Spring - Klein Edition | October 2020

SPRING KLEIN EDITION

VOLUME 7, ISSUE 7  OCT. 17NOV. 13, 2020

ONLINE AT

SOURCES: HARRIS COUNTY ESD NO. 11, CYPRESS CREEK EMSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER Although they cover the same area and serve the same residents, Cypress Creek Emergency Medical Services and Harris County Emergency Services District No. 11 have been at odds since 2019. ESD No. 11 is the tax collecting entity meant to contract EMS services, while CCEMS is a EMS service provider.

• A government taxing entity • Formation approved by voters in 2004 • Collects property tax for the purpose of providing emergency services • ESD No. 11 has 10 ambulances, 4 SUVs and 5 stations. These are leased to CCEMS in addition to what the provider already has. HARRIS COUNTY ESD NO. 11

177 square miles and 600,000 people serviced

“I DONOT UNDERSTANDHOW TWOPUBLIC SAFETY ENTITIES CANNOT GETALONGTOSERVE THE CITIZENS IN THE BESTMANNER THEY CAN.” FRED WINDISCH, PONDEROSA FIRE DEPARTMENT CHIEF

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• Private nonprot • Formed in 1975

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• Contracts out emergency services to ESD No. 11 since 2004 • CCEMS has 255 employees, 66 volunteers, 17 ambulances, 4 SUVs and 12 stations.

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Cypress Creek EMS, ESD No. 11 begin breakup process After terminating contract, EMS provider and district begin year of uncertain transition

BY ANDY LI

Cypress Creek Emergency Medical Services, a longtime EMS provider, and Harris County ESD No. 11 have been engaged in months of disagreements. The conict came to a head in Septem- ber, when ESDNo. 11 voted to terminate its contract with CCEMS in 360 days. Formed by voter approval in 2004,

ESDNo. 11 is the taxing entity that funds emergency services in its coverage area, which includes Spring and Klein. CCEMS, a nonprot, has provided ambulance and emergency services in that same service area since 1975. ESD No. 11 entered into a contract with CCEMS in 2004 and provides

roughly 51% of CCEMS’ average $20 million budget, which is collected through ESD No. 11’s property taxes. The conict has brought uncertainty to the emergency services in the area and concern for outsiders familiar with the situation, including Ponderosa Fire

In fewer than 360 days, the more than 600,000 residents living in the approximately 177-square-mile cover- age area of Harris County Emergency Services District No. 11 could have a new emergency medical services pro- vider for the rst time in 45 years.

CONTINUED ON 18

VOTER GUIDE 2020

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SPRING - KLEIN EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

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THIS ISSUE

FROMKIM: Autumn is perfect for enjoying the cooler temperatures with a hot apple cider or pumpkin spice latte. With a slight chill in the air, take this opportunity to patron our local restaurants and businesses. Check out this month’s business feature, Luliet Creamery + Bake Shop, on Page 17. Community Impact Newspaper also wants to thank our readers, customers and partners for supporting us for 15 years in business. KimGiannetti, GENERALMANAGER

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Kim Giannetti, kgiannetti@communityimpact.com EDITOR Kelly Schaer SENIOR REPORTER Hannah Zedaker REPORTER Andy Li GRAPHIC DESIGNER Ronald Winters ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Kim Laurence

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FROMKELLY: Our front-page story this month dives into the relationship between Cypress Creek Emergency Medical Services and Harris County Emergency Services District No. 11. The entities have been embroiled in conict since 2019 (see Pages 18-19). This edition also features the 2020 Voter Guide, which includes races on the Nov. 3 ballot that specically represent Spring-Klein readers. Candidate Q&A’s can be found on Pages 13 and 15. Kelly Schaer, EDITOR

METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner

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SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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COURTESY ALGOO BUENOO

5838 Louetta Road, Spring, on Oct. 2. The eatery specializes in wings, fish, boudin and burgers, and it can be booked to cater private events. www.facebook.com/goodeatz713 5 The Rustic Boutique opened Aug. 31 at 16714 Champion Forest Drive, Spring. The family-owned boutique specializes in 100% wood-crafted furniture, featuring reclaimed wood, pine and elm. The shop carries farmhouse-inspired furniture, home decor and accessories as well as Country Chic Paint. 281-640-4789. www.therustic-boutique.com 6 Cavender’s Boot City opened a new location in late September at 6760 Grand Parkway, Spring. The new storefront offers a wide selection of Western wear for men, women and children, in addition to boots, hats, accessories, work wear, gifts and home decor. 281-602-8390. www.cavenders.com 7 Gossip & Co. Nail Spa opened a new salon Sept. 11 at 5240 FM 2920, Ste. 100, Spring. With an original location on Louetta Road in Cypress, the spa offers a variety of manicures and pedi- cures for men, women and children and features a full bar with complimentary drinks. 832-246-8208. www.facebook.com/ gossipandconailspaspring 8 Floyd’s 99 Barbershop opened a new shop Oct. 2 at 10115 Louetta Road, Ste. 200, Houston. The salon offers ser- vices for men, women and children, includ- ing haircuts and colors, fades, beard trims and straight-razor shaves. 281-652-5398. www.floydsbarbershop.com 9 Holly Mendoza opened Esthetix Skin Care at 118 Vintage Park Blvd., Ste. 12,

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GEARS RD.

NOWOPEN 1 The Republic Grille opened its third location Sept. 9 at 3486 Discovery Creek Blvd., Spring. According to a Sept. 22 press release, the new location features a private dining room for special occasions and meetings, as well as an outdoor patio. The full-service eatery offers a full bar with craft beer and an expansive wine list. 281-719-2001. www.therepublicgrille.com

2 Gypsy Caravan Events launched a new semimonthly farmers market Sept. 12 in the parking lot of Campioni Restaurant. Located at 13850 Cutten Road, Houston, the Champions Farmers Market will take place the second and fourth Saturdays of each month from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. and will showcase a variety of vendors, including local farmers and artisans. Gypsy Caravan Events also hosts a weekly farmers market in the parking lot of Willowbrook Mall every Thursday from 2-7 p.m.

314-813-7184 or 281-650-7600. www.gypsycaravanevents.com

3 Algoo Buenoo celebrated its grand opening Oct. 10 at 16314 Stuebner Airline Road, Spring. The business offers protein doughnuts, gourmet shakes, energy teas and protein iced coffee. 832-610-5198. www.facebook.com/algoo.buenoo 4 Good Eatz celebrated the grand opening of its new food stand at

Ages 18 months to 5 years 281-370-5001

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY ANDREW CHRISTMAN, DANICA LLOYD & HANNAH ZEDAKER

12850 Perry Road, Houston. The apart- ment complex offers one-, two- and three-bedroom units with energy-efficient appliances and community amenities, such as green spaces, an outdoor grill area, a fitness center and a resident lounge. 281-731-9199. www.smartlivingatcypress.com COMING SOON 14 The Catch plans to open a new restaurant Oct. 19 at 7608 FM 1960, Houston. Menu items at the Texas- and Louisiana-style seafood restaurant include fried, grilled and boiled seafood platters as well as Cajun staples, from gumbo and shrimp etouffee to boudin balls and po’boys. www.thecatchhouston.com 15 Handel’s Homemade Ice Cream plans to open a new location by mid-November at 8765 Spring Cypress Road, Spring. The ice cream parlor will offer more than 50 flavors of ice cream, yogurt, sherbet, ice, and fat-free, no-sugar-added ice cream available by the quart, pint, scoop or cone. The new location will also offer signature items, including pops, banana splits, sundaes, milkshakes and smoothies. www.handelsicecream.com 16 D1 Training Spring plans to open at 8727 W. Rayford Road, Ste. 150, Spring, in December. The performance training facility offers programs for youth athletes ages 7-18, as well as programs for adults, from strength training and boot camps to individual and small group training. 713-714-7476. www.d1training.com/spring RELOCATIONS 17 Derma Nova MedSpa relocated in June from 19758 Hwy. 249, Houston, across Cypresswood Drive to 19610 Hwy. 249, Ste. 200, Houston. The medspa offers a variety of medical treatments and traditional spa services, including facials, microdermabrasion, microneedling, laser hair removal, waxing, threading, eyelash extensions, eyelash and eyebrow tinting, permanent makeup, facial injectables and peels. 832-604-7775. www.dermanovamedspa.com

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The Catch

COURTESY THE CATCH

The School of Art opened Sept. 29. (Courtesy Pearl Fincher Museum of Fine Arts)

Houston, in August. Mendoza said she is a licensed esthetician who has practiced in the Cypress area since 2013. The business specializes in facial treatments for men, women and teenagers. Services include skin cleanses, exfoliations, extractions, light therapy, collagen stimulation, deep hydration and customized skin care plans. Esthetix also offers lash lifts, lash and brow tints, and facial waxing services. 281-650-6556. www.esthetixskincare.com 10 Vintage Smile Family Dentistry opened Sept. 3 at 10300 Louetta Road, Ste. 132, Houston. The new dental practice offers a variety of services, from emergency care and wisdom tooth extractions to Invisalign braces and teeth whitening. 281-251-7770. www.vintagesmilefamilydentistry.com 11 The Woodlands-based Repair One Automotive opened its second location in late August at 8680 Louetta Road, Spring. The automotive repair and service shop offers engine maintenance, alignments, transmission services and inspections, among other services, and it features a children’s playroom. 832-422-3994. www.repaironeklein.com 12 IDEA Public Schools opened its newest North Houston campus Aug. 13 at 2010 Spears Road, Houston. The new charter school opened with 450 students in grades K-3 and 6-7, with plans to add another grade level each subsequent year until it becomes a full-scale K-12 campus. Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the campus is currently offering in-person and remote learning opportunities. 832-844-4200. www.ideapublicschools.org 13 Smart Living at Cypress Creek opened to residents in late August at

FEATURED IMPACT EXPANSION The Pearl Fincher Museum of Fine Arts at 6815 Cypresswood Drive, Spring, launched the inaugural semester of its School of Art on Sept. 29. Geared for students ages 8-12, Art Studio 101 will focus on fundamental drawing skills. Students will learn various techniques, including shading, proportion, texture and value, while working with grey scales and creating projects experimenting with dierent mediums, including pencils, colored pencils, pastels and watercolors. The semester runs through Nov. 20, and weekly classes are oered on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. According to the Pearl Fincher MFA website, in-person classes are limited to four ANNIVERSARIES 18 Little Scholars’ Academy , located at 9606 Spring Cypress Road, Spring, celebrated its fifth anniversary Sept. 21. The academy offers programs for children from as young as six weeks old through pre-K, in addition to before- and after-school care; extracurricular activi- ties, including yoga, culinary arts, music and Spanish; and a 10-week summer camp program. For before- and after-school care, Little Scholars’ Academy offers transportation to and from several Klein ISD elementary schools. 832-698-1352. www.lsacademy.net

to six students to allow for social distancing, and virtual classes are limited to six to 10 students.

Registration for the fall semester costs $325 for museum members and $350 for nonmembers, which covers the costs for eight classes and all materials. 281-376-6322. www.pearlmfa.org

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NEWOWNERSHIPS 19 Rachael and Michael Worthen and Jackie and Scott Qualley took ownership of two Tune Up: The Manly Salon franchise locations in the North Houston area effective Aug. 10. According to Rachael Worthen, the two couples now own the Tune Up salons located at A 24441 Hwy. 249, Tomball, and B 6920 FM 1960 W., Houston. Both locations specialize in men’s haircuts, shaves and waxing, and they also offer complimentary alcoholic drinks. 281-231-2789 (Northpointe), 281-602-2251 (Champions). www.tuneupsalon.com

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SPRING - KLEIN EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

45 TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Environmental report for I45 rebuild released The Texas Department of Trans- portation has reached a critical

COMPILED BY EMMA WHALEN & HANNAH ZEDAKER

ONGOING PROJECTS

SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • realigning sections of I-10 and Hwy. 59 in the downtown area • adding bicycle/pedestrian realms along the 44 downtown streets that cross freeways • adding sidewalks along the frontage roads • adding four managed express lanes on I-45 from downtown Houston to Beltway 8 North • rerouting I-45 to be parallel with I-10 on the north side of downtown Houston and parallel to Hwy. 59 on the east side of downtown Ward and Northside. Proponents of the project said it will alleviate congestion, ood- ing and safety issues on the over 50-year-old highway. Members of the public have until Nov. 9 to submit comments on the study by mail to the Texas Depart- ment of Transportation, Director of Project Development, P.O. Box 1386, Houston, Texas, 77251, or by email to hou-piowebmail@txdot.gov. The Final Environmental Impact Statement on the Texas Department of Transportation’s I-45 project shows the preferred alternative would include:

CHANGING COURSE

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milestone in its highly scrutinized proposal to overhaul much of I-45 through Houston. The environmental impact study published Sept. 25 is one of the nal stages in the project’s approval pro- cess, which has been over a decade in the making. Next, the Texas Transportation Commission will give approval for the agency to seek construction rms and begin work. TxDOT Houston District Engineer Eliza Paul said, however, the com- munication process between TxDOT and local ocials and residents will continue throughout the process. “[The North Houston Highway Improvement Project] is a very important project for the region that will enhance safety and mobility for all users,” Paul said in a statement

*TO BE REMOVED

Hwy. 6, FM 1960 improvements Construction is underway on the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Phase 2F to improve intersections and modify trac signals along Hwy. 6 between West Little York and West roads and on FM 1960 between Fallbrook and Kenswick drives. According to Pamela Rocchi, director of Harris County Precinct 4’s Capital Improvement Projects Division, construction is complete at nine of the 10 aected intersections. Timeline: Aug. 13, 2019-March 2022 Cost: $2 million Funding sources: Harris County Precinct 4, TxDOT ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF SEPT. 30. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SKLNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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accompanying the report. The project has solicited reactions from some Houston residents and elected ocials for its proposal to reroute and expand the highway through the East End while aban- doning its path through Midtown. Advocacy groups Stop TxDOT I-45 and Make I-45 Better Coalition claim the project will have disproportion- ately negative eects on communi- ties of color in the East End, Fifth

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

ENVIRONMENT Flood control district to apply for $20Mto fund Cypress Creek projects

STORING STORMWATER Harris County Flood Control District ocials said the two projects included in the grant application are the rst of several needed to reach the recommended 25,000 acre-feet of additional stormwater detention in the Cypress Creek watershed.

Cypress Creek

TC JESTER Stormwater Detention Basin

WESTADOR Stormwater Detention Basin

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

According to Black, if both projects are selected for the grant funding, construction could begin in 2022. “If we do not receive grant funding for either or both of these projects, then the timing of the project becomes a little more uncertain, and that life cycle may be impacted,” Black said during the session. To speed up the process, Black said the HCFCD is prioritizing projects on land the district owns. While the HCFCD owns tracts of land east and west of TC Jester Boulevard, the district is nearing completion on an interlocal agreement with the Westador Municipal Utility District, which would allow the Westador Stormwater Detention Basin to encom- pass land owned by both entities. Upon completion, the Westador Stormwater Detention Basin will store 1,100 acre-feet of stormwater, while the TC Jester Stormwater

Harris County Flood Control District ocials plan to apply for $20 million in federal grant funding through the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Community Development Block Grant Mitigation Program in late October to fund the construction of two stormwater detention basins in the Cypress Creek watershed. As presented by HCFCD ocials during a virtual information session Sept. 22, the stormwater detention basins included in the application aim to reduce ooding risks by storing excess stormwater and slowly releasing it back into Cypress Creek when the ooding has passed. According to HCFCD Director of Operations Alan Black, applications for this funding are due Oct. 28, and the HCFCD is seeking $10 million for the construction of each project.

Westador MUD property

Existing Harris County basin Proposed detention basin

Flood control district property

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SOURCE: HARRIS COUNTY FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Detention Basin will be constructed on 171.5 acres of land. According to HCFCD ocials, these two projects combined are just the rst of several projects needed to reach the 25,000 acre-feet of additional storm- water detention recommended for the Cypress Creek watershed. “To put that in perspective for you, since the ood control district’s creation in 1937, we’ve constructed

approximately 50,000 acre-feet of detention countywide. So half that much is needed in [the] Cypress Creek [watershed],” Black said. Black added the HCFCD would likely schedule a bond community engagement meeting in early 2021 before going to the Harris County Commissioners Court for authoriza- tion to proceed with the nal design and construction of both projects.

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SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

COVID-19 AND THE FLU While caused by separate viruses, the flu and COVID-19 can both cause serious disease or death, and they share some symptoms.

HEALTH CARE

Experts advise planning for winter flu seasonduringCOVID-19

SHARED SYMPTOMS

BY BEN THOMPSON

providing flu vaccines for residents of all ages this year in addition to the department’s ongoing Texas Vaccines for Children Program. Shuford said the state department will monitor Texas hospital capacity over the coming months. She said that while COVID-19 hospitalizations throughout Texas decreased in September, increases during the fall and winter may again lead to capacity system is safe at this moment in time, but that any addition of flu ... or even COVID-19 in our communities could start to impact and stress our health care system,” she said. In Harris County, general hospital bed usage has remained almost 7,000 beds below its operational capacity of 14,869 as of press time, according to Southeast Texas Regional Advisory Council data. Between Sept. 9-Oct. 9, issues throughout the state. “We feel like our health care

Health officials are preparing for a seasonal wave of influenza they said could compound public health and health care system capacity concerns this year. Dr. Jennifer Shuford, an infectious disease medical officer for the Texas Department of State Health Services, said while flu season typically peaks between December and March, the timing and severity of the flu’s spread every year is uncertain. “Getting the flu shot is the single most important thing that a person can do to prevent themselves from getting the flu or from severe flu and its complications,” she said. Shuford said while DSHS has ramped up efforts to inform Texans about flu shots and recommended precautions ahead of this fall. Shuford also said the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is

Fever

Cough Muscle aches and pains

Sore throat

Runny nose

Headache Shortness of breath

COVID-19ONLY

FLUONLY

Loss of smell or taste Symptoms typically appear one to four days after infection. SOURCES: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION, TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER Symptoms typically appear five days after infection, although symptoms may appear two to 14 days after infection.

Chills

the number of general beds in use for COVID-19 patients went from 482 on Sept. 9 to a low of 299 on Oct. 3, before climbing to 344 on Oct. 9. Dr. Anne Barnes, executive vice president and chief medical officer at Harris Health System, said via email that the ability for local hospitals to handle patients with other conditions amid the pandemic will depend on residents adhering to

COVID-19 guidelines and getting flu shots. “We believe that both flu and COVID-19 infections will be present in the late fall and early winter,” she said. “If community members don’t maintain vigilance, we are at risk for surge level hospital demands for both COVID-19 and flu.” Adriana Rezal contributed to this report.

WORTHWHILE CONVERSATIONS WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?

THE LAST 12 MONTHS HAVE BEEN FULL OF TURMOIL IN THE ECONOMY AND MARKETS. IS TODAY UNUSUAL COMPARED TO OTHER MARKETS L&W HAS OBSERVED IN OUR NEARLY 50 YEARS? In our nearly 50-year history, we’ve seen a lot of markets that created financial uncertainty, which makes planning difficult. The “flavor” of each dish offered up by the markets is always distinct, but the basic ingredients are the same. The key to a successful outcome in personal financial health is not unlike following a healthy diet – get sound ongoing advice from someone who has your best interest at heart. WHAT DO YOU MEAN, “…YOUR BEST INTEREST AT HEART”? Linscomb & Williams had a new client who was unexpectedly early-retired from a downsizing. We explained it this way: ask someone, “What should I eat?” You likely won’t get the same recommendation from your neighborhood butcher as from a Registered Dietician. Your butcher might recommend the pork spareribs that just arrived, knowing you’ll find that recommendation appealing. The dietician, on the other hand, insists on a balanced program that will achieve your ultimate health goal, though it includes items you might not like.

SO, HELP US WITH THE CONNECTION TO FINANCIAL ADVICE DURING MARKET TURMOIL? Much of what passes for financial “advice” today is equivalent to the butcher selling you the pork spareribs. The pork spareribs are what he has on hand to sell; he thinks they will work OK for you and that you’ll be happy. He’s not that concerned that it is the best option for your long-term health. Most financial advisors still operate outside a 100% pure fiduciary standard, and thus not always under a legal obligation to put your best interest above their own. PRESUMABLY, L&W FOLLOWS A DIFFERENT APPROACH? At Linscomb & Williams, we are like that Registered Dietician. Following the fiduciary standard, we are obligated to put your interest ahead of our own. This is always important, but most especially, in times of market turmoil -- times when it makes sense to get a second opinion from an experienced firm with no products to sell. We have an experienced, credentialled team ready to deliver that second opinion right here, right now. For more information, or a copy of our Form ADV, Part II, with all of our disclosures, call Grant Williams at 281 841 0707, or visit www.linscomb-williams.com.

J. Harold Williams, CPA/PFS, CFP ® , and Lauren Rich, CFP ® , discuss the Fiduciary Standard and placing the client’s best interest first.

1400 Post Oak Boulevard, Ste. 1000 Houston, Texas 77056 713.840.1000 www.linscomb-williams.com Linscomb & Williams is not an accounting firm.

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

SCHOOL &COUNTY

COMPILED BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

News from Harris County & Spring ISD

County proposes decreased fiscal year 2020-21 tax rates

HARRIS COUNTY Harris County taxpayers could see a tax rate decrease in fiscal year 2020-21 after commissioners set the proposed FY 2020-21 tax rates for each of the county’s four taxing entities during the court’s Sept. 29 meeting. Following a presentation by Harris County Budget Director David Berry, Harris County Commissioners Court unanimously agreed to a proposed overall Harris County tax rate of $0.5992 per $100 valuation, a decrease of $0.0125 from the FY 2019-20 overall tax rate of $0.6117. The proposed overall tax rate is broken down into four county taxing entities, with Harris County’s and Port of Houston Authority’s proposed tax rates decreasing from FY 2019-20

and the Harris County Flood Control District and Harris Health System’s proposed tax rates rising. According to Berry, the recom- mended tax rate increase for HCFCD of $0.03142—up from $0.02792 in 2019-20—is necessary to avoid an $18.6 million funding cut. Addition- ally, while Berry noted that the Harris Health System is currently in strong financial shape, uncertainty remains surrounding the entity’s future needs as it relates to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. As the proposed tax rates for HCFCD and the Harris Health System exceed the no-new-revenue rates, the rates will be included in a public hearing Oct. 20, and all four tax rates will be voted upon Oct. 27.

Harris County Commissioners Court is expected to vote Oct. 27 on the following proposed tax rates per $100 valuation for the county’s four taxing entities. TRACKING TAX RATES

FY 2019-20

FY 2020-21*

Taxing entities

REAL . LOCAL . SAVINGS .

$0.40713 $0.02792 $0.03142 $0.39116

Harris County Harris County Flood Control District Harris Health

$0.16591 $0.16671

System Port of Houston Authority Overall

$0.01074 $0.00991

$0.6117 $0.5992

See how much you could save on car insurance today.

SOURCE: HARRIS COUNTY/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER *PROPOSED

Commissioners approve $7.3Mfor newpilot programs

HARRIS COUNTY During the Sept. 29 meeting, Harris County Commissioners Court authorized the CARES Act Committee to establish child care assistance and workforce development programs via an expen- diture of $7.3 million. According to Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo, the $4.7 million approved for the Childcare Assistance Program will help fund support services, such as after-school programs, distance learning and child

median incomes in Harris County. “I’m not just looking to help people get a job; I’m trying to make sure we’re thoughtful about how we create a career path that may start at a particular point but not end there,” he said. “It’s not just about making sure someone gets a paycheck; it’s about giving them an opportunity to have a meaningful life.” Details about how Harris County residents can access program benefits are forthcoming.

care for essential workers. Another $2.6 million will be used to help Harris County residents with train- ing, job search and work-readiness support, Hidalgo said. Precinct 2 Commissioner Adrian Garcia said the county must ensure residents are ready to transition into new careers that are not as vulnera- ble as the service industry has been in the coronavirus pandemic. Garcia said he wants to help his precinct, which he said has one of the lowest

713-224-3426 1403 Spring Cypress Rd Spring

Spring ISDadopts revised calendar Option 1 for 2020-21 school year

Cy-Fair ISD board of trustees meets at 6 p.m. Nov. 9 at 10300 Jones Road, Houston. 281-897-4000. www.cfisd.net Klein ISD board of trustees meets at 6 p.m. Nov. 9 at 7500 FM 2920, Spring. 832-249-4000. www.kleinisd.net Spring ISD board of trustees meets at 7 p.m. Nov. 10 at 16717 Ella Blvd., Houston. 281-891-6000. www.springisd.org Harris County Commissioners Court meets virtually at 10 a.m. Oct. 27 and Nov. 10, as the county has not hosted in-person meetings in the pandemic. 713-274-1111. www.harriscountytx.gov Meetings will be recorded or livestreamed. MEETINGSWE COVER

SPRING ISD Spring ISD board of trustees unanimously adopted a revised 2020-21 instructional calendar during a workshop meeting Oct. 8. SISD officials are returning to a traditional calendar per Texas Educa- tion Agency guidance, which allows districts to move to remote learning if campus closures are required, as Community Impact Newspaper previ- ously reported. Trustees previously approved a revised calendar in May; it featured intersessional breaks and ran Aug. 17-June 25. The district presented two revised

calendar options and conducted a survey in late September and early October to gather input from the community. Both options run from Aug. 17-June 4, but Option 1 includes two short breaks—Oct. 30-Nov. 2 and Feb. 11-12—and Option 2 only had one break, in February. Per the survey results, 3,538 of the 4,693 total survey respondents, or 75.39%, selected Option 1 as their preferred calendar. With the board’s adoption of Option 1, students and staff can now expect a fall break from Oct. 30-Nov. 2. SISD will also not hold classes on Election Day, Nov. 3.

Saving people money on more than just car insurance. ®

Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not availableinallstates, inallGEICOcompanies,orinallsituations.Boat and PWC coverages are underwritten by GEICO Marine Insurance Company. Homeowners, renters and condo coverages are written through non-affiliated insurance companies and are secured through the GEICO Insurance Agency, Inc. Motorcycle and ATV coverages are underwritten by GEICO Indemnity Company. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image © 1999-2019. © 2019 GEICO

11

SPRING - KLEIN EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

GUIDE

Candidates and information for November elections

COMPILED BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

DATES TOKNOW

WHERE TOVOTE Registered voters in Harris County can vote at any voting center in the county during early voting and on Election Day. Voters can visit www.harrisvotes.com to nd nearby polling locations.

VOTER GUIDE 2020

OCT. 13 First day of early voting OCT. 23 Last day to apply for ballot by mail* OCT. 30 Last day of early voting NOV. 3 Election Day *DATE RECEIVED, NOT POSTMARKED

SAMPLE BALLOT

*Incumbent

D Democrat

G Green

I Independent

L Libertarian

R Republican

Supreme Court, Place 6 R Jane Bland* D Kathy Cheng Supreme Court, Place 7 R Je Boyd* D Staci Williams L William Bryan Strange III Supreme Court, Place 8 R Brett Busby* D Gisela D. Triana L Tom Oxford Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 3 R Bert Richardson* D Elizabeth Davis Frizell Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 4 R Kevin Patrick Yeary*

Texas House, District 126 R Sam Harless* D Natali Hurtado Texas House, District 150 R Valoree Swanson* D Michael Robert Walsh L Jesse Herrera HARRIS COUNTY District attorney R Mary Human D Kim Ogg* County attorney R John Nation D Christian Dashaun Menefee

Sheri R Joe Danna D Ed Gonzalez* Precinct 4 constable R Mark Herman* D Je McGowen KLEIN ISD BOARD OF TRUSTEES Position 1 Georgan Reitmeier* Lannie McKelvin Milon Position 2

D Tina Clinton Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 9 R David Newell* D Brandon Birmingham LOCAL U.S. House, District 2 R Dan Crenshaw* D Sima Ladjevardian L Elliot Robert Scheirman U.S. House, District 18 R Wendell Champion I Vince Duncan D Shelia Jackson Lee* L Luke Spencer

NATIONAL

President R Donald J. Trump* D Joseph R. Biden L Jo Jorgensen G Howie Hawkins U.S. Senate R John Cornyn* D Mary “MJ” Hegar L Kerry Douglas McKennon G David B. Collins STATEWIDE Supreme Court, chief justice R Nathan Hecht* D Amy Clark Meachum L Mark Ash

Alvin Vaughn Doug James*

County clerk R Stan Stanart D Teneshia Hudspeth

For more election information, visit communityimpact.com/vote .

Note: This is not a comprehensive list of all races on the sample ballot.

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12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CANDIDATE Q&A

2020 Voter Guide

Get to know the candidates running in the general election

Democrat D

Green G

Independent I

Libertarian L

Republican R

Incumbent

COMPILED BY COMMUNITY IMPACT STAFF

TexasHouse, District 126

Texas House, District 150

VALOREE SWANSON

MICHAEL ROBERT WALSH

JESSE HERRERA

Occupation: state representative for District 126 SAM HARLESS

Occupation: semi- retired attorney Experience: practicing attorney for about 16-17 years www.jesseherrerafor texashousedistrict150.org

Occupation: senior at Sam Houston State University majoring in political science with a minor in history; former

Occupation: business Experience: current state representative for District 150

Experience: served the district for the last two years; spent the last 44 years living in the district; involved in many charities in the district 713-899-4219 www.samharless126.com

risk advisor at State Farm for two and a half years Experience: Candidate did not respond. 832-766-9637 www.michaelwalshfortexas.com D

R

L

R

www.valoreeswanson.com

U.S. House, District 2

Occupation: deputy executive director Experience: former legislative staer 281-826-4157 NATALI HURTADO

DAN CRENSHAW

SIMA LADJEVARDIAN

ELLIOTT ROBERT SCHEIRMAN

Occupation: supply chain project manager Experience: 13 years leading major infrastructure project execution, large organizational process improvements, cost reductions and streamlined eciency 713-364-8092 www.scheirmanforcongress.com

Occupation: lawyer Experience: senior adviser for Beto O’Rourke’s U.S. Senate and presidential campaigns 832-269-7427 www.simafortx.com

Occupation: U.S. representative for District 2 Experience: retired lieutenant commander of the Navy SEALs www.crenshawforcongress.com

D

R

D

L

www.natalifortexas.com

U.S. House, District 18

SHEILA JACKSON LEE

WENDELL CHAMPION

Occupation: carpenter, home builder and furniture maker Experience: working as a carpenter and builder www.vinceforus.com VINCE DUNCAN

LUKE SPENCER

Occupation: oil and gas Experience:

Occupation: attorney at law for Harris County Sheri’s Oce

Occupation: congresswoman of Texas’ 18th

businessman and fourth-generation Houstonian

Congressional District Experience: member of Congress since 1995 www.sheilajacksonlee18.com

Experience: former army ocer; lawyer; corporate manager; youth minister; community volunteer; and law enforcement ocer www.champion2020.com

D

R

I

L

www.lukespencerforcongress.com

Answers may have been edited for length. Read full Q&A’s at communityimpact.com/vote .

LoneStar.edu/Register

13

SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

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Learn more about our definition of humanity in cancer care at StLukesHealth.org/Oncology .

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CANDIDATE Q&A

2020 Voter Guide

Get to know the candidates running in the general election

COMPILED BY ANDY LI & HANNAH ZEDAKER

Democrat D

Republican R

Incumbent

Harris County sheriff

Harris County Precinct 4 constable

ED GONZALEZ

JOE DANNA

Occupation: constable Experience: 35 years of law enforcement experience MARK HERMAN

Occupation: Harris County Sheriff’s Office sergeant Experience: 27 years as a peace officer; master peace officer; certified crime prevention specialist 832-639-4849 www.vote4jeff.com JEFF MCGOWEN

Occupation: master peace officer

Occupation: sheriff Experience: four years as sheriff; Houston mayor pro tem; chair of Houston’s Public Safety Committee; 18 years with Houston Police Department 832-534-3847 www.edgonzalez.com

Experience: 27 years as a law enforcement officer in Harris County 409-449-1564 www.dannaforsheriff.com

D

R

R

D

www.constablepct4.com

How will you address police brutality?

How will you address police brutality?

We prohibit chokeholds. We’ve implemented a duty-to-report policy. We’re increasing audits of body cameras and taser use. We’ll continue to build a more effective, equitable approach to law enforcement.

My officers will be required to follow the 1-Plus Rule which simply means officers, under normal circumstances, are only allowed to use one level of force above the amount of force used by the suspect/attacker/adversary.

We will continue to abide by laws and the strict departmental policies that restrict and prohibit such conduct. Police brutality will never be tolerated.

I will review and enhance all policies current- ly in place at Precinct 4, to include use of force, de-escalation training, bias-based po- licing, cultural diversity, engaging youth and crisis intervention training. All complaints will be investigated and reviewed.

What is your stance on Harris County’s bail bond reform?

What is your stance on Harris County’s bail bond reform?

My priority is community safety as we implement the federal court decision. We’ve expanded crime suppression programs. Balance is needed in assisting non-violent individuals and limiting serious offenders.

It has contributed to the degradation of safety in Harris County. For the last two years, the work of law enforcement officers has been subverted by judges playing fast and loose with lenient bond policies.

We at Precinct 4 have developed more innovative crime fighting strategies. These suspects are let out of jail, with little or no bond requirements, and we are arresting the suspects again, for new crimes.

Violent criminals should remain in jail if evidence shows they are a continued threat to society. Misdemeanor cases should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis [and] those that are repeat offenders should be scrutinized before bail is awarded.

Klein ISD board of trustees, Position 1

Klein ISD board of trustees, Position 2

GEORGAN REITMEIER

LANNIE MCKELVIN MILON

Occupation: IT worker Experience: bachelors in business administration; masters in health science informatics ALVIN VAUGHN

DOUG JAMES

Occupation: college professor; field supervisor; faculty at Columbia University Experience: former board member of Association of Texas

Occupation: CEO, creative director of The D. James Group marketing firm Experience: business owner for 18 years; Fortune 500 corporate management experience; KISD board president www.dougjamesforklein.com

Occupation: retired educator Experience: former Early Childhood

Intervention Keep Pace director; trustee for 15 years; Gulf Coast Area Association of School Boards

Professional Educators; member of NAACP and German Marshall Fund; friend of child advocacy groups lmm348@gmail.com

board member www.grkisd.org

Why are you running for the KISD board of trustees?

Why are you running for the KISD board of trustees?

My experience has prepared me to advocate for personalized learning to be creative and innovative, for career pathways to be expanded and for special education services to be adequate and equitable.

[To] service as the “Thought Partner” who has the ... expertise of education law, ethics and social justices, is nationally coveted for being innovative in K-12 and higher ed, and has a ... footprint of community galvanizing.

My goal is not to pursue change for the sake of change, but to be an ear willing to listen to others, and to be a representative willing to communicate the perspectives of different backgrounds. If an opportunity to make a positive change arises, I will welcome and pursue it.

[To] continue to serve KISD and our students. ... I am committed to be a catalyst for accountability and change. Continuing to make real the mantra that every student entering KISD enters with a promise and exits with a purpose.

What do you think is the most important duty of a trustee?

What do you think is the most important duty of a trustee?

[To] actively listen to educators, staff, students and community. ... [To] hire and support the strongest superintendent to lead the district, to review and approve the budget, to review and establish appropriate policy.

The most important duty of a KISD trustee is to adopt the governing policies and regulations that afford the superintendent and the entire KISD to function at optimal [KISD’s] potential.

To listen, be informed and partner with the school district to implement policies [and] educational opportunities that will benefit our community and equip our children for the steps in their educational aspirations and/or career goals.

[To] support and set the stage for our superintendent to successfully lead [KISD]. ... [To] review and establish appropriate district policy, [as] well set and maintain fiscally responsible practices as we review/approve the budget.

Answers may have been edited for length. Read full Q&A’s at communityimpact.com/vote .

15

SPRING - KLEIN EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

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