North San Antonio Edition - September 2022

NORTH SAN ANTONIO EDITION

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 12  SEPT. 19OCT. 16, 2022

ONLINE AT

GILLESPIE

BLANCO

SOURCE A VITAL The Edwards Aquifer Authority’s jurisdiction spans some 8,800 square miles. The aquifer has three zones that provide water for 2.5 million people located in eight counties.

Fredericksburg

UNDERSTANDING THE AQUIFER ZONES

HAYS

EDWARDS

KERR

Blanco

Buda

Kerrville

KENDALL

Rocksprings

REAL

San Marcos Lockhart

CONTRIBUTING ZONE: Also called the drainage zone, the watersheds in this area drain into streams or areas where water is quickly absorbed into the Edwards Aquifer.

COMAL

BANDERA

Boerne

New Braunfels

CALDWELL

Leakey

Bandera

GUADALUPE

Selma Schertz

UVALDE

San Antonio

EDWARDS AQUIFER AUTHORITY JURISDICTION COUNTIES

Hondo

Brackettville

WILSON

ARTESIAN ZONE: This is the section of the Edwards Aquifer where the water pressure brings water to the surface naturally in springs and some wells. RECHARGE ZONE: This is the part of the Edwards Aquifer with sinkholes and fractures where rainwater easily enters and rells the aquifer.

Uvalde

BEXAR

Floresville

MEDINA

KINNEY

MAVERICK

Batesville

Pearsall

Pleasanton

Eagle Pass

ZAVALA

FRIO

ATASCOSA

INSIDE

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SOURCE: EDWARDS AQUIFER AUTHORITYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

San Antonio revising land development rules

Planning for future development

The city of San Antonio’s Unied Development Code guides all land use regulations.

BY EDMOND ORTIZ

amendments that were proposed by city sta, commissions and boards, area public agencies, utilities, commu- nity organizations and individual resi- dents between October 2021-February 2022. Many proposed revisions aect reg- ulations addressing issues, such as CONTINUED ON 18

The city of San Antonio is almost n- ished with a yearlong, periodical eort to update the local Unied Devel- opment Code, which covers rules, policies and procedures for land devel- opment citywide. Local ocials said they are mov- ing forward with 193 of 231 total UDC

The UDC was adopted in 2001 .

Any city department, resident, agency or community group may propose UDC amendments during the city review cycle.

The city may review the UDC every ve years to clarify, edit or update it for design standards and new state or federal laws.

SOURCE: CITY OF SAN ANTONIO COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Shavano Park makes progress on road projects

EDWARDS AQUIFER AUTHORITY EOC

IMPACTS

TRANSPORTATION

A CHICAGO BITE

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Curious what is selling in your neighborhood? Scan me *All prices shown are list price

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

realtysanantonio.com/p/1626847

realtysanantonio.com/p/1604615

realtysanantonio.com/p/1634437

realtysanantonio.com/p/1624987

$405,000

$470,000

$475,000

$540,000

3 bds

2 ba

3 bds

2 ba

2,338 sq ft 1,433 sq ft

3 bds

2 ba

1,674 sq ft

4 bds

2.5 ba 3,147 sq ft

9023 Rio Sedona Dam, Helotes, TX 78023 Carolyn Di Muzio | 210-316-9484

85 Ridgewood Circle, Wimberley, TX 78676 Ina Kail | 737-610-3163

1244 Fernwood Rd, Fischer, TX 78623 Benée Arndt | 512-669-2455

104 Rocky Path, Boerne, TX 78006 Nova Stephenson | 210-859-0982

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

realtysanantonio.com/p/1634544

realtysanantonio.com/p/1613391

realtysanantonio.com/p/1613367

realtysanantonio.com/p/1636289

$600,000

$635,000

$695,000

$995,000

4 bds

3.5 ba 3,421 sq ft

3 bds

2.5 ba 2,304 sq ft

4 bds

3 ba

3,715 sq ft

5 bds

4 ba

3,036 sq ft

1911 Rocky Ridge Loop, Canyon Lake, TX 78133 Lisa Blanco | 210-216-2696

3806 Sweet Olive, San Antonio, TX 78261 Jose Urrabazo | 210-508-0387

27614 Autumn Terrace, Boerne, TX 78006 Anni Colaw | 210-844-9012

1339 Highland Dr, Bandera, TX 78003 Claudia Miranda | 210-863-8113

ACTIVE

PENDING

PENDING

SOLD

realtysanantonio.com/p/1625281

realtysanantonio.com/p/1615311

realtysanantonio.com/p/1626812

realtysanantonio.com/p/1616313

$1,500,000

$509,900

$600,000

$515,000

4 bds

3.5 ba 4,393 sq ft

4 bds

3.5 ba 2,656 sq ft

4 bds

3.5 ba 3,599 sq ft

5 bds

3 ba

3,015 sq ft

12506 Black Mesa Cv, Austin, TX 78739 Gigi Jacks McClaskey | 512-968-0482

12630 Chena Lk, San Antonio, TX 78249 Renae Pretty | 210-376-9815

834 Tiger Lily, San Antonio, TX 78260 Lauren Acuna | 210-240-5587

14 Bighorn Cyn, San Antonio, TX 78258 Julia Bilhartz | 210-722-3405

Are you planning on selling your home in San Antonio? Pricing your home appropriately is key for getting the biggest return possible and to avoid deterring prospective buyers.

How to Price Your Home Correctly

An experienced agent can help advocate for you and get a complete picture of what your home is worth. Scan the QR code to learn how to make your home stand out and sell quickly.

3

NORTH SAN ANTONIO EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. Now in 2022, CI is still locally owned. We have expanded to include hundreds of employees, our own software platform and printing facility, and over 30 hyperlocal editions across the state with a circulation to more than 2.4 million residential mailboxes.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS MONTH

FROM JASELLE: I love the outdoors, and as a native Texan, I know just how important water is to our natural environment. One of this month’s cover stories takes a look at how the ongoing drought is aecting the Edwards Aquifer, one of the region’s largest water suppliers. Give it a read! Jaselle Luna, PUBLISHER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROM TRICIA: There’s nothing like a local delicacy—such as a Coney Island hotdog or a Philly cheesesteak—to take you back to a place you’ve visited. And right here on San Antonio’s North Side, Reporter Edmond Ortiz discovered a gem for Chicago-style everything, including pizza, hot dogs and Italian beef sandwiches. Don’t miss this month’s dining feature. Tricia Schwennesen, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

WHAT WE COVER

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NORTH SAN ANTONIO EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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CAMP BULLIS

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PJ’s Coffee of New Orleans

COURTESY PJ’S COFFEE OF NEW ORLEANS

verde Marketplace, 17202 Bulverde Road, Ste. 101, on Aug. 17. The Tennessee-based chain offers Southern-style scratch com- fort food. Maple Street has two other San Antonio locations. www.maplestreetbiscuits.com 8 Rock & Brews , a chain of rock ’n’ roll- themed restaurants, opened its second San Antonio location in mid-September at 5702 Landmark Parkway. Rock & Brews features comfort food; craft beers; and a concert environment with picnic table seating, concert lighting, projection screens showing iconic rock concerts and a “Great Wall of Rock” tribute to rock music legends. 726-213-7625. www.facebook. com/rockandbrewssanantonio 9 Pet Paradise Stone Oak , a Flori- da-based provider of comprehensive pet care, health and wellness, on Aug. 29 announced it opened its first San Antonio location in Stone Oak at 22811 US 281 N. Pet Paradise offers overnight boarding, a resort-style day camp, professional grooming and NewDay Veterinary Care, which provides routine examinations, procedures and vaccinations. 210-982-3445. www.petparadise.com/ stone-oak.htm 10 Seafood restaurant chain Fish City Grill opened a third San Antonio location Aug. 29 at The Shops at South Rim retail center, 5311 N. Loop 1604 W. Fish City Grill has two other San Antonio locations, including at 18130 San Pedro Ave., Ste. 104, and nearly 20 total restaurants around Texas, Arkansas, Oklahoma and Florida. 210-236-7073. www.fishcitygrill. com/south-rim 11 Kerbey Lane Cafe , an Austin-based scratch kitchen/comfort food cafe, opened its first San Antonio location at

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281

HOLLYWOOD PARK

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SHAVANO PARK

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HILL COUNTRY VILLAGE

LANDMARK PKWY.

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EMBASSY OAKS

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MAP NOT TO SCALE

N TM; © 2022 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOW OPEN 1 Next Level Urgent Care , a Hous- ton-based chain of urgent care centers, opened its first San Antonio clinic in August at 1150 N. Loop 1604 W. Patients of all ages may receive urgent care services for chronic and acute illness, fractures, lacerations, contusions and other non-life-threatening injuries. This location is open 9 a.m.-9 p.m. daily and on holidays. www.nextlevelurgentcare.com 2 Retail coffee chain PJ’s Coffee of New Orleans opened a third San Antonio location Aug. 8 at The Colonnade retail/ office complex, 9811 W. I-10. PJ’s offers various coffee drinks and breakfast and lunch items. 210-455-4299. www.pjscoffee.com

5 Portland, Oregon-based Black Rock Coffee Bar opened its first San Antonio location Aug. 5 at 11701 Blanco Road. Black Rock offers classic and signature coffee drinks, energy drinks, non-coffee drinks and child-friendly beverages. Black Rock plans to open more San Antonio locations at 14635 Huebner Road and 13980 Nacogdoches Road. www.br.coffee 6 Cozy Days Gallery/Art and Stationery opened July 29 at Hollywood Park’s Gal- leria Oaks retail center, 15909 San Pedro Ave., Ste. 125. Cozy Days offers a variety of art prints, merchandise for artists and imported artistic goods. 626-382-8864. Instagram: @cozydaysgallery 7 Maple Street Biscuit Co. opened a third San Antonio location at the Bul-

3 Evolve Human Optimization Labs held a grand opening event Aug. 19 at 502 Embassy Oaks, Ste. 103, San Antonio. Evolve offers various physical and mental wellness services, including cold-water immersion, contrast ther- apy, an infrared sauna, cognitive and neuro training, compression sleeves, vibration therapy, metabolic analysis and more. 210-562-3310. www.evolvehumanlabs.com 4 A new San Antonio Hotworx fran- chise opened in mid- September at the Redland Plaza retail center, 2907 N. Loop 1604 E. Hotworx offers members 24-hour access to virtually instructed, infrared sauna workouts. 210-314-0557. www.hotworx.net/studio/ sanantonio-redlandrd

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TO-DO LIST

September & October events

COMPILED BY EDMOND ORTIZ

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9

RUN FOR FUN WEATHERED SOULS BREWING CO.

PICK A PUMPKIN UNIVERSITY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

OCT. 02-31

SEPT. 24

Cozy Days Gallery/Art and Stationery

Pet Paradise Stone Oak

COURTESY COZY DAYS GALLERY/ART AND STATIONERY

COURTESY PET PARADISE STONE OAK

5515 N. Loop 1604 W., Ste. 103, on Aug. 15. The cafe serves breakfast, lunch and dinner alongside craft beer on tap. www.kerbeylanecafe.com/ locations/san-antonio COMING SOON 12 Dogtopia-Stone Oak , part of a Virgin- ia-based chain of nearly 200 dog day care centers, plans to open in mid-October at 1723 N. Loop 1604 E., Bldg. L-100, San Antonio. The first local Dogtopia franchise opened in the Shavano Park area in 2021. Featuring an indoor dog park, Dogtopia offers various canine boarding and spa services. www.dogtopia.com/ sanantonio-stoneoak 13 The city of San Antonio is planning a grand opening event for Sept. 28 at the Encino Public Library , 2515 E. Evans Road, where the city has been building a playground and exercise area since last October. www.mysapl.org 14 The development of Crosswinds Apartment Homes began in June at 4114 N. Loop 1604 E., San Antonio. San Antonio Housing Trust, CVS Health, and developers Pedcor Investments and WNC are partnering to build the $15.3 million, 312-unit apartment complex to offer affordable multifamily housing between Bulverde and O’Connor roads. Construc- tion is scheduled for completion in sum- mer 2024. www.pedcorcompanies.com 15 The DripBar , a Massachusetts-based IV therapy lounge chain, began renovating a 1,700-square-foot former dance studio at The Strand at Huebner Oaks retail center, 11255 Huebner Road, Ste. 107, in

August. According to a Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation filing, the $338,000 renovation project is due to be complete in October. 210-306-4135. www.thedripbar.com 16 Construction on a second San An- tonio location of Andy’s Frozen Custard will begin in early November at 23438 Wilderness Oak Drive in Stone Oak. A TDLR filing said the $850,000 culinary project is scheduled to finish in early April. www.eatandys.com 17 K Pot Korean BBQ and Hot Pot , a popular Korean barbecue chain, plans to open its first San Antonio restaurant at 12485 I-10 W. in summer 2023, according to a TDLR filing. www.thekpot.com RELOCATIONS 18 Texas Leather Interiors opened its new, larger store in August at 4323 N. Loop 1604 W., San Antonio, having com- pleted its relocation from a nearby spot at 1602 N. Loop 1604 W. Texas Leather Interiors offers a variety of leather home furniture and accessories. 210-492-3300. www.texasleatherinteriors.com EXPANSIONS 19 H-E-B announced it opened a new department, Home by H-E-B , in July at the H-E-B Plus! store at 20935 US 281 N., San Antonio. Along with the new department, H-E-B also launched two new home decor lines, the Haven + Key and Texas Proud collections. The 2,500-square-foot department features

The Summer’s Done 5K Fun Run by Brewery Running Series starts and ends at Weathered Souls Brewing Co. All ages are welcome. Some race proceeds will go to the San Antonio Food Bank. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $30-$46. 606 Embassy Oaks Drive, Ste. 500, San Antonio. www.events.humanitix.com/ txbrs-weathered-souls-2022

University United Methodist Church hosts its annual pumpkin patch with funds beneting UUMC’s student ministry intern program, which runs year-round. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. daily. The patch is located outside the church’s day school at 5084 De Zavala Road, San Antonio. 210-696-1033. www.universitysatx.org

COURTESY BREWERY RUNNING SERIES

COURTESY UNIVERSITY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

SEPTEMBER 24 ENJOY A CONCERT The San Antonio Chamber Choir will begin its 2022-23 season by performing ecology-themed works by composers Andrew Steffen, Paul Winter, Paul Halley and Aaron Copland—all meant to be uplifting in a time of uncertainty and darkness. 8 p.m. $30. Chapel of the Incarnate Word, 4503 Broadway St., San Antonio. www.sachamberchoir. org/concert-schedule 04 HELP FIGHT CRIME The city of Shavano Park invites residents to a Neighbors Together—formerly National Night Out—event at City Hall to promote public safety and anti-crime efforts. The family-friendly City Hall event will include refreshments, giveaways and information from city departments and local civic groups. Neighbors Together block parties are also scheduled in neighborhoods

across Shavano Park. 6-8 p.m. Free. 900 Saddletree Court, Shavano Park. www.shavanopark.org 07 BACK THE JAGS The Johnson High School Jaguar Pride Association presents “Deep in the Heart of Tejas.” The fundraiser for JHS student-athletes will include food, drinks, live entertainment by cover band Kopia, silent and live auctions and a raffle. Casual attire is encouraged. 7:30-11 p.m. $75. Tejas Rodeo, 401 Obst Road, Bulverde. www.jaguarpride.org/jag-bash 08 SUPPORT THE RATTLERS The Diamondbackers Sports Association will hold a red carpet gala fundraiser for Reagan High School student-athletes, including dinner, dancing, casino games and auctions. Red, black or white cocktail attire is required. 6 p.m.-12 a.m. $100. Aggie Park, 6205 West Ave., Castle Hills. www.rattlersports.com/ fundraising

Find more or submit North San Antonio-area events at communityimpact.com/event- calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

500-plus home decor items. 210-491-2400. www.heb.com

Open 9am – 9pm, 7 days a week nextlevelurgentcare.com BECAUSE STICKS AND STONES DO BREAK BONES.

Vineyard 1150 N. Loop 1604 W., San Antonio, TX 78248

South Rim 5311 N. Loop 1604 W., San Antonio, TX 78249

More locations coming soon to San Antonio!

7

NORTH SAN ANTONIO EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

TRANSPORTATION UPDATES Shavano Park makes progress on road project designs

COMPILED BY EDMOND ORTIZ

ONGOING PROJECTS

SHAVANO PARK PLANS UNDERWAY Shavano Park’s consulting engineers with KFW Engineers and Surveying said they are nearing 60% completion on designs for planned citywide road improvements that will be funded by the voter-approved May 2022 city bond. SOURCE: CITY OF SHAVANO PARK COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

KFW Engineers and Surveying—a local rm consulting on Shavano Park’s planned citywide, bond- funded road improvements—pledged to be 60% nished with roadwork designs by October. Project manager Bobby Torres of KFW briefed the City Council on Aug. 22 about engineering activities that KFW has done on city streets east of Northwest Military Highway since mid-February. Shavano Park voters approved a $10 million bond on May 7 authoriz- ing the city to form a multiphase plan to rebuild Bent Oak Drive, Chimney Rock Lane, Cliside Drive, End Gate Lane, Fawn Drive, Saddletree Road, Shavano Drive, Wagon Trail Road and Windmill Road. The city also plans to repave the Post Oak Way entrance from Lockhill-Selma Road and complete reconstruction of cul-de-sacs on Elm Spring Lane, Honey Bee Lane, Hunt- ers Branch and Turkey Creek Road. According to Torres, rising costs of

SHAVANO DR.

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF SEPT. 8. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT NSANEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. North US 281 expansion Construction crews have been alter- nating lane closures while widening US 281 between Stone Oak Parkway and Borgfeld Drive, including bridge work at US 281 at Wilderness Oak Drive and at Overlook Parkway. The next closure at Overlook will be 8 p.m.-5 a.m. Sept. 23. Timeline: summer 2021-early 2023 Cost: $304 million Funding source: TxDOT

asphalt and concrete caused KFW’s opinion of probable construction, or OPC, cost to reach $10.6 million. But Torres said there are ways to bring in the total estimated cost under $10 million. The OPC includes a 15% contingency for the entire project, Torres said. Torres said xing Wagon Trail and realigning it with Northwest Military Highway is challenging, including possibly removing heritage trees in the right-of-way. “This is by far the worst street of them all,” Torres said of Wagon Trail.

In a memo to the council, City Manager Bill Hill said KFW plans to be 30% done with designing improvements on Shavano Park’s segment of De Zavala Road by Sept. 30. City ocials said bond dollars will be used to leverage federal money to upgrade De Zavala Road. Hill said there will be a town hall meeting this December to review nal engineering plans before the city solicits construction bids. Another meeting will be held in spring 2023 with the awarded contractor ahead of the start of road construction.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from North East and Northside ISDs

COMPILED BY EDMOND ORTIZ

North East ISD will meet Sept. 19 and Oct. 3 at 5:30 p.m. 8961 Tesoro Drive, San Antonio. 210-407-0000. www.neisd.net Northside ISD will meet Sept. 27 at 6 p.m. 5900 Evers Road, San Antonio 210-397-8500. www.nisd.net MEETINGS WE COVER NORTH EAST ISD Michael De Hoyos, a 2022 Churchill High School graduate, was among 38 San Antonio-area high school students awarded a total of $190,000 in scholarships from Silver Eagle Beverages this summer. DISTRICT HIGHLIGHTS NORTH EAST ISD In August, Forbes Magazine named the district one of America’s Best Employers for a third straight year. Forbes ranked NEISD 78th out of 100 employers in Texas. NEISD is the only San Antonio-area district to be recognized and one of six Texas districts to make the list. NORTH EAST ISD North East Educational Foundation in early August kicked off the new school year by awarding $30,497 in teacher grants. NEISD said two area grant recipients will use their grants to incorporate outdoor learning into their curriculums. Michelle Saenz, a prekindergarten teacher at Bulverde Creek Elementary School, received $2,266 for an outdoor interactive classroom featuring a mud kitchen. Alicia Jeffrey and Caitlyn Khoury, teachers at Tuscany Heights Elementary School, collectively received $3,000 for a mobile imagination station that will include indoor/outdoor building blocks. NORTHSIDE ISD The district’s board Aug. 23 formally recognized NISD counseling, communications, curriculum and instruction, facilities and police staff who provided aid to Uvalde CISD following a fatal mass shooting where 19 children and two teachers died at Robb Elementary School.

NEISD, NISD earn Bs again on state accountability ratings

NORTH EAST & NORTHSIDE ISDS The Texas Education Agency on Aug. 15 released its first accountability ratings for public school districts and campuses since 2019, and the ratings for two North San Antonio districts remained about the same among key categories since then. TEA ratings were issued for nearly 1,200 districts and about 8,450 campuses based on students’ academic growth and performance in the 2021-22 school year. Overall letter grades A-F are given on categories such as performances on the State of Texas Assessments of Aca- demic Readiness; the level of college, career and military readiness; graduation rates; academic growth; and perfor- mance for economically disadvantaged student populations. According to the TEA, the newest set of ratings saw 25% of districts and 33% of campuses improve their letter grade from 2019. Additionally, 18% of high-poverty Texas schools were rated an A, the agency said. North East ISD received an overall score of 89 and a B rating for the 2021-22 academic year, including an 85 score on the STAAR, according to the TEA. The district scored the same for the 2018-19 school year with an 86 score on the STAAR. NEISD also received 212 distinctions this year, improving upon the 120 it earned in 2019. At least 17 NEISD schools in the north central San Antonio

area received an A rating, and another three campuses in the same area earned a B rating, the TEA said. The TEA said Northside ISD this year received an overall score of 84 and a B rating with a STAAR performance score of 79. The district scored an 87, or B, following the 2018-19 school year and an 83 on the STAAR. In part of the Clark High School cluster of campuses, only Blattman Elementary School received an A rating with Clark, Rawlinson Middle, and Colonies North Elementary schools each earning a B rating, the TEA said. Hobby Middle and Locke Hill Elementary schools each received a C rating. RATING SCHOOLS NEISD and NISD each saw little improvement in 2021-22 in the Texas Education Agency’s first issuance of school accountability ratings since 2019-20.

NEISD Overall 89 (B rating)

NISD Overall 84 (B rating)

Student Achievement 82 (B) School Progress 85 (B) Closing the Gaps 81 (B)

Student Achievement 87 (B) School Progress 90 (A) Closing the Gaps 86 (B)

SOURCE: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

$61.6M deficit part of NISD’s 2022-23 budget NORTHSIDE ISD On Aug. 23, the NISD school board adopted a $985.6 million budget for the 2022-23 academic year that includes a $61.6 million deficit. NISD officials said they are project- ing $923.9 million in general fund reve- nues this new school year, a decrease from the $941.1 million in revenues that NISD was expected to generate in 2021-22. NISD projected $985.6 million in general fund expenditures in 2022-23,

up from $975.8 million in expenditures last school year. The latter budget figure, NISD officials said, includes a $19.5 million increase in employee compensation and $24 million set aside to accom- modate districtwide growth and improvement, such as the opening of Sotomayor High School, a new campus. The result is a $61.6 million general fund deficit, NISD officials said, adding NISD operated with a $34.6 million deficit last year. NISD is also lowering its total property tax rate from $1.2613 per $100 taxable valuation to $1.1901.

A NEW BUDGET Northside ISD’s budget for the 2022-23 school year has higher operational expenses and lower projected revenue than 2021-22.

Expenses

Revenue

2021-22 GENERAL FUND

$975.8M

$941.1M

2022-23 GENERAL FUND

$985.6M

$923.9M

SOURCE: NISD/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

9

NORTH SAN ANTONIO EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

PEOPLE Greg Blasko Hill Country Village City Council, Place 4

BY EDMOND ORTIZ

A WEALTH OF EXPERIENCE Before Greg Blasko was elected to the Hill Country Village City Council, Greg Blasko already had experience offering his skills on a global scale with accounting-based nonprofit, Accountants Without Borders.

1950 Born in Germany, lived with military family in different places, including Conroe, Texas. Moved to San Antonio as a third- grader 1973 Earned bachelor’s degree in mathematics at University of Houston 1980 Earned master’s degree in accounting at University of Texas at Austin 1980-84 Worked as certified public accountant for global accounting firm Arthur Andersen 1985 Self-employed as an accountant since 1985, specializing in income tax planning, estate planning and other tax issues 2020 Founded Accountants Without Borders/Comptables Sans Frontieres, a nonprofit that provides free accounting and business consulting services to small charities overseas, AWB has been active with nonprofits in Zambia, Sri Lanka and India 1981 Moved to Hill Country Village. Has served two stints on the city’s zoning commission, and sat on the economic development corporation and business district review boards

A self-described military brat, Greg Blasko was born in Germany and lived in many places, including briefly in San Antonio, before settling down in Hill Country Village. Blasko was a researcher with the Baylor College of Medicine and a teacher in Houston ISD before a career path as a tax accountant led Blasko back to San Antonio and then Hill Country Village, where he lives in the same house he bought in 1981. Blasko sat on several city commissions and boards for years before being tapped for the City Council, unopposed, in the May election. This article has been edited for length and clarity.

YOU WERE THE ONLY RESIDENT TO APPLY FOR THE PLACE 4 CITY COUNCIL SEAT. WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO SEEK THE POSITION? I had thought about running for City Council, but I put it off for so long. I was so busy. I’m a tax accountant with a lot of clients. I don’t really have a staff. My staff is [my clients’] staff. I needed to wait until I could transfer some clients to other people. Now I’m at a stage where I’m not retired—I don’t want to be retired right now, I really like what I’m doing—but I now have a window of opportunity to come in. I didn’t want to be a council member unless I knew I could do the job. WHAT HAS YOUR CIVIC EXPERIENCE BEEN LIKE IN HILL COUNTRY VILLAGE? I was on the zoning commission for about five years; then I became zoning commission [chair] for 10-12 years; then after a time, I got back onto the commission five or six years ago. I’m also on the economic development corporation board and the business district construction review board.

WHAT GOT YOU INTERESTED IN ACCOUNTING? I’m a numbers guy. It’s really something I think people are born with. It’s an innate ability. … After three years of teaching, we had a career day, and it was one of the best days of my life. For some reason, they assigned a certified public accountant to my class, and he was talking about [a master’s in professional accounting], which was a new thing in 1978. After class, nobody went up and talked to him, but I did and asked him to tell me about it. I told him, ‘You mean to tell me there’s a thing called applied mathematics?’ I immediately applied and got accepted for the master’s of business program, took my first accounting class, switched to the master’s in accounting program and got my master’s in accounting with an emphasis in taxation in 1980 at [The University of Texas]. Then in 1980, I came down here and got accepted to work for [global accounting firm] Arthur Andersen. [My then-wife Mary] and I bought this house in 1981. I’ve been here ever since.

WHAT ARE THE CITY’S CURRENT PRIORITIES? We do have issues regarding roads. I walk every morning. I’m self-employed; almost everyone else is out working, but I can take the time to drive around and see what [road workers] are doing. These roads are not just being built for us, they’re being built for the people who are going to come in after us 10-20 years down the line. We just want to make sure they’re done right. As for the current City Hall, it would take so much money to renovate it. For a few more dollars, we can actually build a new City Hall. That’s the way that I look at it. Whether it’s built at the current site or at the [city-owned Bitters Road tract], that’s a decision for the city to make, and we’ll let the citizenry tell us what they want to do. WHAT’S THE CITY’S NEXT BIG ISSUE? The deal with City Hall puts at the forefront the land on Bitters. It’s been many, many years that we’ve been sitting on that property. It’s done nothing but appreciate in value. What needs to be done?

PUBLIC CONTACT INFORMATION

City phone: 210-494-3671 Council Member Greg Blasko, CPA

Email: blaskogreg@gmail.com

SOURCES: GREG BLASKO, HILL COUNTRY VILLAGE/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE A Chicago Bite Encino Park-area eatery serves Chicago-style dishes P ossessing a Ph.D. in education, Krystal Cross began 2021 as an assistant BY EDMOND ORTIZ

Cross pitched the restaurant idea to her brother Chris Irving, but it was her cousin Johnathan Chatman, who lives in Houston, who came to visit and became her business partner. “In that time, we had the bank account, the [employer identication number and] a business license; [we] found a location, and we were signing a lease, all in four days,” she said. Cross said she spent another four months outtting the physical location inside a small retail strip o Evans Road. “It’s been a whirlwind; it turned my life upside-down quickly,” Cross said. The menu at A Chicago Bite features jumbo wings, Italian beef sandwiches, Chicago dogs, Vienna Beef Polish sausages, gyros, cheeseburgers, fried catsh, chicken, sh and pizza pu s. Patrons may partake in a soul food special on Sundays. Last July, Cross and her family— many of whom pitch in at the eatery— celebrated one year in business. Cross said she is blown away by the community’s response— especially those who have never eaten Chicago- style food. “That’s one of the things that sets apart A Chicago Bite from other places. Here, you get a bite of Chicago [cuisine], but you get authentic, homemade food,” Cross said. also enjoy sh fry Fridays or

principal at public charter school Jubilee Academy San Antonio. Now, she spends each day fully focused on running her rst restaurant, A Chicago Bite, which she opened in July 2021. The eatery oers Chicago-style food in north central San Antonio. Cross said she and her son, James Cross, moved from Chicago to San Antonio six years ago after her son decided a change in scenery would benet them. They love San Antonio and its diversity, she said. “It’s like a big melting pot; everybody kind of meshes in,” Cross said. One day her son suggested she open a restaurant so he could have more chances to enjoy her fried chicken, she said. Cross said she typically tops fried chicken with Chicago Mild Sauce, a condi- ment popular in the southern and western parts of Chicago often used on fried chicken, ribs and hot links. It combines barbecue sauce, ketchup, hot sauce and mild spices, she said. “I put some [Chicago Mild Sauce] on some chicken one time and posted a picture of that just because it was my dinner for the night. Everybody who saw it said, ‘Oh my God, that looks so good, you should open a restaurant,’” Cross said.

The menu includes the Chicago dog ($6.50) with onions, mustard and relish.

EDMOND ORTIZCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Soul food Sunday specials at A Chicago Bite oer the option of wings or catsh with two sides ($12.50-$20).

Krystal Cross, a native Chicagoan, is co- owner of A Chicago Bite, which oers a variety of Chicago-style foods.

COURTESY A CHICAGO BITE

EDMOND ORTIZCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

WHAT DEFINES CHICAGOSTYLE CUISINE? Owner Krystal Cross said Chicago-style foods—often messy but delicious—are known as such because of the ways they are prepared and topped.

“HERE, YOU GET A BITE OF CHICAGO CUISINE, BUT YOU GET AUTHENTIC, HOMEMADE FOOD.” KRYSTAL CROSS, COOWNER

Italian beef

This sausage dish ($8.50) is grilled Vienna beef topped with yellow mustard, grilled onions and, sometimes, a pickled spicy pepper. Beef Polish

Chicago dog

An open-face roast beef sandwich ($14) is dipped in its own juices, or au jus.

Vienna beef ($6.50) in a sesame seed bun has relish, onions, mustard, pickled peppers, tomatoes, celery salt, and pickles on top.

ENCINO COMMONS

A Chicago Bite 2339 E. Evans Road, Ste. 106, San Antonio 210-481-4200 www.achicagobite.com Hours: Tue.-Sun. 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Mon. closed

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NORTH SAN ANTONIO EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

CITY & COUNTY

News from Bexar County, Hollywood Park, Hill Country Village, San Antonio and Shavano Park

Hill Country Village looks to possible spring 2023 bond vote

PLANNING IN SHAVANO PARK The city’s long-range, comprehensive town plan was first adopted in 2010 and last updated in 2018. A new five-year plan review process will contain multiple steps, including a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats— or SWOT—analysis.

Analysis of the 2018 plan update identified five planning areas for further review.

The condition of Northwest Military Highway Residential development Sidewalks and bicycle lanes

Flooding and drainage Improvements around the City Hall complex property

HILL COUNTRY VILLAGE City leaders are foregoing a fall bond election on a potential City Hall proposal, saying they hope spring 2023 will provide a clearer picture of the city’s finances and a way to possibly self-fund a new municipal complex to avoid new debt. According to Hill Country Village officials, the city hosted three town halls in August, collecting input from residents, many of whom in straw polls preferred replacing the existing City Hall at 116 Aspen Lane with a larger, modernized structure. But Council Member Carl Register said he felt many residents also wanted more information and time to consider any possible City Hall proposal. Local officials have also been looking at the city-owned unde- veloped tract at Bitters Road and

Tower Drive, adding that building a new municipal complex there could cost over $3 million. “People want a new City Hall, and they want it at this location. That’s the indication that I got,” Register said. Register and Council Member Matthew Acock asked city staff to explore whether the City Council could repurpose some available cash and projected revenues from different sources, while other council members asked about possibly redirecting surplus money from the $8.5 million road improvement bond, which voters passed in 2019. The city’s bond financing advisors said it is possible, but in a future bond election, the city must make a separate election proposal to redirect specific funds toward such a project.

SOURCE: CITY OF SHAVANO PARK/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Shavano Park commits to updating town plan

SHAVANO PARK The city in August began a months-long process to update the town plan, the city’s comprehensive long-range planning guide, which was developed in 2010 and last updated in 2018. Council Member Pete Miller proposed in the July 25 City Council meeting establishing a five-year cycle for reviewing the plan and revising it to reflect Shavano Park’s accomplishments, demographics and developments to better provide the community with a clearer,

long-term strategy and collective vision. “I think it’s important that we establish a five-year cycle for our plan,” Miller said. Local officials said updating the town plan will involve Shavano Park’s planning and zoning com- mission, which will study a final draft update before the document undergoes a final council review. The plan updating process could wrap up by March 2023, city officials said.

COMPILED BY EDMOND ORTIZ

Bexar County Commissioners Court meets Oct. 18 at 9 a.m. Bexar County Courthouse, 100 Dolorosa St., Ste. 2.01, San Antonio 210-335-2011. www.bexar.org Hollywood Park City Council meets Oct. 18 at 6 p.m. 2 Mecca Drive, Hollywood Park 210-494-2023. www.hollywoodpark-tx.gov San Antonio City Council meets Sept. 22 and 29, and Oct. 6 and 13 at 9 a.m. 114 W. Commerce St., San Antonio 210-207-7040. www.sanantonio.gov Shavano Park City Council meets Oct. 17 at 6:30 p.m. 900 Saddletree Court, Shavano Park 210-493-3478. www.shavanopark.org MEETINGS WE COVER CITY HIGHLIGHTS BEXAR COUNTY The county on July 21 opened its first public, free-use gathering space inside the Precinct 3 facility at 320 Interpark Blvd., San Antonio. Officials said the 1,414-square-foot room is available for community meetings, training opportunities and other special events. Call the Precinct 3 office at 210-335-2613 for details.

Bexar County budgets $20M in federal funds to build and preserve more affordable housing

Hollywood Park works on protocols HOLLYWOOD PARK City Council on Aug. 16 discussed enhancing procedures for introducing new council members and for filling empty council seats. City Secretary Patrick Aten briefed the council on efforts toward updating a six-year-old manual that serves as orientation for newly elected and appointed council members. Aten said he would collect input and return to the council by October with a draft manual. The council on Aug. 16 also approved an ordinance for filling a council vacancy. The council may appoint an eligible resident to an empty post or wait to call a special election, according to the new ordinance. If the council faces two vacancies simultaneously, then a special election must be called to fill both positions, Aten said.

BEXAR COUNTY Commissioners on Aug. 9 approved a process for spending $20 million in federal COVID-19 relief funds to help eligible organizations build new affordable housing and preserve existing homes and apartments. The $20 million is part of the $389 million in American Rescue Plan Act funds received by Bexar County. David Marquez, executive director of economic and community develop- ment, said $8 million is allocated for new construction and preservation of existing housing for multifamily rentals for people earning between 16%-60% of the area median income, or AMI. The San Antonio-New Braunfels AMI is $83,500 for a household of four, states the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Another $5 million is directed toward new construction and pres- ervation of single-family homes for

AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROJECTS WANTED Bexar County is soliciting project proposals from eligible organizations. Criteria include: • agencies experienced in managing federal grant money ; • projects ready to go to construction within 6 months of submission; • projects targeting vulnerable groups , such as children aging out of foster care, individuals unable to complete daily living activities and veterans; • projects leveraging local, state and federal funds, especially those awarded 4% or 9% state tax credit allocations; people earning between 31%-60% of the AMI, Marquez said. The remaining $7 million will help people experienc- ing homelessness, Marquez said.

• and projects incorporating environmentally sustainable development practices . SOURCE: BEXAR COUNTY/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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STONE OAK 23026 US HWY 281 N • 210-497-1322 VINEYARD 1309 N Loop 1604 W • 210-408-8206 DE ZAVALA 5219 De Zavala Rd • 210-561-0900 RECTOR 819 E Rector Dr • 210-340-2244 LEGACY 2003 N Loop 1604 E • 210-494-8600

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMMUNITY Edwards Aquifer Authority Education Outreach Center $3M center oers visitors lessons about water T he Edwards Aquifer Authority to teach people about the geology of the aquifer. We wanted to teach peo- ple about the science of the aquifer.” Talk of an educational center BY TRICIA SCHWENNESEN

opened the doors on its $3 million Education Outreach Center in April and so far has had about 1,000 visitors. Housed in north central Bexar County on the grounds of Morgan’s Wonderland Camp, which was created by Gordon Hartman, a San Antonio business leader and philanthropist, the EOC is the nation’s rst all-ac- cessible aquifer education facility, according to EAA ocials. The purpose of the EOC is to help the EAA further its mission to educate the community about the aquifer, which is integral to providing the area with safe drinking water and is also home to eight endangered and three threatened Texas species, said Ann-Margaret Gonzalez, EAA senior public aairs administrator. “The aquifer is for everyone, and we need to teach everyone about the aquifer, so it was a great partnership [with Hartman],” Gonzalez said. For the past 25 years, the EAA has taken aquifer education into schools and to community groups, she said, but leaders in water management began to talk about the future. The EAA already has a eld research center on the property, and the idea for the EOC was born after a scientist visited in 2019 to study a cave. “[We talked about] how do we bring people to us to understand how we manage, enhance and protect the aquifer,” Gonzalez asked. “We wanted

then became part of the EAA’s Next Generation Strategic Plan, which takes a long-range look through the lens of innovation, imagination and inclu- sion, Gonzalez said. Sarah Valdez, EAA senior science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics educator and EOC manager, said the EOC benets the community by providing a free and safe space to learn about the aquifer. “We all depend on the same clean water. It is the one thing that unites all living things, and now we have a place to learn about it together,” she said. Less than six months after opening, EOC ocials received word in July that a permit application with the Texas Fish & Wildlife Service was approved to house two endangered species: the Texas blind salamander and fountain darters, Gonzalez said. Valdez said the planned endangered species aquarium is her favorite feature of the EOC. “The aquarium [will] provide a soothing and tranquil environment where visitors can be at one with rare and endangered species that are found deep underground,” she said. “It is one thing to look at a photo or a video, but to sit and watch a Texas Blind Salamander move or eat is a rare treat—one that cannot be experienced anywhere else in San Antonio.”

Edwards Aquifer Authority sta members teach visitors about the aquifer in the Karst Theater, which was designed to look like a cave with stalagmites.

Edwards Aquifer Authority ocials said they hope schools and community groups will visit the free Education Outreach Center to learn through the interactive displays. HANDSON LEARNING

Three popular features of the Education Outreach Center:

KARST THEATER: This 25-seat multiuse room provides a 360-de- gree cave-like atmosphere de- signed for immersive experiences. CLOUD CASTER: This exhibit gives visitors the chance to create clouds to demonstrate a part of the water cycle. GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE DISPLAY: This 5-foot-tall, 360-degree spherical display illustrates how water and the Edwards Aquifer are part of a larger global system by showing connections to climate shifts and weather patterns.

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A student uses the Cloud Caster to learn about how cloud formations.

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The Global Perspective Display shows where water is found on Earth.

Edwards Aquifer Authority Education Outreach Center 23400 Cibolo Vista, San Antonio Free (admission) • 210-547-2222 Make an appointment to visit online at www.eaaeoc.org.

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THREE CONVENIENT CAMPUSES SERVING SAN ANTONIO

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NORTH CENTRAL: 12222 Huebner Rd. STONE OAK: 20615 Huebner Rd. DOMINION: 6185 Camp Bullis Rd.

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NORTH SAN ANTONIO EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

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