Richardson November 2020

RICHARDSON EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 3  NOV. 5DEC. 10, 2020

ONLINE AT

C O R E New businesses are opening in the Richardson Core District, a six-hub entertainment zone envisioned as the next Lower Greenville or Deep Ellum. LAUNCHING THE

VALUES RISING RICHARDSON PROPERTY Here is a look at what Richardson residents can expect from the city portion of their scal year 2020-21 property tax bill and how the city’s rate compares to neighboring cities.

Key Highest rate

380

MCKINNEY $0.508645*

5

DNT TOLL

FRISCO $0.4466*

$794.4 MILLION increase in Richardson property values $311,227 average home value in Richardson

Lowest rate

$1,946* city’s average property tax charge

ALLEN $0.485*

SRT TOLL

*PER $100 VALUATION

PLANO $0.4482*

ARAPAHO RD.

75

MURPHY $0.495*

$5 MILLION

75

PGBT TOLL

Learn more about Lockwood District and Main Street area projects on Page 16.

WYLIE $0.671979*

increase in Richardson property tax revenue

RICHARDSON $0.62516*

*Richardson has a $100,000 senior exemption. About 30% of homes in Richardson are owned by seniors, who have an average annual property tax bill of $1,315. SOURCES: CITY OF RICHARDSON, DALLAS COUNTY APPRAISAL DISTRICT, COLLIN COUNTY APPRAISAL DISTRICTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

635

GARLAND $0.7696*

CHINA TOWN

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LOCKWOOD

DALLAS $0.7766*

BELT LINE RD.

RICHARDSON HEIGHTS

MAIN STREET

City budget reects uncertainties of the pandemic BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER AND MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

to forecast revenue; however, sta remained committed to providing key services, such as street and alley repairs, parks maintenance and economic development. Last year’s budget had already sustained unexpected losses due to the Oct. 20 tornado. Millions of dollars were spent on infrastructure repairs, emergency housing and more, City Manager Dan Johnson said. CONTINUED ON 14

SPRING VALLEY

In building the budget for scal year 2020-21, Richard- son sta faced unprecedented challenges, not the least of which was a pandemic that brought with it a projected revenue shortfall of roughly $5.8 million. The city had to quickly rethink its budgeting strategy when the crisis took hold in March. Uncertainty around the length and severity of the pandemic made it dicult

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SPRING VALLEY RD.

SOURCE: CITY OF RICHARDSONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER COURTESY GOOGLE EARTH

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS IMPACTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

4

Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 6 Ongoing and future projects CITY& COUNTY 10 Latest local news

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Leanne Libby, llibby@communityimpact.com SENIOR EDITOR Olivia Lueckemeyer REPORTERS Makenzie Plusnick, Liesbeth Powers GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chase Autin ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Tracy Ruckel

FROMLEANNE: The phrase “shop local” has gained new importance over the last several months. Development of the new Richardson Core District is underway with a focus on growth of the local business sector. This issue has the latest updates on this large-scale project (see Page 16).

Richardson residents have shown their commitment to local businesses by supporting them even during uncertain times. As we enter into a unique holiday season, remember to support the businesses that drive the Richardson economy by shopping local for gifts and entertainment. You can nd these businesses on the pages of our newspaper every month as well as online at communityimpact.com/ric. We continue to partner with local businesses to bring unbiased, trusted, local journalism to your door every month, and we thank you for your readership and patronage.

METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

Leanne Libby, GENERALMANAGER

LOCAL GETAWAYS GUIDE 11 Things to do in Richardson and beyond

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Local sources 20

New businesses 2

Road projects 5

Local getaways 7

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RICHARDSON EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

tooth replacement, extractions, cosmetic dentistry, orthodontics and more. 972- 231-7104. www.ellemdental.com 6 Divine Headboards relocated from Irving to Richardson this August. The custom-design headboards and beds store now operates out of its new loca- tion at 904 Business Pkwy., Richardson. Custom options range from the shape, style, buttons, fabric, length, depth and height of headboards and beds, according to the company’s website. Divine Headboards also offers delivery and installation options. 972-855-0866. www.headboardsdivine.com 7 TheLab.ms plans to relocate its maker space from Plano to 999 Arapaho Road. Ste. 300, Richardson, on Dec. 1. The self-described “gym for tinkerers and makers” is a nonprofit organization that provides a space for collaboration among people interested in robotics, coding, hardware hacking, 3D printing and more. Members have 24/7 access to resources and technology, such as 3D printers. The group also hosts meetups and events for its members. It is the first new tenant in the recently dubbed Richardson Inno- vation Quarter, or IQ. 469-298-9683. www.thelab.ms 8 OptimumWellness Solutions moved its chiropractic office about one mile east this summer to 1750 N. Collins Blvd., Ste. 101B, Richardson. The office had been in its previous location for close to seven years, according to an online announce- ment from Optimum Wellness. The move to a newer building offers patients a more updated look and some updated features. Optimum Wellness Solutions provides chiropractic adjustments and spinal decompression treatments as well as a variety of non-chiropractic ser- vices for overall health. 972-671-2225. www.optimumwellnesssolutions.com NEWOWNERSHIP 9 CBD American Shaman of East Richardson reopened its doors under new ownership in early September. The store, located at 908 Audelia Road, Ste. 100, Richardson, sells a variety of CBD products, including items for pain relief, wellness and pets. 214-774-9045. www.cbdeastrichardson.com

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CAMPBELL RD.

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COLLINS BLVD.

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ARAPAHO RD.

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BELT LINE RD.

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SPRING VALLEY RD.

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4 Eiland Coffee Roasters plans to open a cafe in mid-January at 2701 Custer Parkway, Richardson. The business roasts single-origin coffee at its flagship store- front on Interurban Street that is sold to individual customers, coffee shops and restaurants across the Dallas-Fort Worth area and nationwide. The cafe, which will also serve food, will take over the former location of Pearl Cup Coffee in II Creeks Plaza in the Canyon Creek neighborhood. 972-991-0100. www.eilandcoffee.com RELOCATIONS 5 Ellem Dental is expected to move before the end of the year to a new location at 702 W. Arapaho Road, Ste. 100, Richardson. The practice, which is currently located at 1221 W. Campbell Road, Ste. 101, Richardson, offers com- prehensive dental care for patients of all ages. Services include preventive care,

traditional Persian and Afghan cuisine, such as kebabs, fried eggplant, tadeek and gormeh sabzi, a Persian beef stew. It also offers catering and hosts events in its on-site banquet hall. Its lunch- time buffet is temporarily suspended. 972-235-4007. www.kasracusine.com COMING SOON 3 Nails Plus expects to open this fall at 1235 E. Belt Line Road, Richardson. The beauty supply store will sell nail and beauty supplies, including spa products, wet hair products, hair razors and clippers, false eyelashes, micro- blade ink and facial treatments, among other items. Nails Plus was originally expected to open this summer but was delayed by the coronavirus pandemic, according to a recent post. The store is expected to have its website up soon. www.facebook.com/nailsplusonline

NOWOPEN 1 APLus Workforce Management Solutions opened an office Oct. 19 at coworking space The Common Desk at 3400 N. Central Expressway, Rich- ardson. The business, headquartered in Springfield, Missouri, offers human capital management solutions, including payroll, human resources, and time and attendance software. 417-890-6404. www.apluspayroll.com REOPENING 2 Kasra Persian Cuisine reopened in mid-October at 525 W. Arapaho Road, Ste. 21, Richardson. The restaurant had been closed for several months due to the coronavirus pandemic. Kasra serves COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER, MAKENZIE PLUSNICK & LIESBETH POWERS

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Sheela K. Bailey is the owner of British Emporium, which now has a pop-up shop in Richardson. (Courtesy British Emporium) FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN ARAPAHO RD.

NEWMANAGEMENT 10 Silver Fox , located at 3650 Shire Blvd., Richardson, is under new manage- ment as of Oct. 12. Jason Campbell is the new proprietor, and Connie Trujillo is the new executive chef. Both hail from steakhouse III Forks in Frisco. Silver Fox is a steakhouse, seafood and lobster restau- rant that offers a vast wine selection and private dining rooms suited for large groups, business dinners, wedding events and special occasions. 972-423-8121. www.silverfoxcafe.com CLOSINGS 11 Alamo Drafthouse , located at 100 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 14, Richard- son, temporarily closed in early October, according to an Oct. 7 press release. The movie theater chain initially closed in March but reopened its Richardson loca- tion in August. The decision to shut down all Dallas-Fort Worth locations stemmed British Emporium , a pop-up shop oering British groceries and gifts, opened in Richardson on Oct. 1. The business hails from historic downtown Grapevine and oers traditional British foods, such as Christmas puddings, brandy butter, mince pies, crackers and more. It will be open inside of British eatery Fish & Fizz throughout the holiday season, according to a recent news release. “During these challenging times when homesick Brits can’t travel, comfort food is the order of the day,” British Emporium owner Sheela K. Bailey said in the release. “They can stock up on essential British groceries and pick up a classic meal to take home for the family. No passport required!” Fish & Fizz owner Nick Barclay said the partnership presented an innovative way to populate his restaurant during a time when dine-in business has slowed. “You must think outside the (phone) box to survive,” Barclay joked in

BELT LINE RD.

532 N INTERURBAN ST. eilandcoffee.com 972�991�0100

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from the lack of new movie releases, Chief Executive Officer Bill DiGaetano said in a statement. The company’s closure announcement came on the same day Gov. Greg Abbott allowed movie theaters to expand capacity from 50% to 75%. www.drafthouse.com 12 Mubrooka Egyptian Street Food shuttered Aug. 13 in Richardson, accord- ing to a Facebook post. The restaurant, located at 904 Audelia Road, Ste. 300, Richardson, served authentic Egyptian cuisine. Mubrooka cited financial strain caused by the pandemic as the reason for its closure, according to its website. www.mubrooka.com 13 Pearl Cup Coffee has shuttered its flagship Richardson location at 2701 Custer Parkway, Ste. 917. The business offered a wide selection of coffee, tea, baked goods, panin- is and sandwiches, salads and more. www.pearlcupcoffee.com the release. “We’re really looking forward to seeing where this creative collaboration will take us.” The original British Emporium has been open for nearly 30 years, according to the release. Along with oering British goods, the business also hosts community-related events, such as car shows, meet-and-greets with British celebrities, royal celebrations, “Doctor Who” parties and more. The Richardson pop-up, located at 400 N. Coit Road, Ste. 1908, Richardson, is open Thu.-Sun. from noon-8 p.m. For more information, visit www.british-emporium.com.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

Three major road projects left over from Richardson’s 2015 bond are about to get underway. About a third of the $115 million voter-approved bond package went toward street and alley repairs, said Shawn Poe, the city’s director of engineering. The nal portion of a six-year serial sale, totaling $13.3 million, is scheduled to be issued in 2021. A Custer Road project The rst project sta will tackle in the coming months is on Custer Road between Campbell and Arapaho roads. Among the goals of the project is to replace damaged streets and sidewalks, improve drainage, lower vehicle speeds and improve safety for pedestrians. The existing stretch of Custer is a four-lane undivided road with sidewalks. Sta is proposing to reduce the road to one lane in each direction as well as add a center turn lane and dedicated bike lanes on each side of the road. The street would look slightly dierent at the intersection with Beverly Drive, which is directly across fromNorthrich Elementary School. In this area, the city would add a raised median and a pedestrian crosswalk signal to improve safety. Sta plans to complete design and bid the project in June. Construction would begin in July 2021 and have an estimated completion of July 2022. The project is expected to cost $6.8 million. B West Prairie Creek Drive project Also included in the 2015 bond is improvements to a stretch of West Prairie Creek Drive between Campbell and Collins Boulevard. The goal is to replace damaged con- crete, to improve drainage, to increase the line of sight for pedestrians and vehicles, and to improve owwhen cars are parked on the street, Poe said. The current conguration is a 34-foot-wide, two-lane undivided roadway with sidewalk on the west side. The city is proposing to expand the portion between Fall Creek Drive to south of Collins by three feet. The project would also add four additional crosswalks with curb extensions throughout the project area to encourage people to cross at those points, Poe said. City taps into 2015 bond fund for threemajor road projects BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

ONGOING PROJECTS

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ARAPAHO RD.

NEWBERRY DR.

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FALL CREEK DR.

Arapaho Road construction Crews are installing a new water- line on Arapaho Road to facilitate senior center renovations. Over three phases, the left, center and right lanes of eastbound and westbound Arapaho between Floyd Road and Newberry Drive may be closed to trac from 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Timeline: mid-December completion Cost: $25,000 Funding source: city of Richardson

W. CAMPBELL RD.

75

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E. COLLINS BLVD.

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COMMERCE DR.

W. ARAPAHO RD.

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The project will be bid in June, and construction should begin in August. It will take one year to complete and cost

E. RENNER RD.

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roughly $8 million, Poe said. C Glenville Drive project

Shiloh Road waterline construction The North Texas Municipal Water District is installing an additional 8,000 feet of 24-inch treated water pipeline. The project will provide additional water capacity to residents and businesses in the area. Timeline: September 2019-spring 2021 Cost: $6.3 million Funding source: North Texas Munici- pal Water District

The nal project will occur on Glenville Drive between Campbell and Commerce Drive. This undertaking is dierent from the others in that it must comply with recommendations approved by council as part of the rezoning of The Richardson IQ, Poe said. The current conguration of this stretch of Glenville is a four-lane undivided road with sidewalks on each side. Sta is proposing that the roadway be reduced to two lanes with buered bike lanes added. There would be sidewalks on the opposite sides of the bike lanes, Poe said. The hope is that the project lowers vehicle speeds and promotes multimodal transit, he added. Design of the $7.4 million project is scheduled to be com- plete by December 2021. The project would go out for bid in January 2022, and construction would hopefully begin in February of that year. It would be complete in August.

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF OCT. 21. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT RICNEWS COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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DEVELOPMENT Residentsweigh in on neweld sports facility onApolloRoad

Mark Twain Park

Huines Park

Korean World Mission Baptist Church

Apollo Road property

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

which eld sports they play, what amenities they would like to see and in which priority. The survey was accompanied by a seven-minute video allowing residents to learn more about the property and the city’s process. Normally, the bulk of the public input process would happen in per- son, but a virtual alternative makes more sense in the era of COVID-19, Smeby said. The property is mostly at and has hardly any vegetation; as such, it ought to lend itself well to sports uses, Smeby said. It is still unclear as to whether the facility would be indoor, outdoor or both, she added. Some of the ideas being considered by the city include lighted, compe- tition-grade soccer elds, pickleball courts, restrooms, a small play- ground and a loop trail. If a brick-and-mortar facility is

Plans are beginning to form for a 26-acre lot purchased by the city of Richardson six years ago. The property, located just north- west of the Huines Recreation Center at the southwest corner of Apollo and Plano roads, will likely be used for a eld sports facility, though the details are still under consider- ation. The city has been working with consultants at Dunaway Associates to assess potential uses for the land, said Lori Smeby, director of the Richardson Parks and Recreation Department. “We’ve been waiting for the right time to start to study it and see what might be some of the options for what this piece of property could become,” Smeby said. A ve-question survey posted online by the city was open for responses between Oct. 15-28. It asked respondents to weigh in on

U.S. Post Oce

An aerial image of the property shows where a potential eld sports facility may be housed in the future. (Courtesy Dunaway Associates/Community Impact Newspaper)

built on the property, Smeby said sta would like to ensure that it is exible enough to accommodate whatever use the department may identify as a need in the future. “It might be that we keep a rather informal space out there that then can become a space for something else,” she said. Anything that happens on the property would occur in phases, Smeby said. A rst phase, depending

on availability of funding, could simply be the construction of infra- structure. In other words, public use of the property may not happen immediately, she said. The city is looking at the upcom- ing bond election as a potential avenue for funding the project, Smeby said. A vision for the property should be complete and ready to present to City Council for approval by the end of the year.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

GOVERNMENT City staestimates $170million price tag for potential 2021 bond

W. ARAPAHO RD.

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Proposed connector building

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Library

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

multiple-component litmus test that gauges the project’s cost-eective- ness, urgency, potential to stimulate further investment and ability to be done in phases. Some projects that are not included in the upcoming bond could be included in a future bond or funded through other avenues, Magner said. The rst deep dive into the condi- tion of city facilities was presented to council Oct. 19, when members had the opportunity to review six conceptual plans for renovations at the library and the City Hall/Civic Center building. Costs of the renova- tions range between $31 million-$110 million, and estimates are based on a July 2023 construction date, Engineer- ing Director Shawn Poe said. The library was built in 1969 at a cost of $2 million. The building is structurally sound but needs work to be brought up to par with the needs

The largest bond in city history could appear on a Richardson ballot next November. Sta is in the midst of studying infrastructure and facilities to deter- mine which projects should be added to a potential package. It is estimated the bond will land somewhere around $170 million, Deputy City Manager Don Magner said at an Oct. 19 council meeting. The last bond, which was approved by voters in 2015, totaled $115 million. This estimate could shift over the next fewmonths based on several variables, such as property value projections, the state of the economy and eects of the upcoming legislative session, Magner said. The city will not have to raise taxes to pay for the projects, he added. In weighing projects for the next bond, sta asked council to use a

City Hall/ Civic Center

Three of the six conceptual renovation plans for City Hall and the library include a connection between the two facilities. (Rendering courtesy city of Richardson)

of the modern age. In general, sta is proposing more gathering spaces for the community; more classrooms; improved electrical systems, lighting and climate control; and better signage. Three of the six plans also suggest connecting the library to City Hall. The Civic Center was built in 1980 at a cost of $3.9 million. It is also in good condition; however, it needs work to be made more secure and versatile. Sta is asking council to consider con- verting the civic center to make more space for city departments; enhancing

accessibility for disabled visitors; and clarifying the location of the front door. The current building has two entrances, which makes it dicult for visitors to know where to enter. Over the next few months, sta will return to council on a regular basis to provide deep dives into dierent facilities and systems. The package of projects should be nalized between May and July, and council will vote to call the election in August. If approved, the bond election would be held next November.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

UTILITIES Richardson helps settlewater rate dispute after years of negotiations

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

previous contract, they had paid a combined $275 million in recent years for water their residents and businesses did not use. The new agreement includes an updated allocation method devel- oped by the cities. It will gradually adjust the annual water commit- ments for each city over the next eight years to more closely align with their historical water use. Then, in 2029, that allocation method will shift to a combination of the new annual minimums and the actual water used. The new methodology will take time to implement, and savings may be modest in the early years of the transition, Richardson City Manager Dan Johnson said in an Oct. 29 statement. Still, the new system is better balanced and allows to future rate revisions to be evaluated and implemented, he added.

A new agreement on the North Texas Municipal Water District’s rate structure will allow cost-sharing to be phased in for its member cities over the next 13 years. That change could have a ripple eect on consumer water bills in Richardson, McKinney, Plano, Frisco and the district’s nine other member cities. Representatives from each of the district’s 13 member cities signed an amended wholesale water services contract Oct. 29 at the district’s headquarters in Wylie. A separate agreement approved by the North Texas Municipal Water District and its member cities will settle the wholesale water rate cases that are pending before the Public Utility Commission of Texas. Those cases came about after the cities of Plano, Richardson, Garland and Mesquite argued that under the

Larry Parks, president of the North Texas Municipal Water District’s board of directors, spoke Oct. 29 in Wylie about the amended wholesale water services contract. (William C. Wadsack/Community Impact Newspaper)

“The new methodology also builds toward the long-term success of maintaining and growing our water infrastructure and supplies to support us into the future and better aligns with our goal of promoting conservation,” Johnson said in the statement. Beginning in 2033, the annual minimum for each member city

will be based on a ve-year rolling average of actual consumption. “This document is a pledge to con- tinue our eorts for the benets of our cities, customers and citizens,” NTMWD Board President Larry Parks said. “We celebrate this commitment to each city represented.” Olivia Lueckemeyer contributed to this report.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

CITY& COUNTY

News from Richardson, Richardson ISD, Plano ISD & Collin County

Richardson City Council Meets Nov. 9, 16 and Dec. 7 at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 411 W. Arapaho Road, Richardson. www.cor.net Richardson ISD Meets Nov. 16 and Dec. 7 at 6 p.m. at the RISD Administration Building, 400 S. Greenville Ave., Richardson. www.risd.org Plano ISD Meets Nov. 17 and Dec. 8 at 7 p.m. at the PISD Administration Center, 2700 W. 15th St., Plano. www.pisd.edu MEETINGSWE COVER construct and install energy ecient improvements to their properties. If the county establishes the program, Partain said, it would need one or more administrators who could nd qualied projects, property owners and qualied lenders. Commissioners approved a motion to begin the process of creating a PACE program by a 4-1 vote, with Commissioner Darrell Hale voting against it. NUMBER TOKNOW $500,000 Plano ISD and the city of Plano entered into an agreement Oct. 20 that will allocate $500,000 of the city’s CARES Act funding toward custodial items and personal protective equipment at PISD. So far, the district has spent roughly $275,000 on cleaning and sanitation items and roughly $550,000 on desk shields for students and sta, according to sta. CITY HIGHLIGHTS RICHARDSON Just over 70% of residents had self-responded to the 2020 U.S. Census when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Oct. 13 to end data collection more than two weeks ahead of the scheduled Oct. 31 deadline. This represents a decline from the 74.9% of residents who self-responded to the census in 2010. The city’s 70.1% rate only includes residents who self-responded. It does not include responses gathered by census workers who followed up with households that had not already responded online, by phone or by mail. COLLINCOUNTY Commissioners are looking into the creation of a nancing program that would encourage energy and water eciency projects in commercial and multifamily residential properties. Julie Partain from Bracewell, Collin County’s bond council, told commissioners Oct. 19 that the program would essentially allow property owners to get a loan that would oer a lower cost to

City ocials rene priorities for legislative session

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

Richardson is still under develop- ment, Magner said. The overarching theme of the city’s agenda is to promote and protect its interests by supporting legislation that enforces home rule authority, or the ability of municipalities to manage their own aairs without interference by the state. Several bills passed in the last session undermined local control, Magner said. Sta has asked council to review a draft list of priorities, which will be adopted at an upcoming meeting. The outcome of races in the Nov. 3 election may also cause the city to pivot based on whether incumbent representa- tives are re-elected. Legislators can begin ling bills Nov. 9 for consideration in the session. The session begins Jan. 12.

representatives to familiarize them with the city’s agenda and, hope- fully, to inuence the early stages of legislation being developed, but those meetings are also in question due to COVID-19. Some of the key topics expected to be tackled this session include COVID-19 response, the redrawing of congressional maps based on the results of the 2020 U.S. Census, public and higher education, health care, and public safety, particularly as it relates to racial justice. Richardson currently has three state representatives, one state senator and two U.S. House representatives. The results of the census could shift district lines and cause the city to gain or lose legislators, Magner said. A formal set of priorities for schools or expanding junior highs. Over its next two bonds, the district intends either to rebuild or renovate each of its junior highs, all of which are nearing the end of their useful life, according to sta. Once these projects are complete, overow at junior highs will no longer be an issue, and space will be available at elementary schools for more pre-K. One project that will likely be included is a total rebuild of Lake Highlands Junior High, Assistant Superintendent of Operations Sandra Hayes said. In addition to projects at junior highs, Brenteld and Mohawk elementary schools are nearing capacity and will need more space,

RISDbond could include relocation of sixth-graders RICHARDSON City ocials in Richardson are scrambling to prepare a set of priorities ahead of the state’s 87th legislative session. Very little is known about how the session will be hosted or managed, Deputy City Manager Don Magner said at an Oct. 26 council meeting. It could be fully or partially virtual, and members of the public may or may not be allowed to provide in-person testimony. This will make advocating for Richardson’s priorities dicult, Magner said. “This will be one of the most chal- lenging sessions in recent memory,” he said. The lead-up to the session will also look dierent this year. Normally, ocials in Richardson meet with

Lake Highlands Junior High could be rebuilt. (Courtesy RISD)

BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

RICHARDSON ISD Renovations at junior high campuses to make room for sixth-grade students is a major consideration of a potential May 2021 bond, RISD sta told trustees Oct. 19. The possibility has been discussed for more than a year. Capacity issues and a planned expansion of the pre-K programmean that to accommodate sixth-graders, ocials must decide between adding onto elementary

ANHISTORIC ELECTION Early voting totals in Dallas and Collin counties surpassed those from the 2016 presidential election. Totals include in- person and mail-in ballots received as of Oct. 30. Hayes said. Big Springs, Bowie, Northrich, Stults and Thurgood Marshall elementary schools also need work. The district could budget up to $750 million for bond projects without raising taxes, but it does not yet know how much the projects will cost, Chief Financial Ocer David Pate said.

Thousands turn out to vote early inRichardson

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

Dallas and Collin counties saw higher early voter turnout this year than in the 2016 presidential election, according to data from the Texas secretary of state. Nearly 800,000 Dallas County residents voted early in person or by mail as of Oct. 30, as compared to 549,643 in 2016. Early votes in Collin County totaled 448,806, as compared to 301,939 in the last presidential race. For nal election results, visit www.communityimpact.com/vote.

RICHARDSON More than 35,000 people cast ballots in Richardson during early voting. Residents could vote at one of two polling locations, depending on their county of residence: Dallas County residents could vote at the Civic Center, and Collin County residents could vote at the Richardson Oce Complex. Both counties also allowed voters to cast ballots at any county- wide polling place.

Collin County

Dallas County

2020 2016 SOURCE: SECRETARY OF STATE’S OFFICECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER 2020 2016

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GUIDE

Regional events

COMPILED BY COMMUNITY IMPACT STAFF

GETAWAYS LOCAL Looking for something to do this fall while staying close to home? Here are some area attractions to check out.

RICHARDSON Eisemann Center

Sherrill Park Golf Course Sherrill Park Golf Course is open to the public and includes two regulation courses and a num- ber of tee boxes. It has ranked in the Top 10 municipal golf courses, according to its website. Open dawn to dusk daily. Tee time prices vary by day. 2001 E. Lookout Drive, Richardson 9722341416 www.sherrillparkgolf.com REGIONAL National Videogame Museum The museum preserves the history of the video game industry through archiving physical artifacts along with the stories and information behind its creation. Guided tours and space for private parties are available. Current exhibits include a timeline of consoles, an ‘80s arcade Bendt Distilling Co. tours Take a guided tour of this distillery in Old Town Lewisville. Guests walk through the distillery’s various processes during the hour-long tour, which includes a spirit tasting. Guests can also hang out in the distillery’s tasting hall, lounge or outdoor whiskey garden and purchase craft cocktails. The tours take place Friday evenings and Saturday afternoons. Reservations are required online. $10. 225 S. Charles St., Lewisville 2148140545 www.bendtdistillingco.com and prehistoric games. $10-$12. 8004 North Dallas Parkway, Frisco 9726688400 http://nvmusa.org

Visitors to the Eisemann Center for Performing Arts and Corporate Presentations can enjoy in-house productions and traveling shows, such as concerts, plays, orchestral performances and more. The facility also includes visual arts and exhibitions. Hours and ticket prices vary. 2351 Performance Drive, Richardson 9727444650 www.eisemanncenter.com DFW Chinatown Chinatown is the city’s destination for Asian food, shopping and events. Restaurants in the development serve various Asian cuisines, including Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Taiwan- ese and Vietnamese. The development also includes a grocery store and a community center. Hours and costs vary. 400 N. Greenville Ave., Richardson www.dfwchinatown.com

The “Expanding Universe Hall” exhibit explores the solar system, stargazing and distant galaxies. (Courtesy JerSean Golatt)

The Comedy Arena The comedy theater showcases stand-up, sketch and improv comedy and oers classes. It is also home to the comedy troupe CSz DFW, which performs weekly ComedySportz match- es. The Comedy Arena is oering virtual events and outdoor events with social distancing. Virtual shows are “pay what you can”; outdoor shows are $12. 305 E. Virginia St., Ste. 104, McKinney 2147690645 www.thecomedyarena.com At the Perot Museum, guests can check out ve oors with 11 permanent exhib- its, which include hands-on activities, interactive kiosks and educational games. The Perot Museum also hosts programs for various age groups from early childhood to adults. $13-$20. WORTH THE TRIP Perot Museum of Nature and Science 2201 N. Field St., Dallas 214-428-5555 www.perotmuseum.org

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National Videogame Museum

The Comedy Arena COURTESY THE COMEDY ARENA

COURTESY NATIONAL VIDEOGAME MUSEUM

Find more or submit Richardson events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

An array ofmakers Merchandise at Lone Chimney Mercantile is largely created by local small businesses. Owner Annie Holland purchases items in wholesale batches to sell at the store. Here are some of the featured brands.

LetterCraft

Guttersnipe Press

Next Chapter Studio

The Found

You Can Stitch It

Twice Baked Clay

BUSINESS FEATURE

Owner Annie Holland sells her landmark photography in the store. (Photos by Liesbeth Powers/Community Impact Newspaper)

Lone ChimneyMercantile Richardson boutique features eclectic mix of art and gifts W hat started as a space to manage inven- tory for landmark photographer Annie Holland has grown into Richardson’s Lone Chimney Mercantile. And the growth is not stopping there, she said. BY LIESBETH POWERS

Items include puzzles, apparel, gifts and more.

was going to hit it o. … [But] within two months, I had a booth at the Richardson Mercantile, and [my photos] were ying out of there.” From there, Holland opened a stall at the Dallas Farmers Market, where she now sells items similar to what can be found at the Lone Chimney Mercantile in Richardson. But in Richardson, she has more space and freedom to ll the store with what she wants, Holland said. In Lone Chimney’s little more than a year on Main Street, Holland said she has seen plenty of foot trac and has gained name recognition outside of people who have seen her stall at the farmers market. Holland also lives nearby, and her neighbors love to shop her items without having to go into Dallas, she said. “[Richardson] has gotten to know us, … and a lot of my neighbors know me, and they spread the word,” Holland said. “They don’t want it to leave. They’re like, ‘we want the gift shop here right by the house.’” Support from the community helped Holland power through the early months of the coronavi- rus pandemic, she said. That, her newly created website and advertising packages for gift items at the shop have made all the dierence in pulling the business through the crisis, she said. “We busted our butt, … but I think we’re going to be OK,” Holland said.

This winter, Lone Chimney plans to expand into the open storefront next door to create a location for workshops, pop-ups and small parties and a studio space for photographers. “It’s going to be a multipurpose workspace for everyone to use,” Holland said. Lone Chimney’s storefront is lled with Texas gifts, pop culture-related items, handmade crafts, pottery and T-shirts, all mixed in with displays of Holland’s landmark art from around Dallas and the state. In any given corner, customers can nd anything from “Howdy” stickers to 500-piece dog puzzles to wood ornaments of characters from the television show “Schitt’s Creek.” “I want people to come in here and laugh,” Holland said. Holland got her start in landmark photography after she had her daughter. She wanted to spend more time with her child but still have an income, so she turned to her mother, who owns a landmark photography shop in Oklahoma. “My mom put a camera in my hand, … and I just started doing it,” Holland said. “I didn’t think it

The Richardson storefront is a larger version of Holland’s stall at the Dallas Farmers Market.

Lone ChimneyMercantile 205 W. Main Street, Richardson 214-734-8691 www.lonechimneymercantile.com Hours: Tue.-Thu. 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 10 a.m.- 6 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.-3 p.m., closed Mon.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

The smoked salmon is one of the bestsellers. (Makenzie Plusnick/ Community Impact Newspaper

“MY FATHER IS THE GENESIS OF ALL THIS, THE ORIGINALWOODY BERRY.” WOODY BERRY JR., OWNER

Woody Berry Sr. was a grillmaster in his downtime. (Courtesy Woody B’s BBQ)

A FAMILY LEGACY Woody Berry Sr. was a door-to-door milkman in Corpus Christi. He developed a love for smoking meat and became so good at it, he sold his brisket to a diner that served his homemade brisket sandwiches. He taught Woody Jr. the method to smoke the brisket that Woody Jr. now uses in his own barbecue restaurant.

DINING FEATURE

Woody and Gigi Berry opened the restaurant almost 10 years ago. (Makenzie Plusnick/Community Impact Newspaper)

Woody B’s BBQ Barbecue restaurant brings family tradition to Richardson A fter 28 years in the corporate side of the restaurant industry, Woody Berry said he was excited to put that part of his life BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

Entree items are vacuum-sealed and stored in a cooler where guests can grab what they want and warm it up at home. Berry said this format helped the business when the pandemic hit in March. The restaurant also ships its menu items. Woody B’s was not immune to the economic downturn caused by the crisis—it lost more than 3,000 catered meal orders, Berry said. This side of the business typically makes up roughly 40% of sales, but it quickly dropped to nothing, Berry said. Because of the restaurant’s loyal following, its year-to-date sales are still up. The couple credits their customers for the increase. “These people aren’t just 10-year followers. Some of them are 17-year followers, way back to my rst year, when I retired, back in 2003,” Berry said. The keys to the restaurant’s success are the mesquite wood it uses to smoke the food and the consistency in quality, the Berrys said. Menu items made from the family’s own recipes, such as the smoked salmon and smoked chicken mac n cheese, along with the restaurant’s warm atmo- sphere, are what keep customers coming back for more, they said. “We don’t have the corner on hospitality. But in a small place like this, you just don’t quite expect the fawning all over you,” Berry said. “And it’s sincere.”

behind him. “I was done,” he said. “I decided to retire here in Richardson, where we live.” It was 2003, and Berry said he was looking forward to honing his barbecue skills. His father taught him how to smoke meats, Berry said, and he enjoyed bringing his creations to family get-to- gethers and parties, where he quickly began getting catering requests. “I had to buy a second smoker because every time I took something to a party, I got 10 or 12 orders,” Berry said. Every Christmas, he said he was overwhelmed with the amount of orders that he lled from his home. His wife, Gigi, decided she had seen enough of the backyard business taking over her kitchen. “Gigi nally just said, ‘Hey, I just can’t handle this anymore, and you have to do something. You either have to tell [customers], ‘No,’ or you need to open a business,’ ” he said. Berry took his wife’s advice, and the couple opened Woody B’s BBQ in January 2011. The restaurant is not a typical dine-in establishment:

Woody B’s BBQ 1980 Nantucket Drive, Richardson 214-295-2892 www.woodybsbbq.com Hours: Tue.-Fri. 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; closed Sun.-Mon. The grab-and-heat meals set Woody B’s apart from other restaurants. (Makenzie Plusnick/Community Impact Newspaper)

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RICHARDSON EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

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