Sugar Land - Missouri City Edition | October 2020

SUGAR LAND MISSOURI CITY EDITION

VOLUME 8, ISSUE 2  OCT. 7NOV. 3, 2020

ONLINE AT

VOTER GUIDE 2020

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IMPACTS

TRANSPORTATION

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2020Voter Guide

According to campaign nance reports, here is how much local candidates have raised for the 2020 election. Receipts AS OF 6302020

COVID19 takes toll on 2020 campaigns Local races see low donations due to job loss as result of the coronavirus pandemic, election experts say

Sugar Land City Council At-Large Position 1

U.S. House District 22

Taylor Landin

$33.88 $8,509.09

$517,303.01

Troy Nehls

William Ferguson

Sri Preston Kulkarni

$2.53 million

Missouri City mayor Fred G. Taylor* Robin J. Elackatt* Yolanda Ford

FBISD board of trustees Position 1

BY BETH MARSHALL

Jason Burdine Angie Hanan*

$528.55

As a result of COVID-19 not only halt- ing in-person events for several months this year but also creating an economic downturn, political campaigning has looked dierent, said Cynthia Ginyard, the chair of the Fort Bend County Dem- ocratic Party. “It’s been aggravating, to say the least,” Ginyard said. “It’s curtailed our events and the way we do things [and] our interaction with people.” Linda Howell, the chair of the Fort

Bend County Republican Party, said she is proud of how the party committee and candidates have adapted. “We have been respectful of what the governor has asked and carried on cam- paigns and work with safety, of course, in mind,” Howell said. “We’re trying to do our part to speed this [pandemic] along so we can open up our state.” With social distancing being top of mind the last seven months, Ginyard

$6,016.94

FBISD board of trustees Position 4

Kristin Tassin

$0

Missouri City City Council At-Large Position 1

Shirley Rose-Gilliam*

Vashaundra Edwards Reginald Pearson*

$0

FBISD board of trustees Position 5

Reggie Abraham* Denetta R. Williams*

Missouri City City Council At-Large Position 2

Chris Preston James Mable* Lynn Clouser*

$0

Allison Drew

$1,486.40

CONTINUED ON 14

SOURCES: FEDERAL ELECTION COMMITTEE, CITY OF SUGAR LAND, CITY OF MISSOURI CITY, FORT BEND ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

*NO CAMPAIGN FINANCE REPORT WAS SUBMITTED

COVID19 ANDMENTAL HEALTH

Local mental health experts say the coronavirus pandemic has caused increased depression and anxiety.

“ FIND COMMUNITY. FIND PEOPLE THAT YOU CAN CONNECTWITH AND LOOK FOR THE POSITIVE. BECAUSE THERE’S SOMUCHNEGATIVE THAT’S BEING SHOVED AT US ALL THE TIME, THERE’S SOMUCH

“ANXIETY ANDWORRY AND STRESS ARE NORMAL PARTS OF LIFE. THEY’RE NORMAL REACTIONS TO TRAUMATIC EVENTS, WHICH I SEE THIS PANDEMIC AS A TRAUMATIC EVENT. BUTWHEN

“WITH COVID19, OF COURSE, IT HAS JUST BROUGHTMANY FOLKS TO THE BRINK, ESPECIALLY COMBAT VETERANSWITH POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE ISSUES.”

IT PERSISTS FOR A LONG TIME AND THERE’S NO RELIEF, THAT GETS TO BE REALLY CONCERNING FOR PEOPLE.” CONNIE ALMEIDA, FORT BEND COUNTY BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SERVICES DIRECTOR

POSITIVE THATWE’REMISSING. SO IF WE CAN FOCUS ON THE POSITIVE, IT CAN HELP US FEEL LESS ANXIOUS.” NICOLE PONCE, LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR IN SUGAR LAND

SPENCER WALKER, MARINE VETERAN AND IMMEDIATE FORMER FORT BEND COMMUNITY DIRECTOR WITH MENTAL HEALTH AMERICA OF GREATER HOUSTON

MENTAL HEALTH CONCERNS

SUBSTANCE USE

SEEKING HELP

INSIDE

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Our ERs are ready for whatever, whenever. With convenient locations across the Greater Houston area, trusted emergency care, and a safe environment, our ERs are ready 24/7, every day of the year. Because when an emergency happens, your health is too important to wait.

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Amy Martinez amymartinez@communityimpact.com EDITOR Beth Marshall REPORTER Claire Shoop GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chase Brooks

FROMAMY: Hopefully as your children are settling back into this new—and dierent—school year, you are taking care of yourself, too. In this issue, we tackle mental health and the tolls COVID-19 has had on residents. If you or someone you know needs help, take a look at Page 20 for resources. Amy Martinez, GENERALMANAGER

METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kristina Shackelford MANAGING EDITOR Marie Leonard ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Tessa Hoee SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Anya Gallant CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON Please join your friends and neighbors in CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE support of Community Impact Newspaper’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON CONTACT US 245 Commerce Green Blvd., Ste. 200 Sugar Land, TX 77478 • 5129896808 PRESS RELEASES SLMnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher. SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

FROMBETH: Election season is already upon us. As always, we aim to bring you unbiased candidate coverage as you head to the polls. On Pages 11-15 you will nd candidate Q&A’s with Sugar Land and Missouri City city council candidates. Beth Marshall, EDITOR

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 7 Completed and ongoing projects

VOTERGUIDE2020

SAMPLE BALLOT

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Fort Bend County candidates CANDIDATE Q&A’S Sugar Land City Council CANDIDATE Q&A’S Missouri City City Council

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THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

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Local sources 21

New businesses 4

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Transportation updates

Candidate Q&A’s

Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

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PEOPLE FEATURE 17 Missouri City City Manager Odis Jones REAL ESTATE 20 Residential market data IMPACT DEALS 21 Local coupons

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12603 Southwest Frwy

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Bill McGrath, CCIM 281.598.9860 bmcgrath@landparkco.com

Office (713) 789-2200

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

In Riverstone, fun is always right around the corner.

That’s because it’s ideally situated right in the heart of sensational shopping and dining, and especially close to spacious parks, entertainment venues, employment centers and more. Whatever to whenever, you’re always only moments away in Riverstone.

Luxurious & Convenient Living in New Homes from the $300s -Millions

Riverstone.com New Homes from the $300s- Millions Take 59 to Sugar Land, exit University

Expanding our team of leaders in VASCULAR SURGERY

Houston Methodist Welcomes Dr. Tony Lu The surgeons at Houston Methodist Cardiovascular Surgery Associates at Sugar Land provide patients with highly specialized care. Their expertise includes:

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SUGAR LAND

MEDICAL OFFICE BUILDING �

HOUSTON METHODIST SUGAR LAND HOSPITAL

• Peripheral arterial disease • Venous disease • Visceral and renal aneurysms and occlusive disease

• Aortic aneurysm, dissection and occlusive disease • Central venous occlusive disease • Cerebrovascular disease • Dialysis access • Limb salvage

WELCOMING Tony Lu, MD Vascular Surgeon

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16605 Southwest Fwy. Medical Office Building 3, Suite 560 Sugar Land, TX 77479 houstonmethodist.org/spg 713.352.1820

Our specialists are available to safely see patients in person or virtually , as needed.

Charlie Cheng, MD Vascular Surgeon

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

COMPILED BY CLAIRE SHOOP

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SUGAR LAND

TOWN CENTER BLVD.

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PROMENADE WAY

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Child Advocates of Fort Bend

Sweet Paris Crêperie & Café

99 TOLL

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COURTESY CHILD ADVOCATES OF FORT BEND

COURTESY SWEET PARIS CRÊPERIE & CAFÉ

FIRST COLONY BLVD.

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6 Painted Tree Marketplace plans to open a new boutique in the former location of Babies R Us in First Colo- ny Commons at 15555 Hwy. 59, Sugar Land, in early November. The market- place showcases hundreds of local shop owners, boutiques, decorators, artisans and crafters under one roof while also oering a variety of workshops. 844-762-3342. www.paintedtreemarketplace.com 7 Jello’s Liquor has signed a lease for a 971-square-foot space in the Market at Bees Creek shopping center at 4225 Sien- na Parkway, Ste. 140, Missouri City. The wine, beer and spirits store is planning to open in November, according to an asso- ciate with the business. Jello’s Liquor has one other Houston location in the Brays Oaks area. https://www.facebook.com/ Jellos-Liquor-402105719853774 8 Jersey Mike’s Subs is planning to open a location at 3607 S. Main St., Ste. 106, Staord, in the coming months. The nationwide sandwich chain serves hot and cold subs along with breakfast items. Catering services are also available. The new Staord Jersey Mike’s will join three existing Sugar Land and Missouri City locations. www.jerseymikes.com ANNIVERSARIES 9 The Rouxpour celebrated 10 years of serving authentic Louisiana cuisine in Sugar Land on Sept. 6. The Sugar Land agship location at 2298 Texas Drive has under- gone remodels and expansions since rst opening in 2010. Furthermore, the concept has added locations in Katy, Baybrook and Memorial City. 281-240-7689.

www.therouxpour.com EXPANSIONS

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10 Kindred Hospital Sugar Land , locat- ed at 1550 First Colony Blvd., Sugar Land, opened a new rehabilitation unit inside the hospital Aug. 1. The 11-bed acute rehabili- tation unit provides inpatient care to adults who have experienced loss of function or a disability due to injury or illness, according to a release from the hospital. While in recovery, patients will receive targeted therapy and interdisciplinary clinical care. 281-275-6000. www.kindredhealthcare.com NAME CHANGES 11 Memorial Hermann Medical Group and Children’s Memorial Hermann combined under one name, Children’s Memorial Hermann Pediatrics , the health system announced Aug. 14. This includes a Sugar Land location at 17510 W. Grand Parkway S., Ste. 310. The pedi- atric network provides access to urgent care, emergency pediatric and neonatal transport services, life ight services and other specialty care. 713-222-2273. www.childrens.memorialhermann.org CLOSINGS 12 New York & Co. , a women’s fashion retailer, has permanently closed its location in First Colony Mall at 16535 Hwy. 59, Sugar Land. The store’s website, however, will continue to provide online shopping for delivery. www.nyandcompany.com

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MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 Mirchi Peri Peri opened in mid-August at 1912 Westcott Ave., Ste. 200, Sugar Land. The restaurant’s menu features grilled chicken items dressed with a number of sauces as well as rice bowls, burgers and vegetarian oerings. 346-874-7418. www.mirchiperiperi.com 2 After experiencing several delays, Cabo Dogs Lounge & Grill opened at 7022 Hwy. 6, Ste. 100, Missouri City, on Aug. 22. The cocktail lounge and sports bar features Cabo-inspired menu items which fuse together Baja Mediterranean and Tex- Mex cuisine. The restaurant has happy hour Monday-Friday from 3-7 p.m., live music and karaoke nights, and watch parties for Houston sports teams. 832-271-6900. https://cabodogsloungeandgrill.com 3 Child Advocates of Fort Bend , along with AccessHealth and the Harris Health System, opened a medical clinic for child victims of sexual abuse Oct. 1, according

to a CAFB press release. The clinic is housed at AccessHealth at 400 Austin St., Richmond, and is staed by Harris Health forensic nurses. 281-344-5100. www.ca.org 4 Hertz , a car rental company, opened a new location at 400 Promenade Way, Sugar Land, on Aug. 24. The company oers vehicle rental services for personal and business use. Hertz has one other local location at the Sugar Land Regional Airport. 281-545-0764. www.hertz.com COMING SOON 5 Sweet Paris Crêperie & Café is open- ing its eleventh location this fall at 15911 City Walk, Sugar Land. The fast-casual restaurant will oer a variety of French street fare staples, including sweet and savory crepes, waes, salads, paninis and soups. The restaurant will have seating for 74 guests indoors and an additional 42 on the patio. www.sweetparis.com

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7001 Riverbrook Drive | Sugar Land, TX 77479 Independent Living | Assisted Living | 132339 WWW.SENIORLIFESTYLE.COM

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

Houston, we’ve got you covered. Getting the most from Medicare means partnering with a provider who understands health care � and Houston � like no one else. Memorial Hermann Medicare Advantage HMO is the only Medicare Advantage Plan backed by the Memorial Hermann Health System � trusted by Houstonians for over 100 years. With plans starting at $0 monthly premium*, Memorial Hermann Advantage plans provide additional benefits not covered by Original Medicare: + Access to telehealth services + Preventive screenings and services at no additional cost + No referrals needed to see any network specialist + Prescription drug coverage (Part D) + Dental, vision and hearing benefits + Over-the-counter benefit on the new Plus HMO plan + National/worldwide urgent care and emergency coverage + Health and fitness benefits

Enroll by December 7 for your 2021 coverage. memorialhermannadvantage.org

For more information call 1.855.582.6548 (TTY 711)

*You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium. Benefits and features vary by plan. This information is not a complete description of benefits. Call the plan for more information. Memorial Hermann Advantage HMO is provided by Memorial Hermann Health Plan, Inc., a Medicare Advantage organization with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in this plan depends on contract renewal. Memorial Hermann Advantage complies with applicable Federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability or sex. ATENCIÓN: Si habla español, tiene a su disposición servicios gratuitos de asistencia lingüística. Llame al 1.855.582.6548 (TTY 711). Copyright © 2020 Memorial Hermann. All rights reserved. H7115_MKPrintAd21_M CMS Accepted 8/22/2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Missouri Citymarks completion ofmedian enhancements Several Missouri City City Council

COMPILED BY CLAIRE SHOOP

ONGOING PROJECTS

BROOKS ST.

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members along with city sta gathered Sept. 17 for a ceremony to celebrate the completion of median enhancements along segments of Texas Parkway and Cartwright Road inMissouri City. The median enhancements, which span southbound on Texas Parkway to Turtle Creek and fromMurphy Road to Texas Parkway on Cartwright Road, cost $1 million in grants from the Texas Department of Transportation. “It’s important for residents to know the landscaping along both roadways is a win for the city and the Texas Department of Transportation as they connect thousands of people to their homes, businesses, schools, families and friends,” Mayor Yolanda Ford said. Missouri City funded the design of the beautication project, which cost the city $330,000 and was carried out by TBG Partners, which joined the city

Hwy. 6 road widening Approximately 85% of utility relocation, 80% of trac signal and 40% of road work has been completed on the project to expand Hwy. 6 from six to eight lanes between Lexington Boulevard and Brooks Street, according to the Texas Department of Transportation. Timeline: February 2019-March 2021 Cost: $12.1 million Funding sources: TxDOT, city of Sugar Land, Fort Bend County

Missouri City ocials participate in a ribbon-cutting to celebrate the completion of median enhancements within the city. (Claire Shoop/Community Impact Newspaper)

at the ceremony. “One of the purposes of this from the very beginning was tomake this corridor a premier corridor and enhance the beautication of the city,” saidMeade Mitchell, a principal at TBG Partners. The corridor enhancements are the rst phase of a three-phase project that includes installing monument

and reader signs at key entry and exit points of the city and a “red carpet” entrance to City Hall.

COURT RD.

INDEPENDENCE BLVD.

CARTWRIGHT RD. R D

BRIGHT MEADOWS DR.

LONG ROCK DR.

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF SEPT. 21. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SLMNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. construction is ongoing, motorists in the area can expect some delays, according to ocials with the city. Timeline: fall 2020-fall 2021 Cost: $2.4 million Funding source: city of Missouri City Waterfall Drive reconstruction Waterfall Drive in the Meadow Creek neighborhood is being completely reconstructed from its connection point at Independence Boulevard to the south end of the street near Long Rock Drive. City Council awarded the contract to Conrad Construction. While

Fort Bend Transit commits to health, safety Fort Bend Transit announced it, along with more than 100 public transit agencies nationwide, joined the American Public Transportation Association’s Health and Safety Com- mitment Program, which aims to keep passengers safe during the COVID-19 pandemic.

public health guidelines from ocial sources, disinfecting transit vehicles frequently and requiring face cover- ings, keeping passengers informed and empowered, and putting health rst by requiring riders and employees to avoid public transit if they have been exposed to COVID-19 or feel ill. Fort Bend Transit said in the release it has implemented policies such as disinfecting vehicles daily, reducing capacity by 50% per bus and mandat- ing face coverings.

According to a Sept. 17 press release, the APTA’s program guidelines were developed from a survey of transit passengers from across the country. Main ndings include following

Fort Bend Transit has committed to protecting riders’ health and safety. (Courtesy Fort Bend Transit)

REOPENED AT 16089 CITY WALK!

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GUIDE

Candidates and information for November elections

COMPILED BY BETH MARSHALL

VOTER GUIDE 2020

DATES TOKNOW

WHERE TOVOTE Fort Bend County residents can vote at any vote center during early voting and on Election Day. For more information on where to vote in Fort Bend County, visit www.fortbendcountytx.gov. SUGAR LAND Al Rabba World Food 5800 New Territory Blvd. Fort Bend ISD AdministrationBuilding 16431 Lexington Blvd. Four Corners Community Center

OCT. 13 First day of early voting OCT. 23 Last day to apply for ballot by mail* OCT. 30 Last day of early voting NOV. 3 Election Day *DATE RECEIVED, NOT POSTMARKED

SAMPLE BALLOT

*Incumbent

D Democrat

G Green

I Independent

L Libertarian

R Republican

D Staci Williams L William Bryan Strange III Supreme Court, Place 8 R Brett Busby* D Gisela D. Triana L Tom Oxford Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 3 R Bert Richardson* D Elizabeth Davis Frizell Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 4 R Kevin Patrick Yeary* D Tina Yoo Clinton Court of Appeals, Place 9 R David Newell* D Brandon Birmingham LOCAL Texas House District 26 R Jacey Jetton D L. Sarah DeMerchant Texas House District 27 R Tom Virippan D Ron Reynolds* Texas House District 28 R Gary Gates* D Elizabeth “Eliz” Markowitz Texas House District 9 R Johnny Teague D Al Green*

L Jose Sosa Texas Senate District 13 R Melinda Morris D Borris L. Miles* Texas Senate District 18 R Lois W. Kolkhorst* D Michael Antalan Fort Bend County sheri R Trever J. Nehls D Eric Fagan Precinct 1 commissioner R Vincent Morales* D Jennifer Cantu Precinct 3 commissioner R W. A. “Andy” Meyers* D Hope Martin County constable Precinct 1 R Mike Beard* D Sam Hayes County constable Precinct 3 R Chad Norvell D Patrick Quincy County constable Precinct 4 R John G. Hermann D Nabil Shike FORT BEND ISD Board of trustees, Position 1 Jason Burdine*

Angie Hanan Board of trustees, Position 4 Kristin Tassin* Shirley Rose-Gilliam Board of trustees, Position 5 Denetta R. Williams Reggie Abraham Allison Drew* MISSOURI CITY Mayor Fred G. Taylor Robin J. Elackatt Yolanda Ford* City Council, At-Large Position 1 Vashaundra Edwards* Reginald Pearson City Council, At-Large Position 2

NATIONAL

15700 Old Richmond Road Greatwood Community & Recreation Center 7225 Greatwood Parkway Jacks Conference Center 3232 Austin Parkway James Reese Career & Technical Center 12300 University Blvd.

President R Donald J. Trump*

D Joe R. Biden L Jo Jorgensen G Howie Hawkins U.S. Senate R John Cornyn* D Mary “MJ” Hegar L Kerry Douglas McKennon G David B. Collins U.S. House District 22 R Troy Nehls D Sri Preston Kulkarni L Joseph LeBlanc Jr. STATEWIDE Texas Railroad Commission R James “Jim” Wright D Chrysta Castañeda L Matt Sterett G Katija “Kat” Gruene Supreme Court, Chief Justice R Nathan Hecht* D Amy Clark Meachum L Mark Ash Supreme Court, Place 6

Kroger Riverstone (Community Room) 18861 University Blvd. Lost Creek Park Conference Center 3703 Lost Creek Blvd. Smart Financial Center 18111 Lexington Blvd. Sugar Land Branch Library 550 Eldridge Road Sugar Land City Hall 2700 Town Center Blvd. N. MISSOURI CITY Chasewood Clubhouse 7622 Chasewood Drive Hightower High School 3333 Hurricane Lane Missouri City Community Center 1522 Texas Parkway Quail Valley Fund Oce 3603 Glenn Lakes Lane Sienna Annex Community Room 5855 Sienna Springs Way

Chris Preston* James Mable Lynn Clouser

SUGAR LAND City Council, At-Large Position 1 William Ferguson Taylor Landin

R Jane Bland* D Kathy Cheng Supreme Court, Place 7 R Je Boyd*

VOTER TURNOUT

Texas

Fort Bend County 2012 presidential election

Turnout

Turnout

Registered voters

Registered voters

2012 presidential election

7.99M

13.65M

222,626

341,523

2014 gubernatorial election

2014 gubernatorial election

4.73M

14.03M

133,831

363,732

2016 presidential election

2016 presidential election

8.97M

15.1M

267,167

408,793

2018 gubernatorial election

2018 gubernatorial election

8.37M

15.79M

257,743

434,380

2020 primary election

2020 primary election

4.11M

16.21M

128,955

457,338

SOURCES: TEXAS SECRETARY OF STATE OFFICE’S WEBSITE, FORT BEND COUNTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

For more election information, visit communityimpact.com/vote .

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

Third Time’s the Charm

EARLY VOTING: OCTOBER 13-30, 2020 ELECTION DAY: NOVEMBER 3, 2020

L. Sarah DeMerchant , the Democrat, is an I.T. Executive and the founder of a software development company. A product of Fort Bend public schools, DeMerchant earned two degrees: a BBA in Computer Information Systems from UHD and an MBA from UHV by working her way through college. She designed software that helps companies identify and correct wage gaps so everyone is earning equal pay for equal work. In Austin, DeMerchant will work with Republicans and Democrats in order to get things done for Fort Bend County. DeMerchant will work to lower healthcare and prescription drug costs, improve public school funding, help rebuild the local economy and work to rein in property taxes. www.DemocratDeMerchant.com

Political Advertisement Paid for by Sarah DeMerchant campaign, Harry Truong, Treasurer

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HOUSTON METHODIST BREAST CARE CENTER AT SUGAR LAND

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Visit houstonmethodist.org/breast-care or call 281.436.9513 to schedule your mammogram today.

Our Breast Care Centers are taking every necessary precaution to keep you safe.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CANDIDATE Q&A

2020 Voter Guide

Get to know the candidates running for Sugar Land City Council

COMPILED BY BETH MARSHALL

At-Large Position 1

With only a few greenfield sites remaining for development in Sugar Land, it will be important to take full advantage of these limited opportunities to attract new major employers to the city and retain those that are already here. Attracting new employers to Sugar Land will not only increase our tax base, but also allow more residents to both live and work in Sugar Land. Howwould you ensure economic development remains stable? Our city can never settle for good enough. We need to strive for new ideas and new industries because of a new vision. My vision of Sugar Land in 10 years includes autonomous vehicles to transport our senior residents and our under served, Smart City status, Drone services and much more. My ideas accent the services we offer and business that call us home. Being built out is a limit we can overcome with fresh and new ideas.

As a resident of the north side of Sugar Land and Planning and Zoning Commissioner, I recognize the need to move forward with redevelopment of the site as quickly as possible. Many residents near the site are concerned about the site remaining undeveloped, and I think the city should take all the appropriate steps to work collaboratively with the property owner to ensure we make progress. Few people would hope for Sugar Land without the old Imperial Sugar Factory complex. The problem is that many people don’t understand how complex the issue really is to develop the property. Financing has been the largest issue facing the property. The owners have simply not found a way to fund their plans. The city has certainly promoted development through tax incentives and usage agreements. How would you ensure the Imperial area is redeveloped?

I was a member of the city’s Land Use Advisory Committee that spent five years assessing and making recommendations about the future land use goals of the city. The conclusions of that group, which were ultimately adopted by City Council, included placing reasonable limitations on the number of new multifamily units in Sugar Land and I continue to agree with this approach. Should Sugar Land have more multifamily housing options? I personally like the idea of more families in Sugar Land because diversity grows with every new family. However, many homeowners in Sugar Land have been surveyed. Their unity response is no more apartments. Their ‘no’ may be a barrier to new large businesses such as Amazon that prefer executive apartments. The survey response will be honored because ultimately the city exists to serve the taxpayer.

Occupation: nonprofit executive Years in Sugar Land: 26 TAYLOR LANDIN

www.taylorfor sugarland.com

Occupation: Sales and marketing Years in Sugar Land: annexed 2 years and 10 months ago www.Fergusonfor SugarLand.com WILLIAM FERGUSON

Answers may have been edited for length. Read full Q&A’s at communityimpact.com/vote .

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SUGAR LAND - MISSOURI CITY EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

CANDIDATE Q&A

Get to know the candidates running for Missouri City City Council

Incumbent

Mayor

At-Large Position 1

Occupation: Small business owner Experience: HOA board member; District C council member 2009- 2015; mayor pro-tem 2014-15; Parks Board member 2007-2009 www.robin4mayor.com ROBIN J. ELACKATT

Occupation: Mayor; Urban planner/ land development professional Experience: Three terms as city council member, one term as mayor www.yolandaford.com YOLANDA FORD

Candidate did not respond to questionnaire as of press time. FRED G. TAYLOR

VASHAUNDRA EDWARDS

Occupation: Program director for juvenile probation Experience: Chairwoman of the Planning, Development and Infrastructure Committee www.vedwards.org

What is the biggest challenge facing Missouri City, and how would you address it?

A lack of leadership and vision. I am deeply concerned for the future of our city with current divisiveness within our communities and city hall, continued property tax increases, and recent negative media attention due to decisions made by current leaders. There is a scripture that says, “Where there is no vision, the people perish.”

Currently, the challenge is correcting the previous misuse of city funds and redeveloping distressed corridors. Respectively, by putting in financial internal controls and having professionals who have the knowledge and the ability to facilitate economic development in culturally diverse economies.

Candidate did not respond to questionnaire as of press time.

The biggest challenge facing Missouri City is having residents be acceptable to beneficial change. Change is intended to be positive towards the community and purposeful to benefit all residents in the city.

How should Missouri City think about economic development and growth?

We must focus on accomplishing City Council’s top five goals: resources for economic development; Sienna Plantation commercial development; office development; commercial warehouse/distribution and manufacturing space on Hwy. 90 and Beltway 8; and redevelopment of Texas Parkway and Cartwright Road.

Economic development and growth should be sustainable and focused on the residents’ needs in the city.

Candidate did not respond to questionnaire as of press time.

My vision for the future of Missouri City is to see all areas of the community develop to its full potential. Also, I would love to see the Texas Parkway corridor and Cartwright corridor both fully redeveloped and give small businesses a chance to flourish. We must have a city manager in place that has experience in both areas. Our new city manager, Odis Jones, has a wealth of knowledge and experience in economic development. In addition, it’s important for us to have an economic development director that shares the same redevelopment and economic developments goals.

What is your vision for the future of Missouri City?

My vision is simple: “Together, we can move Missouri City forward.” MCTX has witnessed tremendous growth, and we want our city to remain a safe place to live, work and play. Our leaders today must step up and be leaders who are accessible to all citizens, visible, honest, trustworthy, and transparent.

To create a smart city that is fiscally sound which provides residents with a community that embodies the opportunity to live, work and play within the city.

Candidate did not respond to questionnaire as of press time.

Answers may have been edited for length. Read full Q&A’s at communityimpact.com/vote .

Colony Square Shopping Center

16550 Southwest Freeway, Sugar Land, TX IDEAL MEDICAL / OFFICE SERVICE SPACE AVAILABLE

For More Information Contact: Kimberly Lenardson & Hannah Tosch +1 713 830 2192 hannah.tosch@colliers.com

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12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2020 Voter Guide

COMPILED BY CLAIRE SHOOP

At-Large Position 2

REGINALD PEARSON

Occupation: Development director, Hope for Three Autism Advocates Experience: Class of 2020-21 Fort Bend Chamber/George Foundation Leadership www.lynnclouser.com LYNN CLOUSER

Occupation: Educator Experience: Longtime JAMES MABLE

CHRIS PRESTON

Occupation: Small business owner Experience: At-Large Position 2 council member; mayor pro- tem www.prestonforcitycouncil.com

Occupation: Procurement officer

Experience: District A council member for 18 months; procurement officer www.reginaldpearson.com

resident of Missouri City; educator for the past 10+ years; service in the U.S. Marines; service industry www.votejamesmable.poliengine.com

What is the biggest challenge facing Missouri City, and how would you address it?

The biggest challenge is in ensuring financial transparency while keeping families safe and growing our tax base.

Taking the Missouri City economy to the next level is the biggest challenge. The current economy does not effectively incentivize residents to work or spend locally thus the city is losing both talented workers and sales tax revenue to neighboring cities. This can be addressed by engaging local and regional business owners.

Recent decisions have caused residents to distrust our current leadership and doubt their dedication to act in the best interest of our local government and fiduciary responsibility. Good government is actively listening to constituents, making yourself knowledgeable on the issue[s] at hand and making sound decisions.

Unity. It’s time we collectively come together and build a unified and thriving community that remains one of the safest places to live with flourishing local and neighborly corporate businesses. [I envision] a place that affords an exceptional quality of life with low property taxes. I want us to think about our economic development in terms that are tangible and measurable. It will require a mutually beneficial partnership with our business leaders to meet the demands of our diverse city. We need to bring jobs back to Missouri City. We need to support small businesses that are the backbone of our community. Missouri City must be prepared for any ramifications that may come as a result of COVID-19. We must be mindful and ready to assist our residents during these trying times. This effort will require a thorough assessment of our city financials as a whole to ensure we are well-positioned for an uncertain, yet bright future.

How should Missouri City think about economic development and growth?

We should think big while understanding our beginnings. The founders of our city formed Missouri City as a bedroom community where people resided but worked and shopped elsewhere. Development has challenged that beginning as we now seek new development with offerings to support families in our community.

Our city leaders should ensure that our business community is catering to residents by offering jobs, services and products that they need and want. I am a proponent of not reinventing the wheel by taking a comprehensive approach [and] identifying cities with mature economies as models for strategic planning/consulting. That it remains one of the safest cities in the United States. A low residential tax burden and diversified business economy are just a few strategies that will ensure lasting economic success. I see Missouri City making its presence known as a premiere destination with various local attractions.

Missouri City has experienced tremendous growth in the 40 years I have lived in this community. My desire is to see the city grow by remaining attractive to businesses and developers. Every part of Missouri City matters. Developing good relationships with developers, Realtors, small and large businesses is key, and I will do that.

What is your vision for the future of Missouri City?

I envision a city that is safe for families to reside, transparent in its’ financial dealings and attractive to developers who want to showcase their product and/or service.

My vision is to see us continue to be one of the most diverse and safest cities in America that attracts families to live, work and play. I want my children and my children’s children to want to be part of our community. I envision a community where residents have elected officials they feel are trustworthy.

Answers may have been edited for length. Read full Q&A’s at communityimpact.com/vote .

DR. SHIRLEY ROSE-GILLIAM ELECT W W W. V O T E 4 S H I R L E Y R O S E . C O M FOR FORT BEND ISD BOARD OF TRUSTEES - POSITION 4

EXPERIENCED AND PROVEN LEADER

Early Voting: OCTOBER 13 - 30 Election Day: NOVEMBER 3RD

Pol. ad paid for by the Shirley Rose for FBISD Campaign

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SUGAR LAND - MISSOURI CITY EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

Within Sugar Land and Missouri City’s ve ZIP codes, 77479—which includes Greatwood, New Territory and a portion of Riverstone—saw the most donations to date since Jan. 1, 2019, making up more than half of the total. DONATION distribution Amount donated >$1M $600K-$1M

PACs & caps Federal laws place limits on donors, depending on the type of committee receiving the donation.

Political action committee: a committee that backs a group of candidates or an initiative State/local party committee: supports local party eorts Candidate committee: committees that support a specic candidate for oce Independent-expenditure-only political committees: called super PACs, they are barred from directly coordinating with a candidate National party committee: supports party eorts, with special accounts for designated uses, such as conventions

Cap: $5,000 per year

Cap: $2,800 per election (primary and general have separate limits)

Cap: $10,000 per year

$300K-$600K $100K-$300K $100K

77498 $342,947.29

Cap: $35,500 per year; $106,500 per year, per special account

77478 $925,941.06

Cap: none

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77489 $111,937.84

SOURCE: FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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city and school district candidates do not have to deal with party lines. “I think they might have to ght a little bit for their own platform and rec- ognition not having a party identica- tion next to their name, but these races are probably the most important races that are going to aect our community,” she said. “I think it can be a blessing for them if they don’t want to get caught up with the dierent platforms of the two parties.” FBISD has seven candidates com- peting for three seats, while Missouri City has eight candidates competing for three seats. Sugar Land has three posi- tions up for election this year, but two incumbents are running unopposed, leaving At-Large Position 1 as the only contested race. According to campaign nance records from FBISD, Missouri City and Sugar Land, many candidates did not le reports, while some raised $0 as of the July 15 ling deadline. The next l- ing period ends Oct. 5. Notably, in Missouri City, incumbent Mayor Yolanda Ford reported receipts totaling just over $6,000, while chal- lengers Fred G. Taylor and Robin J. Elackatt did not le any campaign nance reports, according to Missouri City records. Additionally, Vashaundra Edwards and Chris Preston—the Missouri City City Council incumbents for At-Large positions 1and2, respectively—reported raising $0, andnone of their challengers turned in a campaign nance report. Early voting for these and other races will run from Oct. 13-Oct. 30, and Elec- tion Day is Nov. 3. Matt Dulin contributed to this report.

2019-June 30, 2020. The date ranges dier for the two candidates because Nehls led to run later than Kulkarni. The majority of both candidates totals came from individual donations with Kulkarni receiving $2.4 million and Nehls receiving $476,306.94. For Nehls, 42 individuals donated the highest amount of $2,800. For Kulkarni, 72 individuals gave the highest amount of $5,600, with ActBlue—a Democratic Party fundraising site—accounting for $168,000, or 30 separate contributions. As a traditionally red district, the area encompassing Fort Bend County and portions of Brazoria and Harris coun- ties is beginning to trend blue. In the 2018 gubernatorial election, 51% of vot- ers voted for the Republican candidate, while 47% voted for the Democratic candidate. The remaining 2% of voters voted for the Libertarian or Green party candidates. According to Fort Bend County elec- tion data, this near 50-50 split in 2018 closed a large gap compared to 2014’s gubernatorial election, when nearly 70% of voters favored the Republican candidate and about 30% of voters favored the Democratic candidate. Howell said she believes the district will stay red. However, as the early-voting period and Election Day approach, Ginyard said she expects the District 22 race to be a “nail-biter.” “I think that it will be a close race,” she said. “I hope we will prevail. We are working hard to pull it o, but it’s going to be a nail-biter.” Lookingat local races In Sugar Land andMissouri City, both city councils and Fort Bend ISD have seats up for election Nov. 3. These races are nonpartisan, and Howell said she thinks it is a good thing

77479 $3.16MILLION

6

TOTAL DONATED: $5.49MILLION

77459 $944,018.35

N

parties’ federal accounts per year and $5,000 to political action committees. Donors have no limits when it comes to super PACs, but those groups are legally prohibited from coordinating directly with a campaign. “They tend to be more focused on attacking their candidate’s opponents rather than supporting them directly,” said Mark Jones, a Rice University pro- fessor and fellow with the Baker Insti- tute of Public Policy. Diving intoU.S.HouseDistrict22 A highly contested race with 20 can- didates in the primary election, the U.S. House District 22 seat will see a new oceholder after the Nov. 3 election. The seat has been held Republican Pete Olson for over a decade, but he decided not to run again this election cycle. Now, Republican Troy Nehls, Democrat Sri Preston Kulkarni and Libertarian Joseph LeBlanc are vying for the congressional seat in the Nov. 3 election. According to Federal Election Com- mission data from July 1, 2019-June 30, 2020, Nehls received about $517,000 in campaign donations, while Kulkarni received over $2.5 million from Jan. 1,

CONTINUED FROM 1

saidgoingdoor todoor for campaigning has not been happening because it is hard to gauge how comfortable people are with coming in contact with others. “It’s just been a total hindrance,” Ginyard said. “But, you know, you just keep moving. But [COVID-19] has been very interruptive.” Fundingows While Ginyard said she could not speak specically to the nancial eects the coronavirus pandemic has had on campaigning and donations, she acknowledged with so many peo- ple losing their jobs, donating has been interrupted. Federal campaign nance law sets limits on how much money can be given and to whom. For the 2020 races, donors can give up to $2,800 per elec- tion per candidate, with primary and general elections counted separately, according to campaign nance law. But they can also give up to $35,500 per year to national party committees’ general funds and up to $106,500 to specic party funds, such as accounts used for the national convention. Another $10,000 can be given to local

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TURNING BLUE Historically a red district in Fort Bend County, U.S. House District 22—which also includes some portions of Harris and Brazoria counties—is seeing more votes for Democratic candidates. In fact, the district saw a 54% increase in Democratic Party votes from 2014-18, resulting in a near 50-50 split for Democratic versus Republican votes. U. S . HOUSE D I STR I CT 22 I S

Republican

Democrat

Libertarian

Green Party

2014

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59

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Republican 68.05% Democrat 30.16% Libertarian 1.79% 23 Voting breakdown

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JOIN US UNDER THE SIENNA STARS FOR A FUN, FAMILY OUTING. FOOD TRUCKS CONCESSIONS

2016

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6

59

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Republican 59.87% Democrat 40.13% Voting breakdown

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2018

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IT’S FUN LIVING IN SIENNA! NEW HOMES | LOW $200S-MILLION+

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Republican 51.23% Democrat 46.66% Libertarian 1.06% Green 1.05% Voting breakdown

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*WHITE SECTIONS WITHIN FORT BEND COUNTY ARE PART OF U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 9.

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

e advantage of edicare benefits you

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Plans are insured through UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company or one of its affiliated companies, a Medicare Advantage organization with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in the plan depends on the plan’s contract renewal with Medicare. Benefits, features and/or devices vary by plan/area. Limitations and exclusions apply. Network size varies by market and exclusions may apply. HouseCalls may not be available in all areas. ©2020 United HealthCare Services, Inc. All rights reserved. Plans are insured through UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company or one of its affiliated companies, a Medicare Advantage organization with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in the plan depends on the plan’s contract renewal with Medicare. Benefits, features and/or devices vary by plan/area. Limitations and exclusions apply. Network size varies by market and exclusions may apply. HouseCalls may not be available in all areas. ©2020 United HealthCare Services, Inc. All rights reserved. Y0066_200717_100916_M SPRJ55532_002E0420

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