Lewisville - Flower Mound - Highland Village | March 2021

LEWISVILLE FLOWERMOUND HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION

VOLUME 4, ISSUE 5  MARCH 17APRIL 13, 2021

ONLINE AT

Copperas Branch Park in Highland Village is now the target of a master planning vision. A REGIONAL DESTINATION

$18 MILLION 10-20 YEARS 75 ACRES

The city has outlined investments that would increase regional usage. The full list of projects may take up to two decades to complete. The land is roughly double the size of nearby Doubletree Ranch Park.

IMPACTS

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WEATHER CAMP GUIDE 2021

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A proposed lakeside, grassy lawn could one day host events like the Highland Village Balloon Festival. (Courtesy city of Highland Village)

City embarks on $18Mvision for Copperas BranchPark

BY DANIEL HOUSTON

health ocials were warning that indoor activities carried greater risk of viral spread, the city watched trac at Copperas Branch Park rise by more than 140% over that of the previous year, Parks & Recreation Director Phil Lozano said.

The city is looking to build on that interest with a series of capital invest- ments over the next two decades that would upgrade some of the park’s most popular features and add a bevy of new recreational options. CONTINUED ON 16

Tucked away in a hard-to-reach corner of Highland Village, a lakeside park has attracted renewed interest during the pandemic. Throughout a year when many people were cooped up at home and

LISTINGS

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Businesses’ pandemicwoes compounded bywinter storm

“WEWERE STILL BURNINGMONEYTO KEEP THIS BUSINESSOPERATING. EVEN

THOUGHWEGOT THAT LOAN, ITDIDN’TCOVER EVERYTHING.” — JIMVERFURTH OWNER, SHOAL CREEK TAVERN ONRECEIVINGPPP LOANS DURINGTHE PANDEMIC

THEANTIQUE GALLERYOF LEWISVILLE

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BY DANIEL HOUSTON

Weeks after single-digit temperatures and blankets of snow in February pushed the state’s electrical power grid to its limits, Valerie Sample still nds herself wondering what might have been if the storms had only arrived one day later. Sample is the general manager for Shoal Creek Tavern in Highland Village, where, heading into Valentine’s Day, the sta had been anticipating some of its best sales numbers CONTINUED ON 18

EGGSPRESS CAFE

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Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMBARB: Although everything looks dierent this year, one thing remains the same: Parents are on the lookout for safe summer camps for their children. Organizations throughout our community have made adjustments to meet the needs of families. In our Camp Guide (see Page 13), parents can nd a variety of interesting summer activities. Barb Delk, GENERALMANAGER

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FROMDANIEL: After an already trying year colored by a pandemic, the business community was hit hard by last month’s storms, which encased roads in snow and left water and electricity in short supply. In our cover story, you can read more about the eorts of local entrepreneurs to keep their businesses aoat during this period. Daniel Houston, EDITOR

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • MARCH 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

COMPILED BY DANIEL HOUSTON

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HIGHLAND VILLAGE

LEWISVILLE LAKE

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JUSTIN RD.

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JOSEY LN.

LLELA NATURE PRESERVE

RIVER WALK DR.

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ALLY CRUTCHER/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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DANIEL HOUSTON/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

NOWOPEN 1 The Porch Patio Bar & Kitchen opened in January at 1402 Justin Road, Lewisville. The establishment serves a variety of alcoholic beverages and features a menu with tacos, enchiladas, nachos, queso and desserts. In its early weeks, the kitchen also served a variety of special dishes and hosted live music. www.facebook.com/theporchpatiobar 2 Sushi Damu is now open at 3651 Justin Road, Ste. 140, Flower Mound. The restaurant serves sushi and sashimi dishes as well as appetizers and noodle entrees. Sushi rolls come in tempura, baked and low-carb options. 214-513-5103. www.sushidamutexas.com

3 Holy Rollie Pastry Shop opened March 6 near the Center Court in Music City Mall at 2401 S. Stemmons Freeway, Lewisville. The small storefront sells large homemade cinnamon rolls. It also offers flavors other than cinnamon for the filling. www.holyrollie.com COMING SOON 4 Spenga is expected to open a Flower Mound location in April at 2450 Cross Timbers Road, Ste. 130, Flower Mound. The fitness concept focuses on cardio, high-intensity interval training and flexibility exercises in one-hour sessions, according to the company website. The sessions are broken down into 20 minutes of spin class, 20 minutes

of strength training and 20 minutes of yoga. 214-513-5003. www.spenga.com 5 New York Pizza and Pints is expected to open a new location in April at 2717 Cross Timbers Road, Ste. 410, Flower Mound. The pizza restaurant specializes in New York-style crust and sauce and of- fers a variety of craft beers and growlers to go. The restaurant also has locations in Carrollton, Frisco, McKinney and Allen. www.nypizzaandpints.com 6 Wild Fork Foods , a Florida-based company, is planning to build a new store near Sam Rayburn Tollway at 6139 N. Josey Lane, Lewisville. An opening timeline is not yet available, but the construction project is expected to be- gin in July and last nearly four months. The meat and seafood market sells

animal products, including beef, chicken, lamb, fish, pork and others. 7 Primo’s is expected to open in May in The River Walk at Central Park development in Flower Mound at 4120 River Walk Drive, Flower Mound. The restaurant will be a chef-driven Tex-Mex concept with an emphasis on fresh in- gredients. The opening of this and other restaurant concepts at the development were delayed because of the effects of the pandemic on the business, the developer said. The restaurant has three

other locations, all in Dallas. www.primosmxkitchen.com

8 Sfereco is also expected to open in May at The River Walk at Central Park at 4110 River Walk Drive, Flower

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Mound. The Italian restaurant serves pasta, pizza, calzones, sandwiches, and other dishes and appetizers as well as meatballs, offered either with pasta or a la carte with sauce. Sfereco has another location at the Statler development in Dallas. www.sfereco.com 9 Scout is currently slated for a June opening date at The River Walk at Central Park at 4110 River Walk Drive, Flower Mound. The dining and gaming business offers opportunities to play pool, bowling and table tennis. The food ranges from fish and chips to burgers, and the menu includes a selection of shareable appetizers. Scout has another location at the Statler development in Dallas. www.scoutdallas.com 10 Boi Na Braza has signed on to join The River Walk at Central Park project in Flower Mound at 4110 River Walk Drive, Flower Mound. The Brazilian steakhouse recently closed its Grapevine restaurant and announced in February its plans to open new locations in the Dallas area. In a March update to Flower Mound Town Council, the River Walk developer listed Boi Na Braza among the concepts it

plans to bring to the property, possibly as early as this summer. www.boinabraza.com/our-menu RELOCATION 11 St. Philip the Apostle Catholic Church is constructing a new building on a 40-acre property at 5201 Cross Timbers Road, Flower Mound. The project was initiated in 2014 after the church identified a need for more space. The church continues to operate at its Lewisville address, 1897 W. Main St., during construction. 972-436-9581. 12 A merchant space will undergo ren- ovations starting in April to make way for a Harbor Freight Tools location at 500 E. Round Grove Road, Ste. 101, Lewis- ville. State construction filings said the 15,000-square-foot space is being ren- ovated to install a new loading dock and automatic doors in addition to the interior upgrades. www.harborfreight.com www.stphilipcc.org RENOVATION

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LEWISVILLE - FLOWER MOUND - HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • MARCH 2021

TODO LIST

March & April events

MARCH 1620, 2325

LEWISVILLE ISDHIGH SCHOOL ART SHOW LEWISVILLE GRAND THEATER

High school students across Lewisville ISD have submitted 10-inch by 10-inch art pieces for the district’s annual art show at the Lewisville Grand Theater. The exhibition features the work of students from Lewisville High School, Flower Mound High School, Marcus High School, Hebron High School and The Colony High School. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. 100 N. Charles St., Lewisville. 972-219-8446. www.mclgrand.com (Courtesy Lewisville Grand Theater)

Briarhill Middle School near Justin Road. Some eggs may include special prizes, and other activities will be oered. 10 a.m. Free. 2200 Briarhill Blvd., Highland Village. 972-317-7430. www.highlandvillage.org APRIL 03 UNDERWATER EASTER EGG HUNT Children can participate in an underwater Easter egg hunt at the indoor pool at the Flower Mound Community Activity Center. The event will feature an appearance by the Easter Bunny. Parents must accompany children who are not able to swim. Registration is required. 10 a.m. $7. 1200 Gerault Road, Flower Mound. 972-874-7275. www.ower-mound.com 30 STAY IN SCHOOL BANQUET Communities in Schools North Texas will hold its annual banquet at Circle C Ranch, and awards will be presented to students, educators and volunteers in its programs. Guests can attend in person or virtually this year. The organization runs case-management programs and after-school programs for students of various grade levels in Denton and Wise counties with the purpose of helping at-risk children stay in school. The organization is also seeking sponsors for the event at banquet@cisnt.org. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. 5901 Cross Timbers Road, Flower Mound. 972-538-9930. www.cisnt.org

COMPILED BY DANIEL HOUSTON MARCH 20 TODDLER NATURE TIME The Lewisville Lake Environmental Learning Area will host an outdoor program for toddlers and their parents. The nature program will feature a storytime and a guided hike through the learning area. If weather interferes, the event will take place in one of the learning area’s classrooms. Registration is required, and parents can register at the website below or by calling 972- 219-3550. 10 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Free (with $5 vehicle entry fee). 201 E. Jones St., Country musician Sunny Sweeney will perform two shows at the Lewisville Grand Theater. According to materials from the performance venue, Sweeney delivers her witty, confessional songs with her Texas soprano vocals. The theater will perform temperature checks, require audience members to wear masks and ask visitors to space out within the seating area. 6 p.m. (early show), 8:30 p.m. (late show). $20-$35. 100 N. Charles St., Lewisville. 972-219-8446. www.mclgrand.com 27 LANDBASED EASTER EGG HUNT Families can participate in this traditional Easter egg hunt event held annually at Highland Village’s Unity Park, located by Lewisville. www.llela.org 20 SUNNY SWEENEY PERFORMANCE

Find more or submit Lewisville, Flower Mound or Highland Village events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY DANIEL HOUSTON

ONGOING PROJECT BELLAIRE BLVD.

UPCOMING PROJECTS

DOVE CIR.

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Colonial Drive project, Phase 2 The town of Flower Mound is planning to reconstruct a portion of Colonial Drive between Whitney Lane and Homestead Street. In addition to roadway recon- struction, the project will include the replacement of some failing sewer pipelines and improvements to sidewalk and pedestrian ramp improvements. During the design process, the town also identified a deficient storm main line that will be replaced before pavement repair begins. The town is expected to award a contract for the construction in the month of April. Timeline: April-TBD Cost: $2.3 million Funding source: town of Flower Mound

Intersection project at Cross Timbers, Flower Mound roads

Timberbrook neighborhood project As part of the project to revamp streets and pipelines in Lewisville’s Timberbrook neighborhood, crews have begun placing new pavement on the south- bound portion of Live Oak Drive toward Holly Oak Drive and are preparing to start construction on Mockingbird Drive. The project was identified as a top city priority because of the area’s high rate of water-main breaks and its substandard pavement conditions, according to the city. Several community meetings have been held to update residents on the progress. Work will continue into next year. Timeline: February 2020-August 2022 Cost: $11.4 million Funding source: city of Lewisville

The town of Flower Mound is negotiating with a firm for design services for a major project at the intersec- tion of Flower Mound Road and Cross Timbers Road. The project would reconfigure the intersection to provide two left-turn lanes, three thru-lanes and a dedicated right-turn lane in each direction. East- bound Flower Mound Road would continue to feature two right-turn lanes. Currently, the major project is in the planning phase and does not have a hard timeline. Timeline: TBD Cost: $2.2 million Funding source: town of Flower Mound

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF FEB. 25. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT LFHNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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LEWISVILLE - FLOWER MOUND - HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • MARCH 2021

VOTE

COMPILED BY DANIEL HOUSTON

May 1 elections are approaching, and a number of municipal and school board races will be on the ballot. See which candidates have led for various municipal and school board races below. OUT THE FIELD ROUNDING

DATES TO KNOW April 1 Last day to register to vote for May 1 election April 19 First day of early voting April 20 Last day to apply for ballot by mail (received, not postmarked)

April 27 Last day of early voting May 1 Election day

May 1 Last day to receive ballot by mail (unless late-arriving deadline applies)

* Incumbent

Council member, Place 2 William J. Meridith Council member, Place 3 Ronni Cade Penny A. Mallet Charter amendments

Proposition D —would remove a provision that gives City Council authority to administer city departments, which is the role of the city manager TOWN OF FLOWER MOUND Mayor Stephanie Bell Derek France Itamar Gelbman

LEWISVILLE ISD Trustee, Place 1 Buddy Bonner Paige Dixon

CITY OF HIGHLAND VILLAGE Council member, Place 3 Andrew Crawford Michael Lombardo* Council member, Place 5

Trustee, Place 2 Allison Lassahn* Sheila P. Taylor CITY OF LEWISVILLE Mayor Tianie Fowler Timothy M. Friebel Jr. T.J. Gilmore Delia Parker-Mims

Jason Bates Tom Heslep* Council member, Place 7 Dan Jaworski*

Proposition A —would add one member to the Lewisville City Council to represent Castle Hills as part of annexation process Proposition B —would remove some budget-related provisions that are covered by or inconsistent with state law Proposition C —would eliminate a requirement that residents must own real property to serve on the Lewisville Planning and Zoning Commission

Cheryl Moore Jehangir Raja Council member, Place 4

Jim Engel* Ani Umoh

FOR MORE INFORMATION

For question-and-answer responses from each candidate in the coming weeks, visit communityimpact.com. A voters guide will appear in our April print edition.

HOMEDEPOT.COM/MYCABINETMAKEOVER 469 - 802 - 7468

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

WEATHER

The Electric Reliability Council of Texas manages an electric grid that covers most of Texas and is disconnected from larger interconnections covering the rest of the U.S.

1

2

WESTERN INTERCONNECTION Includes El Paso and far West Texas 1 EASTERN INTERCONNECTION Includes portions of East Texas and the panhandle region 2 3

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ERCOT INTERCONNECTION

ERCOT’s grid provides electric

ERCOT man- ages 90%

ERCOT provides for 26 million customers.

ERCOT’s grid includes 46,500 miles of transmission.

power to the majority of Texans.

of the Texas electrical load.

Winter conditions bring outages to isolated Texas power grid Widespread power outages across the state left many North Texans residents with intermittent power or no electricity at all. (Liesbeth Powers/Community Impact Newspaper)

Real-time data varies, but more than half of ERCOT’s generation capacity comes from natural gas. Experts cited a natural gas shortage in February’s power outages.

POWER BREAKDOWN

2021 ERCOT grid power generating capacity 51% Natural gas 4.9% Nuclear

24.8% Wind 3.8% Solar

13.4% Coal 1.9% Other

0.2% Storage

BY BEN THOMPSON

it prone to isolation issues during high-demand events, such as Febru- ary’s winter storms, experts said. “Staying independent keeps the management of our power systems within Texas. But it means that we can barely import any power when we need it most,” Daniel Cohan, a Rice University civil and environmental engineering professor, said via email. Winter collapse A Feb. 11 press release from ERCOT stated the agency issued notices from Feb. 8-11 about the cold weather expected to hit Texas and that gener- ators were asked to prepare for it. ERCOT followed with a Feb. 14 notice asking customers to reduce electricity through Feb. 16. The next day, ERCOT announced the council had begun rotating outages at 1:25 a.m. Feb. 15. More than 4.3 million Texans were without power the morning of Feb. 16, according to poweroutage.us. Despite early warnings, Ramanan Krishnamoorti, a chemical engineer- ing professor and chief energy ocer at the University of Houston, said he believes the state’s reliance on market conditions to manage supply and

Widespread power outages prompted by severe weather across Texas in February led to increased focus on the Electric Reliability Coun- cil of Texas, which manages statewide electric power ow. The failure of portions of the state’s power grid left millions of Texans without electric service the week of Feb. 15-19. As blackouts and power restoration eorts continued, public ocials, including Gov. Greg Abbott, called for an investigation of ERCOT. ERCOT did not respond to phone calls or email requests for comment. An independent system Texas’ power grid has long been controlled within the state, separate from eastern and western North Amer- ican interconnects. Founded in 1970, ERCOT operates under the supervision of the Public Utility Commission of Texas and the Texas Legislature and manages most of the state’s electric system and retail market. ERCOT ocials have highlighted benets of the insular system in the past, although its disconnect from the continent’s larger grids has left

TRACKING THE OUTAGES Millions of Texans lost power during winter storms Feb. 15-18.

• At 1:25 a.m. Feb. 15 , ERCOT began rotating outages from customers statewide • As much as 16,500 megawatts removed

• 4.3 million Texans were without power at 9 a.m. Feb. 16

from the grid due to forced outages Feb. 15 • 1 megawatt can power about 200 households during peak demand

SOURCES: ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL OF TEXAS, PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION OF TEXAS, POWEROUTAGE.US COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

demand is partially responsible for outages given providers’ lack of incen- tive to begin production in advance of the supply shortage. He and Cohan also cited a low supply of natural gas. “The shortfall in natural gas supply is about 20 times as large as the shortfall in wind supply compared to expectations for a winter peak cold event,” Cohan said. Planning ahead The statewide outages were the fourth such event in ERCOT’s history. One result of the most recent event in February 2011—also caused by winter weather—was the publi- cation of a federal report outlining past failures of power generators

and recommending ERCOT and other authorities make winterization eorts a top concern. Beyond just following previous recommendations, the state and power suppliers could have further incentivized preparation for the record-breaking conditions experi- enced, Krishnamoorti said. “We knew that this polar vortex was coming at least a week ahead. We could have planned,” he said. Cohan said he hopes the state will take a broader range of issues into consideration for potential updates to its energy systems. “We need to look beyond the elec- tricity system and realize that this is an energy systems crisis,” he said.

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • MARCH 2021

EDUCATION

GRADUATION PLANS SHIFT The decision to move the graduation ceremonies for Lewisville ISD high schools aected the dates and times of some of the events. UPDATED SCHEDULE May 29

A NEW VENUE Ford Center at The Star 9 Cowboys Way, Frisco

9 a.m.—Marcus High School 1 p.m.—Hebron High School 5 p.m.—Flower Mound High School May 30 1 p.m.—Lewisville High School 2 p.m.—The Colony High School

DNT TOLL

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High school graduation ceremonies throughout Lewisville ISD will be held at the Ford Center at The Star in Frisco this year, a change from previous plans. (Community Impact sta) Lewisville ISD selects newvenue for 2021 high school graduations

SOURCE: LEWISVILLE ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COWBOYS WAY

district said in a message to students. “Despite all the challenges, our high schools are working to give seniors an alternative and memorable experience while also adhering to social distanc- ing procedures and health guidelines.” Schools will soon provide additional details on alternatives to prom, the district said. District ocials said the original planned venue, the University of North Texas, would not be an option because of pandemic-related restrictions. “The Ford Center at The Star allows

us to safely hold commencement and is available on dates that work best for LISD,” the district said. The plans represent a move back toward a more traditional commence- ment environment than the district held in the rst year of the pandemic. The class of 2020 graduated at Texas Motor Speedway with families and friends watching from their vehicles. The class of 2021 will graduate from the Ford Center at The Star, a 12,000- seat indoor stadium used for Dallas Cowboys practices and large events.

BY DANIEL HOUSTON

schools after failing to secure ade- quate venues. High school graduation ceremonies will also be moved to a new location at the Ford Center at The Star in Frisco, the district said. “As the campuses explored options, it became clear hotels and other venues are unable to meet capacity requirements for the events,” the

The pandemic will aect key rites of passage for high school seniors throughout Lewisville ISD for the second year in a row as schools continue to navigate instruction during a pandemic. Lewisville ISD announced Feb. 22 that it will cancel proms at all high

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

MASKORDER ENDS Gov. Greg Abbott ended the statewide order for public face coverings March 10.

GOVERNMENT State rescinds order, butmasks still required atmany businesses

2020

NEWGUIDELINES

July 2: Abbott signs an executive order requiring face coverings in public spaces, in build- ings or in outdoor situations where a distance of 6 feet cannot be maintained. June 3: An executive order allows establishments to operate at 50% capacity in Texas. Oct. 14: An executive order allows establishments in Texas to operate at 75% capacity. March 10: An executive order eective March 10 increases capacity to 100% and rescinds the mask requirement.

BY DANIEL HOUSTON

capacity restrictions again. These restrictions, however, would not be allowed to reduce capacity below 50% for any business type, according to the governor’s order. As of this paper’s March 12 print deadline, the hospital- ization rate in North Texas was 5%. Eects on business Across the state and in the greater Lewisville area, the early signs pointed to many businesses continu- ing to require masks in some form. In an industry survey in early March, a majority of Texas restaurant owners told the Texas Restaurant Association they

The statewide mask mandate that had been in place since last summer ended March 10 on the orders of Gov. Greg Abbott, prompting local ocials to react and, in some cases, clarify that masks would still be a requirement at schools and some local businesses. Abbott ended COVID-19-related mask mandates and business restric- tions March 10 by executive order. However, local schools and many in the business community were not expected to change their policies. Denton County Judge Andy Eads said the county would

If COVID-19 hospitalizations rise above 15% within a region, county judges can lower business capacity to 50%. They cannot impose penalties for failing to wear a mask.

People are encouraged to use “good-faith eorts” to follow recommendations from Texas Department of State Health Services.

Businesses may require customers or employees to use face coverings.

2021

would require their employees to wear masks even after the governor lifted the order. The survey results, respondents would continue to require sta to wear masks. However, only 38% said they would while informal, showed 73% of

comply fully with the changes. As of this paper’s press deadline, the North Texas region was well below the state’s 15% threshold for COVID-19 hospitaliza- tions, which means further restrictions by counties on capacity were not allowed. “We are following

“I HOPE RESIDENTS UNDERSTAND THE COMMUNITYHAS TOHAVE HEALTHY SMALL BUSINESSES, TOO. IT’S PART OF THEMIX.” LORI FICKLING, PRESIDENT AND CEO, LEWISVILLE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

SOURCE: OFFICE OF GOV. GREG ABBOTT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

comfortable.” Fickling said she hopes that

Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention update their guidelines, Superintendent Kevin Rogers said. “Even with Governor Abbott’s recent decision to remove the state- wide mask mandate, the Texas Edu- cation Agency has stated local school districts still have the authority to enforce health and safety protocols,” Rogers said in a March 4 letter to families. “Ultimately, I’m responsible for the health and safety of 50,000 students and 6,500 sta members, which I take very seriously.” Guidance released from the TEA stated that a public school system may continue to require masks even after the governor’s order was lifted.

customers would make a point to support local stores, restaurants and other businesses in whatever manner they feel is safe. “I hope [residents understand] the community has to have healthy small businesses, too,” Fickling said. “It’s part of the mix.” Schools stay the course School ocials have also weighed in on what the change will mean for sta and students. Lewisville ISD is planning to maintain its mask mandate at schools through at least the end of the school year, or until Denton County Public

require their customers to wear masks. Lori Fickling, the president and CEO of the Lewisville Area Chamber of Commerce, said she has spoken with a number of local business owners to hear about their plans. “I think what you’ll see is the sta will still be in masks, just to keep their patrons safe,” Fickling said. “They want patrons to feel

the governor’s lead on reopening Texas to allow all businesses to operate at 100 percent,” Eads said in a statement. “Twice before when I had the legal authority to open our local businesses, I immediately opened them that same day.” If North Texas hospitalizations were to rise above 15% of available beds for seven consecutive days, the county would have the ability to implement

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11

LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • MARCH 2021

CITY& COUNTY

News from Lewisville, Flower Mound & Highland Village

Transit agencies oer rides to vaccine clinics at Texas speedway

BY DANIEL HOUSTON

DENTON COUNTY Two area transit services are now providing free bus rides to the mass vaccine clinics at Texas Motor Speedway in Fort Worth. The bus service began running Feb. 26 from two locations: Denton County Transportation Author- ity’s Hebron station in Lewisville and the agency’s downtown transit center in Denton. “As the COVID-19 vaccine becomes available tomore people, DCTA is dedicated to ensuring that transportation is not a hindrance in getting vaccinated,” DCTA CEO Raymond Suarez said in a statement. “Oering this service aligns with our commitment to help keep our communities safe and provide mobility options for those who need it.” This park-and-ride service will be free to those with a scheduled vaccination appointment through the Denton County vaccine waitlist. Only certain groups were eligible to sign up for the waitlist as of this paper’s print deadline, including health care workers, school and childcare work- ers, people age 65 and older and some younger individuals with chronic medical conditions. Eligible individuals can sign up for the waitlist on the county’s website, www.dentoncounty.gov. To inquire about free bus rides or pickups, call 940-243-0077.

Lewisville ISD trustees approved an update to the district’s academic calendar March 1.

COURTESY LEWISVILLE ISD VIDEO

Anewnish line: Lewisville ISDmoves up end of year toMay 21 for summer prep

BY DANIEL HOUSTON

programs, he said. Heading into this school year, the district extended its school days by 25 minutes each in an eort to bank extra time in the event the district had to close because of possible coronavirus spread. This extra time was used instead to move up the end date of the school year. The district’s decision was made in light of the fact that it did not expect to have to make up instructional days lost due to the winter storms that forced school closures in February. Rogers said the district was seeking a waiver for instruc- tional days lost because of inclement weather. Rogers told trustees that his decision to shorten the year was the result of a set of circumstances unlike any he had seen before. “There would never be another time in my career that I would ever think of making this request,” Rogers said. “I’m hoping we will never face anything like this [again].”

LEWISVILLE ISD The district has moved the end of its school year a few days earlier and extended the third nine-week period to account for how February’s winter storms disrupted semester exam schedules. The academic year will now end May 21 at LISD schools after the board of trustees approved these changes to the 2020-21 academic calendar at its March 1 work session. Trustees also pushed the end date for the third nine-week period later to March 12. “If we really believe that we’re going to make up for all learning [losses] in four days at the end of the school year, we’re kidding ourselves,” Super- intendent Kevin Rogers told trustees. “We have to have sta that aren’t burned out.” The earlier end date will enable district sta to bring what Rogers described as a challenging year to a close and shift their focus toward summer

People with appointments for a Denton County vaccine clinic may drive to Texas Motor Speedway or take a free DCTA bus from two locations in the county. GETTING INPLACE

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Texas Motor Speedway vaccine site DCTA bus service to vaccine site

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BY DANIEL HOUSTON

SOURCE: DENTON COUNTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FLOWERMOUND The developer behind the Riverwalk at Central Park in Flower Mound said he is considering replacing the project’s proposed amphitheater with a commercial event space north of the restaurant row. Mehrdad Moayedi of Centurion American told Flower Mound Town Council members March 1 that his team has approached The Hub, a Flori- da-based food and entertainment concept, about opening a new operation at the Flower Mound property. Plans for the amphitheater have already been approved, but Moayedi said even if they could attract 15-20 events to the venue each year, it may not be enough to cover the costs to the developer of building on and occupying that space.

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MEETINGSWE COVER Lewisville City Council Meets at 7 p.m. the rst and third Mondays of each month. www.cityoewisville.com Lewisville ISD board of trustees Meets at 7 p.m. the second Mondays of each month. www.lisd.net Flower Mound Town Council Meets at 6 p.m. the rst and third Mondays of each month. www.ower-mound.com Highland Village City Council Meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month. www.highlandvillage.org

Work continues at the Riverwalk property. (Daniel Houston/Community Impact Newspaper)

DANIEL HOUSTONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

One advantage of working with The Hub, Moayedi said, is that the company would organize its own events throughout the year, including concerts, movie nights and watch parties for sports games. If approved, the change is not expected to aect Centurion American’s plans for a farmers market and splash pad, which would remain part of the plans for the Riverwalk, Moayedi said.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2021

C A M P G U I D E

GUIDE

A noncomprehensive list of camps in the area

COMPILED BY DANIEL HOUSTON

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Lewisville ISD summer day camp COURTESY LEWISVILLE ISD

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8 Pinnacle Prep School This school oers a number of summer camp programs for children ranging from public speaking to astrophysics. Camps can be done in a one-week block or a full four weeks. A+ Dates: various dates from June-July Cost: $300 1310 S. Stemmons Freeway, Lewisville 940-453-5887 www.pinnacleprepschool.com 9 Robots-4-U Lewisville Summer Camp This camp features the chance for chil- dren of various ages to build a series of robots. Depending on age group, the ac- tivities may involve designing, program- ming and testing the robots as well. A+ Dates: TBD Cost: TBD 2701 Lake Vista Drive, Lewisville 214-315-5607 www.robots-4-u.com 10 School’s Out Camps at Lewisville Thrive Lewisville’s newest recreation facility will host a number of day camps throughout the summer. For a complete list, visit the website below. REC Dates: TBD Cost: TBD 1950 S. Valley Parkway, Lewisville 469-635-5302 www.lewisvillethrive.com 11 Teen Camp at Lewisville Thrive This camp for teenagers will oer a num- ber of activities related to technology, nature and other topics. The camp will be held at the Lewisville Thrive recreation

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MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Thrive recreation facility. REC Dates: various dates from May-August Cost: TBD 1950 S. Valley Parkway, Lewisville 469-635-5300 www.lewisvillethrive.com 6 D-BAT Lewisville D-BAT Lewisville oers a summer camp that provides batting cage practice and coaching for ball players. The camps are structured to be fun for participants and help them improve their bat swing technique. SP Dates: TBD Cost: TBD 1500 Fairway Drive, Lewisville 972-353-3322 | www.dbatlewisville.com 7 Goddard School STEAM camp This school oers a summer camp curricu- lum that focuses on STEAM learning with a series of fun activities each day. A+ Dates: TBD Cost: TBD 625 FM 2281, Lewisville 469-850-1212 https://www.goddardschool.com/dallas- fort-worth/lewisville-fm-2281-tx/summer Lewisville ISD summer day camp This summer care program for LISD stu- dents features fun activities for children while parents are at work during the months of June and July. A+ Dates: various dates throughout the summer Cost: $175 Activities held at various campuses www.lisd.net

GRAPEVINE LAKE Parents looking for summer camps for their kids have a number of options to choose from in the greater Lewisville area, from outdoor activities to indoor robotics courses. This list is not comprehensive, and dates and prices are subject to change.

A+ Academics REC Recreation SP Sports

3 STEAM Camp DFW This summer camp features a variety of STEAM-centered activities including eld trips, group classes, Monday movies, challenge courses, outdoor sports and weekly swimming. A+ Dates: TBD Cost: TBD 3415 Cross Timbers Road, Flower Mound www.steamcampdfw.com HIGHLAND VILLAGE 4 Camp on the Lake This regional program is run by YMCA Dallas and oers a day camp for children near Lewisville Lake. The camp includes archery, crafts and water activities. REC Dates: various dates from May-August Cost: $275 709 Highland Village Road, Highland Village 972-489-5769 www.ymcadallas.org/locations/ camp_on_the_lake LEWISVILLE 5 Camp PLAY at Lewisville Thrive This camp’s name is short for Program- ming and Learning for Active Youth, and includes eld trips, swimming, games and crafts for children at the Lewisville

SUMMER CAMPS FLOWERMOUND 1 Camp Yipiyuk

This summer day camp from the Cross Timbers YMCA serves children ages 5-12. The activities include outdoor learning, tness, community service, improvisation games and performing arts. The camp also features o-site eld trips. REC Dates: various dates from June-July Cost: $181 2021 Cross Timbers Road, Flower Mound 972-539-9622 www.ymcadallas.org/locations/ cross_timbers/day_camps 2 Spanish Schoolhouse camp This camp immerses children in Spanish language and culture with hands-on activities. The camp is for ages 3-8, and features a variety of educational themes. The program includes options for children with little to no Spanish experience. A+ Dates: various dates from June-July Cost: $104-$562 2525 Forest Vista Drive, Flower Mound 972-539-6204 www.spanishschoolhouse.com/ owermound

facility. A+ Dates: TBD Cost: TBD 1950 S. Valley Parkway, Lewisville 469-635-5301 www.lewisvillethrive.com

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • MARCH 2021

BUSINESS FEATURE The Antique Gallery of Lewisville Business booms during pandemic for vendors selling vintage items, furniture near I35E A t this antique business, which has stood the test of time—and even picked up steam during the pandemic—the aisles are lined with an array of

BY DANIEL HOUSTON

and other items for sale at The Antique Gallery and places like it. The Lewisville business is not a single store. It oers booths for roughly 120 vendors at any given time. These vendors usually each lease a small space from The Antique Gallery. The result is a wide variety of items for sale from many small busi- nesses. The model is also subject to a great deal of seasonal uctuation in the vendor pool throughout the year, Burnett said. Near the beginning of the pan- demic, the business was forced to close due to restrictions intended to curb the spread of the coronavirus. But in the months after reopening, Burnett said the gallery saw a bigger-than-expected boost in sales. Burnett attributed this to some of the unique trends observed in his industry during economic recoveries. “We had one of our better years for very specic reasons,” Burnett said. “When people are sitting at home, conned to their space, they may grow bored with what they see.”

wares, from rustic farmhouse items to new furniture for purchase from model homes. For nearly 30 years, The Antique Gallery of Lewisville has been operat- ing in a building formerly operated by Kroger, General Manager Paul Burnett said. Burnett has been there for roughly half of that time, which he said has provided him with perspective on an ever-evolving business. “The society that we’re moving into right now—they tend to be a throwaway society,” Burnett said. Burnett said he believes this is largely a generational mentality among younger adults, who he said often buy cheap furniture with the intent to throw it away at a later date. But once younger adults graduate

The aisles of The Antique Gallery of Lewisville are lled with items for sale from a wide array of vendors. (Daniel Houston/Community Impact Newspaper)

FACTS & FIGURES

110130 vendors on-site

STYLES OF FURNITURE FOR SALE

• Primitive • Barley twist

• Midcentury modern

SOME OTHER OFFERINGS

• Home decor • Clothing • Collectible items

• Sports

memorabilia

A chest of drawers (Courtesy The Antique Gallery of Lewisville)

from this mindset, they start to show

more interest in the type of furniture

TheAntique Gallery of Lewisville 1165 S. Stemmons Freeway, Ste. 128, Lewisville 972-219-0474 www.antiquegallerylewisville.com Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun. noon-6 p.m.

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“WEHADONEOFOURBETTERYEARS FOR VERYSPECIFICREASONS.WHENPEOPLE ARE SITTINGATHOME, CONFINED TOTHEIRSPACE, THEYMAYGROW BOREDWITHWHATTHEYSEE.” PAUL BURNETT, GENERAL MANAGER

LEWISVILLE

BELLAIRE BLVD.

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