Lake Houston - Humble - Kingwood Edition | May 2022

LAKE HOUSTON HUMBLE KINGWOOD EDITION

VOLUME 7, ISSUE 1  MAY 20JUNE 23, 2022

ONLINE AT

Low pay, pandemic exacerbate teacher shortages for local, statewide districts

TAKING A TOLL ON TEACHERS A 2021 Charles Butt Foundation poll of 919 Texas teachers showed a 10% increase from the previous year in the number of teachers who seriously considered leaving the profession.

BY WESLEY GARDNER

policy at Raise Your Hand Texas, a statewide nonprot that supports public policy solutions for the state’s education system—pointed to low teacher pay as a primary factor for the declining workforce. Despite across-the-board pay raises for teachers stipulated in Texas House Bill 3—a sweeping school nance bill approved by the Legislature in 2019—new teachers are on average making less money than they were a decade ago when adjusted for ination, Popinksi said. CONTINUED ON 20

CAUSE FOR CONCERN

The Texas workforce saw the addition of 134 total teachers at the beginning of the 2021-22 school year—a 98.02% decrease from the 6,771 total teachers added the year prior, according to Texas Education Agency data. Additionally, roughly 11.6% of the 2020-21 workforce—or about 42,800 teachers—had left the profession by the end of the school year, which is nearly 9,000 more than the previous year, TEA data shows. Bob Popinski—senior director of

Among the teachers who considered leaving, the following reasons were cited:

68% of the teachers polled seriously considered leaving their profession.

87%

Work-related stress Teaching students virtually

87%

84%

Feeling undervalued Excessive workload Poor pay and benets Advancement concerns

79%

74%

46%

SOURCE: CHARLES BUTT FOUNDATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Local food banks struggle to meet growing demand amid supply chain issues, ination

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

HUNGRY FOR HELP Prior to the pandemic, Harris and Montgomery counties had more than 715,200 people combined who were considered food insecure in 2019, according to the National Food Security Survey. Local food bank ocials said the pandemic has further exacerbated the issue. SOURCE: FEEDING AMERICACOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

More than two years after the coronavirus pan- demic rst hit the Greater Houston area in March 2020, food banks are still struggling to meet the growing demand for their services as volunteers are slow to return and donations become scarce. According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s Household Pulse Survey, 10.9% of residents in the Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land metro area reported being food scarce at the start of the pandemic between April 23-May 5, 2020. Between Oct. 28-Nov. 9, 2020,

Food insecurity is dened as a lack of consistent access to enough food for an active, healthy life.

FOOD INSECURITY RATE IN 2019

MONTGOMERY COUNTY

70,560 people

12.3%

4.09 million people TEXAS

644,710 people HARRIS COUNTY

14.1%

13.9%

CONTINUED ON 22

Grand Parkway opens from Hwy. 59 to I10

Humble ISD voters approve $775M in bonds

IMPACTS

TRANSPORTATION

ELECTION RESULTS

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LAKE HOUSTON - HUMBLE - KINGWOOD EDITION • MAY 2022

 

 

 



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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. Now in 2022, CI is still locally owned. We have expanded to include hundreds of employees, our own software platform and printing facility, and over 40 hyperlocal editions across three states with circulation more than 2.8 million residential mailboxes.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS MONTH

FROM KIM: Families are wrapping up the 2021-22 school year and will kick o summer with the Memorial Day holiday. As parents, it is our responsibility to share the meaning of Memorial Day and why we honor the American ag with our children. There are events all around the Greater Houston area to pay tribute to the men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military. To learn more about these events, visit communityimpact.com. Kim Giannetti, GENERAL MANAGER

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FROM HANNAH: Food insecurity has been an issue in the Lake Houston community long before the rst wave of the COVID-19 pandemic hit the Greater Houston area in March 2020. Since then, however, ination, supply chain issues and a lack of volunteers has made meeting increased needs in the community even more challenging for local food banks and pantries. To learn more about how these nonprot organizations are adapting to these challenges, see our front-page story, which continues inside (see Pages 20-21). Hannah Zedaker, EDITOR

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LAKE HOUSTON  HUMBLE  KINGWOOD EDITION • MAY 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

plant-themed items, including incense dishes, stationery, ornaments, keychains and cups. Prior to opening her brick-and- mortar location, Burton ran her business from a renovated cargo trailer dubbed “Ms. Dottie.” www.shopdoteon.com 3 Collections by Mimi opened April 1 at 23594 FM 1314, Porter. Owned by Michele Millican, the store sells furni- ture, decor and other home items, such as planting pots, cutting boards, keychains, drink tumblers and holiday knick-knacks. The business also creates custom home decor 936-320-8039. www.facebook.com/collectionsbymimi 4 Houston Methodist Primary Care Group opened a new comprehensive care center in Kingwood on April 11. Located at 4501 Magnolia Cove Drive, Bldg. 6, Ste. 201, the medical practice offers primary care services with on-site access to specialty care and lab services. Among the services offered include acute care, chronic disease management, physicals and health screenings, preventive care, immunizations and women’s health services. 713-394-6638. www.houstonmethodist. org/kings-harbor-pcp 5 Mr. Smoke celebrated its grand open- ing in Kingwood on March 12. Located at 1310 Northpark Drive, Ste. 300, the smoke shop offers a wide selection of vaping devices, CBD products, tobacco products, hookah pipes and glass pipes. According to Manager Blade Clymer, cus- tomers can request products if the store does not already have them. Additionally, the shop offers a reward system that allows customers to accumulate points with each sale that can be used for future purchases. Clymer said the business is working on a website that should be online soon. 281-570-6602 6 Juicy Heads & Spicy Tails Crawfish & More celebrated its grand opening April 29 in Humble. Located at 1502 First St. E., Ste. G, the eatery offers a menu of crawfish, Dungeness crabs, boiled shrimp, shrimp and fish tacos, and fried seafood platters with sides ranging from boudin balls and links to hushpuppies. The restaurant offers both dine-in and carryout services. 832-802-9024. www.juicyheadsspicytails.com

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LAKE HOUSTON WILDERNESS PARK

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VALLEY RANCH PWKY.

MARKET PLACE DR.

99 TOLL

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Dote On

COURTESY DOTE ON

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NORTHPARK DR.

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COMING SOON 7 Jay’s Burgers n More is projecting a June 15 grand opening for its new brick- and-mortar location in Humble. Located at 20131 Aldine Westfield Road, the restaurant is operating as a food trailer until renovations on the building are completed. According to owner Jamail Williams, Jay’s Burgers n More offers gourmet, organic versions of a variety of fast-food favorites, including burgers, boudin balls, fried chicken tenders, fried wings and french fries. www.instagram.com/jaysburgersnmore 8 Domino’s Pizza will be opening a new location along Hwy. 242 in New Caney this fall, the company confirmed May 10, with construction slated to begin this summer. According to the company web- site, Domino’s was founded in Michigan in 1960 and has more than 18,000 locations worldwide. According to a May 2 Face- book post from the East Montgomery County Improvement District, the new pizzeria will be located across from Big Rivers Waterpark & Adventures— located at 23101 Hwy. 242, New Caney. www.dominos.com 9 ​The new Target store planned for Valley Ranch Town Center—located at 11985 Grand Parkway N., New Caney—is expected to open in 2023, according to a May 11 Facebook post from the East Montgomery County Improvement Dis- trict. Developer Signorelli Co. announced the planned store, which is expected to be 136,000 square feet, in October, and construction is slated to begin in August. Target has 1,926 stores across the coun- try and made about $94 billion in revenue in 2020, according to the retailer’s web-

KINGWOOD EXECUTIVE DR.

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KINGWOOD

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ATASCOCITA

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HUMBLE

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MAP NOT TO SCALE

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N . L A K E H O U S T O N P K W Y . NOW OPEN 1 Freebirds World Burrito celebrated the grand opening of its newest loca- tion at 3112 W. Lake Houston Parkway, Kingwood, on May 9. Freebirds is an Austin-based Tex-Mex chain that has locations across Texas, including in Houston, Dallas and San Antonio. The restaurant’s menu boasts burritos, tacos,

bowls and salads that can be customized according to customers’ tastes. 281-721-0143. www.freebirds.com 2 Plant boutique Dote On opened March 12 at 3033 Woodland Hills Drive, Kingwood, owner Joselyn Burton con- firmed. Burton’s business offers indoor tropical plants and plant care supplies, such as ceramic pots, wall planters and plant food. Dote On also sells decorative

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY WESLEY GARDNER, EMILY LINCKE, JISHNU NAIR & HANNAH ZEDAKER

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Houston Methodist Primary Care Group

Court Appointed Special Advocates

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site. www.target.com 10 HomeGoods is projecting its new location in New Caney’s Valley Ranch Town Center to open in the third quarter of 2022, according to the East Mont- gomery County Improvement District. Located at 21872 Market Place Drive, the national chain will sell a variety of home decor items, including pillows, towels, rugs, dishes and cutlery as well as pet items. HomeGoods is a sister store to TJ Maxx, Marshalls, Sierra Trading Post and Homesense. www.homegoods.com 11 Pet Supplies Plus will be opening a new location in King’s Crossing—located at the intersection of West Lake Houston Parkway and Kingwood Drive in Kingwood—in early July, a spokesperson with Identity PR confirmed May 11. The retailer sells food and supplies for dogs, cats, birds, fish, reptiles and small ani- mals such as hamsters. The business also offers grooming services for dogs and cats. www.petsuppliesplus.com 12 By the end of this year, Enterprise Holdings expects to open an Enterprise Rent-A-Car and Enterprise truck rental location at Archway Properties’ Park Air 59 development in Humble, a company spokesperson confirmed May 11. The businesses will occupy 4.9 acres at the northeast corner of Will Clayton Parkway and Hwy. 59. The news of these locations was initially announced in early 2021. www.enterpriseholdings.com 13 Weather Shield Structures Solu- tion Factory will host a grand opening celebration June 17 for its new location at 1413 Northpark Drive, Kingwood. The business offers both commercial and res- idential roofing services as well as storm

damage restoration, commercial and residential asset risk management, in- surance claims consultation, and project design and engineering services. Based in Kingwood, Weather Shield Structures has been in business for 13 years and serves the Houston, Austin and San Antonio metro areas. 936-230-8366. www.weathershieldstructures.com RELOCATIONS 14 On April 4, Service Wire Co. relocat- ed to a new manufacturing and distribu- tion center at 10803 W. Lake Houston Parkway, Houston, in the Generation Park development. The family-owned cable and wire manufacturer was founded in 1968, according to the business’s website. Service Wire Co. produces wire and cable for commercial use in various sectors, such as renewable energy, the automotive industry and mining. The business also has locations in West Virginia and Arizona. 800-231-9473. www.servicewire.com ANNIVERSARIES The Montgomery County-based Court Appointed Special Advocates celebrated its 30th anniversary April 27 and officially celebrated the opening of its new head- quarters at 505 N. Main St., Conroe. CASA child advocates are appointed by judges to watch over abused and neglected children, according to the organiza- tion’s website. The group serves 100% of Montgomery County children picked up by the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services, according to its 2020 impact report. Montgomery County Judge Mark Keough gave CASA special

The Fall Creek Sports Complex expansion included the addition of two sand volleyball courts, among other amenities.

COURTESY FALL CREEK

FEATURED IMPACT EXPANSION Following roughly 18 months of construction, the Harris County Water Control and Improvement District No. 96 will host a grand reopening celebration for the Fall Creek Sports Complex on May 27 from 5:30-9 p.m. Located at 9810 Wyatt Shores Drive, Humble, the newly expanded Fall Creek Sports Complex encompasses two baseball elds, two soccer elds, two sand volleyball courts and two dog parks in addition to playground equipment, covered pavilions, picnic areas, and ping-pong and chess tables. The 65-acre complex also features an extended trail system that borders Garners Bayou and features a buttery recognition at the April 26 session of Commissioners Court and congratulated the group on its mission. 936-441-5437. www.casaspeaks4kids.com NEW OWNERSHIP 15 In early April, J. Christopher’s Pizza and Pasta was sold to Steve and Gina Williamson, Steve Williamson confirmed May 16. The 42-year-old restaurant was formerly owned by Mike and Adriana

garden, birdhouses and bird-watching stations. Construction on the expansion project began in December 2020. The grand reopening celebration will be free to attend and feature live music, complimentary food from Chick-l-A and James Coney Island, airbrush tattoo artists and bounce houses. Attendees are encouraged to bring lawn chairs and blankets. 281-458-8000. www. fallcreekhouston.com/sports-complex

REDSTONE VIEW DR.

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Swift, and founded in 1980 by John and Marcie Brennan. The Williamsons are in the process of gathering customer feed- back, and Steve Williamson said they do not plan on implementing many changes yet. J. Christopher’s serves a variety of Italian dishes, such as ravioli, spaghetti, pizzas and salads as well as burgers, sandwiches and pastas. The restaurant is located at 2245 Northpark Drive, Kingwood. 281-358-6601. www.jchristopherspizzapasta.com

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LAKE HOUSTON - HUMBLE - KINGWOOD EDITION • MAY 2022

TODO LIST

May & June events

COMPILED BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

LIVE MUSIC GREEN OAKS TAVERN 211 E. Main St., Humble 281-570-4344 www.greenoakstavern.com JUNE 01 Jazz Night with Jordan Almes & Lamar Boulet, 8 p.m. 03 Van Wilks Band, 9 p.m. 04 Pride & Joy from Waco, 9 p.m. 05 Whitt-Ness, 6 p.m. 10 Cotton Stone, 9 p.m. 11 Mark May Band, 9 p.m. 12 Kevin Swanson, 6 p.m. 14 Chris Castaneda’s Jam, 8 p.m. 17 Eric Demmer Band, 9 p.m. open). $10-$20. Humble Civic Center & Arena Complex, 8233 Will Clayton Parkway, Humble. 281-446-4140. www.humblecc.com 17 LISTEN TO LOUISIANA BLUES Kenny Neal, a second-generation Southern Louisiana bluesman, returns to Humble to perform traditional blues music onstage. 7 p.m. $20. Charles Bender Performing Arts Center, 611 Higgins St., Humble. 281-446-4140. www.humblepac.com

Erica Johnston, and Rotary Club of Lake Houston Area. The event will include live entertainment from Dueling Pianos, an auction and rae. Proceeds from the event will support holiday meals, Christmas toys and job center assistance provided through HAAM. 6 p.m. $150. The Clubs of Kingwood, 1700 Lake Kingwood Trail, Kingwood. 281-446-3663. www.haamministries.org 11 SPEND AN AFTERNOON AT THE THEATER Presented by A Crafted Diamond Productions, “So You Think The Grass Is Greener” is a stage play that tells the story of church leaders Eric and Ashley Greener and their parishioners, whose relationships with Christ are about to be tested by deception within the congregation. 3 p.m. $50-$60. Charles Bender Performing Arts Center, 611 Higgins St., Humble. 281-446-4140. www.humblepac.com 11 ATTEND BLOCKCHELLA Dubbed “the block party of all block parties,” BlockChella will feature two live music stages featuring zydeco, hip-hop and R&B music with performances by Paul Wall and Lil Nate, among others. The block party will also feature a slab show and competition, and food and alcohol will be available for purchase. 4 p.m. (doors

MAY 22

LEARN ABOUT LATIN CULTURE HUMBLE CIVIC CENTER

beer. Children and leashed dogs are welcome to attend. Noon-5 p.m. Free. Megaton Brewery, 808 Russell Palmer Road, Kingwood. 346-600-5166. www.texasartisanmarkets.com JUNE 10 HONOR PILLARS OF THE COMMUNITY Join Humble Area Assistance Ministries as it hosts its annual Pillars of the Community event, which recognizes community members who have supported the nonprot organization. This year’s recipients include Charles and Stella Cunningham, Duane and Experience Latin culture at The Feria Houston Festival, which will showcase street food, live entertainment, local vendors and children’s activities. Attendees will be able to vote for their favorite dishes and drinks. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Free (general admission),$50-$85 (VIP). Humble Civic Center & Arena Complex, 8233 Will Clayton Parkway, Humble. 281-446-4140. www.humblecc.com (Courtesy La Feria)

MAY 21 WALK FOR PREECLAMPSIA Join Houston Promise Walks to bring awareness of preeclampsia, a hypertensive pregnancy disorder. The event is free for children age 10 and under; however, a medal is not included. 9 a.m. $30. Kings Harbor, 4501 Magnolia Cove Drive, Kingwood. https://secure.qgiv.com/event/2022pw 22 SHOP A SUMMER MARKET Texas Artisan Markets hosts its annual Summer Artisan Market, featuring more than 80 artisan vendors, food trucks, two live music stages and craft

Find more or submit Lake Houston-area events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION UPDATES

COMPILED BY WESLEY GARDNER

UPCOMING PROJECTS

Grand Parkway opens from New Caney to Baytown Motorists can now travel the

CONNECTING COMMUNITIES

TxDOT ocials noted the new stretch of the Grand Parkway—a roughly $1.28 billion expansion that includes segments H, I-1 and I-2—represents a 52.5-mile corridor spanning Harris, Montgomery, Liberty and Chambers counties. The scope of the project included the construction of new lanes and the modernization of existing tolling infrastructure. Ocials added the new segments connecting New Caney to Baytown would be free to motorists for two days before tolls begin to be collected at midnight May 21. According to TxDOT, the Grand Parkway is the longest highway loop in the U.S. and is the third circumferential highway around the Houston metro, joining the 610 Loop and Beltway 8. With the completion of segments H, I-1 and I-2, the Grand Parkway is now open from I-10 in Baytown to I-69 in Sugar Land. 6 10 69 290 90

Grand Parkway from Hwy. 59 in New Caney to I-10 in Baytown after 52.5 miles of new roadway segments opened May 19, Texas Department of Transportation ocials said. According to TxDOT Public Information Ocer Danny Perez, the Grand Parkway—a 184-mile highway composed of 11 segments across seven counties—is intended to improve mobility, reduce congestion, and accommodate population and economic growth in the Greater Houston area. “[The Grand Parkway] will provide additional route options for the traveling public, who will no longer have to come into the core of the Houston area to get to their destination,” Perez said in an email. “This, of course, reduces the number of vehicles coming into the central part of the city, providing congestion relief.”

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Northpark Drive overpass A project to expand Northpark Drive from four to six lanes between Hwy. 59 and Russell Palmer Road and add an overpass over the railroad is expected to go to bid in June with construction beginning shortly after. According to Ralph De Leon, administrator of the Lake Houston Redevelopment Authority and Tax Increment Reinvestment Zone 10, the project is expected to take roughly 30 months to complete once construction begins. Timeline: June 2022-winter 2024 Cost: $52 million Funding source: LHRA, TIRZ 10, city of Houston

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The Grand Parkway extension project from New Caney to Baytown represents a 52.5-mile corridor of the 184-mile highway aimed at improving mobility and easing trac congestion in the Greater Houston area. Timeline: April 2018-May 2022 Cost: $1.28 billion Funding source: Texas Department of Transportation SOURCES: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, GRAND PARKWAY TRANSPORTATION CORP. COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER 288

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MAY 17. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT LHKNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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LAKE HOUSTON  HUMBLE  KINGWOOD EDITION • MAY 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION Projections estimate New Caney ISD will add roughly 5,600-9,600 new students by 2031

BY WESLEY GARDNER

the district is poised to see the most short-term growth with more than 4,000 new homes being constructed in The Highlands community, roughly 900 units being built in Maple Heights and around 500 units coming to The Landing. Additionally, Silhavy said the northeast portion of the district will gain more than 2,400 new homes in the Tavola and Roman Forest communities, while the southern portion of the district will see roughly 900 new units in the Pepperdine, Northpark South and Royal Pines neighborhoods. Silhavy also pointed to several undeveloped tracts of land that he said could provide additional housing in the future, including 1,500 acres of property—dubbed the Cheng Tracts— located north of the Grand Parkway as well as additional property owned by The Highlands’ developers located 22,000—closer to 23,000—homes are projected to be occupied [within the district’s boundaries],” Silhavy said, noting each housing unit within the district has an average of 0.6 students per home. According to the projections, north of its current location. “Looking out 10 years, over Pool said several schools within the district could reach 120% capacity within the next 10 years, including Crippen, Dogwood, Tavola and Oakley elementary schools; Keefer Crossing and White Oak middle schools; and New Caney High School. Pool noted Crippen Elementary, which could potentially reach 120% capacity in the 2025-26 school year, could be relieved by a new school in

NEW HOUSING ON THE HORIZON Population and Survey Analysts projected around 22,800 new housing occupancies will be built within New Caney ISD’s boundaries by 2031.

New Caney ISD’s student popu- lation is projected to grow between roughly 5,600-9,600 students by 2031, according to the most recent Population and Survey Analysts report presented to trustees April 18. NCISD’s student population stands at roughly 17,100 students as of April, according to district officials. According to PASA Planning Director Kris Pool, the demographic firm studies existing and projected residential development and poten- tial land uses for undeveloped land parcels to create student growth projections that aim to help school districts outline where new schools could be needed in the future. Outside of 2020—during which the district’s annual growth rate dropped to 1% as students throughout the state shifted to remote learning due to the COVID-19 pandemic—NCISD’s student population has grown by an average of 4.6% annually since 2016, district officials said. “Ignoring 2020, you can see how [student growth] really is continuing on an upward trajectory as many of those students [returned to class- rooms],” Pool said. Pool noted projections for growth would place NCISD’s student popula- tion in 2031 around 26,700 students in a high-growth scenario and 22,700 in a low-growth scenario. According to PASA demographer Justin Silhavy, student growth scenarios are calculated, in part, by assessing housing developments under construction as well as projected new housing. Silhavy said the western portion of

Number of new housing units

On average, every home within NCISD’s boundaries has 0.6 students per household.

Manufactured housing

Mixed- use

Senior housing

Recreational vehicles

Single-family housing

Multifamily housing

PROJECTED STUDENT POPULATION New Caney ISD’s student population has grown by roughly 13.8% since the 2017-18 school year with growth expected to continue as more housing opportunities are developed, according to a Population and Survey Analysts report.

Low projection Median projection High projection

Actual population

26,735

0 30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000

25,026

17,120

15,046

22,694

2018 2019 2020 2021 2026 2031

2017

SOURCES: NEW CANEY ISD, POPULATION AND SURVEY ANALYSTS/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

the western portion of NCISD, while Dogwood, Tavola and Oakley could be relieved by a new school in the northeastern portion of NCISD. Pool said an additional middle school and high school in the northern portion of the district would relieve projected capacity issues, but

she noted the new schools would not be needed until the second half of the projection period, which begins with the 2027-28 school year. “The district has done a good job in managing the growth, but there are things to be handled here in the next several years,” she said.

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LAKE HOUSTON - HUMBLE - KINGWOOD EDITION • MAY 2022

NEWS BRIEFS

News from the Lake Houston area

Partnership Lake Houston CEO to resign eective June 5

East Montgomery County Improvement District to bring dog park, trails to New Caney

“According to Lance, this was an oppor- tunity that has transpired very quickly and is not a reection of his time at the part- nership,” Johnson

BY EMILY LINCKE

December, and the EMCID hopes to close on the tract “this month,” according to the news release. The land touches parts of both Dry and Caney creeks. “We’ve heard from residents for years how they’d like for park space to be added into the East Montgomery landscape, and we believe this former crushed concrete site can be transformed into a beautiful green space,” said Frank McCrady, EMCID president and CEO, via the news release. The project is still in the plan- ning and development phase, according to the EMCID, and a timeline or cost for the project has not yet been announced. EMCID ocials noted they planned to apply for grants to fund the project to help keep costs down. Eventually, the park is expected to include biking and walking trails as well as gardens to host wildlife.

A 64-acre tract of land in New Caney will be transformed into a dog park with nature trails, accord- ing to a May 5 news release from the East Montgomery County Improve- ment District. Located on FM 1485 at the intersection of Gene Campbell Boulevard in New Caney, this area has been under contract since

BY WESLEY GARDNER

Lance LaCour

Lance LaCour, CEO and president of economic development for Part- nership Lake Houston, announced his resignation May 5. LaCour rst joined Partnership Lake Houston, which functions as a chamber of commerce and economic development entity in the Lake Houston area, as its president of economic development in Novem- ber before being appointed CEO in January. Prior to joining Partnership Lake Houston, LaCour served as president and CEO of the Katy Area Economic Development Council for more than 16 years. According to Partnership Lake Houston Chair Erica Johnson, LaCour is taking an opportunity with the city of Granbury to launch and run its newly formed economic development department.

said in a May 6 email, noting LaCour’s daughter lives near Granbury. “This is an opportunity that aligns his pro- fessional life and personal life. I know we all feel that family is so important, so we wish him all the best in his future endeavors.” LaCour’s last day with Partnership Lake Houston will be June 5. Moving forward, Johnson said LaCour will work with Partnership Lake Houston sta to ensure the organization runs smoothly as it works to ll the vacancy. “As a board, we are in communi- cation about the next steps needed to hire an economic development professional to support the exciting work that is occurring within our community on the economic devel- opment front,” Johnson said.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

ELECTION RESULTS Humble ISD voters approve $775M in bond funds to address capacity, technology needs

David Pierce re-elected to Humble City Council

BY WESLEY GARDNER

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

community, a community that we love and that supports us in oering the very best education opportunities for all students,” Fagen said in an emailed statement May 9. “Humble ISD is a family and a partnership where everyone contributes to supporting students in achieving their dreams. ... This bond will support our growth, safety and innovation for all students. It will allow us to provide quality compensation for our incredible sta. This bond will allow us to reinvest in our community and help keep it strong.”

Humble ISD Superintendent Elizabeth Fagen touted the May 7 voter approval of both proposi- tions included in a bond package that would net the district $775 million to accommodate future growth and technology needs. According to unocial results with 465 out of 465 Harris County voting centers reporting election day results, Proposition A—which provides $730 million for a number of facilities districtwide—received 7,737 votes, or 63.55% of the total. Proposition A will fund the construction of Middle School No. 11 and a new campus for the district’s Mosaic Program, the complete rebuilds of Foster Elementary School and Sterling Middle School, and additional classrooms at Humble and Summer Creek High Schools and Summerwood Elementary School, among other projects. Similarly, 7,734 voters, or 63.78% of total voters, supported Proposition B, which includes $45 million for new laptops and workstations for sta and new Chromebooks and iPads for students, among other technology investments. “We are so incredibly grateful to our

With 100% of Harris County voting centers reporting election day results, voters re-elected incumbent David Pierce to the position of Humble City Council Place 5 in the May 7 election. Pierce received 74.58%, or 358 votes, while challenger Linda Greenan garnered 25.42%, or 122 votes. Pierce was elected to his position in 2015, although he served on the council previously from 1986-2022. Pierce has also served as the council’s mayor pro tem since February 2021. “I would like to say a heartfelt thanks to my family, friends and neighbors for their support and help in getting the votes,” Pierce said in a statement to Community Impact Newspaper on May 9. “Everyone is so busy, and taking the time to be a part [of the election process] is a positive and a win for our community.” The Humble City Council is made up of one mayor and ve council members, each of which are elected to two-year terms. While places 3 and 4 were also up for election May 7, the incumbents—Bruce Davidson and Paula Settle, respectively—ran unopposed.

VOTER VALIDATION

Voters approved both propositions on the May 7 ballot, netting Humble ISD $775 million in bond funds.

Proposition A: $730M

PASSED

7,737 (63.55%)

Proposition B: $45M

PASSED

7,734 (63.78%)

SOURCE: HARRIS COUNTY OFFICE OF THE ELECTIONS ADMINISTRATOR COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Dorothy Dalton, Zach Dunlap elected to Harris County ESD 11 board

Challengers Dorothy Dalton and Zach Dunlap were the top two vote-getters in the race for two at-large positions on the Harris County Emergency Services District No. 11 board of commissioners. NEW FACES

BY WESLEY GARDNER

tallying 1,420 votes, or 21.18% of total votes. Christo- pher David and Joel Ocasio followed with 1,195 and 920 votes, respectively. “I want to weed out the bad and dead wood on that board,” Dalton said. “It’s time for new blood.” Moving forward, Dalton said she was going to aim to increase transparency on the board. “The rst thing I want to see is how much [the board] has spent and how much in debt they put the taxpayers in,” Dalton said. “I want to be reassured that our level of care ... is where it needs to be.” Dunlap could not be reached for comment.

With unocial voting results in for the May 7 election, Dorothy Dalton and Zach Dunlap won two at-large positions on Harris County Emergency Services District No. 11’s board of commissioners. Dalton took in 1,681 votes, or 25.07% of total votes, followed by Dunlap with 1,489 votes, or 22.21% of total votes. The election was held to select two at-large positions on the ESD 11 board held by Kevin Brost and Fred Grundmeyer. While Grundmeyer was not seeking re-election, Brost nished third in the race,

Incumbent

Winner

21.18% Kevin Brost 22.21% Zach Dunlap 25.07% Dorothy Dalton 17.82% Christopher David

13.72% Joel Ocasio

SOURCE: HARRIS COUNTY EMERGENCY SERVICES DISTRICT NO. 11 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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LAKE HOUSTON  HUMBLE  KINGWOOD EDITION • MAY 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

INSIDE INFORMATION

BY WESLEY GARDNER

BRINGING IN BLOOD

The Gulf Coast Regional Blood Center, an area nonprofit that provides blood to Houston and its surrounding communities, is nearing a shortage of blood supplies for the roughly 170 hospitals it serves across 26 Texas counties. Here is a look at how blood donations are used and how residents can help.

DONOR DILEMMA

BLOOD TYPE BREAKDOWN

TRACKING TRANSFUSIONS

According to the GCRBC, the percentage of Americans who will need a blood transfusion at some point in their lives greatly outweighs the percentage of Americans who donate blood.

There are four major blood groups determined by the presence or absence of two antigens, A and B, on the surface of red blood cells. Additionally, the presence or absence of a protein called the Rh factor determines whether the blood type is positive or negative.

Rh-negative blood can only be given to Rh-negative patients, while Rh-positive or Rh-negative blood types can be given to Rh-positive patients, meaning O-negative blood types can be given to all four blood groups, and patients with an AB-negative blood type can receive blood from all four groups.

1 in 20 people will donate blood at some point in their life. 1 in 7 people will need a blood transfusion at some point in their life.

BLOOD TYPES by percent of U.S. population

Donor

O

A

B

AB

37.4% 6.6%

+

O

-

44%

Recipient

O

A

B

AB

+

35.7% 6.3%

A

The GCRBC has 17 permanent donor centers across Southeast Texas in addition to mobile blood drives hosted across the area on a daily basis. WHERE TO DONATE?

Anyone who is age 17 or older may be eligible to donate blood. Individuals who are 16 years old may be eligible to donate with parental consent. WHO CAN DONATE? Donors who are age 19 and older must weigh at least 110 pounds. Whole-blood donors who are age 16 must weigh at least 120 pounds. Whole-blood and automated donors who are ages 17-18 and male must weigh at least 115 pounds; female donors must weigh at least 120 pounds. Donors must be in general good health without any cold or flu symptoms. Donors who have COVID-19 or a positive test for COVID-19 must wait 10 days and be

-

42%

8.5% 1.5%

+

B

-

Champions Donor Center 6935 FM 1960 W., Ste. A, Houston 281-440-5900 Conroe Neighborhood Donor Center 2125 N. Loop 336 W., Conroe 936-760-3345 Cy-Fair Donor Center 11811 FM 1960 W., Ste. 120, Houston 281-469-1964 For a complete list of donation sites, visit www.commitforlife.org .

Cypress Neighborhood Donor Center 15050 Fairfield Village Square Drive, Ste. 105, Cypress 832-334-4880 Humble/Kingwood Donor Center 9616 FM 1960 W., Humble 281-446-5955 The Woodlands Donor Center 3091 College Park Drive, Ste. 130,

10%

+

3.4% 0.6%

AB

-

4%

RH+ 85%

RH- 15%

asymptomatic prior to donating. Donors must bring a valid photo ID.

The Woodlands 936-321-8440

SOURCES: AMERICAN RED CROSS, GULF COAST REGIONAL BLOOD CENTER, STANFORD MEDICINE BLOOD CENTER/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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LAKE HOUSTON - HUMBLE - KINGWOOD EDITION • MAY 2022

DON’T PUT YOUR DIGESTIVE HEALTH ON HOLD

Living with digestive health issues can be challenging. If you suffer from GERD, Acid Reflux, Crohn’s, IBS, Ulcerative Colitis, colorectal polyps or have a family history of colon cancer, you know how important regular screenings are to your health. Endoscopy and colonoscopy can find issues early while they’re still treatable. And with a network of affiliated digestive health specialists at convenient locations across Greater Houston, there’s no reason to put it off. MAKE REGULAR SCREENINGS A PRIORITY Schedule a follow-up with your gastroenterologist or visit memorialhermann.org/colonoscopy to find a physician

Advancing health. Personalizing care.

16

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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AN INNOVATIVE WAY TO DIAGNOSE AND TREAT GI CONDITIONS

The specially trained physicians affiliated with Memorial Hermann Northeast Hospital use advanced technologies to diagnose and treat a wide range of digestive conditions. One of those technologies is endoscopic ultrasound, an innovative procedure that provides a detailed view of the digestive tract to diagnose disorders of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Affiliated gastroenterologist Shahrooz Rashtak, MD, assistant professor at McGovern Medical School at UTHealth Houston, utilizes this leading-edge procedure to make faster, more accurate diagnoses. He explains how endoscopic ultrasound works and how it can be used to improve digestive health. What is endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)? Dr. Rashtak: EUS, or echo-endoscopy, is a fairly novel technique which essentially combines ultrasonography with endoscopy. While endoscopy is used to visualize inside the digestive tract, EUS enables the gastroenterologist to examine gastrointestinal wall layers as well as the nearby organs, such as pancreas and liver. Think of endoscopy as a camera to see the interior of a chamber (GI) and EUS as a device to see through the walls and the exterior area. Since EUS has been introduced, gastroenterology has rapidly evolved into an interventional field that offers precise diagnostic and minimally invasive therapeutic procedures. How is EUS used? Dr. Rashtak: EUS is considered an advanced endoscopic technique performed by gastroenterologists who are specifically trained in therapeutic endoscopy. EUS provides certain anatomical details that are otherwise difficult to observe by standard endoscopy or imaging. EUS gives the

gastroenterologist the opportunity to visualize abnormalities that have been noted by medical history, lab tests, imaging or endoscopy. What conditions does EUS treat? Dr. Rashtak: EUS applications are constantly expanding. For instance, mass or cystic lesions

Advanced GI Diagnosis and Treatment in Lake Houston Area The affiliated specialists at the Endoscopy Center at Memorial Hermann Northeast perform routine colonoscopy and upper endoscopy procedures and offer advanced diagnostic testing and treatment for digestive diseases, such as ulcers, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), Barrett’s esophagus, colon cancer and inflammatory diseases (Crohn’s, ulcerative colitis). The newly expanded Center features four enlarged procedure suites where physicians perform EUS and endoscopic bronchial ultrasound (EBUS) procedures. And the Center’s motility lab enables physicians to see real-time muscle contractions of the GI tract in the esophagus or small bowel. Early detection saves lives. Don’t put off GI screenings. The best way to stay healthy and avoid treatments and procedures is to stay current with preventive screenings, including screenings for colon cancer. Screening colonoscopy saves lives by detection and removal of early cancers and growths (polyps) that have the potential to turn into cancer. Both cancer and GI societies endorse colon cancer screening starting at age 45 for average-risk individuals, sooner for high-risk individuals.

Shahrooz Rashtak, MD Gastroenterologist

within gastrointestinal walls or organs such as pancreas and liver can be further distinguished by this technique. Additionally, cancer staging and evaluation of the bile duct for stones or narrowing is commonly done by EUS. If needed, a tumor or abnormal lymph node can also be sampled. Occasionally, large cystic lesions form after an attack of pancreatitis. They can get infected or cause symptoms such as abdominal pain. Using EUS, we can treat the lesions by placing a special stent in the cyst for drainage. What makes EUS better than other options? Dr Rashtak: Over time, EUS has evolved from being primarily a diagnostic tool to becoming therapeutic equipment that enables GI doctors to not only make accurate diagnoses but to also perform therapeutic intervention. There are several conditions that in the past could only be treated by surgery and are now treated with minimally invasive endoscopic procedures. For example, there is solid evidence that drainage of fluid buildups after pancreatitis attacks can be safely and effectively performed by EUS. And using EUS in this fashion provides a much lower risk of complications compared to surgical options. EUS has become the first line of therapy for this condition.

To schedule an appointment with an affiliated primary care or specialized GI physician, please call 713.222.CARE (2273) or visit memorialhermann.org and use the Find a Doctor tool.

Advancing health. Personalizing care.

17

LAKE HOUSTON - HUMBLE - KINGWOOD EDITION • MAY 2022

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