Richardson Edition | March 2022

RICHARDSON EDITION

VOLUME 4, ISSUE 7  MARCH 28APRIL 24, 2022

ONLINE AT

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IMPACTS

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TODO LIST CAMP GUIDE 2022

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The Belt+Main development at the northwest corner of Belt Line Road and Interurban Street is amixed-use facility that began construction in 2021 and is expected to be completed in 2023. (Jackson King/Community Impact Newspaper)

LISTING

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Brick-and-mortar businesses nding success despite shifting consumer needs, forecast shows

2021 GROWTH Richardson saw steady commercial growth despite being 96% built out.

Richardson’s Lockwood Distilling Company had to refocus its entire busi- ness model after less than six months in operation at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic in March 2020. The business was forced to close its doors when the city began implement- ing social distancing protocols. But the restaurant and brewery continued oper- ating by shifting to a tailgate approach, allowing locals to pick up food in the parking lot. Sean Saunders, Lockwood’s vice president of operations, said while BY JACKSON KING & WILLIAM C. WADSACK

it was not a perfect approach, the shift allowed the company to retain employees while providing a commu- nity experience. “This provided an outlet for us and locals to still have a taste of something normal in a safe environment,” Saun- ders said. With business remaining steady thanks to the brewery accelerating its distribution, Saunders said Lock- wood was lucky in that the business did not have to lay any workers o. Saunders said he’s always adapting to CONTINUED ON 16

$37.1 MILLION new building construction costs over eight properties

BUSINESS FEATURE

$88.7 MILLION money spent building multifamily facilities $27.5 MILLION money spent on new shell building construction of 33 buildings FROM 2020 77.6 %

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new occupants in Richardson

SOURCE: CITY OF RICHARDSON COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

DINING FEATURE

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MARCH 2022

We’re proud to announce that some of the most trusted names in Cardiology have joined Methodist Cardiovascular Consultants. After serving the Richardson community for years, you’ll now find them just one floor up from their previous practice. Our medical group is here for all your cardiology needs including diagnostics, treatment, and prevention. Changing to meet and exceed the cardiac health needs of our friends and neighbors. That’s community. And why so many people Trust Methodist. Familiar Richardson faces. An entirely new name in Cardiology. Methodist Medical Group welcomes Methodist Cardiovascular Consultants.

Methodist Richardson Medical Center – Heart and Vascular Center 3001 E. President George Bush Highway, Suite 210, Richardson, TX 75082

For more information or to make an appointment, visit MethodistHealthSystem.org/RichardsonCardiology or call 469-913-9400 .

ASAD MOHMAND, MD Board Certified Interventional Cardiologist

NHAN NGUYEN, MD Board Certified Interventional Cardiologist

MOHAMAD KABACH, MD Board Certified Interventional Cardiologist

JOSHUA BURAK, MD Board Certified Cardiologist

Methodist Cardiovascular Consultants is owned and operated by MedHealth/Methodist Medical Group and staffed by independently practicing physicians who are employees of MedHealth/ Methodist Medical Group. The physicians and staff who provide services at this site are not employees or agents of Methodist Health System or any of its affiliated hospitals. Methodist Richardson Medical Center – Heart and Vascular Center is a department of Methodist Richardson Medical Center and is not owned or operated by Methodist Medical Group. Methodist Health System complies with applicable federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex.

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMCHRISTAL: With spring comes fresh beginnings. I’m excited to introduce you to General Manager Barb Delk, who has been with Community Impact Newspaper for nearly ve years, and Editor Alexander Willis, who recently moved here from Tennessee. They now lead the Richardson paper, and our new Lake Highlands and Lakewood edition launching in April. Each time we expand and serve more communities with unbiased, hyperlocal news, it’s a tremendous honor. We must also thank you. Our growth is not possible without readers like you, who support the advertisers that fund our eorts.

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

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Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

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Alexander Willis Editor

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MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Barb Delk

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BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION &DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Mindy Tang METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES &MARKETING DIRECTOR Tess Coverman CONTACT US

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MARCH 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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COURTESY VALERIE KERNAN, SMARTLOOKS WINDOW AND WALL DECOR

NOWOPEN 1 Club Pilates is now open at CityLine Market in Richardson at 1417 E. Renner Road, Ste. 330. The tness center held its rst member classes March 14 and is oer- ing complimentary introduction courses for new customers. Club Pilates oers a variety of Pilates and other tness-related classes at four dierent levels that focus on balance, strength, mobility and exibil- ity. 469-828-1209. www.clubpilates.com 2 La Cacerola Colombian Cuisine is now open in the Camelot Shopping Center in Richardson. The restaurant, which opened in mid-March, is located at 580 W. Arapaho Road, Ste. 130. La Cacerola oers diverse and authentic Colombian dishes, combining traditional avors and techniques that, according to the restau- rant’s owners, will capture “the exquisite taste of Colombia.” 972-685-6140. www.lacacerola.co

COMING SOON 3 Noble Fine Jewelry is coming soon to Richardson at 2090 E. Arapaho Road. The jewelry store is expected to open by late June or early July and will be the company’s third location after its store in Garland and another upcoming location in Grand Prairie. Noble oers luxury jew- elry, including heirloom Swiss watches, diamonds, custom engagement rings and more. 972-292-9796 (Garland location). www.noble.jewelry 4 The Brass Tap is coming to CityLine in Richardson this spring. The bar is under construction at 1251 State St. “With its delicious menu, impeccable location right on the CityLine Plaza and expansive drink menu, The Brass Tap adds another great gathering spot to CityLine,” said Jessica Robertson, director of marketing at CityLine, in a press release. “We’re excit- ed to continue adding unique tenants like

The Brass Tap to CityLine’s diverse list of restaurants and entertainment options.” The Brass Tap oers over 150 craft beers from around the world and serves a diverse menu, featuring grilled cheese sandwiches and a weekend brunch selec- tion. The bar plans to host various events, including live music, karaoke, trivia and music bingo. www.brasstapbeerbar.com 5 Bruncheon is coming soon to Richardson at CityLine Market. The new store will be located at 1551 E. Renner Road, Ste. 830, near Whole Foods, and is expected to open sometime in April. The restaurant will oer breakfast and lunch options. 214-679-9713. 6 Brakes Plus is coming soon to Rich- ardson o of US 75. The auto shop will be located in the former Kwik Kar location at 400 N. Central Expressway. No specif- ic date for its grand opening has been conrmed. Brakes Plus oers a wide se-

lection of automotive services, including brakes, tune-ups, air lter maintenance and more. www.brakesplus.com 7 LimeHoney Modern Mexican Restau- rant is coming soon to The Shire devel- opment in Richardson. The restaurant will be located at 3613 Shire Blvd., Ste. 180, and is expected to be open by July 1. Serving as the sister restaurant to 42 BBQ Smokehouse + Market, LimeHoney will serve Mexican lunch and dinner food items, including brisket tacos, along with a full-service bar and a covered patio. 214-704-4885. 8 42 BBQ Smokehouse + Market is coming soon to The Shire development near CityLine in Richardson. The restau- rant will be located at 3613 Shire Blvd., Ste. 100, and is expected to be open by May 1. 42 BBQ Smokehouse + Market will serve breakfast and lunch barbecue op- tions, including breakfast tacos and other specialties. 214-704-4885.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Call (972) 665-8313 or visit HomeInstead.com/278

Owner Valarie McGhee said the Children are Heroes Learning Center is set to open in Richardson in late April.

COURTESY VALARIE MCGHEE

FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON The Children are Heroes Learning Center will be located at 1006 Hampshire Lane in what was previously Richardson Learning Center and DayCare. After acquiring the property last September, owner Valarie McGhee said she plans to open the business by the end of April. “While times are changing, one thing remains the same, and that is quality for our children,” McGhee said. “We plan on providing child care from a parent’s perspective and to provide a new environment for each child to thrive.” McGhee said she plans to construct RELOCATION 9 The Great Outdoors Sub Shop closed at 242 W. Campbell Road in Richardson on March 13. The shop will relocate to 2005 Alamo Road, though no date has been set for the new location’s open- ing. The Great Outdoors’ menu includes breakfast sandwiches, deli subs, salads, soups, sides and desserts. 972-437-5038. www.greatoutdoorsubs.com ANNIVERSARIES 10 SmartLooks Window and Wall Decor is celebrating 50 years of business this year. The window store rst opened in 1972 and is located in Richardson at 101 S. Greenville Ave. Serving as a Hunter Douglass gallery, the business oers over 100 displays of blinds, shades and shut- ters in its showroom along with several walls of fabric swatches. 972-699-1151. www.smartlooksdecor.com 11 Desperados Mexican Restaurant is celebrating 45 years in business, according to a banner on its locations. The restaurant was started in 1976 and has a location just outside of Richardson at 3443 W. Camp- bell Road, Garland. It also has a location in Dallas at 4818 Greenville Ave. Desperados serves authentic Mexican cuisine as well as Tex-Mex favorites. 972-530-8886. www.desperadosrestaurant.com NEWOWNERSHIP 12 Cinnaholic in the Richardson Heights Village changed ownership Feb. 18. Kris-

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white fencing. 214-964-0804. www.childrenareheroes.com

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tine Baugh became owner of the compa- ny at 100 S. Central Expressway, Unit 15. Her daughter was an original employee of the company when it opened in 2016. Before acquiring Cinnaholic, Baugh was a real estate broker for 16 years and owned a mortgage company with her husband. Cinnaholic sells cinnamon rolls and other sweets, such as brownies, cookies and edible cookie dough, all of which are vegan. 972-502-9263. www.cinnaholicrichardsontx.com IN THE NEWS 13 Alamo Drafthouse Cinema in Rich- ardson will remain open despite ling for bankruptcy. The movie theater, located at 100 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 14, will continue to operate under normal hours. It reopened in September after being closed for much of 2020 and 2021 due to the pandemic. The Richardson location is one of three Alamo Drafthouses to le for bankruptcy alongside the Lake Highlands cinema and its North Richland Hills cinema, the latter of which will be permanently closing. 972-534-2120. www.drafthouse.com/theater/richardson CLOSINGS 14 Tri Tip Grill in Richardson is perma- nently closed, according to a sign posted on its door. The restaurant was located in CityLine Market at 1417 E. Renner Road. This marks the second Tri Tip Grill location to close along with the location at The Star in Frisco, which closed Sept. 30. Tri Tip Grill specialized in barbecue.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MARCH 2022

TODO LIST

April events

APRIL 09

ENJOY AMUSICALINSPIRED CONCERT CHARLES W. EISEMANN CENTER

British vocal group The Barricade Boys are performing a vocal medley at the Eisemann Center in Richardson. The show will feature stars from the West End production of “Les Misérables” performing ballads and operatic arias as well as pop, rock and swing numbers. The concert will include songs from several Broadway hits, such as “Jersey Boys” and “Phantom of the Opera.” Tickets can be purchased online. 8 p.m. $39-$54. 2351 Performance Drive, Richardson. 972-744-4650. www.eisemanncenter.com/events-tickets. (Courtesy Eisemann Center)

16 LEARN TOUSE GOOGLE TOOLS The Richardson Public Library is oering an introductory class in using Google features. These include Google Search, Google Images, Google Maps and YouTube, according to the website’s description. This class will also teach residents about the dierence between an operating system, a browser and a search engine. This is for adults and teens age 16 and up. Registration is required with a valid library card. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Richardson Public Library, 900 Civic Center Drive, Richardson. 972-744-4350. www.cor.net/departments/public-library 22 ROCKOUT AT THE SIXSPRINGS TAVERN Musical groups Sneezy along with Sunny Disposition and Learning Names will be performing at the Six-Springs Tavern in Richardson. Sneezy is a Chicago-based fusion band that blends rock, soul, pop, hip-hop and R&B inuences into their own unique sound, according to the event’s description. Learning Names is a six-piece indie rock band based out of Dallas, featuring a variety of instruments, including tubas, trumpets, trombones and drums, according to the band’s website. 7 p.m. $12.50. 147 N. Plano Road, Richardson. 469-917-3040. www.sixspringslive.com 23 THROUGH MAY 1 SEE A SWASHBUCKLING PIRATE ADVENTURE IN ‘PIRATES OF PENZANCE’ Richardson’s Repertory Company Theatre is performing the Gilbert & Sullivan favorite, “The Pirates of Penzance.” According to the play’s description, “The Pirates of Penzance” presents the screamingly funny satirical play about a turncoat apprentice, a tender-hearted band of pirates and one very marriage- focused nursemaid. Tickets are available online or through the company’s box oce. Repertory Company Theatre, 770 N. Coit Road, Richardson. 972-690-5029. www.rcttheatre.com

COMPILED BY JACKSON KING APRIL 02 THROUGH03 LISTEN TOVOCALMAJORITY’S 50THANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION Vocal Majority is performing its spring celebration at the Eisemann Center. Celebrating its 50-year anniversary, the vocal group will bring back songs the group’s patrons have loved for years, while also introducing new songs from their next recording titled “Imagine,” according to the concert’s description. Tickets can be purchased online. 2 p.m., 7 p.m. $19-$59. Eisemann Center, 2351 Performance Drive, Richardson. 972-744-4650. www.eisemanncenter.com/events-tickets 09 ATTENDAMURDER MYSTERY COMEDY The Richardson Adult Literacy Center is hosting the annual fundraising event, the Murder Mystery Play. According to the event website, the play is a fun, interactive event where professional actors and community celebrities perform a comedy mystery play while attendees work in teams to solve the crime. This year’s play includes RISD Board President Regina Harris and Richardson City Council Member Joe Corcoran. Tickets can be purchased online. 7-10 p.m. $60. Richardson Public Library, 900 Civic Center Drive, Richardson. 972-644-5119. www.ralc.org 11 LEARN CALLIGRAPHY AT CITYLINE PLAZA CityLine is hosting an introduction that will cover all the calligraphy basics, allowing attendees to add special lettered details to their goods. According to the event page, the class includes a beginner’s calligraphy kit, which contains two nibs, a black ink pot, two letter guides, tracing paper and a straight pen holder, as well as materials to write on. This is a BYOB event. 6-7:30 p.m. $65. CityLine Plaza, 1150 State St., Richardson. 972-739-5080. www.sipandscript.com

Find more or submit Richardson events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

PLANO PKWY.

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Catering • (214)-619-3555

Restaurant • (214)-716-2610

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between Belt Line Road and 505 Plano Road, in front of Richardson Square Mall may still experience closures through late May due to ber optic work. Timeline: mid-February-mid-April/late May Cost: $225,000 Funding sources: city of Richardson 3 Fiber optic work on Renner/North Star The right-turn lanes of eastbound and westbound Renner Road onto south- bound and northbound North Star Road may be closed to trac from 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. daily due to ber optic work. The work is expected to be complete by early May. Timeline: mid-February-early May Cost: not available, privately funded Funding sources: franchise utility compa- ny Spectrum 4 Fiber optic work along US 75 front- age road The right lane of the southbound US 75 frontage road between Renner Road and Palisades Creek Drive may be closed to trac from 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. daily for ber optic work. The work is expected to be complete in late May. Timeline: late February-late May Cost: not available, privately funded Funding sources: franchise utility compa- ny Spectrum

COMPILED BY JACKSON KING

ONGOING PROJECTS 1 Custer Road bond project

Work has begun on the Custer Road Im- provement Project, one of the last 2015 bond program projects awaiting comple- tion. Various lane closures are expected throughout this year on Custer Road between Arapaho Road and Campbell Road as the street is transformed from its current lane design to a new cong- uration with one northbound lane, one southbound lane, a continuous left-turn lane in the center, a dedicated at-grade bike lane in each direction and 5-foot sidewalks on each side. In addition, a pe- destrian crossing at Northrich Elementary School will be enhanced with a raised median island and rectangular rapid ashing beacons. Timeline: March 2022-early 2023 Cost: $8,462,578 Funding source: city of Richardson’s 2015 bond 2 Plano Road concrete rehabilitation Various lanes of northbound and south- bound Plano Road between Buckingham Road and the President George Bush Turnpike may be closed to trac in dierent locations from 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. daily while concrete rehabilitation—joint and crack sealing—takes place. While the work is scheduled to be complete by mid-April, some of the lanes, specically

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MARCH 17. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT RICNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MARCH 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& SCHOOLS

News from Richardson & Richardson ISD

COMPILED BY JACKSON KING

Richardson City Council meets March 28 and April 4, 11 and 18 at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 411 W. Arapaho Road, Richardson. www.cor.net. Richardson ISD board of trustees meets April 11 and 19 at 6 p.m. at the RISD Administration Building, 400 S. Greenville Ave., Richardson. www.risd.org Plano ISD board of trustees meets at 6 p.m. April 5 and 19 at the PISD Administration Center, 2700 W. 15th St., Plano. 469-752-8100. www.pisd.edu MEETINGSWE COVER CITY HIGHLIGHT RICHARDSON The city is partnering with the Network of Community Ministries and Richardson ISD to help restock supply shelves for residents in need. The Network of Community Ministries is a nondenominational, community-based organization. Drop-o locations will be available until April 30 at 10 municipal facilities as well as the RISD Administration Building at 400 S. Greenville Ave. Donations can also be dropped o at the ministry’s facility at 1500 International Parkway. Call 972-744-4080 to learn more. NUMBER TOKNOW The Richardson ISD board of trustees unanimously approved during its March 7 meeting a guaranteed maximum price of $18.23 million for the rst phase of a planned expansion and renovation project at Forest Meadow Junior High School. The rst phase of the project will primarily consist of site work additions, including site grading, paving and installing site utilities. Phase 1 will also include early work for building steel, roong and electrical infrastructure. $18M+

Council looking to update district boundaries

RICHARDSON The city’s Council District Boundary Commission recommended an updated boundary map during its March 22 meeting that will be forwarded to the City Council for consideration. The nine-member commission deliberated between two options heading into its meeting and ended up selecting Option A in a 7-1 vote, with Gary Beech the lone dissenting opinion. If approved, the new boundary map would see the Eastside and GreenVue developments, which are located in the northern section of The Richardson IQ, move from District 4 to District 2. Richardson’s charter requires that boundaries for the city’s four council district be reviewed every 10 years once census data is available. The dier- ence in population exceeded the 10% maximum once 2020 census data was incorporated. The recommended map has a 6% deviation. The recommended map will now go to Richardson City Council during a late April meeting for consideration.

DISTRICTMAP This map shows the four district boundaries being recommended to the Richardson City Council.

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SOURCE: CITY OF RICHARDSON COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Council consists of the mayor, two at-large members and four district members. Council members represent- ing a district must reside within its boundaries, but they are elected by voters citywide, according to the city.

202223 academic calendar approved

RICHARDSON ISD The board of trustees approved the district’s 2022-23 academic calendar at its March 7 regular meeting. Under the adopted calendar that was unanimously approved by the board, the 2022-23 school year will KEY DATES Here are some key dates for the Richardson ISD 2022-23 school year. AUG. 16 First day of school DEC. 19, 2022JAN. 3, 2023 Students’ winter break MARCH 1318, 2023 Spring break

start Aug. 16 and end May 26. The school year will include 79 instruc- tional days in the rst semester and 95 instructional days in the second semester. Winter break will begin Dec. 19 with students returning for the second semester Jan. 4. Spring break will be March 13-18 with two potential weather makeup days lined up in April. In addition, the calendar will reect four two-hour early release days modeled similarly to previous RISD academic calendars. The district rst reviewed two draft calendar options in January and received 4,255 community responses before making a nal decision in March.

The Wildower Arts &Music Festival will take place May 2022.

COURTESY WILDFLOWER ARTS & MUSIC FESTIVAL

Toadies, Neon Trees added to festival RICHARDSON The lineup for the 2022 Wildower Arts & Music Festival now includes Toadies and Neon Trees. Organized by the city, the festival is scheduled for May 20-22 at Galatyn Park Urban Center and features live music. Tickets are at www.wildowerfestival.com.

SOURCE: RICHARDSON ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

MAY 26, 2023 Last day of school

A Nonprofit with REAL impact

May 7, 2022 – SATURDAY 6-10 pm St. Paul the Apostle Catholic Church Parish Center 900 St. Paul Drive, Richardson, TX 75080

Richardson East Rotary Club supports our community! - The Ann Eisemann All-inclusive playground was inaugurated in 2019 through collaboration with the City of Richardson. - Yearly scholarships awarded to RISD students to make it possible for them to pursue their dreams. Join our club of business professionals to serve above self and make a difference locally and throughout the world. www.rerotaryclub.com

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MARCH 2022

C A M P G U I D E GUIDE

A noncomprehensive list of camps in the area

Parents looking for camps for their children have a number of options to choose from in the Richardson area. This list is not comprehensive.

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A+ Academics ART Arts DAY Day NIGHT Overnight SCI Science SP Sports TECH Tech

INPERSON 1 Camp Sa-Que-Sippi

5 First Baptist Richardson summer camps

First Baptist Richardson oers several dier- ent camps for children ages nine months to 12 years. Camps range from summer play days, cheer camp, sports camp and the LaLa Letter- ing Camp, a free camp that features a variety of Bible-focused activities. Dates: June 1July 30 Ages: 9 months-12 years Cost: $450 per child ART DAY SP First Baptist Richardson, 1001 N. Central Expressway 9722355296 www.richardson.org 6 First United Methodist Church Richardson summer camps The church is oering a Vacation Bible Camp with outdoor family worship and a take-home kit for a virtual family experience as well as a series of art, science and music half-day camps. Dates: June 13July 29 Ages: pre-K-sixth grade for Vacation Bible Camp, Grades 16 for other camps Cost: $25-$100 ART SCI SP First United Methodist Church Richardson 503 N. Central Expressway 9722358385 www.fumcr.com/children_camps 7 The Heights Church Summer Camps The Heights Church oers a free, half-day Va- cation Bible School camp for children, as well as an overnight Kids Camp, Summer Music Day Camp, and a week of worship and thrilling activities at Carolina Creek Christian Camp in Riverside, Texas. Dates: June 710, 1523, 2730 Ages: grades K6 Cost: TBD ART DAY NIGHT The Heights Church, 201 W. Renner Road 9722387243 http://www.theheights.org/summer/ 8 The Heights CDC Summer Camps The Heights Childhood Development Center is oering three individual weeks of camp this summer with each week running Monday-Thursday, from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. The development center accepts children ages 12 months through pre-K for the camp. Each week will involve a dierent theme, including “Music and Movement,” “Things that Grow” and “Construction Zone.” Dates: June 27July 21 Ages: 12 months-pre-K Cost: $150 per week ART DAY The Heights Children Development Center

This day camp includes activities that allow campers to experience nature/outdoor learn- ing, performing arts, tness/conditioning, community service projects, o-site eld trips and more. Dates: May 31Aug. 4 | Ages: 512 Cost: $140 per week (YMCA members), $175 per week (nonmembers), plus an $85 regis- tration fee. ART DAY SP Richardson Family YMCA, 821 Custer Road 9722313424 www.ymcadallas.org/richardson-day-camps 2 Carpe Diem Private Preschool Summer Camp Carpe Diem Private Preschool will host 11 dierent camps this summer, with subjects such as the great outdoors, gardening, marine biology and more. Dates: May 31Aug. 10 | Ages: 512 Cost: $156-$260 A+ ART SP TECH Carpe Diem Private Preschool 271 Renner Parkway 9723628470 Camps oer a variety of activities for children, including but not limited to indoor/outdoor games, sports, arts and crafts, eld trips, swimming, volunteer opportunities and more. Dates: June 6July 29 Ages: 515 Cost: TBA ART DAY SP Heights Recreation Center 711 W. Arapaho Road 9727447850 www.cor.net/departments/parks-recreation/ summer-camps 4 Drama Kids International Camp: Mermaids & Pirates Drama Kids summer camps are designed to help children develop collaboration and com- munication skills as well as self-condence. Dates: July 1115 www.carpediempreschool.com 3 City of Richardson Parks & Recreation Day Camp Program

Camp Sa-Que-Sippi

First Baptist Richardson summer camps

COURTESY RICHARDSON FAMILY YMCA

COURTESY FIRST BAPTIST RICHARDSON

12 Kids R Kids Camp Boomerang Summer Camp Preschool to elementary school-age children can enroll in these themed camps that oer a unique blend of weekly themes, including magic and superheroes.

201 W. Renner Road 9722387289 www.theheightscdc.com 9 H.E.R.O.E.S. Summer Camp

An acronym for “Helping Everyone Reach Outstanding Educational Success,” this six- week program is oered to children, teens and adults. Campers participate in a variety of therapies and do team building activities, vocational training and more. H.E.R.O.E.S. creates social, recreational and vocational programs for individuals with disabilities. Dates: June 13July 22 Ages: 3 and older Cost: $425-$525 per week (scholarships available) A+ ART DAY SP First United Methodist Church Richardson 503 N. Central Expressway 4697500022 www.heroesdfw.org 10 iD Tech Camp at UT Dallas These weeklong camps will have live instruc- tors blending instruction with fun activities. Programs include courses on how to code a mobile app, design a video game, produce a viral video and more. Dates: June-July Ages: 717 Cost: $1,029+ TECH iD Tech UT Dallas, 800 W. Campbell Road 8887098324 www.idtech.com/on-campus 11 Kids Montessori Academy Summer Camp Kids Montessori Academy will begin hosting summer camps in the rst week of summer. Additional details on camps will be posted

Dates: June 1Aug. 6 Ages: not available

Cost: TBD ART DAY Kids R Kids Learning Academy 3521 North Star Road 9722355437 www.kidsrkids.com/richardson 13 Legendary Youth Sports Summer Camps

These weeklong camps include martial arts, hip-hop dance, parkour, outdoor sports, edu- cational activities, arts and crafts, and more. Dates: June 1Aug. 20 Ages: 512 Cost: $187 base rate SP Legendary Youth Sports 1980 Nantucket Drive, Ste. 108 4693472494 www.richardsonsummercamp.com www.legendaryblackbeltacademy.com 14 Music So Simple Summer Camps Music So Simple’s summer camps will cover singing, movement, dance and more. A be- ginner piano group class for kindergarten and rst grade students will also be available. Dates: begins June 4 Ages: 6 months-rst grade Cost: $120-$250 ART Music So Simple 1144 N. Plano Road 4697782121 www.musicsosimple.com 15 Precision Gymnastics & Tumbling Camps Precision camps include gymnastics and tum- bling instruction, games and free time. The gym has a full-size spring oor, an in-ground pit, a rod oor, two trampolines, a tumble track, rope climbs, gymnastic bars, a beam and vaults, among other skill practice areas. Dates: June 1Aug. 12

online after April 19. Dates: June 1Aug. 15 Ages: 412 Cost: TBD A+ DAY Kids Montessori Academy 1521 E. Arapaho Road 9722356930 www.kidsrichardson.com

Ages: 612 Cost: $175 ART DAY Heights Recreation Center 711 W. Arapaho Road 9723632369 Drama Kids International Camp www.dramakids.com/tx3

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2022

COMPILED BY JACKSON KING

Dates: May 30Aug. 12 | Grades: K5 Cost: $330 per week base fee ART DAY SP TECH Primrose School at Richardson 1100 Jonsson Blvd. 9724799888 www.primroserichardson.com

instruction by skilled teachers and are aimed toward aspiring preprofessional dancers and budding ballerinas. Dates: June 6Aug. 11 Ages: 318 Cost: $225-$425 per week ART DAY Texas Ballet Theater 300 N. Coit Road, Ste. 231 2143778576 www.texasballettheater.org/summer-program 19 Toby’s School of Dance Summer Camps These camps include ballet, tap and tumbling classes as well as weekly themed camps, such as “Minions” and “Space Jam.” Dates: June 14July 31 Ages: 3 and up Cost: $100-$150 ART Toby’s School of Dance 635 W. Campbell Road, Ste. 224 9722350514 www.tobysdance.com/summer 20 Windmill Stables Summer Camps Campers at Windmill Stables learn the safe and proper care and handling of horses while

also improving their riding abilities. English and Western half-day camps are open to beginner and intermediate riders. Registration is now open. Dates: May 23July 29 Ages: 7 and up Cost: $450 DAY SP Windmill Stables, 2029 N. Clie 9722389820 www.windmillstables.com VIRTUAL 21 UT Dallas Summer Camps The University of Texas at Dallas is oering more than 200 morning, afternoon and whole day coding camps online. Camps include but are not limited to website and game design, drawings, animation and creative coding. Dates: June 6- Aug. 5 Ages: 718 Cost: $75-$300 per camp DAY TECH UT Dallas 2149242148 (text) https://k12.utdallas.edu/summer

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17 Repertory Community Theater Campers will learn the dierent aspects of putting on a show before performing on stage at the end of the camp. Scheduled plays in- clude “Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella” and “Beauty and the Beast Jr.” Dates: June 6Aug. 27 Ages: 718 Cost: $250-$525 per session ART DAY RCT Driegert Theater 770 N. Coit Road 9726905029 https://www.rcttheatre.com/ workshops-classes-camps.html 18 Texas Ballet Theater Summer Dance Classes The Texas Ballet Theater oers one- or two-week summer dance class programs to children and teens ages 318. Adult programs are also available. Camps feature professional

H.E.R.O.E.S. Summer Camp

COURTESY H.E.R.O.E.S. SUMMER CAMP

Ages: 3 and up Cost: $30-$230 SP Precision Gymnastics & Tumbling 1144 N. Plano Road, Ste. 104 9729072248 www.rstgymnastics.com 16 Primrose School Summer Adventure Club

This camp’s activities include cooking, sports, theater, engineering, deep sea adventures, eld trips and weekly splash days.

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WHY A CATHOLIC CLASSICAL EDUCATION? Encouraging children to seek truth, goodness and beauty in all things will ultimately lead them to walk with Christ. At SPCCS, our fundamental tenets are faith, wisdom and virtue; the devel- opment of these tenets in our students helps build a foundation in Christ while providing them an enriching education. a classical curriculum i clud s e liberal arts, grammar, logic, rhetoric, arithmetic, g ometry, m sic, astronomy, and Latin. a classical curriculum includes the liberal arts, grammar, logic, rhetoric, arithmetic, geometry, music, astronomy, and Latin. see beautiful works of art on the walls, the great books on our shelves, and thriving gardens outside our windows. The Catholic Classical student is curious, asks questions, and approaches the exciting journey of learning with a sense of wonder. In addition to the pursuit of goodness, truth and beauty, exciting journey of learning with a sense of wonder. In addition to the pursuit of goodness, truth and beauty, see beautiful works of art on the walls, the great bo ks on our shelves, and thriving gardens outside our windows. The Catholic Classical student is curious, asks questions, and ap roaches the

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MARCH 2022

BUSINESS FEATURE Boxes toGo

BY JACKSON KING

From delivery driver to owner, Melwin Zachariah aims to grow company reach L ocated o of US 75 near Spring Valley Road, Boxes to Go sells a large variety of boxes and

I’m living withmy parents, and I don’t have any kind of income. Now, I’m going to be a father and a husband.” Looking for a way to support his family, Zachariah said he was intrigued by an ad on Craigslist posted by the previous owner of Boxes to Go for a management position at the company. After a year of working for

other shipping supplies. Celebrating its 40th anniversary this year, the company has sold products across the metroplex and beyond, including shipping products as far as Hawaii. Owner Melwin Zachariah said Boxes

to Go’s biggest dierentiator is having great cus- tomer service and providing services its competitors do not. “The foothold for this company is mainly the customer base [and] the way that we take care of them and treat them,” Zachariah said. “We thrive

the company as a driver, Zachariah was promoted to manager before earning an oppor- tunity to buy the company in December. Zachariah said he would not have been able to run the company himself if not for his time working as a delivery driver.

“ANYBODY CANBE ANOWNER IF THEY HAVE THEMONEY, BUT BEINGOUT THERE IN THE FIELD ANDMAKING SURE THE CUSTOMERS ARE SATISFIED IS IMPORTANT.” MELWIN ZACHARIAH, OWNER

Melwin Zachariah recently became the owner of Boxes to Go after nearly two years of working for the company. (Photos by Jackson King/Community Impact Newspaper)

VARIETY OF SIZES

Boxes to Go provides a variety of box sizes for moving and shipping needs. It also sells specialty boxes for some specic products, such as: • Guitars; • Ries; • Large pictures or mirrors; • Record albums; and • Bikes.

Boxes to Go sells a large variety of boxes and other shipping supplies.

to please our customers in whatever way that other companies are not doing. We are doing the small, little things that make a huge dierence, especially with our long-term customer base.” Zachariah said his journey to Boxes to Go grew out of desperation. After spending a few months with his wife in India, Zachariah said he returned to America right before the pandemic with no money, along with an impending surprise. “Aweek later, my wife called and toldme that I was going to be a dad,” he said. “At this time, I don’t have a job,

“Without knowing this business, you cannot really understand this company,” he said. “Anybody can be an owner if they have the money, but being out there in the eld and making sure [the customers] are satised is important.” Since owning the company, Zach- ariah has already begun renovating and expanding the Richardson store, and said he is looking for ways to expand the store’s reach throughout the region. Until then, he said he continues to work hard with his partners to provide quality service on a daily basis.

W. BELT LINE RD.

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Boxes toGo 777 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 1E, Richardson 214-348-3000 www.boxestogo.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun. 1-4 p.m.

CENTENNIAL BLVD.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE

BY JACKSON KING

FROM CHALKBOARD TOMENU The chalkboard allows Fish City Grill to experiment with its menu and add unusual seafood dishes. Some fan favorite dishes started

Garlic caper grilled salmon ($19.49) is a favorite entree dish. It is salmon served with cherry tomatoes, lemon, white wine and a choice of two sides.

on the chalkboard before becoming

permanent menu items. Some examples include:

• oyster nachos • sh and chips

• barbecue salmon tacos • garlic pepper salmon

Chargrilled oysters ($14.99) are served with lemon pepper butter and Parmesan cheese.

Since launching his family of restaurants in 1995, Bill Bayne has opened 23 seafood locations, including Fish City Grill in Richardson. (Photos by Jackson King/Community Impact Newspaper)

Fish City Grill Seafood restaurant oers variety, aordability at CityLine Market B ill Bayne has always held a special place in his heart for seafood. Growing up in the Texas panhandle, Bayne teammembers and with our customers. Happy team members do a better job of producing great food, so we love to put on a smile and provide great service.”

Oyster nachos ($11.49) are a seafood twist on a Tex- Mex classic. This dish includes fried oysters, chipotle tartar sauce and fresh pico de gallo.

began to associate seafood with family after vacations to his father’s hometown of Baytown. He paid his way through college by waiting tables, eventually meeting his wife, Lovett Bayne, while serving as general manager of a Cajun restaurant in Addison. When he left to create his own restaurant in 1995, Lovett joined him as a partner, and the couple went on to build a family of 23 seafood restaurants across four states, including the Fish City Grill at CityLine Market in Richardson. With a commitment to quality service, Bayne said Fish City Grill has thrived because of a focus on creating customer relationships. “Our culture is our competitive advantage,” he said. “Anybody can steal our menus or our recipes, but they can’t steal the relationship we have with our

Fish City Grill includes a full-service bar and a diverse menu of Cajun and other seafood-inspired dishes at aordable prices. The restaurant also oers select items unique to each of its locations, with items displayed for guests on a large chalkboard. Every day, at least ve dierent nonmenu items are oered, with at least three being picked by the local restaurant’s sta. Fish City Grill designs their locations with a small oor plan, helping create a more friendly and intimate dining space. “We [use] small restau- rants by design in order to create a more intimate atmosphere, [and] because of that, we have an easier control over quality of food and quality of service,” Bayne said. “We like to build those core relationships and get people closer together.”

Fish CityGrill 1415 E. Renner Road, Ste. 260

972-235-3474 • www.shcitygrill.com Hours: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.

PGBT TOLL

ROUTH E DR.

E. CITY LINE DR.

E. RENNER RD.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MARCH 2022

The Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex saw a total of nearly 4 million more square feet of retail space leased in 2021 compared to the year before. This map measures the overall change in occupied retail space leased in square feet from 2020 to 2021. CHANGE IN NET LEASING

CONTINUED FROM 1

customers’ needs as the restaurant continues to see a return of guests in person. “We continue to strive for a guest- friendly experience to accommodate everyone, and that includes making things as clean and safe as possible,” Saunders said. That return to in-person shopping is something Texas-based commer- cial real estate rm Weitzman said is happening throughout the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex. “We’re in a much better place today [than in March 2020],” Weitzman Executive Vice President Michelle Caplan said during the rm’s annual forecast in January. “Everyone from retailers to landlords to shoppers have all faced enormous challenges with innovation and ingenuity. We’ve nav- igated risk and achieved one of the greatest market turnarounds ever.” As part of its report, Weitzman noted construction of new retail space in the region was at an all- time low in 2021, with just 640,000 square feet of new space added. That was nearly half the previous record low of 1.2 million square feet built in 2012, according to Matthew Rosen- feld, Weitzman executive vice presi- dent and director of DFW brokerage. However, increased demand for retail space and rising occupancy rates are expected to help turn things around in 2022, according to the forecast. “Based on what’s in the pipe- line, we expect construction to total approximately 2 million square feet [in 2022],” Caplan said. “That’s more than double the 2021 total, but it remains on the conservative side.” The Weitzman forecast also found retail occupancy was at 93.5% throughout the region at the end of 2021. That rate was the third highest total the rm has recorded for DFW,

35

380

DENTON

DNT TOLL

MCKINNEY

ADDISON

FRISCO

CARROLLTON

SRT TOLL

Retail space leased in square feet

ALLEN

ROANOKE WESTLAKE TROPHY CLUB

HIGHLAND VILLAGE

700,001+ 600,001 to 700,000 500,001 to 600,000 400,001 to 500,000 300,001 to 400,000 200,001 to 300,000 100,001 to 200,000 1 to 100,000 0 to -100,000 less than -100,000

PLANO

MURPHY

LEWISVILLE

FLOWER MOUND

75

NORTHEAST FORT WORTH

35E

WYLIE

PGBT TOLL

RICHARDSON

FAR NORTH DALLAS

SACHSE

COPPELL

SOUTHLAKE

FARMERS BRANCH

COLLEYVILLE

KELLER

GARLAND ROWLETT

GRAPEVINE

NORTH RICHLAND HILLS

NORTH DALLAS

635

EULESS

NORTHWEST FORT WORTH

NORTHEAST DALLAS

IRVING

30

FORT WORTH CBD*

161

PARK CITIES OAK LAWN

121

WEST DALLAS

DALLAS CBD*

MESQUITE

SOUTHEAST DALLAS

30

SOUTHEAST FORT WORTH

SOUTHWEST DALLAS

ARLINGTON

*CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT

35W

20

35E

GRAND PRAIRIE

45

NOTE: AREA DESIGNATIONS WERE MADE BY TEXASBASED COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE FIRM WEITZMAN AND DO NOT ALWAYS MATCH CITY BOUNDARIES. ADDITIONALLY, SOME OF THE AREA DESIGNATIONS SHOWN INCLUDE MULTIPLE CITIES.

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SOUTHWEST FORT WORTH

DESOTO LANCASTER

HURST

CEDAR HILL

DUNCANVILLE

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

BEDFORD

SOURCE: WEITZMANCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

just below its previously recorded highs of nearly 94% in 2019 and almost 95% in 1981. “This is [a] complete reversal from 2020, when pandemic-related clo- sures resulted in vacancy jumping by more than 4 million square feet,” Rosenfeld said at the January event. “Now our numbers [going into 2022] look remarkably like those of prepan- demic 2019—one of the best years ever Unlike other nearby cities, Rich- ardson is roughly 96% developed, according to city ocials. Manasseh Durkin, chair of the board of directors for the Richardson Chamber of Com- merce, said this lack of buildable land as well as recent shopping trends will for our retail market.” Adapting in Richardson

cause stores to shift toward smaller retail locations. “The consumer is now OK with going smaller into what I call micro-retail,” Durkin said. “It used to be an instant gratication thing where I’d want to walk in [a store] and leave with a product. Now, Amazon and the big players have solved that for the most part where [any product] can come in two days.” The convenience of online shop- ping has shifted what needs to be pro- vided in stores, with many industries, including health care and housing, now incorporating online elements, Durkin said. “The way we’ve shopped has shifted,” Durkin said. “When I sawmy neighbors in their 80s having Uber eats delivered to their house, you

know the world has changed. The big box stores have been a dying thing for a while, and I think the novelty of that mix of everything is gone.” That change is also happening with restaurants, such as Velvet Taco and Piada Italian Street Food, Caplan said, with those two eateries modifying some of their existing restaurants to include digital drive-thru windows that allow customers to pick up online orders with minimal contact. A shift toward exible work space is also being incorporated into the design of new apartments and town- homes, according to Matt Enzler, a senior managing director with multi- family development company Tram- mell Crow Residential. The company has built multifamily developments in Richardson and throughout the

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