, the bar also oers burgers and pizza as well as entree dishes such as meatloaf and salmon. info@ kosportsbar.com. www.kosportsbar.com 7 Swedish all-electric auto brand Polestar will soon be coming to Grape- vine as part of the Grubbs family of deal- erships. It will be operating a temporary facility on-site starting this summer at 1500 E. SH 114 while the showroom is being built next door to the current Grubbs Inniti dealership. A set opening date for the showroom has not yet been announced. Grubbs will be open for sales of the car brand starting in September. 817-458-4465. www.grubbs.com EXPANSIONS 8 Cracker Barrel Old Country Store , located at 2700 Grapevine Mills Parkway,

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NOWOPEN 1 Frescas , located at 1957 W. Southlake Blvd., Ste. 150, opened Aug. 7. The local drink and snack shop oers authentic Mex- ican treats and cravings from mangonadas to street-style corn on the cob. It also has a variety of fresh fruit waters and freshly made exotic popsicles. 817-912-1005. www.instagram.com/frescasco 2 Retail chain Five Below opened Aug. 6 at 2910 E. Southlake Blvd., inside Southlake’s Gateway Plaza. The franchise is known for its products priced between

28 at 2801 E. Southlake Blvd., Ste. 120, Southlake. Menu items include a fresh take on Hawaiian-inspired poke bowls and burritos with a customizable menu and online ordering options. 817-912-1008. www.pokeworks.com 5 Black Rock Coee Bar opened its Southlake location 2305 E. Southlake Blvd. on Aug. 27. The Oregon-based bou- tique coee shop is known for its premi- um roasted coees, teas, smoothies and energy drinks. This is the company's sixth location in Texas. Black Rock Coee Bar has locations in the cities of Austin and Houston. 469-481-1307. www.br.coee.

$1 and $5 geared toward tweens and teens. 817-993-5630. www.vebelow.com 3 The B-12 Store , known for its injectable vitamins and wellness shots, held a soft opening Aug. 2 for its new location inside Grapevine Mills at 3000 Grapevine Mills Parkway, Ste. 325, Grapevine. Products include shots for vitamins B12, C, D3, zinc, magnesium and more. It also oers weight- loss shots and immunity-boosting shots. 469-946-8494. www.theb12store.com 4 Pokeworks , a fast-casual poke destination, held its grand opening Aug. BE DFORD R

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Houston-based Toasted Yolk Cafe is opening a location in Southlake this fall. Popular dishes from other locations include the West Coast Arnold. FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON COURTESY TOASTED YOLK CAFE

Patterson said in the release. The restaurant is slated to open after renovations to the existing space and patio. www.thetoastedyolk.com

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can now sell wine and beer in addition to its food and merchandise after obtaining a conditional-use permit from the city of Grapevine on Aug. 17. Known for its American comfort food and retail, the franchise has begun expanding its ser- vices to include alcohol sales. 972-874-2325. www.crackerbarrel.com/ locations/states/tx/grapevine/609 NEWOWNERSHIP 9 Anytime Fitness Grapevine , located at 2350 Hall-Johnson Road, Ste. 155, Grapevine, is under new ownership as of June 1. The franchise is now run by hus- band and wife Joseph and Gwen Trahan and their son Jake Pitt. The gym recently underwent renovations and now sports new equipment, according to the owners. 817-442-0228. www.anytimetness.com/ gyms/2261/grapevine-tx-76051 ANNIVERSARIES 10 Kasai Hibachi Sushi & Bar has been open for one year at 5645 Colleyville Blvd., Ste. 100, Colleyville, as of mid-August. The menu includes hibachi dinners, sushi, Japanese fried rice, bento boxes and more. 817-398-4226. www.kasaicolleyville.com 11 CycleBar Southlake has been open for ve years at 1241 E. SH 114, Ste. 180, Southlake. The location opened Sept. 5, 2016, and oers indoor cycling Houston-based Toasted Yolk Cafe will open a location late this fall at 2800 E. Southlake Blvd. in Southlake’s Gateway Plaza Shopping Center, according to a press release. The chain of restaurants features the tag line, “It’s never too early to get Toasted!” The franchise oers a full bar and pairs breakfast and lunch dishes alongside juices, coees and cocktails. According to the release, Ryan Patterson of Yolked LLC and his team considered several locations in the metroplex. “We are excited to bring this fresh new concept to the Southlake market,”

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rides designed for all tness levels. An assortment of membership options are available. 972-703-2757. www.cyclebar.com/location/southlake 12 Colonial Banking, Home Loans & Insurance in Colleyville has been at 4900 Colleyville Blvd. for 10 years. The location opened in September 2011 and oers a variety of nancial products. 817-282-9281. www.gocolonial.com 13 Sherwood Montessori Academy is celebrating ve years at 300 W. Green- briar Lane in Colleyville. The academy opened in August 2016 and oers preschool, day care and after-school services. 214-245-5135. www.sherwoodma.com CLOSINGS 14 The Wright Style , a women’s clothing store, has closed its Grapevine Main Street location at 314 S. Main St. as of July. The boutique will continue to sell items on its online store. 817-416-7272. www.thewrightstyle.net 15 SkateTown , a family-owned and -operated roller rink, closed in August after 24 years of business in Grapevine. Owners Mike and Kathy Vouklizas made the announcement on SkateTown’s Face- book page that they sold the property, located at 2330 William D. Tate Ave., Grapevine, to pursue retirement.

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GRAPEVINE  COLLEYVILLE  SOUTHLAKE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

TODO LIST

September events

COMPILED BY SANDRA SADEK

12 WATCHA BALLET PERFORMANCE

20 HIT AHOLEINONE, HELP KIDS INNEED Kids Matter International, a charitable organization providing free programs to help develop, encourage, educate and nourish children, is hosting the Eagles Challenges Hole-in-One Golf Tournament. Participants can play to win up to $2 million in cash and prizes. Proceeds from the event will help provide clothes and shoes for children in need. 10:30 a.m. registration, 12:15 p.m. tee-o. Group and individual rates available. Timarron Country Club, 1400 Byron Nelson Parkway, Southlake. 817-488-7679. www.eagleschallenge.org 24 THROUGH 26 VIEWAND BUY ART FROMRENOWNEDARTISTS Art in the Square is returning to Southlake in September for its 21st year. The nationally-ranked event invites attendees to view and buy art from over 100 artists as well as enjoy entertainment, children’s activities, and festival food and beverages. Proceeds will help fund programs that serve women, children and families in Northeast Tarrant County. Hours vary daily. Free admission. 285 Grand Ave., Southlake. www.artinthesquare.com

The North Central Ballet company will perform the 19th-century ballet “Fairy Doll” at the Palace Theatre in downtown Grapevine. The story follows a toy store where the dolls come alive at night and perform dances from around the world. 2 p.m. $18. 300 S. Main St., Grapevine. 817-410-3100. AROUND THE COUNTRY The 35th Annual GrapeFest returns to Grapevine. The wine festival will highlight wines from across the state, California’s Napa Valley and South Australia’s Barossa Valley. The four- day event will include live music and entertainment, a carnival and local vendors. Highlights include the People’s Choice Wine Tasting Classic— the largest consumer-judged wine competition in the Southwest—and GrapeStomp, where guests can stomp 18 pounds of grapes for two minutes. Free (Thursday), $10 (adults Friday- Sunday), $5 (kids and seniors Friday- Sunday). 11 a.m. Main Street, Grapevine. www.grapevinetexasusa.com/grapefest https://bit.ly/2WJ7TAX 16 THROUGH 19 TASTEWINES FROM

SEPT. 11

ATTENDA SHOWCASE OF ITALIANAUTOMOBILES NASH FARM

The Italian Car Club of North Texas and the Grapevine Convention & Visitors Bureau will be hosting ItalianCarFest 2021 at Nash Farm. A prelude to GrapeFest, this premier show of Italian automobiles will include more than 90 vehicles, from Fiats and Alfa Romeos to Lamborghinis and Ferraris. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. 626 Ball St., Grapevine. 817-410-3185. (Courtesy Grapevine Convention and Visitors Bureau)

SEPTEMBER 11 THROUGH 12

be on-site to answer any questions, and watermelon will be provided to children to feed and interact with the butteries. The weekend event ends with the release of the butteries at 5 p.m. on Sunday. 9 a.m. $7 (adults), $5 (children ages 3-12). 1400 E. Southlake Blvd., Southlake. www.netckiwanis.org/butteryfest.html

LEARNABOUT BUTTERFLIES

FROMTHE EXPERTS Walk among hundreds of butteries contained in a 600-square-foot tent at the 2021 Kiwanis Buttery Festival, held at the Rustin & Family Park. Experts will

Find more or submit Grapevine, Colleyville or Southlake events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Commissioners Court to put bond for transportation projects on ballot

COMPILED BY STEVEN RYZEWSKI & SANDRA SADEK

ONGOING PROJECTS

Pleasant Run Road improvements Work is expected to be completed along Pleasant Run Road in Colleyville ahead of schedule, weather and sup- plies permitting. The project upgraded sidewalks and trails. Ribbon curbs with improved storm drain infrastructure were added as well as a full asphalt rehabilitation of the road surface. Timeline: January-mid-September. Cost: $1.8 million Funding source: Colleyville Capital Improvement Program Big Bear Creek bridge replacement The replacement of the bridge over Big Bear Creek is expected to be open around mid-September. Timeline: January-mid-September Cost: $1.05 million Funding source: Texas Department of Transportation

E. CONTINENTAL BLVD.

A unanimous vote Aug. 10 by the Tarrant County Commissioners Court called for a bond election for two propositions that will be placed on the ballot for the Nov. 2 election. Proposition A is for the issuance of $400 million in general obligation bonds for transportation projects. A second proposition will focus on $116 million in general obligation bonds for a new facility for the county’s criminal district attorney office. The bonds proposed for Proposition A will be described on the ballot as being for streets, roads, highways and bridges that are managed by their respective cities, by the county or by the state. The language says the funds can be used for costs associated with construction, reconstruction, renovation, rehabilitation, improve- ment or maintenance of any of these

categories. It also addresses the Court’s ability to impose a tax for the purposes of paying the principal and interest on the bonds. Cities and public agencies in Tarrant County submitted projects previously. Bonds approved by the voters in November will be allowed to fund up to half the cost of a selected municipal project and, of the $400 million being proposed, $200 million is tentatively to be allocated for the projects submit- ted by municipalities. An evaluation committee began meeting in May to rank the projects. It presented its rankings to the Commissioners Court on Aug. 3, and they were recorded for further consideration. Projects for Colleyville and Southlake were among the projects recommended for funding by the court.

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COMPLETED PROJECT

North White Chapel Boulevard improvements

HIGHLAND ST.

The sidewalk along North White Chapel Boulevard in front of Carroll Senior High School now includes handicap ramps. Timeline: July-August Cost: $41,000 Funding source: city of Southlake

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF AUG. 31. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT GCSNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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GRAPEVINE - COLLEYVILLE - SOUTHLAKE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

DEVELOPMENT

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Carillon Parc is a 42.5-acre mixed-use development expected to break ground in Southlake in 2022. (Rendering courtesy Carillon Parc)

CarillonParc development back on track for 2022 groundbreaking

BY SANDRA SADEK

another oce building, depending on market demands. “With the Delta open and the Westin coming, we’ve got to just make sure that there is a market for another hotel in Southlake,” he said. Terrell attributed Carillon Parc’s delay mostly to the COVID-19 pan- demic. Originally planned to begin construction in the spring of 2020, the project was placed on hold after a downturn in the retail and dining

The long-awaited development known as Carillon Parc is slated to break ground late in the rst quarter of 2022, after an 18-month delay for the mixed-use project. The 42.5-acre, European-style development located at the north- east corner of Hwy. 114 and White Chapel Boulevard has been revised to include more single-family residen- tial units, reducing the number of

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lofts planned. The amended develop- ment will also include more green and open park space—from a previously approved

business caused a lack of interest from potential tenants. Now, he said, that has changed. “There’s quite a bit of interest in coming back into Carillon Parc,” Terrell told Community Impact Newspaper . “We’re thrilled that we can be bringing this

“WE’RE THRILLED THATWE CANBE BRINGING THIS PROJECT BACK TO THE CITY.” JOHN TERRELL, FORMER SOUTHLAKE MAYOR AND CARILLON PARC DEVELOPER

10.2 acres to more than 12 acres, according to John Terrell, a former Southlake mayor and one of Carillon Parc’s developers. A portion of the park will be dedicated to the city, as well, and is projected to add around $10 million in value to Southlake’s parks. Carillon Parc will still include three mixed-use buildings, two single-story restaurant sites, three two-story oce buildings, and a three-story library and entertainment building. There will also be a hotel inside the development. However, Terrell said the council will have the option to change the planned hotel out for

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project back to the city.” Carillon Parc was rst approved in June 2018 and has since been revised twice, with the most recent proposed amendments being discussed. The development is estimated to cost nearly $290 million. Terrell said the developers are looking to present updated site plans to a joint meeting of South- lake’s Planning and Zoning Commis- sion and City Council in October for nal approval.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Grapevine, Colleyville, Southlake & Tarrant County

COMPILED BY SANDRA SADEK

Colleyville City Council Meets at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 7, 21 www.colleyville.com Grapevine City Council Meets at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 7, 21 www.grapevinetexas.gov Southlake City Council Meets at 5:30 p.m. Sept. 7, 21 www.cityofsouthlake.com MEETINGSWE COVER effort with Homeland Security Investigations’ Dallas Field Office and the U.S. Secret Service in taking down a prostitution and sex trafficking global website. The second award is the 2021 IACP Leadership in the Prevention of Transnational Crime Award for the team’s success in helping apprehend offenders from a West African fraud ring that was targeting elderly victims across the country, including a local victim. “It is a feat for any agency to win one award, but for a department the size of Colleyville to win two agency awards in one year is absolutely NUMBER TOKNOW This is the percentage increase of population in Tarrant County from the 2010 Census (population 1,809,034) to the 2020 Census, for which Tarrant County is being credited with a population of 2,110,640. 16.7% CITY HIGHLIGHTS COLLEYVILLE The police department will receive two awards from the International Association of Chiefs of Police for its work in solving two high- profile cases relating to sex trafficking and elder fraud. The department will receive the 2021 IACP/Thomson Reuters Excellence in Criminal Investigations Award for its collaborative incredible,” Colleyville Police Chief Michael Miller said in a news release.

Southlake recruitment task force to bring business prospects to the city

Council rejectsMain Station apartments GRAPEVINE A new 248-unit multifamily complex proposed on the corner of S. Dooley Street and E. Dallas Road was denied by unanimous vote from Grapevine City Council during its joint meeting with the city’s planning and zoning commission on Aug. 17. Citing the Transit District Overlay, an amendment zoning ordinance relative to the Dallas Road transit corridor passed in February 2019, planning and zoning members and City Council members alike suggested that the proposal did not comply with the ordinance and was not appropriate for approval.

SOUTHLAKE City Council has directed city staff to create the Target Industry Recruitment Task Force in an attempt to attract more businesses to Southlake. As part of the city’s economic development master plan, Mayor John Huffman said the council has made a goal “to be intentional about recruiting new businesses” moving forward. The task force, which will focus on target indus- tries, will comprise local business owners who will collaborate with city staff to identify and meet prospects as well as work on communication and recruitment marketing efforts. Daniel Cortez, director of eco- nomic development and tourism for the city of Southlake, said the general exodus of companies to Texas—especially North Texas— has made now the prime time to bring in new businesses to the

Targeted industries

The economic development master plan focuses on certain industries.

Corporate offices Niche retail

city. This initiative is in line with the city’s latest economic devel- opment master plan addendum, passed in March to address “both the short-term and long-term economic challenges of the pandemic.” Appointments, made by City Council, will be for one-year terms. A total of six members will make up the task force. Medical and health care Finance and insurance Information technology/media Biotech and pharmaceutical SOURCE: CITY OF SOUTHLAKE/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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City Council approves open space bond election for November ballot SOUTHLAKE City Council has called a special election Nov. 2 for an open space bond program. Council directed staff Aug. 3 to prepare the bond proposal. On Aug. 11, the bond election was approved in a special meeting. Oct. 4 Oct. 18 Oct. 22 Oct. 29 Nov. 2 DATES TO KNOW: SOURCE: TARRANT COUNTY ELECTIONS OFFICE/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER Last day to register to vote First day of early in-person voting Last day to apply for ballot by mail Last day of early in-person voting Election day

Based on current estimates by Chief Financial Officer Sharen Jackson, the program could generate a capacity between $20 million and $50 million. According to Jack- son’s presentation to City Council Aug. 3, her estimates also take into account no increase in taxes for residents as well as maintaining the city’s AAA bond rating. “This is not necessarily saddling the city with any more debt,” Southlake Mayor John Huffman said. “This

is basically going to function as a line of credit that this council, or future councils, could employ as they see the availability of opportunity.”

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GRAPEVINE - COLLEYVILLE - SOUTHLAKE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Grapevine-Colleyville & Carroll ISDs

CAMPUS HIGHLIGHTS GRAPEVINE-COLLEYVILLE ISD The board of trustees voted to give an additional pay increase to all teachers, nurses and librarians by at least $600 at the Aug. 23 meeting. The board also decided to extend that pay raise to 44 other district employees in a handful of other positions. Previously, on June 21, the board approved its general operating budget for fiscal year 2021-22 with a 2% midpoint pay increase for all employees. The budget adopted in June anticipated a deficit of about $7.5 million, with almost $188 million in its expected general fund to account for nearly $195 million in expenditures. The vote Aug. 23 will add $949,256 to that total, bringing the anticipated deficit to nearly $8.5 million, which GCISD documents state will be accounted for by use of the district’s fund balance. Grapevine-Colleyville ISD board Meets at 7 p.m. Sept. 27 www.gcisd.net Carroll ISD board Meets at 5 p.m. Sept. 27 www.southlakecarroll.edu MEETINGSWE COVER

Trustees approve balanced budget

ProposedGCISD total tax rate set for vote

BY SANDRA SADEK

million in salaries budgeted for open positions deemed noncritical was removed from the budget, and the unfilled positions were frozen. The district also used funds from the Elementary and Sec- ondary School Emergency Relief programs. From ESSER II, CISD pulled $400,000 to offset some payroll expenses. From ESSER III, $199,000 is being used to cover administrative costs, and $533,000 is being used from the ESSER Supplemental funds for payroll and campus operations. The board will be voting on a proposed total tax rate of $1.2586 per $100 in valuation at its Sept. 13 meeting.

CARROLL ISD The board of trustees unanimously approved a balanced budget for fiscal year 2021-22 to help mitigate unforeseen expenditures from the pandemic. According to WilliamWooten, Carroll ISD assistant superinten- dent for financial services, this is a 4% decrease from the previous year’s initial budget due to a decrease in the maintenance and operations tax rate. Some adjustments were made to balance the budget, including staff travel, payroll and administration. Superintendent Lane Ledbetter said no compensation or staffed positions were cut. Instead, $1.3 Approved expenditures: $119,103,955 Total revenue expected: $119,103,955 FEDERAL AID

BY BAILEY LEWIS

GRAPEVINE-COLLEYVILLE ISD Trustees plan to vote on a proposed total tax rate of $1.2501 per $100 valuation for fiscal year 2021-22 at a Sept. 27 meeting, which decreased $0.053 from last year’s tax rate. The proposed total tax rate consists of its proposed maintenance and operations, or M&O, tax rate of $0.9134 and a proposed debt service tax rate of $0.3367. On June 11, the district published an original proposed total tax rate of $1.3001, consisting of a $0.9634 M&O tax rate and $0.3367 tax rate for debt service. However, the Texas Educa- tion Agency recalculated the M&O tax rate to be $0.9134, instead of $0.9634, based on certified values from the appraisal district, per GCISD meeting documents. The owner of a house valued at $300,000 will pay $159 less per year in taxes to GCISD due to the decrease.

Federal money from the ESSER programs helped Carroll ISD balance out its budget for fiscal year 2021-22.

Total ESSER funds used: $1,132,000

SOURCE: CARROLL ISD/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

LEGISLATION

Local ISDs sign letter asking for amendments to bill New required accelerated instruction comes with logistical concerns

Additional highlights of HOUSE B I L L 4545

LEARN I NG COMMI T TEES

An accelerated learning committee will be established to develop an individual educational plan and monitor progress for any student who does not pass the STAAR math or reading test in grades three, five or eight.

BY STEVEN RYZEWSKI

districts that signed a letter to state Rep. Dan Huberty, who sits on the House Public Education Committee, urging alterations to the legislation. The letter cites several practical concerns, including the logistics in implementing the hours and ratio, as well as concerns over autonomy for parents and the districts as well as the workload for impacted students. “These kids, they go to school for … basically eight hours a day—and so to add an additional time com- mitment to them, it’s just hard,” said Gina Peddy, CISD executive director of curriculum and instruction. As for fixes, the letter asks for, among other things, increased flexibility for school districts rated B or higher, to eliminate the student- to-teacher ratio, to allow parent choice to opt out of the measure and to remove the Teacher Incentive Allotment language from the bill.

program passed by the Texas Legis- lature in 2019. According to Travis Whisenant, the instructional services director for Education Service Center Region 11, most districts have not implemented the program yet— Whisenant said the process can be time intensive. That leaves tutoring, which, for students who failed more than one exam, can total 60, 90 or even 120 hours. The instruction can occur during or outside of the normal school day, though students cannot be removed from certain classes for tutoring. The bill also has a required ratio of no more than three students per instructor—unless waived by the student’s parents or guardian. “A lot of the challenge is with scheduling,” said Elizabeth Schrader, a specialist for ESC 11. Grapevine-Colleyville ISD and Carroll ISD are two of 11 area school

Local school districts are working to comply with a new state law that requires each student who did not pass a standardized test in the spring to receive 30 hours of extra instruc- tion per test failed. House Bill 4545 requires any student who did not pass a State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness exam in grades three through eight, or an end-of-course assessment at the high school level, to receive accelerated instruction, according to the Texas Education Agency. This can come in one of two forms: students can receive instruction from a certified master, exemplary or recognized classroom teacher, or they must receive 30 hours of tutoring for each test failed. The first option bypasses the 30-hour requirement, but it is based on the Teacher Incentive Allotment

GRADE RETENT I ON

A student in grade five or eight is no longer required to be retained at the same grade level based on STAAR testing results.

TEACHER REQUESTS

Under HB 4545, parents have the right to request the student be placed with a different teacher in the applicable subject area.

SOURCE: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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GRAPEVINE - COLLEYVILLE - SOUTHLAKE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

HEALTH CARE ‘Our staff is fatigued’: Hospitals await relief to combat nurse shortage

BY SANDRA SADEK

surge staff that “cannot be met locally” by recruiting staff from out- of-state to assist hospitals and health care facilities reaching capacity. “We have received notice from the state that we will be allocated additional nurses and respiratory therapists,” said Baylor Scott & White Health in a statement. “We look forward to welcoming the additional medical personnel who will soon be available.” Matthew Eiserloh, director of community and public relations for Medical City Alliance, said the health

care system hired 25 new nursing interns in the last two months to assist with the increased number of cases they have also seen. Love said individuals needing medical attention or experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 should still come to their hospital to get treatment. “There are ways hospitals, in a real critical search situation, can flex up a little bit,” he said. “But I do not want to create panic... we’re going to do everything we can to try to give them the best [care].”

we’re burnt out completely.’” The delta variant has forced many hospitals to pause elective surgeries. The DFWHC reported on Aug. 30 that Tarrant County had 62 staffed adult ICU beds. The council also reported four available staffed pediatric ICU beds in Trauma Service E, an area of 19 counties including Tarrant, Dallas, Collin and Denton and counties. To assist with the need for staff, the Texas Department of State Health Services announced Aug. 11 it will resume filing requests for medical

As the latest surge of COVID-19 spreads across Tarrant County, local hospitals need nurses as they tackle the delta variant. Diana Brodeur, vice president of JPS Health Network—Tarrant Coun- ty’s taxpayer-supported hospital district—said JPS has been experienc- ing staffing shortages and is down 288 nurses. “The JPS Nursing team is extremely proactive,” Brodeur said. “That’s not to say this isn’t incredibly hard. Anything the community can do to ease the pressure the pandemic is putting on already busy hospital systems is what’s needed now.” Staffing challenges are not unique to JPS facilities. “Our staff is fatigued, they have been at this for over 18 months,” said Steve Love, president and CEO of the Dallas-Fort Worth Hospital Council. “We’ve got professionals [who are] just leaving, saying, ‘We’ve had enough, we’re gonna change careers,

1,200

ATROUBLING TREND

Confirmed hospital beds occupied by COVID-19 patients in Tarrant County increased 77.7% from Aug. 1 to Aug. 24. SOURCE: TARRANT COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

800

+77.7%

400

0

August 12

August 24

August 1

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PEOPLE

GAYLE HALL’S GRAPEVINE LEGACY Gayle Hall spent more than two decades shepherding the city’s signature events: GrapeFest Grapevine’s annual fall event celebrates its signature export—wine. Main Street Fest Grapevine’s longest-running festival celebrates craft beer and local businesses. Individual events As part of the city’s Convention & Visitors Bureau, Hall was involved in numerous events such as Butterfly Flutterby, a free event each October where local children release Monarch butterflies.

COURTESY LUANN CHAPMAN GATTS

GayleHall Community remembers Grapevine native, longtime director of festivals and events

BY STEVEN RYZEWSKI

wanted to come back year after year.” Tate said Hall became the face of Grapevine’s festivals. Others, such as Grapevine Mayor Pro Tem Darlene Freed, agree. “You’ll see a million pictures of her, having been involved in running festivals, and she’s always got the headset on,” Freed said. “If there was anything that you needed to get done during a festival—one call to Gayle and we knew it was taken care of.” Hall’s life was celebrated Aug. 31 at First Baptist Church in Grapevine with a memorial service that was followed by a horse-drawn hearse procession to the Grapevine Convention Center, where attendees enjoyed a reception titled “Gayle’s Taste of Grapevine” featuring local restaurants. Many attendees were past festival volunteers who wore shirts from the events they worked. The native of the city was rec- ognized just this past January as D.E. Box Citizen of the Year by the Grapevine Chamber of Commerce. “As far as I’m concerned, we work and live in the best community that we can live in—and I support it 150% percent,” Hall said in accepting the award. “And if you don’t, then get off the wagon.”

Perhaps you do not know Gayle Hall, but if you have enjoyed any of Grapevine’s downtown festivals, you have enjoyed the fruits of her labor. She became the Grapevine Con- vention & Visitors Bureau Director of Festivals and Events in 1998—a role she occupied for more than two decades until she died Aug. 22 at the age of 68. During her long tenure as director of festivals and events, GrapeFest, Main Street Fest, the city’s famous Christmas festivities and other events Grapevine is known for only contin- ued to grow in popularity. “The festivals grew because … they were produced at a high quality,” Grapevine Mayor William Tate said. “Gayle was able to produce an environment, through her organiza- tion and leadership ... where people “IF THERE WAS ANYTHING THAT YOU NEEDED TO GET DONE DURING A FESTIVAL—ONE CALL TO GAYLE AND WE KNEW IT WAS TAKEN CARE OF.” DARLENE FREED, GRAPEVINE MAYOR PRO TEM/COUNCIL PLACE 4

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GRAPEVINE - COLLEYVILLE - SOUTHLAKE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DEVELOPMENT

2 0 2 1 H I G H E R E D U C AT I O N G U I D E

Tarrant County CollegeNorthwest campus begins $320Mconstruction

PAVING THE WAY FOR LEARNING Tarrant County College’s construction on its northwest campus is part of an $825 million bond program approved by Tarrant County voters in 2019.

BY BAILEY LEWIS

Tarrant County College 2019 Bond Program Total: $837,000,000

and science labs, according to the release. The rst oor of Building 2 will contain the majority of student development services and a student gathering atrium, while the second will have more student services, testing areas and faculty spaces. The second building’s third level will house more faculty space, adminis- trative oces and classrooms. Building 1 and Building 2 are set to be nished in late 2023 “in time to be used as a swing space” to demolish and clear spots for the construction of Building 3 and Building 4, accord- ing to the release. With construction on Building 1 and Building 2 having begun around the same time classes started Aug. 23, students and faculty will be in the heart of the project. But John Posch, program director of the team that is executing TCC’s 2019 bond program, said they have made adjustments to the construction, such as moving construction fences, setting up additional temporary parking and adding temporary waynding signage to help faculty and students navigate their way around campus. Building 3 will contain two oors consisting of art, music and general classrooms, according to the release. South of Building 3, Building 4 will house the Learning Commons, bookstore, food services and a multipurpose center. As for the existing buildings on the core campus, three—WACB, WHPE and WBSA—will be kept and redone to match the four new buildings.

A $320 million project to create four new buildings, remove ve and renovate three more at Tarrant County College’s Northwest campus in Fort Worth is underway. On June 17, the TCC board of trust- ees approved a $105 million contract with Skanska USA, according to a TCC press release. Construction of two of the planned new buildings began shortly thereafter. The project is part of an $837 million bond program voters approved in 2019. TCC’s six other campuses are part of the bond program as well, includ- ing TCC’s Northeast campus in Hurst. The northeast campus’ renovations are budgeted at $28 million and will consist of replacing four chillers and their supporting equipment and replacing all in-ground sewer mains that are over 50 years old or met their life cycle, along with other various building upgrades pertaining to hot water and air conditioning, per TCC’s website. While construction began this summer, the project’s roots extend to 2016, when a severe thunderstorm caused major damage to the campus, said Margaret Lutton, TCC’s exec- utive director of institutional and strategic development. “We had a major storm that caused a lot of damage ... and the assessment really led to this redevelopment,” Lutton said. The rst new building—Building 1—will have three levels that consist of the early college high school

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820

Northwest campus redevelopment program: $320,000,000

N

New buildings:

As part of the bond, four new buildings will be built on the northwest campus. Building 1 1

Mechanical, electrical and plumbing/ infrastructure budget: $202,000,000 TCC’s three goals and eight principles budget: $190,000,000

Early college high school and science labs

Building 2

2

Student services, an atrium, oces, classrooms and faculty spaces

Building 3

3

Southeast campus expansion budget: $125,000,000

Art, music and general classrooms

Building 4

4

Learning Commons, bookstore, food services and a multipurpose center

1

The removal of ve already existing buildings on campus will make way for some of the new construction.

3

2

4

SOURCE: TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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